The Farm income situation

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Title:
The Farm income situation
Physical Description:
v. : ill., maps ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economic Research Service
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
semiannual, with supplement[1969-]
frequency varies[ former 1940-1968]
semiannual
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Farm income -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
FIS-1 (Feb. 1940)-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased in 1975.
Issuing Body:
No.144-181 (Nov./Dec. 1953-Feb. 1961) issued by: Agricultural Marketing Service; no. 182 (Apr. 1961)- by: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Combines the monthly report on United States income from farm marketings and the report on monthly receipts from the sale of principal farm products by States.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: FIS-225 (Feb. 1975).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004885668
oclc - 01768375
lccn - 59035075
Classification:
lcc - HD1751 .F3
ddc - 338.13
System ID:
AA00012197:00001

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Agricultural outlook digest
Succeeded by:
Demand and price situation
Succeeded by:
Marketing and transportation situation
Succeeded by:
Farm income statistics
Succeeded by:
Agricultural outlook (Washington, D.C. : 1975)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


1958 OUTLOOK ISSUE


FARM


FARM


November 1957
FOR RELEASE
;NOV. 19, P.M.


INCOME


SITUATION


FIS- 166


"- L

IL


Ot I' .-i57


* -AMS

INCOME OF FA M OPERATORS


$ BIL.
Realized
40


0









56 1958


0 o
1950


/3Z IY54 I
:I .CLJUDIC GC, I ErlEer l aIE*I
S8BASED ON rFiQS ri EE DL.IarE OF t"E fEAR


Su. i. DE.- 1M-i.i OF -GgICLtLT1iU
Farmers' realized net income turned
up in 1956, following four consecutive
years of decline, and is showing some
further improvement this year. Real-
ized net income was at an annual rate
of 12.1 billion dollars in the first three
quarters of 1957, up 2 percent from the
corresponding period in 1956. An in-
crease in realized gross income so far
this year, mostly due to larger Soil Bank
payments, is only partly offset by higher

.' L LI l



U S DEPO' lTOC'RY'


production expenses.
Realized gross income increased
considerably between 1950 and 1951, but
then declined every year until 1956. Pro-
duction expenses also rose in 1951, and
again in 1952. They declined some in
1953, but not enough to offset the decline
in gross income. Since 1953, production
expenses have crept steadily upward, and
in 1957 they are exceeding the previous
high of 1952.


Published five times a year by
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


gross*


/:q0 i / (


.E: h. r; ..cr




NOVEMBER 1957


Table 1.- Gross and net income of farm operators,
seasonally adjusted at annual rates, by quarters, 1956-57


1956
Item
: : :Average,:
: I II : III :- : IV :Year

Bil. Bil. Bil. : Bil. Bil. : Bil.
dol. dol. dol. : dol. dol. :dol.
Cash receipts from
farm marketing .....: 30.0 30.3 30.3 30.2 30.9 30.4
Nonmoney income and
Government payments..: 3.7 3.9 4.1 3.9 4.3 : 4.0
Realized gross
farm income ......... 33.7 34.2 34.4 :34.1 35.2 34.4
Farm production
expenses ............ 22.0 22.3 22.3 :22.2 : 22.6 22.3
Farmers' realized
net income ..........: 11.7 11.9 12.1 11.9 12.6 12.1
Net change in farm
inventories ......... -.3 -.4 -.6 -.4 : -.6 : -.5
Farmers' total
net income ..........: 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.5 12.0 11.6


1957
Item
: :Average,:
: I II :III : I I : IV Year

Bil. Bil. Bil. Bil.
dol. dol. dol. :dol.
Cash receipts from
farm marketings .....: 30.3 30.6 30.3 :30.4
Joonmoney income and
Government payments..: 4.4 4.6 4.6 4.5
Realized gross
farm income .........: 34.7 35.2 34.9 :34.9
Farm production
expenses ............: 22.7 23.0 22.8 22.8
Farmers' realized
net income ..........: 12.0 12.2 12.1 :12.1
Net change in farm
inventories ......... -.5 -.5 -.3 : -.4
Farmers' total
net income ..........: 11.5 11.7 11.8 :11.7


FIS-166


- 2 -





NOVEMBER 1957


CONTENTS
Page

Farm income in 1957 and outlook for 1958 ...................... 3
Current estimates ............................................. 5
Volume of marketing and home consumption in 1957 ........... 5
Cash receipts in September and October ...................... 5
Cash receipts by regions and States, January-September ...... 6
Volume of marketing and home consumption, 1940-57 ............ 7
Tables on monthly cash receipts, January-September 1956-57 .... 8



FARM INCOME IN 1957 AND OUTLOOK FOR 1958

Farm income is up a little more this year, making two years of gain
following four consecutive years of decline. This increase is likely to be
maintained in 1958, when farm income is expected to average much the same as
in 1957. Farmers' realized net income in the first 9 months of 1957 was up
2 percent over the same period in 1956, mostly due to increased payments under
the Soil Bank program. Although present prospects do not indicate any further
increase next year in total farm income, continued reductions in the number of
farms and in the number of people living on farms, together with increasing
income from off-ferm sources, might well result in some further increase in
average income per farm and per person living on farms.

