The Farm income situation

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Material Information

Title:
The Farm income situation
Physical Description:
v. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
semiannual, with supplement[1969-]
frequency varies[ former 1940-1968]
semiannual
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Farm income -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
FIS-1 (Feb. 1940)-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1975.
Issuing Body:
No.144-181 (Nov./Dec. 1953-Feb. 1961) issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service; no. 182 (Apr. 1961)- by: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Combines the monthly report on United States income from farm marketings and the report on monthly receipts from the sale of principal farm products by States.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: FIS-225 (Feb. 1975).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004885668
oclc - 01768375
lccn - 59035075
Classification:
lcc - HD1751 .F3
ddc - 338.13
System ID:
AA00012197:00002

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Agricultural outlook digest
Succeeded by:
Demand and price situation
Succeeded by:
Marketing and transportation situation
Succeeded by:
Farm income statistics
Succeeded by:
Agricultural outlook (Washington, D.C. : 1975)


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FARM INCOME


SITUATION

FIS-161


1957 OUTLOOK ISSUE
FOR RELEASE NOV. 28, 1956, A.M.


r____AMS %ZX0

INCOME OF FARM OPERATORS
S BIL.

Realized gross*
4 0 --- --------
40

30
ii PRODUCTION EXPENSES .l



10 1
10
1 5 REALIZED NET INCOME


1950 1952 1954 1956 1958


INCLUDING GOVERNMENT PAYMENT
BASED ON FIRST T-REE QUARTERS OF ThE YEAR
U. L DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG. 44Ai-6Tl101


AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


Farmers' realized net income has
turned up this year, and may rise fur-
ther in 1957. Realized net income was
at an annual rate of 11.7 billion dollars
in the first three quarters of 1956, up
4 percent from 1955. Realized gross
income is up about 2 percent so far this
year. Production expenses have also
risen, but only about 1 percent.
Realized gross income increased
considerably between 1950 and 1951,


'u,' CC .r L i-_-
fJniC:'MFfIT_ UrD
L UN



U S DEPOSITOR'


but then declined every year until 1956.
Production expenses also rose in 1951,
and again in 1952. They have declined
a little since then, but not nearly enough
to offset the declines in gross income.
Realized net income in 1955, estimated
at 11.3 billion dollars, was down 6 per-
cent from 1954 and 23 percent from the
post-Korea high of 14.8 billion dollars
in 1951.




ITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE


I Ff. 9/V : /I/







FARM INCOME IN 1956 AND OUTIOK KOR 1957

Farm income has turned up this year, following four consecutive years
of decline, and present prospects are for some further increase in 1957.
Farmers' realized net income in the first 9 months of 1956 is up 4 percent
over 1955, and some further increase is expected next year. Payments under the
new Soil Bank programs are an important contributing factor to this year's in-
crease, as they will be again next year.

Farmers' realized net income was at an annual rate of 11.7 billion dol-
lars in the first three quarters of 1956, compared with 11.3 billion for the
whole year 1955. Cash receipts from farm marketing totaled 23.9 billion
dollars through October of this year, up more than 2 percent from the corre-
sponding months of 1955. The volume of farm marketing is about 3 percent
larger than last year's volume, more than offsetting slightly lower average
prices. Farmers' nonmoney income, including the value of home-consumed farm
products and the rental value of farm dwellings, is about the same as last
year. However, the new incentive payments for w ol, started in July, and pay-
ments for participation in the Soil Bank of 1956, beginning in September, are
together adding about 300 million dollars to farmers' income this year.

Farmers' realized gross income, including cash receipts from marketing
and Government payments plus nonmoney income, is up about 2 percent so far this
year. Production expenses have also risen, but only about 1 percent. The
result has been a h-percent increase in realized net income. These estimates
refer to the average rate for the first three quarters of the year (table 1).
Estimates for the whole year may differ somewhat from these, depending on
what happens in the fourth quarter.

Allowing for expected crop acreage reductions under the Soil Bank pro-
grams, it seems likely that cash receipts from marketing of farm crops will
be smaller than in 1956. Prices of farm crops may average slightly higher
next year, but the volume of crop marketing will probaULy be reduced more
than enough to offset the prospective increase in average prices. But wuth
somewhat higher receipts from livestock and livestock products, the decline
in total cash receipts from all marketing is expected to be fairly small.
This decline, however, will be more than offset by increases in Soil Bank
payments. Because of reduced acreage, production expenses in total are likely
to showlittle change from this year's level, even though unit costs will be
higher. Thus, farmers' realized net income appears likely to rise further
in 1957.

