Coast Guard bulletin

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Material Information

Title:
Coast Guard bulletin
Physical Description:
4 v. : ; 25 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Coast Guard
Publisher:
Treasury Dept., Coast Guard
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (July 1939)-v. 4, no. 1 (July 1948).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for July 1939 to June 1942 numbered v. 1, no. 1-36; issues for July 1942-June 1945 numbered v. 2, no. 1-36; issues for July 1945-June 1948 numbered v. 3, no. 1-36.
General Note:
"CG 134."
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004847253
oclc - 01586958
lccn - sn 90034071
Classification:
lcc - HJ6645 .C6
System ID:
AA00012190:00008

Related Items

Preceded by:
Lighthouse Service bulletin
Preceded by:
Marine inspection and navigation bulletin
Succeeded by:
U.S. Coast Guard bulletin


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text










BULLETIN Y


Volume 3 WASHIINGTON, APRIIL 1947' Number 22


br25'47


"I -, 3 I
r r


COAST GUARD


Foilow\i ne~ the cessation of hostilities he
wa~s relieved from active dulty onl Nu.
vemnber 30, 1946j, andi resumned his r~etiredl
status. H-e wals then appointed d director
of teleconumnI1I1Iil.ntionsl~ of thej National
Fm~1leratio of Ame~rican Shiling, luec.,
wh~ic~h position he now: holds.
LAST-IMINUTE APPLICATIONS IN-
CREASE NUTMBERC OF CADET
CANDIDATES


SHIPS ARE READIED FOR
INTERNATIONAL ICE
PATROL


1947


Th~e Coast Guardl Outters Mendota
and Moiiarrc were orderedi to be readied
for service on tlhe International Ice
Patrol for the season of 19417 and
reached Boston, Mdass., on F1'brua'r1y 15.
Threy were attached to tlhe North At-
lantic Ocean Patrol which assumed the
I~;respnsibiity for de~te'rminingi l the date


when, the patrol would be inaugurated. Applications from young men desir-
ing to participate in the examinations
COM[MODORE WIEBSTER IS NOMI- for malpl.itoinhnen as cadets at the Coast
NATEID AS ONE O1F FCC Guard Academy continued to pour in
CO~a[lISSINERSup to and even after the April 1 dead
line.
Commodore Edrward M. Webrster, The 1947 competitive scholastic exam-
USCG, (Retiredt), now D~irector of nation is scheduled for IMay 7 and 8
Telecommunications with the National and will be given in. various cities of
F('lerat~fio of American Shlilililne has the United States, Honolullu.n T. H-.,
been nominated by the President as one! K*etchikan, Alaskia, and San Juarn, P'. R.,
of the Federll; 1 Communications Commis- accep~ted candidates he~ing~ advised of the
sioner~s. The nomination hlas b~eenl sent time and place at which they are to re-
to the Senate. C~ommodlore Webster, a port. The schedule of examinations is
native of Wash~indoniil. D. C., was for- as follows: May 7 from 8 a. m. to 12
motrly ('hief of the Communication Divi- noon, mathematics, science, and vocatb-
sion at Coast Guard Hew;lynal~rters. ulary test; 1 p. m. to 4: 30 p. m.. Ene-
Commodlore Webster at the close of lish~ and social studies; Mlay 8 from 8
the first World War waas assigned to a. m. to 12 noon, aptitude tests, qules-
Coast Guard communications dulty and tionnaires; 1 p. m. to 4: 30 p. mz., inter-
servedl for m~any years as its chief views.
communications officer. The examination is d--ienedc' l to ueasj-
Hre was r~etired1 from active duty in ure as fairly and accurately as poss.-ilte
19:'4- because of playska~71 l ic~nhility and the extent to which each candidate
accepted a position with the Fed~eral meets the genrarfl qualifications for suc-
Communications Comm~ission where he cessful completion of the A~cademy
served as its assistant chief engineer course and success as a Coast Guard
until June 1, 1942. On that date heofir .eanaqutedctnl
was recalled to active duty in thte Coast
Guar an reasiged o hi fomerbackground, possession of aptitudes rel-
duty as chief communications officer ative to both technical and cultural
with thre rank of captain. H-e w~as pro- studies, a sincere interest in the Coast
moted to commodore on June 1, 1945. Guard as a career, and relevant per-
1 Published with the approval of the Director of the Budget.
O. G. Distribution
A, B, C, and List 102~ .
737339--47 337