Farmers' realized net income was at an annual rate of 12.1 billion dol-
lars in the first three quarters of 1957, compared with 11.9 billion for the
same period last year. (See table 1.) Total net income, including the change
in farm inventories, also has shown some increase. Farmers' realized gross
income, including cash receipts from marketing and Government payments plus
nonmoney income, is up about 2 percent so far this year. Production expenses
have also risen about 2 percent; and the result has been a 2 percent increase
in realized net income.

These estimates refer to data for the first three quarters converted to
annual rates. Estimates for the whole year may differ somewhat from these,
depending on what happens in the fourth quarter. Last year the fourth quarter
was high compared to the first three quarters, raising realized net income
from 11.9 billion dollars in the first three quarters to 12.1 billion for the
year as a whole. This year the fourth quarter rate is also expected to be
higher than the average for the first three quarters. Marketings of cotton
were generally later than usual this year, and are expected to swell the
fourth quarter marketing rate. Thus, cash receipts from farm marketing
this year are expected to total about 30 billion dollars, and realized net
income for the whole year will probably be slightly higher than the annual
rate of 12.1 billion dollars for the first three quarters. With the farm
population on April 1 substantially lower than a year earlier, net income per


FIS-166


- 3 -






person on farms will be higher than in 1956 or 1955.

Over the past 2 years, cash receipts from farm marketing rose about
1 billion dollars. Government payments to farmers increased about 800 mil-
lion dollars, mostly Soil Bank payments but also incentive payments for wool.
During the same period, farm production expenses rose by some 1.2 billion dol-
lars.

In 1958, cash receipts from farm marketing may rise a little as a
larger volume is sold at prices averaging near this year's levels. With
smaller funds for the 1958 acreage reserve program, together with additional
administrative requirements for participation and more favorable soil moisture
fewer acres will likely be withdrawn from production than were withdrawn this
year. Furthermore, with hog, broiler, and dairy output expanding, marketing
of livestock and livestock products may also increase in 1958. Although acre-
age reserve payments may be smaller next year, payments under the conservation
reserve should increase with the result that total Government payments may
hold fairly close to this year's level. Accordingly, realized gross farm in-
come may be up slightly next year, reflecting a larger volume of marketing.
However, production expenses are also expected to increase slightly, so that
net income will likely show little change.

The anticipated total of 30- billion dollars in cash receipts from
farm marketing this year is up slightly from last year's total of 30.4 bil-
lion. It includes about 17.1 billion dollars from livestock and livestock
products and 13.4 billion from crops. The livestock total is 5 percent higher
than last year, reflecting a 7 percent increase in average prices and a de-
cline of 2 percent in volume. Cash receipts from cattle and calves are ex-
pected to total about 5.8 billion dollars, almost 10 percent more than last
year; receipts from hogs may be nearly 3.0 billion dollars, 14 percent above
last year; and total dairy receipts are up 32 percent to 4.6 billion dollars.
Higher average prices account for all of these increases, which were only
partly offset by a 7 percent decline in total cash receipts from poultry and
eggs.

This year's estimated total of crop receipts is 5 percent smaller than
last year, reflecting smaller marketing and lower average prices in about
equal proportion. Major declines occurred in cotton, tobacco, and wheat, all
due to substantially smaller marketing. Soil Bank payments for these com-
modities were an offsetting factor. For potatoes, smaller receipts reflected
lower average prices.

The increase expected next year in farmers' cash receipts from market-
ings is likely to be mostly in commodities such as cotton, potatoes, eggs,
and poultry showing some recovery from declines experienced this year, al-
though the upward trend in dairy receipts will probably continue. Total
receipts from livestock and products are likely to increase further next year.
Total crop receipts may show little change.
Total farm production expenses are up this year from 22.3 billion dol-
lars in 1956 to an annual rate of 22.8 billion in the first 9 months of 1957.