The 2-percent increase in cash receipts from marketing so far this
year reflects increases for both crops and livestock. Prices of livestock
and livestock products have averaged about 3 percent lower than in 1955.
However, the volume of livestock marlktings was 5 percent larger, so that
cash receipts from livestock and products total about 2 percent above last
year. Marketing and average prices of crops are both up slightly, adi total
crop receipts are also a little above last year. The increase in total live-
stock receipts is mostly due to a 7-percent increase in dairy receipts,
resulting from both higher average prices and increased production of milk.


FIS-161


- 2 -





FIS-161


Table 1.- Gross and ret income of farm operators,
seasonally adjusted at annual rates, by quarters, 1955-56


S1955 : 1956
It : Year I : II III : Average,
: : : z: I-III
: Bil. : BiB. B.Bil. : B11.
Sdol. : dol. dol. dol. : dol.

Cash receipts from : :
farm marketing ......: 29.2 29.6 29.7 29.7 29.7
Nonmonay income and :
GovernmenFpayments ..s 3.7 3.6 3._7 4.0 3.7
Realized gross : :
farm income ..........: 32.9 : 33.2 334. 33.7 33.4
Farm production :
expenses ............ 21.6 : 21.6 21.8 21.8 21.7
Farmers' realized a I
net income .........: 11.3 : 1.6 11.6 11.9 11.7
Net change in farm : :
inventories ..........: .4 s -.1 -.3 -.3 -.2
Farmers' total : :
net income ...........: 11.7 2 11.5 11o3 11.6 11.5


Receipts from turkeys are also substantially above last year, reflecting in-
creased sales. The increase in total crop receipts is the result of hig er
cash receipts from wheat, soybeans, and many of the fruits and vegetables,
which more than offset declines in receipts from cotton, tobacco, rice, and
some feed crops

The reductions expected next year in farmers' cash receipts from
marketing are likely to be concentrated in the basic crops, especially wheat,
cotton, and corn, whose acreage will likely be curtailed under the acreage
reserve program. But these reduced receipts from crops may well be offset
by Soil Bank payments. Cash receipts from livestock and livestock products
may show some increase, reflecting higher average prices for hogs and possibly
cattle and some further increase in dairy receipts.

Total farm productionexpenses are up this year, with increases in
interest, taxes, and depreciation, larger purchases of feeder livestock, and
higher costs of operating and repairing motor vehicles, machinery, and build-
ings. Prices paid by farmers for some industrial commodities are expected to
be higher next year. Further, interest and tax payments, farm wage rates,
and depreciation charges will likely be higher than this year. However, the
Soil Bank will reduce acreages used, with some reduction in the quantity of
items purchased by farmers, On balance, total production expenses in 1957
may not be much different from the 1956 total.


- 3 -





FIS-161


CURRENT ESTIMATES

Third quarter farm income (table 1)

Farmers' realized net income in the third quarter of 1956 was at an
annual rate of approximately 11.9 billion dollars. This was the highest
quarterly rate in more than two years, 8 percent above the third quarter
of 1955.

Cash receipts in the July-September quarter were up 4 percent from last
year, with prices and marketing both a little higher than in the same months
of 1955. In addition, third quarter gross income was boosted by the distri-
bution of incentive payments for wool, totaling some 53 million dollars through
September, and by the beginning of Soil Bank payments in late September. Pro-
duction expenses are running higher than a year earlier, but only by 1 or
2 percent.

Volume of marketirgs and hone consumption (table 2)

The volume of farm marketing is setting a new record high in 1956.
lhe total index has risen steadily since 1950, and now stands at 118 percent
of the 1947-49 average, representing an increase of 3 percent from the previous
high in 1955. Marketing of livestock and products have increased faster than
crop mark tings. The preliminary livestock index for 1956 is 126, the crop
index 106. Total crop marketing in 1956 are about the same as in 1955, but
livestock merketings have risen about 5 percent. Markeitings of farm products
used primarily for food are up 5 percent, while nonfood marketing are down
2 percent. With some further decline in the volume of home consumption this
year, the combined index of marketings and hone consumption is up 2 percent.
These and other 1956 index numbers in table 2 are estimates based on condi-
tions as of November 1.

Cash receipts in September (table 3) and October

Farmers received 3.1 billion dollars from narketings in September, or
2 percent more than they received in September last year. (See table 3 for
September estimates by commodity groups, table 6 for September estimates by
States.) Cash receipts in October are tentatively estimated at 3.6 billion
dollars, up seasonally from September and 5 percent above October of last
year. October crop receipts were about 2.0 billion dollars, livestock re-
ceipts 1.6 billion.