338


COAST GUARD BULLETIN


soal~u~ity and physical characteristics.
The subijetlt matter of the examination
will be material within the scope of
most high school curricula. The tests
are designed to be as fair as possible to
students from all varieties of secondary
.schools, but no candidate is expected to
have had dletailed instruction in all the
topies coveredl in the various tests.
Since the examination is competitive,
not merely qualifying, it will be difficult
enough to discriminate between candi-
dates of nearly equal educational
.achievement. The tests will be objec-
tive in form except that candidates may
be required to write one or more short
English essays on specified subjects.
Candidates will be offered appoint-
mnents to cadetship in the order of their
final marks until thne vacancies for the
year have been ~filled. Those considered
eligible and passing the required physi-
cal examination will receive appoint-
ments and instructions to report to the
Coast Guard Academy at New London,
Conn., on a specified date, usually the
third week in July.
A cadet in the Coast Guard receives
tLhe same pay and allowvances as are now
or may hereafter be provided by law for
midshipmen in the Navy. At present
they are $780 per annuxm and commuta-
tion for one ration per day. Pay com-
mences upon the late the oath of office
as a cadet is taken. A cadet's pay is
furnished by the Governm~ent for ui-
forms, equipment, textbooks, and others
expenses incidental to his training.
CONFERENCE CONSIDERS THE
READING OF PLANES FOR
HURRICANE RESCUE W~iORK
A hurricane evacuation plan confer-
ence, which was pa't-icipatedl in by
-Coast Guard representatives, was held
recently at the Naval Air Station, Pen~
.saal, Fa.Principal point under dis-
cussioni was the length of time during
whichl it was advisable to have aircraft
held in readiness because of the possi_
ability of hurricanes. It was brought out
that search and rescue planes should be
readied as far in advance of any pre-
dlirtct hurricane as possible, as well as
immredliately after the storm had struck.
The conference is expected to result in
~certa~in changes being made by the Coast
Guard in its plans for hurricane relief.
HUDSONI RIVER 1FOG SIGNAL I[S
NOWJ OPIERATIED IBY A SOUND
CONTROLLER
Automat-ic operation of a fog signal,
thronehl~i its control by the sounlrdingL of


the whistle of an approaching vessel,
has been instituted at thze West Point
Light on the Hudlson River, N. Y. The
fog signal, which is a bell, is set in
operation by the sound emanating from
the whistle of a passing vessel. A ves-
sel desiring the bell to operate wyill
sound its whistle onl which the fog bell
will then operate on its advertised char-
aeteristic for a period of 8 minutes.
After 8 minutes the bell will stop until
it is again operated by the sourid
controller,
Previous experiments with this type
of signal have been made, and the ad-
vantages sought are: Operation of the
fog signal without the need for full-time
attendance, and avoidance of unneces-
sary disturbance of residents of the
vicinity by the continuous sounding of
the signal.
The development of devices for con-
trolling the operation of fog signals by
a sound from the whistle of an approach-
ing or passing vessel has been under
study for many years. The earliest mod-
els of this equipment were tested at
Back Creek No. 2 Light Station in the
Chesapeake and Delaware Canal about
1938. Later, an improved model was
used at HEog Island No. 12 Light and
Sound Signal at the West entrance to
the Capel Cod Canal. Based on the ex-
perience ganined from the -operation of
those units a much improved model was
completed about 1943. Its installation
was of Il.-= -essi ly deferr~ed until the pres-
ent time.
The fog signal controller responds to
sounds in the frequency range fromn 200
to l,000 cycles. It is r~elatiwlly unaf-
fected by wind noises which lie in fre-
quency ranges above 1,000 and belowr
200 cycles. It may be adjusted to start
the fog signal when :Icrntellc d by a sound
having a sil1nal Il-endli~l of 50 decibels
if it is sustained for a period of a seet-
ond or more. The sound level in a quiet
room is generally of thle order of 40
or more decibels making it a tpparenmt that
a sound level of 50 decibels is compara-
tively low. In fact, the unit will re-
spond to a blast from. a fish horn at a
distance of 1/4 mile even though the
wind is makingrlr more noise at the time.
The equipment may be set to solundl the
fog signal for a .siplnal blast in respol~nse
to a ship's whistle or it may be adljus~tell
to sound the fog sigrnn1 for a period up
to eight minutes each time it is actuated
by a ship's whistle. The unit at Wecst
Point Light is adjusted in the latter
fashion.






339


COAST GUARD BULLETIN


tain L. B. Olsen, Executive Officer of
the Academy, atnd Hon. F'red Benvenuti,
Mayor of New\\ London, Connz. Because
of illness, Rear Admiral James Pine,
Superintendent of the Acadlemy, was un-
able to be at the airport, but he later
greeted the? Secretary at the Academy,
FIull honors were rendered, including a
10~-=un salute, and thCe traditional ralttles~
and flourishes.
Secretary Snyder inspected the Eagle,.
former Nazi training vessel, while a
seamaznship class was in progress, a~nd
presented an American flag to the ship.
With his olfficinl party, the Secretary
toured the grounds and buildings of the
Academy, visiting several classes where
instruction was in progress. In a lunch-
eon address, he spoke to the cadets andl
their guests.