FIS-166


NOVEMBER 1957





NOVEMBER 1957


The estimated total for the year is also 22.8 billion dollars. Prices paid by
farmers for production items so far this year have averaged considerably
higher than last year. The largest increases have been for feeder livestock,
motor vehicles, and farm machinery, but there has been some increase in prices
paid for all production commodity groups except feed and fertilizer. The in-
crease of a half billion dollars in total farm expenses is mostly in the over-
head items of interest, tax payments, and depreciation charges. However,
expenditures for hired labor have also risen along with some of the miscellan-
eous operating expenses. Although prices paid by farmers have been fairly
stable in recent months, some further increase is likely in 1958, particularly
for interest, taxes, and wages. Thus, a further small increase in total
production expenses seems likely in 1958.
*

CURRENT ESTIMATES

Volume of marketing and home consumption in 1957

The volume of farm marketing in 1957 is not expected to equal the
record volume marketed last year. Based on conditions as of November 1, mar-
ketings this year are expected to total ll8 percent of the 1947-49 annual
average volume as compared with 120 percent for 1956. The index for 1957,
however, remains higher than in any previous year except 1956. (See table 2.)

Both crop and livestock have contributed to the smaller volume of farm
marketing this year. Sales of poultry and eggs are setting a new record
high, 3 percent above last year. Milk production is also a new high, about
2 percent above 1956. These increases, however, were more than offset by a
4 percent decline in marketing of meat animals. The decline in total crop
marketing reflects substantially smaller sales of cotton, tobacco, and food
grains, which were only partly offset by a record volume of feed crop market-
ings, up 15 percent from 1956.

Marketing of farm products used primarily for food are down 24 percent
from 1956. Nonfood marketing are also down slightly. The volume of home
consumption is continuing its long-term decline.

Cash receipts in September and October

Farmers received 2.8 billion dollars from marketing in September,
down 7 percent from September 1956. (See table 3.) Late marketing of the
current cotton crop was an important factor in lower receipts for recent
months than a year earlier.

The tentative estimate for total cash receipts in October is 3.5 bil-
lion dollars, 7 percent below October of last year. Receipts from livestock
and livestock products in October were about 1.7 billion dollars, crop re-
ceipts around 1.8 billion.


FIS-166


- 5 -






Cash receipts by regions and States, January-September

Dur..g the first 9 months of 1957, the North Central Regions each
showed a gain of 3 percent in cash receipts from farm marketing and the
Western Region a gain of 1 percent, compared with the same period a year ago.
The South Central, South Atlantic, and North Atlantic Regions declined 9, 3,
and 1 percent, respectively. (See table 7.) Cash receipts from marketing in
the country as a whole were nearly the same as last year, but with Government
payments added in, total cash receipts were up 2 percent.

Livestock receipts were up in all regions except the North Atlantic,
where a slight decline occurred. In this region, a substantial drop in re-
ceipts from eggs counteracted increases in dairy products and broilers. Re-
gional increases in livestock receipts ranged from 3 percent in the South
Atlantic Region to 7 percent in the West North Central. For the most part,
these gains were due to a sharp rise in prices of meat animals.

Cash receipts from crops dropped in all regions. By far the largest
regional decline (25 percent) occurred in the South Central Region, where
cotton marketing were down sharply. Crop receipts were down 7 percent in
the West North Central and South Atlantic Regions, 3 percent in the Western,
and 1 percent in the North Atlantic and East North Central Regions.

Percentage changes from a year ago fluctuated much more widely by
States than by regions -- from declines of 27 percent in Mississippi and
25 percent in Arkansas to an increase of 12 percent in South Dakota. The gain
in South Dakota was due mainly to higher prices of hogs and cattle and to
larger marketing of corn and wheat. Other important increases were 10 per-
cent in Colorado, 9 percent in Washington, 8 percent in Nebraska and Wyoming,
7 percent in Nevada, and 5 percent in Iowa, Montana, and Utah. Higher prices
of cattle and increased production of wheat were important factors in Colorado;
higher prices of cattle and milk and larger production of wheat and apples in
Washington; higher prices of cattle and hogs in Nebraska; higher prices of
cattle in Wyoming, Nevada, and Utah; and larger wheat marketing in Montana.
In Iowa, substantial increases in receipts from hogs and cattle were partly
offset by lower receipts from corn and eggs.

A sharp drop in cotton production, together with delayed marketing,
mostly accounted for declines in total cash receipts of 15 percent in Louisi-
ana, 11 percent in Tennessee, and 5 percent in New Mexico, plus the larger
declines already mentioned for Mississippi and Arkansas. A decrease of
12 percent in South Carolina was due to smaller production of both cotton and
tobacco. Seven-percent declines were brought about in Maine by lower prices
of potatoes, in Florida by lower prices of oranges and potatoes, and in
Alabama by smaller cotton production.


