Market news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Market news
Uniform Title:
Market news (Washington, D.C.)
Physical Description:
9 v. : ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Production and Marketing Administration. -- Livestock Branch
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock Division
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Production and Marketing Administration, Livestock Branch
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Meat industry and trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Livestock -- Marketing -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 18, no. 16 (Apr. 18, 1950)-v. 26, no. 52 (Dec. 30, 1958).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Production and Marketing Administration, Livestock Branch, Apr. 18, 1950-Dec. 15, 1953; Agricultural Marketing Service, Livestock Division, Dec. 22, 1953-Dec. 30, 1958.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004691907
oclc - 29653329
Classification:
ddc - 338.105 UNIL
System ID:
AA00012178:00018

Related Items

Preceded by:
Livestock market news (Washington, D.C.)
Succeeded by:
Livestock, meat, wool; market news


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




















Vol. 24, No. 20 May 15, 1o56

Week ended May 12

Page
Livestock Market Reviews. .. ... 388
Livestock Market Receipts ....... 390
Feeder and Stocker Statistics 390
Steer Sale Statistics . 391
Estimated Slaughter and Meat Production 392
Slaughter at Major Centers .. 393
Estimated Percentage of Feeder and Stocker Cattle and
Slaughter Cows in Salable Receipts. 393
Cattle Prices . .. 394
Hog Prices . . 395
Hog Purchase Statistics . 396
Sheep and Lamb Prices . 398
Wholesale heat Trade Reviews. .. 399
Wholesale Meat Prices . 411
Wool Market Review ....... 402
Special to this issue

Early Lamb Situation, May 1, 1956 . 397
Livestock Slaughter Meat and Lard Production 1954-55, 403
Stocker and Feeder Cattle and Sheep Received in
Several Corn Belt States, April 1956. 405
storage Holdings of Meats and Lard, Apr. 30, 1956 406









U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
LIVESTOCK DIVISION
Wauhington 25. D. C.


SI11l-aI1




388


MIDWEST LIVESTOCK MARKET REVIEW

Cattle receipts decreased compared with the previous week and were smallest
since mid-April, Fed steer trade was featured by both higher and lower prices,
closing sales varying from 50# higher to 50# lower, instances off more, with more
pressure than recently on weights above 1150#. Heifers were in good demand at
steady to 500 higher prices, and cows also cleared readily with closing prices
steady to t1.00 higher. Recent rainfall and higher temperatures stimulated pasture
growth, and for the second straight week demand expanded for stocker and feeder
cattle. Prices were largely steady to 50# higher with yearling stockers and stock
calves occasionally as much as $1,00 higher. Hog receipts were smallest since
last September and butchers closed 500-11.00 higher. Prices of spring lambs -
showed further upturns at several markets, but weakened late at a few points.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE AND CALVES
Cattle marketing decreased for the second straight week and were smallest
since the week ended April 14. Despite smaller numbers of beef steers, trading
was slow and uneven with buyers more "weight conscious" than in several weeks,
Most unevenness was shown on fed steers with price declines at several markets on
weights around 1150 pounds and above, At Chicago late steer sales were largely
steady to 50# higher with closing transactions at Indianapolis and St. Louis
National Stock Yards mainly 25 to 500 higher. At most other midwest markets, late
prices were unevenly 500 higher to 50# lower, with severest pressure on weights
around 1150 pounds and heavier. At Omaha high-Choice and Prime fed steers closed
500-Q1.00 lower than a week earlier, other grades weak to 500 lower. Among the
bearish influences in the week's trade were some weakness in dressed beef prices
and reduced order buyer activity due to impending non-slaughtering Jewish holidays.
Receipts of heifers were again moderate to small and trading on these was active
at steady to 50# higher prices. Strengthening of heifer prices in recent weeks
has substantially reduced the price spread between steers and heifers. Marketings
of cows were moderate to small with decreases at some points. This class was in
good demand and prices closed steady to 500 higher, instances 75-l.~00 up. Bulls
sold firm to 50# higher. The average weight of beef steers at Chicago was 1122
pounds, a few pounds below the week before and lightest in six months. The average
weight at Omaha showed little change but at Sioux City it was 15 pounds below the
previous week, Bulk of the week's supply of fed steers consisted of Good and
Choice grades.
Price spread on Good to Prime steers remained wide. One load of high-Prime
1202 pound fed steers reached t27.00 at Chicago, next highest price there $25.00,
bulk Prime 1100-1400 pounds t23,00-24.00; Choice and mixed Choice and Prime 1593-
1835 pound steers t20.00-22.00. Bulk of the Good and Choice fed steers cashed at
Chicago and other midwest markets from t17.00-21.00, with most heifers 416.50-
20.5C, a short load of Prime 886 pound heifers reaching 922.00 at Omaha,
Calves and vealers were steady to $1.00 higher, instances t2.00 up at St.
Joseph. Good and Choice vealers sold from t20.00-24.00 at S. St. Paul, Prime to
$25,00, Commercial $15.00-19.00, At St. Louis National Stock Yards, Good and
Choice vealers brought 18.00-24.00; same grades of slaughter calves l18.00.20.00,
Commercial to low-Good $15.00-17,00.
STOCKER AND FEEDER CATTLE AND CALVES