COURTESY SMALL BOAT
INSPECTIONS BE=GINM ON
A NATIONAL BASIS

Courtesy boat inspections, being made
by the Coast Guard Auxiliary as a means
of securing the active cooperation of
boat owners in the observance of the
motorboat regulations, began through-
out the country on April 1 and will be
continued through the spring and sum-
mer months. The idea of courtesy in-
spections to determine if motorboats
and other small vessels complied with.
the regulations as regards safety equip-
ment originated in one of the Coast
Guard districts. Interest in the plan.
spread rapidly through the Auxiliary
and at the national commodore's con-
ference held in 'Washington in Febru-
ary, headquarters adopted the plan and
announced that it would be applied on a
national basis.
The plan presents a challenge to the
members of the Coast Guard Auxiliary
to demonstrate their integrity by con-
ducting the boat inspections both in1-
telligently and impartially. The suc-
ce~ss of the plan also depends to a great
extent upon the attitude of boat owners,
for it is acknowledged that a boat
might successfully pass an inspection
while moored at a dock: by means of
equipment only temporarily installed.
The Coast Guard has taken a fur-
ther step toward enforcing the provi-
sions of the motorboat regulations
through education, by directing the
Coast Guard Auxiliary flotillas to pre-
pare to operate classes in small boat
handling which. would be open to the
boating public. Headquarters feels that
the Auxiliary should use the knowledge,.


SHEIP STRUCTURE COMVIMIT'TEE
PRESIDENTS REPORTS ON WAR-
TIME SH~[IP FAILURES
The finatl report on the Design and l
nletlllands of Construction of WVelded Steel
3I1.rchant Ve -els prea red by tie
board convened by thle Secretary of the
Navy, which was dissolved on August
17, 1946, has just been published. This
report is a volume of 164~ pages~C and t
numerous illus~tra;tirons.
Thle purpo"~'~t and scope of th~e report
is indicated in its fllreward,.~l wlherIe it
is statedt that early in. the war, welded
mer~chtant vessels experienced tliftis-ultir
in the form of fractures which could not
he explainedl. Thle Secr~etatry of the
Navy, pursuant to his responsibility
through the Coast Guard for certificat-
ing vessels in accordance with the ma-
rine inspection laws, established a board
to inquire into the design and methods
of construction of welded steel merchant
vessels. This board wvas composed of
thle EngIineer'l-in-Chief, U. S. Coast
Guard; the Chief, ]Bureau of Ships, U. S.
Navy; the Vice Chairman, U. S. Mari-
timue Commission; and the Chief Sur-
veyor, American Bureau of Shipping.
Thle present report is th~e result of the
inves~ticrntillns initiated by this board.
The in cosit ~licln in was in progress more
than 3 years, during which timue two
interim reports were issued.
Although the results obtained through
this investigation were satisfactory for
the war emergency, certain important
phases of the work remain unfinished.
To complete this unfinished work, which
is listed in the report just published,
and to continue the valuable efforts of
the Board in the field of ship structure?,
a permanent organization has been es-
tabli~shed by the Secretary of the Treas-
ury, consisting of essentially the same
membership as formerly comprised the
Board. This newN body is known as the
Ship Structure Committee.


F~rench channel lighthouses have re-
cently: been greatly dimmed owing to the
electricity cuts due to coal shortage.

ACB)ADEM IS INSPECTED BY TIE
SECRETARY OF THE
TREASURY

Secretary of the Treasury John W.
Snyder recently made an official visit
of inspection, to the Coast Guard Acad-
emy, New London, Conn. TIhe Secretary
was met at the Groton Airport by Cap-







340


COAST GUARD BULLETIN


experience, and past training of its mem-
bers to promote safe motorboating by
having them. instruct new and prospec-
tive boat owners in good seamanship
and safe motorboat operation.

CUTTERS TAMPA ANSD MODOC
ARE DECOMMISSIONED

The cutter Tamp3a (WYPG-48) and tle
cutter J/rndoc ( WPG-46), vessels 240 O
feet in length, were decommissionedi on
February 3, and are to be disposed of.
During thle recent war, these two cut-
ters served for long periods of time on
the Greenland Patrol.
The cutter TampaL, the second Coast
Guard vessel of that name, was built by
the Union Construction Co., in OaklanX,
Calif., in 111"11-21. She was commis-
sioned on September 15i, 1921, and sailed
shortly thereafter for the Atlantie
coast. She was attached to the eastern
division until 1932, serv\ine many times
on the International Ice P~atrol. Her
next atssignmlent was to the New York
Division.
The cutter M~odoc, like the Tamzpa, was
built by the Union Construction Co., at
Oaklaznd, Calif., being launched shortly
after the latter. Upon commissioning,
she proceeded to the Atlantic coast and
was n-stened.~ to the southern division,
with W~ilmington, N. C., as permanent
station. She, also, served at various
times onl the International Ice Patrol.
Even before the United States entered
the Second World War, the Modoc and
the Tampla were detailed to Greenland
expedijtionIs. In Ma~y 1941, while the
British navy was tracking down the
Ger~man battleship Bismarck in the
north Atlantic, the Modoc, with the cut-
ter Northland, was close by. The
Mlodoc at one time found herself in the
midst of an air attack, but was identi-
fied before any damage was done. The
Tampa in 1943 was serving inz northern
waters on convoy duty.