FIs-166


-6-


NOVEMBER 1957





FIS-166 7 IJOVfMBER 1957

Table 2.- Index numbers of volume of farm marketirigs and home consumption, by major subinaexes, 1940-57

(1947-49=100)


: Marketing


Marketings
: Home consumption : and home consumption : Food


:: i onfo -d
Year : Live- : : : Live- : : : Live- : : : : Market-:mari;et-
stock : : : stock : : : stock : : :Market-:ings and: ing;.
and : Crops : Total : and : Crops : Total : and : Crops : Total : ings : nome ;
orod-: 2. : : prod- : : : prod- : : : :corsump-:
:ucts I/: : : ats : : : uts : : : : 1on


1940 81 72 77 117 126 119 84
1941 : 84 73 79 113 127 116 8r,
1942 : 93 80 88 110 126 114 95
1943 : 103 79 93 112 122 115 104
1944 : 107 85 98 111 120 114 107
1945 : 105 87 98 112 115 113 106
1946 :103 86 96 114 112 113 104
1947 : 102 96 99 106 105 106 103
1948 : 96 98 97 100 98 99 97
1949 : 101 106 103 94 96 95 101


1950 : 104 96 100 91
1951 : 107 94 101 88
1952 : 109 100 105 85
1953 : 113 107 110 79
1954 :117 104 111 76
195 : 121 108 116 76
195 : 128 110 120 75
19;,7 4: 126 107 18 73


93 92 103
90 91 105
90 87 107
85 82 110
75 76 113
72 75 117
73 74 123
71 72 121


75 80 78 82
7o 82 18 85
83 90 91 93
81 94 97 98
87 99 102 103
89 99 102 103
87 97 101 102
96 100 102 102
98 97 98 98
10o 103 100 100

95 99 100 99
94 101 103 102
99 104 106 104
106 108 109 106
103 109 111 i08
107 112 114 110
108 117 120 115
i05 114 i17 113


Marketings by major commodity groups
Livestock Crops
Year : and products
: Dairy :Poultry: : :Cotton : : : : Fr.ts:
:Meat : prod- : and : Food : Feed : (lint :Tobacco: Oil : Vege-: and : Sugar : Seeds
:animals: ucts : eggs : grains: crops : ana : : cross: tables: nuts : crops :
: seed):

1940 83 87 64 50 74 82 70 45 79 89 109 8b
1941 : 83 92 70 ol 69 74 o5 60 84 100 99 88
1942 94 97 84 73 74 81 06 83 91 97 ii 94
1943 : 106 97 100 66 73 77 c5 105 94 80 83 84
1944 : 111 99 104 78 77 89 79 814 9 99 83 84
1945 :106 103 l0o 80 94 ob 100 87 99 91 95 9o
1946 : 14 i101 101 82 85 58 99 85 108 105 10Co 108
1947 : 104 101 98 100 93 84 luI 81 98 102 ii4 (4
1948 96 98 96 102 86 100 93 108 i0l 10C' 91 91
1949 : 100 102 lt. 98 121 116 92 108 99 98 95 115

1950 : 101 102 114 81 113 79 98 114 100 98 i19 148
1951 :105 101 119 77 88 93 il 102 103 107 '. 125
1952 : 108 102 122 98 91 102 104 112 97 102 97 140
1953 : 111 109 124 96 107 124 100 107 10l 103 o18 125
1954 : 115 111 130 92 1i2 101 106 101 100 100 122 130
1955 : 123 113 129 81 137 101 110 14o 103 105 ill 134
1956 :128 117 142 85 137 99 103 153 108 108 112 143
1957 j/ : 23 119 146 79 157 82 8i 155 104 110 119 i37

i' Includes the "miscellaneous" group of livestock items in addition to groups shown separately below.
SIncludes the "miscellaneous" group of crop items in addition to groups shown separately below.
There are no nonfood items in the nome consumption index.
Preliminary estimates as of November 1, 1957.




NOVEMBER 1957


Table 3.- Cash receipts from farming, United States


Source


August : September : January-September
196 : 1957 1956 1957 : 1956 : 957
Mil.dol. Mil.dol. MUt.dol. il.dcol. Ki.Aol. Mi.dol.