Cash receipts by regions and States, January-September (table 7)

All regions except the West North Central region have shared in the
higher cash receipts so far this year. Increases in total receipts ranged
from 1 percent in the South Atlantic and Western regions to 11 percent in
the South Central region. The East North Central region increased 5 percent
and the North Atlantic region 4 percent. A 4-percent decline occurred in
the West North Central region. Changes in livestock receipts were not large,







but for crops they varied from a loss of 11 percent in the West North Central
region to a gain of 21 percent in the South Central region.

All of the South Central States except Kentucky showed increases.
Larger cotton marketing were mainly responsible for total gains of 37 per-
cent in Arkansas, 19 percent in Oklahoma, 16 percent in Tennessee, and 12 per-
cent in Louisiana. These increases reflect a larger carry-over from the crop
of the preceding year, and earlier marketing of the current year's crop. Some
reductions will probably occur during the remaining 3 months of the year, as
the impact of the smaller 1956 cotton crop is felt. In Alabama, a 7-percent
gain was due primarily to the carry-over of the comparatively large corn crop
from the preceding year, but also to increased production and higher prices of
potatoes. Larger production and higher prices of milk, together with increased
broiler andgg production, boosted livestock receipts for all States in the
region from 1 to 5 percent.

Other significant increases in total cash receipts were as follows:
12 percent in Maine; 10 percent in New Jersey and Illinois; 6 percent in Rhode
Island, Missouri, Florida, and New Mexico; and 5 percent in New York, Michigan,
and Wisconsin. Sales from the comparatively large potato crop held over from
the preceding year accounted for the large gain in total cash receipts in
Maine. New Jersey's increase was due mostly to truck crops. Increased sales
of corn were important in Illinois, reflecting larger production during the
preceding year. Milk and potato production and prices were up in Rhode
Island. In Missouri, the rise in cash receipts was due partly to marketing
from a much larger corn crop carried over from the preceding year, and partly
to earlier marketing of a larger 1956 cotton crop. Higher prices of oranges,
together with larger production of milk and eggs, are reflected in Florida's
increase. Cotton was the important factor in New Mexico's gain, with a larger
carry-over from last year's crop and earlier marketing of the new crop. In-
creased milk production, accompanied by higher prices, was important in
Wisconsin, New York, and Michigan. In addition, a moderate gain was made in
truck crops and potatoes in New York, and in truck crops and corn in Michigan.

A third of the States showed a loss in total cash receipts, but with
only a few exceptions the declines were small. A short corn crop in 1955,
marketed during the first 9 months of 1956, a substantial reduction in the
1956 wheat crop, and lower prices of hogs and cattle, all combined to bring
about a reduction of li percent in total cash receipts in South Dakota and
10 percent in Nebraska. Marketings from the larger 1956 corn crop and
increased meat animal prices during the latter months of this year, compared
with a year ago, will probably reduce the decline for the year as a whole in
both of these States. A substantially smaller carry-over of the preceding
year's tobacco crop was responsible for a decline of 9 percent in total cash
receipts in Kentucky. Cash receipts were down 5 percent in Iowa and Arizona.
Smaller marketings of corn, soybeans, and oats in Iowa reflected crop reduc-
tions in the preceding year, and lower hog prices also contributed to the
decline in that State. Smaller cotton marketings and lower prices of truck
crops and cattle accounted for the decline in Arizona, although the larger
1956 cotton crop will probably improve total receipts for the year as a whole.


FIS-161


-5 -







Table 2.- Index numbers of volume of farn msrketings and home consumption, by major subindazes, 1910-56

(1917-19-100)


Marketing : Hoe consumption : Marketings Food
: : and home consumption :Nonfood
ear s Live- : : Live- : : Live- :Market-:market-
stock stock : st ocktock : : :Market-:k aend : ing
Sand : Crop Total: and : Crops : Total : and : Crops Total :ing : hom :
Sprod- i 2/ s a prod- : : prod- : consump:
I ucts VI i I ucta :ct a I -ucts A i i tion


1910 : 81
191 : 81
1912 93
19L3 : 103
191L : 107
1915 s 205
1916 103
1917 102
191h8 96
19149 101