The Bar Lightship, Liverpool, Eng-
land,, has been modernized with a more
powerful light of 124,000 candlepower.

END OF HOSTI[LITIIES AIFFIECTS
AWNARDINTSG OF MIEDALS

The Presidential p~rllc-lanat~icn end-
ing hostilities as of 31 Decemnber, 10-10;,
affects the awarding of decorations and
medals.
Recommendation for the award of the
Medal of Honor, Navy Cross, Distin-
gruishled Service Mledal, Silver Star


Medal and the Navy and Marine Corps
Medal for acts or services performed
between December 7, 1941 and June 30,
1944, and recommendations for the
award of the Distinguished FL~ing Cross
for acts or services performed between
7 December 1941, and 30 June 1H43.
must be initiated and placed in official
channels on or prior to 30 June 1917i.
RCecommlendations for' the above dlee-
oraltions and medals initiated on or after
July 1, 1947, must be limited to acts or
services performledt not more than 3
years prior to thle date of such recom-
mendations except Distinguished F~lying
Cross for which recommendation is
limited to acts or services which were
performed not muore than 2 years prior
to the date of the initiation of the
recomlmeundtion.
The proclamation also fixes December
31, 10-1,rS a's terminal dlate for service
eligibility for World War II Victory
M~edal.
No other decorations or medals are
affected by the proclamation.

AUXILIARY UNITS ON GREAT
LtAKES DIVIDED INTO
NIEW GROUIIPS

Because of the great amount of small
boat activity in the 9th Coast G~uard
District embracing the Great Lakes,
andi also the large size of this district,
the A1?uxiliary has recently been reor-
ganized into thze following areas, and an
additional vice commodore authorized
for each of these areas. The areas and
the newv vice commodores are as followocs:
Area O (L~ake Ontario), District Vice
Commzodore J. Webb L. Sheehy; Area E:
(Lake Erie), District Vice Commodore
Charles R. 'Wallach; Area J (Lake
H~uron), District Vice Commodore Earl
H. Teetzel; Area M-S (Lakes Michigan
and Superior), District Vice Commodore
Adiolph Schmidt.

The Hydrographic Department of the
British Admiralty is producing a new
type of chart for use with radar, having
the land areas printed in deeper colors
to show the contours.

1947 EDITION OF PACIFIC
COAST LIGHT LIST IS
NJOW;I AVAILABLE
The 1947 edition of the Pwlific Coast
Light List has just been p.ub~lished~ and
is nowv ready for distribution. This edi-
tion of the light list is identical in
format with that published in 1946,






341


COAST GUARD BULLETIN


though manyrl~ cllnnges~ in the indlividurl
aids to na~vigation. are reflected in th" e
entr~ies.
Mar~1iners may obtain copils of thre
new light list from the Superintendelt
olf D~ocumnents, Washlinegonl 2:5, D. C., or
tranIII the sales ownI1I (. le in most United
Staltes palrs. Trhe price is gl '-'1 per
coPY. A list of the sales agencis*Rj1' w1S
p~ublishedi in thle Notice to Mariners umn-
her1.*.11 14 and11 dated~1 April 5i, as well as
Notice to Marinersl~ numbered 1 pub-
lished early\ in January, of this year.

CALIFORNIA AUXILIARISTS
HOL) PILOTING RACES
AT SAN FRANCISCO

Auxiliar0 flotillas of thre 12th Coast
Guardl District held their first annual
over1-the-hottomn race for motorboats in
Sun Francico Bay on AP~ril 12. Thlis
marine evenlt attracted oierl1
public noltic, and it was estimaated that
approximately 5,000 persons witilessed
the race from. boats in the harbor and
nearby shore points. Thie focal point
of the race was the St. F'rancis Yacht
('inlll where a public address system was
installed to broadcast a description of
the event to spectators.
This race event assisted in bringing
to the attention of the public the Coast
Guard Auxiliary's efforts to foster com-
pliance with the motorboat regulations
and the establishment of safety stand-
ards over and above the legal reqluire-
ments.

Fox Island Radiobeacon, established
inl Pha u-rtinl Bay, Newfoundland, for
wartime purposes, has been discon-
tinued, there now being a radio range
station nearby which is sufficient for
present peacetime needs.
RIEQUIRE1YrJIENTS OF ORAL EXAM1Y-
INATION: FOR FOREIGN SERV-
ICE ARE OUTLINED
Infolrmaltion concerning the special
oral examinations which wTill be 'iven i
from time to time by the Department of
State to candidates for appointment to
th~e middle and upper grades of the for-
cign service has been- Ilubllished'l to Coast
G personnel through Personnel
Cir~cular N'o. -CT, dated 21 'ebruary
19417. These examinations will be o~f
interest to roalflt Guard personnel since
dtuty in the Coast Guard as an officer
or hnlisted man will partially fulfill the
rnivemenjIPIIFlts which qualify applicants
to take the examination.