Volume of stocker and feeder cattle and calf receipts at terminal markets
varied only slightly from that of the previous week, but was materially smaller
than might have been expected if range conditions had remained as dry as during
most of April, However, substantial rains during the past two or three weeks have





389


materially improved pasture prospects in many of the areas which earlier this
spring had been suffering from drought. This has not only tended to slow market-
ings of stock cEttle during the past couple of weeks but has also influenced an
expanded and noticeably more aggressive demand. In addition, many feeders ap-
parently expect a fairly good outlet for fat cattle during the next several months,
based on estimates of reduced numbers of cattle now on feed. Thus, trading for all
classes was fairly active and the previous week's price upturns were followed by
additional advances during the week under review. Prices were largely steady to
50 higher, extremes as much as 41.00 higher on yearling stickers and calves. Al-
though fat cattle prices ar. materially higher than during last winter's low time,
tne current margin between feeder end fat cattle prices is still narrow. The aver-
age cost of all stocker and feeder steers 800 pounds up shipped from Kansas City
during the week was t18.01 while the average cost of all Choice beef steers there
was $19.77. A year ago the costs wer. t20,25 and t22,34, respectively.
Choice partly-fattened 1113 pound steers sold for further feeding at $20.25.
Other Good and Choice feeders 800 pounds up ranged from $16,50-20.00, the majority
$17.50-19.00. Good and Choice yearling stock steers bulked from t17.00-20.50,
including a few loads around 650 pounds at t20.00 and t20.25. Choice 592 pound
yearling steers reached t21.00, Good and Choice yearling heifers brought $16,00-
18.50, one shipment of Choice 541 pounds $19.00. Several loads of Choice thin-
fleshed 330-400 pound heifer calves brought t1~.50, Steer calves of comparable
flesh and grade were very scarce. However, a few Choice steer calves sold upward
to $21.50. The few Medium and Good stock cows on offer bulked at ti0.00-12,00.
One load of Good young cows with calves at side rr.t.ed 414.00.
Shipments of steers to the country totaled 15,681 compared with 13,288 a week
ago and 19,539 a year ago. Outgo of calves was 4,197 compared with 4,043 the
previous week and 8,959 a year ago.
HOGS
Receipts in the midwest were smallest since early last September, but the
combined total for the 12 terminal markets end Interior lowa-Southern Minnesota
area was still moderately larger than for the same period last year. Prices at
most points were lower Monday, but improved shipping orders along with packing
plant aggressiveness for the smaller supply influenced a progressive advance on
following days. Net upturns wore the greatest since the latter part of March,
carrying top prices to the highest levels since last September at several points,
Compared with the previous Friday, butchers closed 500-41.00 higher, with prices
at several terminals 750 or more up. Sows were unevenly steady to as much as $1.25
higher, mostly 50-750 up. Butchers weighing 160-260 pounds often sold within a 500
price range. Most late sales of mixe-d U. S. No. 1 to 3 lots at terminal centers
ranged from $15.75-16.50 compared with a general spread of $15.40-15.85 in the
Interior area. No. 1 and 2 butchers sold 25-500 or more higher than lots of,
mostly No. 2 and 3 grade of comparable weight. Howev:.r, No. 1 and 2 lots were in
rather small supply, particularly in the Eastern part of the Corn 3elt. Uniform
lots also sold somewhat higher than uneven lots of similar weights. Competition
for numbers in the Interior area nearly eliminated the discounting of excessively
fat butchers at many country points. Sows mode up from 5 to 19 percent of rea
ceipts at the 8 markets.
Feeder pig prices were mostly 500 higher. Good and Choice sold at S. St. Paul
from ,14.00-15.00. The same grades at Sioux City brought t13.50-14.00. Some 125-
150 pound feeders at Kansas City sold from r 13.50-13.75.
Continued on page 407.,





WEEKLY RECEIPTS OF SALABLE LIVESTOCK AT 12 PUBLIC MARKETS


T Cattle iCalves Hogs 5 Shep
Market May y May MayMayMay May i 'Vay
12 : 14 12 112 14 12 412 14
1956 :1 1955 1956 1955: 1956 1955
Chicago......--- ..' 39,792 38,569 1,401 2,285 43,419 46, 2Z 6 3,039 3,034
Cincinnati...-...... 3,742 3,695 1,351 1,4?8 13,304 12, 4?6 315 403
Denver............. 14, 317 15,826 813 1,261 3,405 2,473 5,360 R,613
Fort Worth.......... 12,131 17,458 2,189 3,514 3,780 2,283 46,350 42,073
Indianapolis...---... 9,030 8,942 1,097 1,48 41, 825 38,335 929 517
Kansas City-...... 17,188 20,076 1,356 2,151 13,106 "',686 9,760 18,";65
Oklahoma City-..... 12,135 11,826 1,035 1,301 5,227 2,801 4,885 2,745
Omaha ---......... 40,010 44,284 911 1,639 35,567 34,304 6,845 14,413
St. Joseph.-.....- 13,559 13,094 962 991 27,557 23,549 3,055 6,615
St. Louis NSY-.... --17,641 16,766 3,942 4,649 65,333 16,726 2,861 4,161
Sioux City---....... 21,961 23,135 457 623 23,466 25, 77 2,912 5,478
S. St. Paul.......... 2C ,610 19,925 8,066 7,899 46,656 39,008 3,144 4,437