1950 103
1951 107
1952 s 109
1953 i 113
1951 : 117
1955 121
1956 h/ 1 126


77 117 126 119 81 75 80 78 82
79 113 127 116 86 76 82 81 85
88 110 126 111 95 83 90 91 93
93 112 122 115 101 81 9k 97 98
98 111 120 11L 107 87 99 1C2 103
98 112 115 113 106 89 99 102 103
96 114 112 113 10o 87 97 101 102
99 106 105 106 103 96 100 102 102
97 100 98 99 97 98 97 98 98
103 914 96 95 101 106 103 100 100
100 92 93 92 102 95 99 100 99
101 92 ,90 91 105 91 101 103 102
105 86 90 87 107 99 104 106 10l
110 81 85 82 110 106 108 109 106
111 78 82 79 113 101 108 111 108
115 77 81 78 116 105 112 11 110
118 76 79 77 121 105 111 119 115


SMarketings by major commodity groups

Year S Livestock : rops
I and products :
Meat : Deiry Poultry: : :Cotton : : : Fruits'
animal prod- i and : Food F Feed : (lnt :Tobacco Oil Vege- and Sugar' Seed
a l ucts : eggs grain Scrop s and crops :tables : nut :crops
a : : : : a5Rod): :

19140 83 87 614 56 71* 82 70 45 79 89 109 86
1941 83 92 70 61 69 7k 65 60 81 100 99 88
1912 91 97 81 73 7h 81 66 83 91 97 114 914
1913 106 97 100 66 73 77 65 105 91 86 83 814
1914h 111 99 101 78 77 89 79 81 99 96 83 81
1915 106 103 106 86 91 66 100 87 99 91 95 96
1966 s 10 101 101 82 85 58 99 85 108 105 106 108
1967 : 10 101 98 100 93 8h 116 8k 98 102 114 91
1918 96 98 96 102 86 100 93 108 10 100 91 91
1919 :100 102 106 98 121 116 92 108 99 98 95 115

1950 10 102 113 81 113 79 98 11 100 98 119 118
1951 : 105 100 121 77 88 93 111 102 103 107 96 125
1952 s108 102 122 98 91 102 10, 112 97 102 97 140
1953 111 108 12h 96 107 121 100 107 101 103 108 125
19514 115 111 130 91 11l 101 106 98 102 1d4 122 119
1955 122 113 128 80 126 100 110 1145 105 106 111 134
1956 4/ 1 126 117 141 8h 122 95 99 117 111 109 113 126

I/ Includes the miscellaneouss" group of livestock item in addition to groups shown separately below.
Includes the "miscellaneous" group of crop items in addition to groups shown separately below.
There are no nonfood items in the home consumption inex.
e/ Preliminary estimates as of November 1.


FIS-161


- 6 -







Table 3.- Cash receipts from farming, United States

Source : August : September : January-September
: Mil.dol. Ml.dol. M.dol1.M.dol. Mil.dol. Ml.dol.
Farm marketing and
CCC loans 1/ ..............: 2,560 2,672 3,013 3,111 19,860 20,299

Livestock and products ....: 1,353 1,125 1.378 1.385 11,652 11.793
Meat animals ............: 728 785 739 746 6,007 5,879
Dairy products ..........: 317 372 332 355 3,201 3,115
Poultry and eggs ........: 262 253 290 268 2,231 2,301
Other .................: 16 15 17 16 213 198

Crops .....................: 1,207 1,217 1,665 1,726 8,208 8,506
Food grafts .............: 205 30 303 30- 1,173 1,55
Feed crops ..............: 199 186 186 163 1,620 1,600
Cotton (lint and seed) ..: 137 118 350 118 913 1,055
Oil-bearing crops .......: 50 21 135 167 543 472
Tobacco ................. 177 177 272 215 689 558
Vegetables ............: 189 228 189 208 1,379 1,582
Fruits and tree nuts ....: 114 129 120 132 832 941
Other ................. : 76 77 110 115 759 773

Government payments .........: 10 13 13 37 166 252

Total cash receipts .........: 2,570 2,715 3,056 3,li8 20,0211 20,551

If Receipts from loans represent value of loans minus value of redemptions during
the month.