Farm marketing and
CCC loans i/ ..............:

Livestock and products ....:
Meat animals ............:
Dairy products ..........:
Poultry and eggs ........:
Other ...................:


2,631 2,579


1,392
745
370
260
17


1,476
824
381
253
18


3.066 2,847 20,473 20,373


1,398
756
354
269
19


1,483
831
365
267
20


11,876
5,896
3,393
2,339
248


12,451
6,593
3,507
2,085
266


Crops .....................
Food grains .............
Feed crops ..............
Cotton (lint and seed) ..
Oil-bearing crops .......
Tobacco ................
Vegetables ..............
Fruits and tree nuts ....
Other ...................

Government payments .........


1,239 1,103 1,668 1,364 8,597 7,922
: 295 246 292 332 1,551 1,477
173 175 165 163 1,693 1,732
: 134 84 406 150 1,042 596
33 24 132 118 497 505
: 167 159 224 174 551 543
: 226 209 204 194 1,443 1,291
: 121 120 117 109 933 896
: 90 86 128 124 887 882


43 136


37 107


Total cash receipts ......... :


2,674 2,715


3,103 2,954 20,725 21,179


1/ Receipts froa loans represent value
the month.


or loans minns value o redemptions during


Table 4.- Index numbers of cash receipts from farm marketing and CCC loans, physical
volume of farm marketing, and prices received by farmers, United States (1947-49=100)

Item August : Se1tember January-September
:-1956 : 1957 ; 1956 : 1957 2 1956 i 1957

Cash receipts from farm mar-
ketings and CCC loans: :
All commodities ...........: 108 106 126 117 93 93
Livestock and products ..: 102 108 103 109 97 102
Crops ................. : 115 103 155 127 89 82

Physical volume of farm
marketing:
All commodities .......... 123 116 143 130 108 105
Livestock and products ..: 128 124 129 126 124 122
Crops ................... 117 106 163 135 87 83

Prices received by farmers:
All ccummodities ........... 87 92 87 90 87 89
Livestock and products ..: 82 89 82 89 79 84
Crops ...................: 95 94 95 92 98 96

f/ Receipts from loans represent value of loans aiau value of redemption during
the month.


m m .. ..


:


--- -- --


- 8 -


FIS-166


*
*
*
*
*
*






9 -
Table 5.- Cash receipts from farm marketing, by States, August 1950-57


NOVEMBER 1957


State and region


: iuoU lot.

Maine ....................... 9,184
New Hampshire ...............: 4,797
Vermont .....................: 8,390
Massachusetts ...............: 9,644
Rhode Island ................: 1,268
Sponecticut .................: 9,306
New York ....................: 47,568
New Jersey ..................: 17,121
Pennsylvania ................: 45,905
North Atlantic Region ....... 153,183
Ohio ........................ 51,791
Indiana .....................: 60,146
Illinois ........ 0..........: 85,711
Michigan ...................: 31,029
Wisconsin ...................: 68,371
East North Central Region ... 297,048
Minnesota ...................: 64,934
Iowa ........................: 136,304
Missouri ..................: 57,399
North Dakota ................: 12,834
South Dakota ..............: 25,307
Nebraska ....................: 53,340
Kansas ......................: 47,389
West North Central Region ... 397,507
Delaware ....................: 6,614
Maryland ....................: 13,203
Virginia ....................: 22,767
West Virginia ...............: 8,546
North Carolina .............. 20,930
South Carolina .............: 7,668
Georgia .....................: 27,661
Florida .....................: 12,405
South Atlantic Region ........ 119,794
Kentucky ....................: 22,647
Tennessee ...................: 21,105
Alabama ....................: 18,240
Mississippi ................: 15,560
Arkansas ..................: 17,781
Louisiana ...................: 10,234
Oklahoma ...................: 33,657
Texas ......................: 81,517
South Central Region ........ 220,741
Montana .....................: 15,633
Idaho ......................: 14,637
Wynming ....................: 8,539
Colorado ...................: 23,813
New Mexico ..................: 3,283
Arizona .....................: 6,992
Utah ........................: 8,951
Nevada ......................: 1,911
Washington ..................: 17,904
Oregon .....................: 15,814
California ..................: 86,372
Western Region .............. 23,849

United States ............... 1,392,122


:Livestock and products : Crop Total
: 1956 1957 : 156 : 1957 : 1i0 : 157


1,UUU 0 do.

10,115
4,847
6,52L
10,150
1,319
9,464
48,211
16,692
46,824
156,346
54,523
64,462
91,178
32,411
72,608
315,182
o8,002
144,183
00,635
13,y14
27,868
56,202
52,419
423,283
7,092
13,811
22,760
8,209
21,724
7,965
30,556
13,463
125,580
23,664
22,332
20,613
17,131
19,303
10,999
37,040
93,130
244,212
17,379
14,887
9,068
24,125
3,622
7,421.
8,807
1,911
19,101
16,395
88,o36
211,352

1,475,955


1,000 dol.