LICGHTHOUSES AIRE AGAIN
OPENED TO VISITORS.
Vistor~s will :I-alIn be adrmit~ted tor
ligrhthouses, 1Inave.~ SUbstantially the
salme rules as those prevaliling ~ef'ore
thle walr, according to inrstrunctions just
issuedl by Coast Gua~rdl TI';:1111unrIter~s.
E~xcludedi from Ilthese structures dullrine
hostilities for obvious re~asonsr, the pub-
lic Iruniv now visit light stations, where
theset are readily accessible, aInd may
limb the towers andt be shown the fog
-iL'nil and other applr~nl ins. However,
as the keepers must perform their reg-
ular duties as well as conduct parties of
visitors about thle station, hours of ad-
mittance will be kept wYithin reasonable
bounds.
In years past, certain lighthouses, be-
cause of their close proximity to heav-
ily travelled~ highlways, have beecn much
v-isited. WVhat was probably the most
visited lighthouse was the split Rock:
~ifht Station~, in the state! of Wiscon-
sin, and on the north shore of Lake Su-
perlior. Dluring a -inllel season, newly~'1
20,000 visitors were admitted to the
grounds and to the station buildings.

C. G. AUXILIARY SAFETY FORUlt
HEARS ABOUT POSSIBILITIES
OF ELECTRONICS AIDS

Thle Coast Guard Auxiliary flotillas
of Miami, Fl]a., sp~onsoredi a safety forum
during the M~iami Motorboat Showr held
the middle! of March, one of the princi-
pal features of which was a talk by
Lieut. Comdr. L. E. Brunner, from Coast
Guard Headqluarters. The follo-wing
has been extracted from Lieut. Comdlr.
Brunner's talk:
The apD~lication of recent devlopl-,l
ments in the field of electronic navi~gat-
tionlal aids to small craft has been some--
what overshadowed by the interest in
the a plllil'ntionl of radar, loran, and other'
related devices to larger vessels. This,.
of course, is due to the more ready ap-.
p'lil'nlionr of these items to larger ves--
sels, and to the fact that conver~sion-
from war requirements to a large ship
p~'rodulct Ir"(!uires' less engineering and
production effor~t. Progrressive manu--
facturers, however, have fully realized
that the wide electronic experience
given many service men dluringr the w~ar
would lead directly to lrcquesitc: for elce--
tronice equipment from these same prer-
sons once they return to civilian life
and become small craft operators. Sta-
tistics in, support of this reasoning are
Mace"rrine. *






342


COAST GUARD BULLETIN


A good depth tinder is probably the
simplest and, most useful electronic
nal i,;ltional aid. There is a model
available for everyl' type of vessel. HIow-
ever, thie more elaborate models require
considerable space and battery power
and of course cost a great deal more.
M~ost all models of dea~lthl fnders canl be
installedl by any good, boat yard. There
are depth ~finders available that will
not only keep a record of the depth, but
provide knowledge of the type of bot-
tom such as rockry, muddy, sea-weed,
etc., to an experience operator. Like-
wise they will indicate pn.-suee~t over a
concentrated school of fish. It is easy
to visualize what an experienced fisher-
man could do with an instrument of
this type provided he is willing to spend
the time and patience required to train
himself in the necessary instrumentL-
tion.
The radio direction tinder, although
not strictly a modern device, is still a
g~oodZ navigational instrument. Consii-
erable improvement is to be expected as
thle nlew models come out incorporating
w2ar dlevelop~ed comp~onents and circuits.
To tens-..urag.-- the production of auto-
matic radio direction finders, somewhact
similar to those used on aircraft, the
Coast Guard has recently modified
many of the prominent radiobeacons so
fll-\ will emit continuous radio fre-
qluency energy during the period they
are t commlli~ ittin with kreyedf modulation
for the characteristic i etlir fy-i ng signal.
Radio direction finders are available,
from the small portable variety up to
elaborate permanently installedl models.
Installation on a wood vessel that is not
fitted with masts presents no serious
problem and does nlot greatly reduce the
accuracy and lllit-ienslability of the bear-
ings taken. A rad~Cio directions fin~der
wrhen installed on a steel vessel must ~e
\precisely compensated and enlibrated if
accurate hearings are to be exspecttal-
Adlditional errors, that are beyond~ the
control of the operator can occur, but
these errors are likrely to be wlc--elriihh'
on small craft as they do not operate far
enough off shore. An If tmPt11) has been
madle in the case of small direction find-
ers to devlop~~1I a general purpose dr'vir.s
which will fulfill both the communica-
tion ;I nd position fixsingf requi'rements of
smln~l boats. Fiolr ilsta~nCe, smrall mod-
fels incorporate circuits for shifting to
brandienlst bands for news, wovinthclr etc.,
andlilin t the communication
handr~s for communication in addltition to
ttbo regu~lln r direction find-ing fac The1(se instruments hIave their place in
v~ssels less thlan T,0 feet in lengthl where