Table 4 .- Index numbers of cash receipts from farm marketing and CCC loans, physical
volume of farm marketing, and prices received by farmers, United States (1947-49=100)

Item August Septaember : January-September
: 1955 : 1956 : 1955 : 1956 : 1955 : 1956

Cash receipts from farm mar- :
ketings and CCC loans: / :
All commodities ...........: 105 110 125 128 91 93
Livestock and products ..: 99 105 101 102 95 96
Crops ...................: 112 116 155 160 85 88

Physical volume of farm
marketing:
All commodities ...........: 122 121 10 114 102 107
Livestock and products ..: 122 129 123 126 116 123
Crops ................... 121 117 163 168 81 86

Prices received by farmers:
All commodities ..........: 86 87 87 87 89 87
Livestock and products ..: 81 82 82 82 82 79
Crops ................... 92 95 93 95 98 98

1/ Receipts from loans represent value of loans minus value of redemptions during
the month.


FIS-161


- 7 -







Table 5.- Cash receipts from farm arletings, by States, August 1955-56


State and region


Maine .......................:
evw Hampshire ..............:
Vermont .....................
Massachusetts ...............:
Rhode Island ................
Connecticut .................
New York ...................
Nev Jersey ..................:
Pennsylvania ...............
North Atlantic Region .......
Ohio ......... ......... ......
Indiana ....................
Illi'ois ....................
Michigan .................
Wisconsin .................:
East North Central Region ...
Minnesota .................:
Iowa ........................:
Missouri ....................:
North Dakota ................:
South Dakota .............:
Nebraska ....................:
iKanas .....................:
West North Central Region ...
Delaware .................
Maryland ....................
Virginia ....................:
West Virginia ..............:
North Carolina ..............
South Carolina .............:
Georgia .........o,%..........:
Florida ...................:
South Atlantic Region .......
Kentucky ...................
Tennessee ..................:
Alabama .....................
Mississippi ...............:
Arkansas ....................:
Louisiana ...................
Oklahoma ...................:
Texas .....................:
South Central Region ........
Montana .....................
Idaho ......................:
Wyoming .....................:
Colorado ....................:
New Mexico .................:
Arizona .....................:
Utah ......................:
Nevada ....................:
Washington ................:
Oregon ....................:
California ..................:
Western Region .............

United States ..............


: Livestock and produts Crope: Total
: 1959 1956 1959 1 : 15 5oCA


:*


1,000 dol.

9,775
1,8,45
8,2914
9,6714
1, 05
10,125
4,,750
17,9714
16,339
153,181
149,715
59,110
83,131
33,271
66,070
291,297
63,9514
110,110
55,116
10,037
28,801
63,763
I5,516
1407,300
6,759
14,4614
22,726
8,011
19,1406
7,L88
26,711
13,291
118,889
21,4108
20,3143
17,207
16,518
16,126
9,913
29,317
62,697
193,559
11,740
ll4,3140
1,210
19,820
3,980
5,187
8,165
3,0o6
15,907
16,414
85,h41
188,553

1,352,779


1,000 dol.

9,807
4,781
9,069
10,075
1,610
9,366
48,336
17,516
17,200
157,810
52,077
61,7149
92,262
314,4l70
69,872
310,130
67,733
157,959
58,146
10,1470
30,130
72,518
47,536
J42,692
5,727
13,L40h
23,507
8,169
19,878
8,010
26,623
35,105
120,0423
23,015
21,775
17,885
17,502
16,546
11,1143
29,690
60,969
198,525
11,599
15,551
4, 701
22,2148
3,9214
5,bl5
8,699
3,287
16,579
16,939
84,788
193,766

1,125,666


-~-- -~-- ---- ---- -"' -"-


- --- ~- ----- -- --- --


1,000 dol.

3,229
1,670
1,011h
5,6148
997
3,166
25,198
14,500
19,951
75,673
36,988
24,755
55,198
30,952
12,338
160,531
36,186
32,906
17,065
1'1,2148
21,606
25,663
69,8541
214,5146
3,749
9,887
7,h23
3,128
72,5143
66,996
70,625
20,088
251,1439

14,611
16,131
8,376
5,119
17,001
16,365
128,876
201,223
26,632
12,105
2,257
lh,053
1,511
2,579
14,067
162
22,337
29,180
155,500
270,663

1,207,075


1,,000 aO..

3,159
1,5141
833
5,191
1,095
3,128
31,030
16,022
22,3 4
84,6146
32,802
23,597
53,692
33,315
15,560
158,966
32,338
16,617
19,837
41,856
12,7149
16,772
814,C37
221,206
h,845
11,595
10,135
3,105
80,776
55,552
77,008
16,991
260,007
7,999
5,659
12,880
12,812
8,098
21,709
36,320
121,178
226,655
20,790
11,948
2,097
15,589
1,0195
2,875
3,800
248
26,190
39,224
168,002
292,258

1,216,738


1,000 dol.