4,463
1,357
642
6,136
1,065
3,832
28,611
23,637
20,264
93,027
41,307
26,876
52,628
37,861
14,753
173,425
39,403
20,070
21,557
o2,66i
15,720
20,309
82,962
262,742
5,706
10,429
11,088
2,496
75,06o
61,507
71,930
13,191
251,413
5,981
7,546
15,498
18,184
8,479
16,949
12,872
107,486
192,995
18,296
15,606
2,223
19,045
1,838
3,583
5,322
419
26,638
27,735
147,706
268,411

1,239,013


1.,uuu aoIl.

4,905
1.306
627
5,502
7o2
3,279
30,161
18,655
18,582
83,781
35,572
23,223
45,989
34,319
13,o43
152,746
28,746
17,133
17,418
58,084
25,67o
22,394
31,799
201,250
4,204
7,oo2
9,945
2,112
101,664
69,660o
30,888
6,318
232,653
4,452
6,123
15,956
9,032
4,492
11.484
13,494
93,062
158,095
18,205
14,080
2,352
24,453
2,376
4,505
0,376
41o
27,600
28,478
146,070
274,911

1,103,430


FIS-166


I J I f f f i


1,000 dol.

13,647
6,154
9,032
15,78&
2,333
13,138
76,179
4o,758
66,189
243,210
93,098
67,022
133,339
08,890
83,124
470,473
104,337
156,374
78,950
75,495
41,027
73,709
130,351
000,249
12,320
23,632
33,855
11,042
95,996
69,175
99,591
25,596
371,207
28,o28
28,651
33,738
33,744
26,2o0
27,183
46,529
189,003
413,736
33,929
30,243
10,7b2
42,858
5,121
10,575
14,273
2,330
44,542
43,549
234,078
472,260

2,631,135


1,000 dol.

15,020
o,155
9,151
15,o52
2,081
12,743
78,372
35,547
65,4o6
240,127
90,095
87,085
137,1o7
o6,730
86,251
4o7,928
90,748
161,316
78,053
71, 98
53,544
78,o50
84,218
024,533
11,296
21,473
32,705
10,321
123,588
77,625
o0,444
19,781
358,233
28,116
28,455
36,509
2o,103
23,795
22,483
50,534
186,192
402,307
35,584
2 907
i, 420
48,578
5,998
11,926
15,183
2,327
46,701
44,873
234,706
486,263

2,579,391





FIS-166


10 -
TabLe 6.- Cash receipts from farm marketing, by States, September 1956-57


NOVEMBER 1957


: Livestock and products Crops : Total
State and region 1957 i 19 1957 O 1956 d 1
: 195r 1957 19: 56 1957 1956 1957


Maine .......................
New Hampshire ..........:
Vermont .....................:
Massachusetts ..............:
Rhode Island ................:
Connecticut .................:
New York ....................:
New Jersey ................:
Pennsylvania ...............:
North Atlantic Region .......
Ohio ........................:
Indiana ......................
Illinois ...................:
Michigan ...................:
Wisconsin ...................:
East North Central Region ...
Minnesota ...................:
Iowa .........................:
Missouri ....................:
North Dakota ..............:
South Dakota ................:
Nebraska ..................:
Kansas ......................
West North Central Region ...
Delaware ....................:
Maryland ...................:
Virginia ......................
West Virginia ...............:
North Carolina ..............
South Carolina ..............:
Georgia ....................:
Florida ...................:
South Atlantic Region .......
Kentucky ....................
Tennessee ...................
Alabama ....................:
Mississippi ..................:
Arkansas ...................:
Louisiana ..................
Oklahoma ...............,...:
Texas .....................:
South Central Region .........
Montana .....................
Idaho .......................
Wyming ....................:
Colorado ...................:
New Mexico .................:
Arizona ....................
Utah ........................:
Nevada .......................
Washington .................
Oregon .....................:
California .................:
Western Region .............


United States ............... 1,397,410


:


1,000 dol.

9,216
4,632
8,104
9,100
1,280
9,002
48,3b0
17,487
46,5439

153,730
54,202
58,924
83, b47
32,295
64,280
293,348
61,277
131,301
60,640
13,711
27,232
57,420
50,328
401,969
7,490
13,291
23,145
9,322
21,934
1, oo3
27,972
11,838
122,655
24,520
19,751
16,201
14,161
lb,407
10,370
29,123
72,236
202,829
19,143
14,331
15,6o9
27,007
5,485
'9,176
13,552
2,361
1i,749
17,516
80,890
222,879


~ --- ~-


1,000 dol.