at radio direction finder is occasionally
handy, but for regular navigation a
completely installed, compensated and
culibra:tedc radio direction finder is
dlesiratble.
Radar has captured the fancy of mar-
iners, and is extremely useful for any
171l'l* of nasvigation. I'wvr aa
equipment is complllil-ated~ and expensive
and is likely to remain beyond the: means
of many small craft operators. There
is dlelinite hope that a small craft radar
will be available inz the near future at a
considerably reduced price but it will
still remain in the price range of a good
automobile. This situation is aggraz-
vated by indications that the small craft
operators would not be content with
the simple type of radar. A rough sur-
vey indicates that radar to suit the taste
of small craft operators must have PPI)
presentation, good range and bearing
resolution and a short minimum range.
These reqzluirementslt entail considerable
expense, particularly so when they must
be placed in a packrage suitable for in-
stallation on a small vessel. There is
reason to believe that should a sufficient
number of small craft operators be in-
terested in a radar that would provide
only thle necessities, at a sacrifice of
convenience and the short minimum
range requirements, this type might be
built at a price range that could be
afforded by a majority of owners of
small craft.
Radar fulfills two primary requisites
of navigation, it is a good anti-collisionl
device, as well as a good Ilavigansonllrl
instrument. In most cases it canl uti-
lize natural topography or already in-
stalled aids, but in some few cases
adlditiona~l aids mzay be desirable.
MeIans are at hand whlereb~y fixed radafr
aids can be produced, such as radar re-
flectors, radar beacons and interrogattor-
responder beacons. However, it re-
mains to be determined just what for~m
thre commlleriatl rushr:11 will take and, just
how much artificial aid is required for
practical usefulness. MosI-t of us who
have been working with radar since its
conception are convinced that it will be
years before the practical mariner hals
exhaustedl the poss;~;ibilitires of radar as
it now stands, and thlat it is premature
to further compliciate the picture by adl-
vocaztinge a wider programs for Inlr dr aids.
In summary radar is a sh~ort listanlce
navirantil'lnn aid which might be pro-
lulr-d within the means of small craft
operators if non-lptedr for use in a dlis-
talnce I:rl ne of 8 to 10 miles downt to .-,nl
yards, with a range neeurney'li? Of 300)
yards andl a hearing ncecuracy; of 5i dP-






COAST GUARD BULLETIN


343:


-11e and1( on targelts of the size of a
gitood-sizedt iMay~ on up. At the present
b(l~i' ofI thle art, improvementsllt'I~ C such as
senlsitivit y,, resollt'ion, hll~igh nou~rney
and( low Ininimunt101 nameI'c are expensIZive
it-tmts whlicth if insisted upon soon p1ines
tthe Irwhirl. beyondrr the monstalc of th2e
over-ca: e smal~ll cra:ft ownelrt1. *
Lora:n has1: excellent j1112imil;jl as for
use on SmaIll craft wh-ich p~redomninanrtl~y
OpraLI: te whe~re good1 lor'nI covel'Lrge es-
ists, M~ost of the olt'fclorel'( fl.CehineL areas
have! good11 loran11 (.nvera=0' andl this syS-
turnI Cenu L'InorallyII; be use~d to locate fer-
tile fishine- sites to the nearest quarter
of a ile. oran receivers can be ptur-
c~hatscd from. .?"'III up. TheC acc'(ur;CY of
the eqtuip~ment is not Ililrna~lly a factor
of cost, the cost usually dl'pendllinel upon
t~he ctonv\enienee and simplicity of opetr-
ation of thre equlrillnin**In No compelnsa-
tion or` c:librat ~ionl is required. Thbe sys-
tentl is so clesiprna~l thant the internal
(nus u m elr'tsl of thle eqluipment pro-
vide the mI(eans for self-en;librlat iol.
Nirew m~odecls of the equip~mentt include
dlirec~t ro1.IInlne features as well as dual
presentation wherein. two lines of posi-
tion a~re simultaneouslyv presented. For
those coast areas where good loran cov-
(r**e1 exists, this system offers one of
the best and most reliable means of
position. fixrin=.
A\ detfin~ite required devrelopme-nt for
clraft under 50 feet is some sort of gen~
er~al punrpose device that will satisfy both
the conununication and position-fixing
needs. The microwaves and ultra-high
frequarnciese offer the best possibilities
for such a dlvice but the powcrer re-
rluircemenlt will remain high. Anything
tha~t (:n bel done to improve the electri-
(; Ictal lt powerenpc.ity of small <:raft w-ill
futh lll:r cln...ur';l- radio aid develop-


Th'le first 11.-lltel1 buoy to be established
as an aid to navigation. in the U7nited
Startes w~as moored near Scotlandl Light-
ship, in the a ppl~croll~l to New York h~ar-
bor, in '1 1. It used oil gas, made by
Irul--in, oil through pipes heated red
hot. ,
CHANGES IN VESSEL STATTUS
7'IG.4i YT (WSO--154)
Pin:cedl in full ople rat ing i status. Pres-
ently stationed in 7ith District at Fort

MrOCOMA ( WT~PG-13)
I1-18-= -10 1 to be commissioned about
Mla~c~h 17.