13,009
6,515
9,308
15,322
2,102
13,591
69,9148
32,4714
66,290
228,8514
86,703
83,865
138,629
61,223
78,108
451,828
100,1i0
173,m4
72,201
51,285
50,110
89,126
115,370
651,846
10,508
24,351
30,149
11,1162
91,9149
74l,l814
97,366
33,379
373,328
25,822
24,951
33,638
21,8914
21,275
26,914
15,712
191,573
394,782
38,372
26,415
6,1467
33,873
5,191
8,066
12,212
3,208
38,2U1
45,8941
210,914
159,216

2,559,8514


- a 8-


FIS-161


1,000 dol.

12,966
6,325
9,902
15,266
2,705
12,791
79,416
33,538
69,514
242,156
84,879
85,346
145,951
67,785
85,132
169,396
100,071
174,476
77,983
52,326
h3,179
89,290
131,573
668,898
10,572
214999
33,6142
11,271
100,651
63,562
103,631
32,096
380,130
31,014
27,134
30,765
30,312
24,644
32,852
66,010
182,147
125,180
32,389
27,502
6,801
37,837
5,119
8,320
12,499
3,535
12,769
56,163
252,790
186,0214

2,672,381i





-9-


Table 6.- Cash receipts from farm marketing, by States, September 1955-56

State and region : Livestock and products Crops Total
S io055 1956 1n55 956 : 1955 : 19,6
: 1,000 dol. 1,000 dol. 1,000 dol. 1,000 dol. 1,000 dol. 1,000 dol.

Maine ......................: 9,495 9,h14 3,168 3,773 12,663 13,187
New Hampshire ...............: 5,133 4,758 1,223 1,064 6,356 5,822
Vermont .....................: 8,536 9,130 867 783 Q,1,03 9,913
Massachusetts ...............: 9,821 9,708 5,15 5,517 15,L13 15,225
Rhode Island ................: i,')51 1,433 685 603 2,136 2,236
Connecticut ..................: 9,809 9,093 ,,210 3,808 1t,019 12,9141
New York ....................: 46,916 L9,358 jo,517 1,2,9L6 83,433 92,304
New Jersey ..................: 18,252 17,5n 12,C23 16,319 30,275 31,890
Pennsylvania ................: L8,202 L7,732 19,169 20,901 67,371 68,633
North Atlantic Region ....... 157,618 158,197 83,451 03,951 241,069 252,151
Ohio ......... A.............: 53,1SL 5L,634 39,,444 39,541l 92,628 9h,175
Indiana ....................: 58,759 56,015 36,721 13,956 95,L83 99,971
Illinois ....................: 86,3L5 85,64h 80,227 105,667 166,572 191,311
Michigan .................... 30,910 31,951 32,080 37,5L4 62,990 69,495
Wisconsin ...................: 68,321 70,571 16,483 18,1.37 04,801 88,758
East North Central Region ...: 297,519 2i8,815 201,958 24h,895 502,477 513,710
Minnesota ...................: 65,3l9 63,303 36,552 33,617 101,901 96,950
Iowa ........................: 140,666 143,681 35,724 26,113 176,390 169,794
Missouri ....................: 54,072 55,312 L3,518 66,861 98,490 122,173
North Dakota ................: 13,653 13,715 53,058 52,023 66,711 65,738
South Dakota ................: 26,901 27,153 24,280 ih,986 51,181 L2,139
Nebraska ....................: 59,"78 59,913 L3,L28 30,061 102,906 89,951
Kansas ......................: 46,099 h3,h66 L4,621 18,112 81,720 91,578
West North Central Region ...: 05,118 L06,5L3 281,181 271,783 686,299 678,326
Delaware ....................: 6,109 5,426 2,01l 2,977 8,813 8,L03
Maryland ....................: 16,011 13,095 5,521 5,739 19,532 18,334
Virginia ...................: 23,616 23,577 16,231 11,937 39,847 35,514
West Virginia ...............: 8,703 3,652 2,051 2,206 10,754 10,858
North Carolina ............... 20,612 20,226 235,00L 196,018 255,616 21o,2714
South Carolina ..............: 8,137 8,614 72,385 58,970 80,522 67,614
Georgia .....................: 27,h55 27,598 66,019 65,642 03,,7L 93,240
Florida .....................: 12,716 1L,200 11,L72 10,639 2h,188 26,839
South Atlantic Region ....... 121,659 121,418 411,087 351,158 532,716 475,576
Kentucky ....................: 23,351 2L,321 3,786 14,819 27,137 29,140
Tennessee ...................: 20,207 21,067 22,376 31,999 h2,583 56,066
Alabama .....................: 17,407 17,972 50,422 44,391 67,829 62,363
Mississippi ................. 12,708 13,140 55,806 66,61L 68,512 80,054
Arkansas ...................: 15,723 15:704 51,280 76,982 o7,003 92,686
Louisiana ...................: 10,357 11,990 37,587 L8,6714 7,94, 60,664
Oklahoma ....................: 26,334 25,234 10,986 17,126 37,320 42,360
Texas .....................: 61,390 59,687 118,357 125,672 179,747 185,359
South Central Region ......... 187,477 189,a15 350,598 419,277 536,075 603,692
Montana .....................: 16,l66 1L, !lO 29,081 23,605 43,567 38,015
Idaho .......................: 11,854 12,679 25,506 25,383 37,360 38,063
Wyoming .....................: 12,329 12,708 3,082 3,C'5 31,11 15,753
Colorado ....................: 23,731 25,271 22,101 22,111 5i5.535 47,362
New Mexico ...................: 5,918 5,857 3,r01 ,oL&1 9,349 10,798
Arizona .....................: 5,512 5,3i6 7,177 10,565 12,689 15,881
Utah ........................: 11,539 12,71Ui 5,653 6,063 11,192 18,777
Nevada ......................: 4,698 5,066 406 729 5,10 5,795
Washington ..................: 16,713 16,976 56,383 51,652 73,096 68,528
Oregon .....................: 18,505 18,7814 3L,395 38,202 52,900 56,986
California .................: 82,791 81,451 1L6,927 155,366 229,718 236,820
Western Region ..............: 208,086 211,135 334,11,5 31,663 512,201 552,798