9,756
4,834
8,399
10,100
1,329
9,446
50,178
17,569
48,586

160,197
56,.17
63,420
89,204
32,072
68,070
310,283
62,691
139,679
64,899
15,040
29,112
60,313
50,899
428,633
7,419
13,554
23,541
8,990
23,262
8,326
3u,908
12,842
128,841
26,016
20,423
18,360
15,443
17,725
11,313
32, 401
80,943
222,624
20,924
14,524
16,418
27,780
6,381
9, 92
13,206
2,326
18,914
18,504
83,477
232,146

1,482,724


1,000 dol.

2,117
1,000
617
5,968
658
3,504
38,954
14,517
23,403

90,738
32,456
32,926
84,736
40,199
19,362
209,679
34,672
24,789
49,785
68,015
15,204
22,038
30,612
245,115
2,553
5,474
12,144
2,007
200,336
76,665
52,754
8,526
360,759
5,822
35,546
43,181
66,426
63,527
48,013
15,543
117,282
395,340
29,320
31,158
3,069
16,730
6,206
10,903
5,444
555
60,538
39,982
162,726
366,631

1,668,262


1,000 dal.

2,239
1,105
555
5,599
568
3,398
35,509
15,605
20,206

84,784
29,383
40,954
73,926
39,230
19,835
203,328
25,

26,223
58,193
23,483
28,692
41,193
232,057
2,308
4,609
15,625
2,072
167,872
33,647
41,396
7,984
275,513
4,743
14,011
24,799
19,135
24,086
25,735
7,964
70,591
191,064
39,930
29,948
3,277
21,731
4,223
7,835
5,102
465
74,736
39,037
150,646
377,530

1,364,276


, 006 d01.
11,333
5,632
8,721
15,068
1,938
12,506
87,314
32,004
69,952
244,468
86,658
91,850
168,383
72,494
83,642
5o3,027
95,949
156,150
110,425
81,726
42,436
79,458
80,94o
647,084
10,043
18,765
35,589
11,329
222,270
84,328
80,726
20,364
483,414
30,342
55,297
59,442
80,587
79,934
58,383
44,666
189,518
598,169
48,463
45,489
18,738
43,737
11,691
20,079
18,996
2,916
78,287
57,498
243,b16
589,510

3,065,672


1,000 dol.
11,995
5,939
8,954
15,699
1,897
12,844
85,687
33,174
68,792
244,981
86,300
104,374
163,130
71,902
87,905
513,611
88,360
168,283
91,122
73,233
52,595
89,005
98,092
660,690
9,727
18,163
39,165
ii,062
191,134
41,973
72,304
20,826
404,354
30,759
34,434
43,159
34,578
41,811
37,048
40,365
151,534
413,688
60,854
44,472
19,695
49,511
10,604
17,527
18,308
2,791
93,650
58,141
234,123
609,676

2,847,000o







Table 7.- Cash receipts from farm marketing, by States, January-September 195o-57


tate and region Livestock and products Crops total
: 4b 1957 : 1195957 1957 1950 : 1957
S1,000 dol. 1,000 dol. 1,000 dol. 1,000 dol. 1,000 dol. 1,000 dol.