Y'OCONA1 (WAT--lay~
Arrived~i newv prolmanelnt statlion E~u-
rekac, Calif., 1:lelicvi neL the A I-I itT.

ALRR r n l(W SO-127)
To a~ssumne rs::nla;~r station at Alalmeda~,


T. I .I I II.' cIC (WAGL-2~48)

troit, Allb b., to Rault Ste. MP~arie, Alv-hI.

I'LANET/I'I'.'EL (WAGE~307)
Placed "out of commission in reserve"
at PE-ar~l Hanrbor Navall Shipyard, T. H-I

sEDGEe ( WAGle402)
Placed "ou~t of commission in reserve"
aIt Pear~l Har~Ibor'S II Navl Spyardi, TC. H-.

ACUSHlNET (WtAT-1~G7)
Directedl when ready for sea to depart

S. C. with Yamzacraw (WC7ARC-338) inr
tow. Upon completion this duty, AcushL-
nert to Ipro,-end'r to CG Yarrd for availatbil-
ity prior departure for new permanent
station San Junan, P. R.

ILE (WACGL-22)
Ditrc~ted w~ht-n ready for sea to pro-
cee~Jd to C~harleston, S. C., for decomnuis-
winineill anld diisposal.

1VIYPORT TRAlINSING STATION
IBECOVIES COAST GUARD
PROPERTYT

Permanent transfer of the property
constituting the Coast Guard Tra:inineL
Station, M~layport, Fila., from the Navy
to the Coast Guard was effelr-~cted by au-
thority of Public Lawv 627, dated Febru-
ary 25. These facilities were formerly
krnown. as the Naval Auxiliary Air Sta-
tion, and were turned over to the Coast
Guard on a temporary basis on May 16,
19436. On June 7 of the same year the
station was formerly commissioned by
the Coast Guard and began to function
as the Service's only recruit training
station, Ireplalcing2 the purely temzporarY
Curtis B~ay station. It became the only
recruit training station through th~e plac-
ing in an inactive status of the Alameda,
Calif., training station.






344


COAST GUARD BULLETIN


ATTEND) MEETING OF AMERICAN
SOCIETY FOR TESTING
MATERIAS
]Because of the Coast Guard's concern
with the construction of merchant ships,
through its marine inspection activities,
as well as with vessels for its own use,
a Headquarters representative recently
attended, a meeting of the American So-
ciety for Testing Materials, at which al-
loy steels were discussed. The particu-
lar subject before the meeting was the
characteristics of chromium and molyb-
denum bearing alloy steels and their
graphitization inhibiting characteristics.

DECORATIONS AND AWARDS
MADE SINCE JANUARY
BRONZE STAR, MEDAL
Cromwell, Robert P., lieutenant.
Welch, Richard G., Mo190MM2c (R).
LEGION OF lMERIT
F~inlay, Gordon T., rear admiral.
Seammel, William K., rear admiral.
Wood, Russell E., captain.
DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS
Vukic, John, lieutenant (jg).
Am MEDAL
Baum, William S., surgeon USPHS.
COMMENDABTION RIBBO)N
Baker, Henry G., boatswain.
Beeton, TJhomas L_., lieutenant (R).
Bridges, LaMar G., COM.
Britton, Martin M., WTlc.
Dobbins, Cliff~ord F"., BMle.
Eichhorn, Thomas D., S2c (R).
H~amilton, Raymond E., CB1M.*
Hartley, Harold W\., SM2c (R).
Heckr, Stephen B., lieutenant.
Hlelmer, F'rank V., lieutenant com-
mander**
H-iltbruner, W7Cilliam O., 810 (R).
Huber, George F~., CBM.
Laecabue, Richard C., CSK (R).
Landefeld,, John W.~, lieutenant (jg).
L~ankre, Max H[., chief pharmacist.
Lowrry, Gilbert M., SCle (Rt).
Lydon, John. M., boatswain"***
Preston, Allen R., MoMMlc (R).
Robison, Charles J., Jr., QM3c.

iltMan's name as gia n on Citatio "e i
record "Hamilton, Raymond ~Everett. '
**Bronze Star in lieu of 2d Commenda-
to**FCo endation Ribbon with Combat
"~V."


Ruark, Herman L., CWTir (R).
Scholtz, William, lieutenant.
Springfield, Leon T., St3c.
COM~MANDANT'S CITATION
Coombs, Robert E., captain (R).
O'Conlnor, Gustavus R., captain,
COMMA~NDANT'S LETTER& OF COMMSENDA-
TIoN
Waters, Harold C., CGM.