United States ...............: 1,377,L77 1,385,523 1,665,390 1,725,730 3,0h2,867 3,111,253





FIs -161


- 10 -


Table 7.- Cash receipts from farm marketing, by States, January-September 1955-56


"t r: Livestock and products : Crop Total
State and region ,5 1956 1 1995 1956


:1,000 dol. 1,000 4ol.

Maine .......................: 77,629 78,232
evw Hampshire ...............: L0,291 .lL26
Vermont .....................: 72,951 75,611
Massachusetts ...............: 81,915 86,11(0
Rhode Island ................: 11,511 12,130
Connecticut .................: 80,792 80,1491
Nev York ....................: 122,835 440,625
New Jersey ..................: 115,086 119,143
Pennsylvania ................: 113,1663 21.,6h13
North Atlantic Region .......: 1,39,h76 1,388,641
Ohio .......................: 139,539 157,307
Indiana ....................: 179,856 881,12)1
Illinois ....................: 712,179 713,h92
Michigan ....................: 278,291 292,378
Wisconsin ...................: 650,956 686,887
East North Central Region ... 2,590,821 2,661,188
Minnesota .................: 622,771. 632,853
Iowa .......................: 1,207,966 1,200,673
Missouri ....................: ..7,319 U16,607
North Dakota .................: 95,709 96,691
South Dakota ..............: 2166,993 212,.i18
Nebraska ....................: 538,033 528,213
Kansas ......................: 319,018 317,381.
West North Central Region ..: 3,507,812 3,192,869
Delaware ....................: 58,310 51,111
Maryland ....................: 122,1108 118,150
Virginia ....................: 172,779 171,373
West Virginia ...............: 61,585 62,895
North Carolina .............. 166,031. 172,285
South Carolina .............: 60,112 61,941,
Georgia .....................: 227,018 229,192
Florida .....................: 10,5,55 112,903
South Atlantic Region ......... .973,11 983,150
Kentucky ....................: 174,291 180,901
Tennessee ...................: 160,11,3 165,206
Alabama ....................: 15,126 119,986
Mississippi ..................: 116,172 122,012
Arkansas ....................: 128,113 130,951
Louisiana ...................: 86,152 90,172
Oklahas ....................: 220,218 221,856
Texas .......................: 582,962 586,785
South Central Region ........ 1,613,210 1,617,899
Montana .....................: 91,186 87,369
Idaho ........................: 107,911 109,916
Wyoming ....................: 46,515 1.6,739
Colorado ....................: 189,651 190,260
Hev Mexico ..................: l9,861 4l8,60
Arizona .....................: 72,777 70,811
Utah ........................: 76,173 76,162
Nevada ......................: 27,698 27,127
Washington ..................: 133,566 137,188
Oregon ......................: 126,166 126,277
California ..................: 697,l..0 699,021h
Western Region ............... 1,616,957 1,610,933

United States ............... )1,651,717 11,793,b180


1,000 dol.