Maine ....................... 76,474 81,413 03,294 50,970 141,768 132,363
New Hampshire ............... 40,814 40,505 8,1o2 8,198 48,976 46,763
Vermont .....................: 73,709 75,o31 8,588 8,687 82,297 84,3i8
Massachusetts ...............: 84,751 64,966 37,532 36,205 122,283 121,171
Rhode Island ................: 11,122 10,680 4,639 4,189 15,761 15,009
Connecticut ...............: 82,715 79,166 38,753 39,286 121,4 6 118,452
New York ...................: 441,524 433,96o 162,0o6 170,441 003,590 604,407
New Jersey .................: 150,533 143,373 105,0o4 102,224 255,597 245,597
Pennsylvania ...............: 412,983 413,328 138,052 140,018 551,035 553,340
North Atlantic Region ....... 1,376,625 1,363,288 5o6,150 500,21i 1,942,775 1,923,506
Ohio ........................: 458,728 470,671 271,010 242,581 729,738 713,252
Indiana .....................: 472,894 500,232 268,o08 271,563 741,502 771,795
Illinois ......4............: 753,986 810,786 o19,945 o23,232 1,373,933 1,434,016
Michigan ....................: 292,028 297,025 205,952 213,808 497,980 510,833
Wisconsin ...................: 671,707 693,524 96,702 100,011 768,409 793,535
East Narth Central Region ...: 2,649,345 2,772,238 1,462,217 1,451,195 4,111,562 4,223,433
Minnesota ...................: 630,777 652,858 271,918 260,714 902,695 913,572
Iowa ........................: 1,169,422 1,273,080 277,1o6 252,680 i, 44o,588 1,525,760
Missouri ....................: 490,854 5i9,104 212,887 170,296 703,741 689,6400
North Dakota ................: 108,971 116,683 259,950 254,228 366,921 370,911
South Dakota ................: 251,435 272,120 64,143 104,305 335,578 376,425
Nebraska ....................: 450,428 493,472 178,092 185,196 628,520 678,668
Kansas ......................: 363,974 394, 559 294,092 234,170 658,066 628,729
West North Central Region ... 3,465,861 3,721,876 1,578,248 1,461,589 5,044,109 5,183,465
Delaware ....................: 56,873 60,389 22,742 22,227 79,o15 82,616
Maryland ....................: 120,; 82 121,732 59,568 58,814 180,550 180,546
Virginia ....................: 173,373 175,316 92,055 93,269 265,428 208,585
West Virginia ...............: o2,199 61,019 12,125 12,088 74,324 73,107
North Carolina .............. 180,968 181,537 371,032 373,756 552,000 555,293
South Carolina ..............: 61,433 65,055 205,501 169,542 266,934 234,597
Georgia .....................: 237,759 254,413 226,848 198,785 464,o007 453,198
Florida .....................: 111,482 110,984 4o8,140 3o8,815 519,622 485,799
South Atlantic Region ....... 1,00),069 1,036,445 1,398,011 1,29-,296 2,403,080 2,333,741
Kentucy ....................: 186,309 197,382 93,949 93,916 280,258 291,298
Tennessee ...................: 168,26o 174,087 119,763 83,228 288,029 257,315
Alabama .....................: 149,269 162,476 133,221 100,368 282,490 202,844
Mississippi ................. 121,366 130,432 206,974 108,817 328,340 239,249
Arkansas ....................: 134,054 138,384 209,208 119,751 343,262 258,135
Louisiana .................: 86,868 89,879 123,246 88,770 210,114 178,649
Oklahma ....................: 223,914 236,916 135,025 112,917 358,939 349,833
Texas .......................: 623,829 607,781 521,620 447,282 1,145,449 1,115,063
South Central Region ........i 1,693,875 1,797,337 1,543,006 1,155,049 3,230,881 2,952,386
Montana .....................: 106,119 115,514 135,165 137,514 241,264 253,028
Idaho .......................: 116,854 122,000 115,512 102,325 232,366 224,325
Wyoming .....................: 52,733 57,159 13,756 14,361 6o,489 71,520
Colorado ....................: 197,524 210,075 89,378 106,872 286,902 31o,947
New Mexico .................. 52,919 57,563 38,397 29,083 91,316 86,646
Arizona .....................: 75,371 79,810 134,343 129,652 209,714 209,462
Utah ........................: 75,175 77,085 23,676 26,922 98,851 104,007
Nevada ......................: 17,916 18,744 3,008 3,635 20,924 22,379
Washington ..................: i43,418 153,807 218,516 240,731 301,934 394,538
Oregon ......................: 122,003 126,911 158,092 159,171 280,095 286,082
California ..................: 724,097 740,836 1,119,604 1,046,103 1,844, 301 1,786,939
Western Region .............. 1,o84,729 1,759,504 2,049,447 1,996,369 3,734,176 3,755,873


United States................11,875, 5014 12,450,688 8,597,079 7,921,716 20,1472,583 20,372,1404


FIS- 166


- 11 -


NO'EMaBER 1957


United States ............... 11,875,504


12,450,688 8,597,079 7,921,716 20,472,583 20,372,404




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Ill IIIII 111lll 11llI III lHIIIII
3 1262 08862 8820


U. S. Department of Agriculture
Washington 25, D. C.


Penalty for private use to avoid
payment of postage $300


OFFICIAL BUSINESS


NOTICE
If you no longer need this publication,
check here return this sheet,
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If your address should be changed,
write the new address on this sheet
and return the whole sheet to:
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U. S. Department of Agriculture
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: Issue dates for the Farm Income Situation are February,
: April, July, September, and November. The next issue is :
: scheduled for release about March 4, 1958.




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