NEW LIGHTSHRIP SOON TO
LEAVE GREET LAKES FOR
ATLANTICI COAST

Lighttship 189, completed by her build-
ers and accepted by the Coast Guard
late last year, will leave Detroit, Mich.,
RS Soon as possible after the opening
of Great Lakes navigationz and proceed
by way of the St. Lawrence River to
Norfolk, Va., preparatory to taking up
station upon the D~iamond Shoals. The
vessel was placed in a reserve commis-
sion status at Detroit last fall, as she
was not ready for sea until too late to
complete the voyage to salt water before
heavy ice formed.
The new lightship, to occupy the Dia-
maond Shoal Station, off the North Caro-
lina 'coast, is to replace Lightship 105
which was sunk in a collision while serv-
ing under the Navy as an examination
vessel in Chesapeake Bay during the
war. The ship is of all-welded steel
construction, and has a single screw
driven by a six-cylinder diesel engine
connected to the propeller shaft through
reduction gearing. The vessel was built
by the Defoe Shipbuilding Company, at
]Bay City, Mich.
When placed on station, the new light-
ship will display and sound the same
signals as the vessel now having that
duty.

INTERNATIONAL LIFEBOAT CON-
FERENCE TO BE HELD IN
OSLO, NSORWAYe~
Papers on various lifesaving subjects
are now being pr'ls;~epar by the Coast
Guard for presentation at the fortheoma-
ing International Lifeboat Conference to
be held at Oslo, Nor wa~';y on. the 8th.
9th, and `10th of July. At least one
r~I1ep~treserdtie of the Coast Guard is to
attend this meeting, the first of its tyvpe
to be held since the war.
Amocner the subjects which. will prob-
ably be discussed at the meetings are:
Impprovedi line-throwing guns andl rock-







345


COAST GUARD BULLETIN


ets, unpliihillls vehicles dlevelopedt dlur-
in*.* the war~, the: use of1 helicopters in
lifesa\i I workz, and other deve(lllsun-nil I
of thle past 5 or 6 years.

CHANGES IN ASSIG;NMENT


SH~BEC aIs com~mniowling otticer.
Ca~pt. (:I-1IIe E..1.Cbe resunwdl)(l 1(511'1
dlut'y aIs C~onunanderL~l Hu~lt~inioret~ Section.
Commlanderr Iussel EI. Y:IIfem. f:rom 7ith
District Ollicet to 1)t~h D~istrict Ollice

]Lt. Comdlr. ILalrry L. Dalvis, frou
Commanider, Nor~th A\tlantie (c Owan a-
trol, to St. P'etersburg~ A~ir Statio.
Lt. Comlde. Chalrles S. L.-;-in-.. fr~ont
OWAVSICO to C'.l/PH'lELI a's I'-neiIIn.-r.
oflic'er
Lt. C'omdtr. Johnr E. D). H~udg~ens, front
Coast Guardl Air St-ationr, San Fi'rn-
eisco, Calif., to AAF1 Ba~se Un~it, Chan~tute
F~ieldl, for inist~uc~tion.
Lt. Comdlr. TLhomals F. Eply,lz, fl~rom
C.oaLSt Guarld Repa:ir Basel, Char~lle~ston,
S. C., to AAF' BaSse Unit, Chlanlute Ftieild,
for instruction.
Lt. Comdr. Jlames WI. Williams, from
coast Guard Air Statillln, Elizaibeth City,
N. C., to A~AF Ba~se Unit, Chanlelll~ Fie~ld,
for instruction.
Lt. Comdlr. Thomas Kt. Wh~itelawl (]R),
callledl to active dluty and :124ioned'~ me'-
chant marine inspection duties, 14th
Coast Guard District.


Bo~tst~on R~epresntaut ivve, North Atlantic
Ocean:L1 Patrlol, t:o UNASLG;A as cengFineer~l
oflicer.
Lt. Comd~r. Johln Enl~wr Blainr, fromm
Hec.adq~uar Iters to 1.11I Il Dist rict O I I I for


Operatl'lilin Hu:Se, Ketchllikan~, A~las~ka, to
10thl D~istr~itt Offitce for civil Iesl-n.,-ringl
utlny.
Ilt. C:omrnt. C.halrles E. Miastcers, fr~om
~YA1NE to OpenI:iive B~ase, Kectc~hikanr,

Lt. Comd~r. Ra;llph S. Foeolar, froml 10lth
District Crllil a to :'itl D~istrict (,llic 0 for
civil (lnllliron-rin I1ulI~. .
lld. ('omar. (tchestecr A. R~ichmond~lt, JrI.,
from 14thi Distrtic~t (,rts a to AAF~i B~ase,
Chanultte 1I- l-le, for instruction.
L~t. (Iomdr. Cllarancit e H. Wa~lrine. Jr.,
fromI D)IONEl t~o NEB~C.
lIt. C'omdr. Ellis S. OurI) n.1I fro(m 1st
District Office to 7thl Distric:t Office for


RIETIIRIEMENTS

Cap~t. Henryv J. Betzmer
L~t. Comdlr. Charles E. Greenifirld, Jr.,
USCGR

RELEASED) TO INACTIVE D)UTYP

Lt. Comdtr. Arthur Fi. .An1l~d
Lt. Codr.cr John WY. L~ozier*

*By reason of reaching statutory age of 64,


I. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1947











































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