63,00.
8,1492
10,6ll
37,063

4.,869
165,663
90,566
139,116
563,860
269,1492
256,258
507,710
190,1497
92,218
1,316,175
265,6145
31o0,339
176,8914
227,771
127,059
236,596
312,986
1,683,290
19,093
55,658
82,165
16,227
37L,7h5
192,1.5
226,080
378,012
1,3l1,l125
123,200
77,135
111,181,
133,373
125,805
110,513
91,629
538,669
1,311,508
11.8,632
108,621
1, 215
96,336
30,276
139,631
23,660
1,222
219,982
156,838
1,OL7,026
1,989,.39
8,208,697


1,000 dol.

79,861
8,036
9,502
37,125
1,809
41,3814
176,386
109,655
135,389
600,152
262,659
213,1,38
630,622
197,609
93,251
1,4127,582
258,917
261,172
215,682
227,530
77,679
166,199
287,613
1,197,822
25,1.38
65,21l.h
88,1477
15,985
350,732
173,1341
237,361
393,689
1,355,0140
89,901.
111,207
125,297
192,820
217,282
129,923
14.9,396
572,765
1,588,571h
117,221
107,985
1L., L82
95,585
36,5148
131,1714
22,865
2,918
213,002
163,5314
1,101,130
2,036,711.

8,505,91.


1,000 dol.

110,630
18,783
83,568
121,978
15,957
125,661
588,4198
235,652
552,609
1,913,336
709,031
736,111
1,219,889
168,788
743,17h1
3,906,996
888,1.19
1,518,305
622,213
323,1480
371,052
772,629
662,001
5,191,102
77,h103
177,806
251,9.1
77,812
51.0,779
252,557
.53,098
1.83,h67
2,317,866
297,1h91
237,278
256,310
21h9,5145
253,9M8
196,665
311,877
1,121,631
2,926,718
239,818
216,562
60,730
285,987
80,120
212,1408
99,833
31,920
353,51.8
281,001.
1,76bhL66
3,606,396

19,860,ji 2


1,000 dol.

158,096
1.9,162
85,113
123,265
16,939
121,875
615,013
258,798
560,032
1,988,593
719,966
721,562
1,376,114
189,987
780,111
16,088,770
891,770
1,h64,Bh5
662,289
322,221
320,127
691,412
635,027
6,990,691
79,51.9
183,391.
259,850
78,880
523,017
235,075
166,833
511,592
2,338,190
270,805
276,113
275,283
31i,862
318,233
220,095
371,252
1,159,530
3,236,173
236,590
217,901
61,221
285,845
85,008
201,985
99,327
30,315
350,190
289,811
1,800,h51.
3,656,677

!0,299,391






- 11 -


NATIONAL AND FARM INCOME


DEPARTMENT OF COMMIRCIE ETIRIlA OF MATIO
COaPaRRLI e IT0 PA
SFaRM INCOME REPFEf ToD NF ISCOaf PROM aC.
U. % DEPARTMLI 05 AGRICULTURE


1940 1950 1960
SAL INCOME NAVE IENS ADJUSTED TO MANE THEm
IS INCOMEr rESTrrES
ICULTURAL URCElS TO PERSONS LVINC ON FARMS
NEG Ill A-.M6 0 AGRICULIuAL MARKEl G %EIVCE


FARM INCOME AND POPULATION
IlL. I I MIL. PERSONS
Farm population

*, 30
...... .- ..



m o.. .......... .... ... .
Income from .: 20
I.0


0
1935 1940
FARm POPULATION AS
U. S. DEPARTMENT OW AGRICULIURE


Agricultural Outlook Charts for 1957 includes
three charts relating to farm income. One is re-
produced on the cover, the other two on this page.
The cover chart includes preliminary estimates


10


0
1955


NEG. 151l-5.1105 AGRICuLTIURAL ARESllG TSE(Ict


for 1956 based on seasonally adjusted data for the
first three quarters. Those on this page are only
through 1955 because reliable information for 1956
is not yet available for most of the series.


FIS-161


S 1945 I5Y U
OF APRIL I 0 INCLUDE NET CHANGE IN PARI INVENTORIES




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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3 1262 08862 8796


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Washington 25, D. C. payment of postage $300

OFFICIAL BUSINESS

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