Total ---------- 222,116 233,616 23,580 29,278 322,765 2801994 89,455 117,254
Nay 5, 1956 237,455 23,032 327,788 75,342
INTERIOR IOWA AND SOUTHERN MINNESOTA
Week ended: Hogs Sheep
May 12, 1956 ...---------- 280,500 18,4'f
Nay 5, 1956 .---...-.....---. 341,500 22,600
May 14, 1955 ..-............. 278,000 19,830
FEEDER AND STOCKER CATTLE: AVERAGE COST. WEIGHT, AND NUMBER
Week ended Month Four months
...--.-.--..--.-. .-------- .---- --------- .---.--- --- ------"----.--- '------
:Iay~ 15 May 3 :May 12 Apr. Apr. Jan.: Apr.
1956 : 156 1955 1956 : 1956 1951 : 1955
Steers 1001 op 527 242 706 2,058 3, 670 96,935 10",955
901.1000 596 820 1,298 5,131 8,283 23,042 34,570
801-900 2,355 2,127 2,031 8,812 11,346 46,133 51, 987
701-800 3,484 3,043 3,773 13,629 13,611 55,399 55,890
501-700 8,319 7,657 11,767 39,430 42,816 146,017 159,351


Total steers 10 mitts.
Av. wts. "
Av.cost*" "F
," Chicago
" Ks. City
" Omaha
" S. St. Paul
" Sioux City
S" ""Denver
" Ft. Worth
" Oklo. City
" St. Joseph
" Natl. Stk. Yds.
Total calves-10 mkis.
o cows.
heifers, bulls- ""


15,681
710#
$17.22
17,77
18,03
16.96
15.86
17 .72
1P.18
16,13
16,10
17.19
16.84
4,197

4,528


13,889
700f
$17.00
17.61
17.80
16.74
15.70
17.42
17.19
15.72
1 .24
1C.04
16.68
4,043


19,539
691V
$18,69
20.85
19.76
17,81
17.64
19.73
20.38
16.87
17.05
18.59
18.27
8,959


69,060
697=
$17.32
18.41
17.81
17.13
16.36
17.67
17.49
16.87
1. 30
16.77
16.92
19,195


79,726
"16,
$20.52
20.96
21.25
20.67
19.04
20.77
20.96
19.23
19.36
20.03
19.69
29,732


277,526
708#
616.83
17.34
17.36
16.65
15.46
17.09
17.34
16.46
16.27
16.54
16.35
91,570


312,753
718P
$20.13
20.30
20. 30
20.1"
18.24
20,48
21.78
19.11
19.21
19.84
18.99
125,293


3,281 5,428 14,560 17,326 49,528 63,793


* Not adjusted for differences in grade of cattle sold at each markeI.


3o0




391
BEEF STEERS SOLD OUT OF FIRST HANDS FOR SLAUGHTER 1
Percent of Average price
: Average weight A p
Number of head total (pounds) in dollars
by grades per 100 b.
-----...- -----------------......- : ....---------...-- .......--------------------
Grade Week ended
May May : May May
10 3 12 10 3 12 10 3 12 10 3 12
1956 1956 19F5 1956 1956 16 1955196 19 11956: 19.?6 1955
CHICAGO


Prime
Choice
Good
Com'l.
Utility


All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Com'l.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Com'I.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Cor'I.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Co'lI.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Com'I.
Utility
All grades


I


1237 1477 1010 4.6 4.3 4.1 1291 1287 1217 22.98 23.34 25.75
15831 21007 14649 59.0 60.8 60.1 1174 1176 1123 20,59 20.67 22.77
8626 10712 6799 32.0 31.0 27.9 1026 1026 1004 18.52 18.56 20.10
1101 1142 1623 4.1 3.3 6.7 936 941 937 15,73 15.69 17.25
91 208 284 .3 .6 1.2 1036 1010 930 14.34 14.34 14.92
26886 34546 24365 1122 1126 1079 19.92 20.03 21.82
OMAHA 1/
188 478 81 1.0 2.5 .5 1309 1313 1269 21.72 22.49 21.49
11444 11957 10512 63.2 63.5 63.5 1155 1152 1106 19.78 19.94 21.37
5526 5451 4604 30.5 29.0 27.8 1029 1016 969 17.89 17.97 18.95
775 678 966 4.3 3.6 5.8 964 955 957 15.26 15.28 16.72
186 263 387 1.0 1.4 2.4 890 898 922 13.52 13.62 14.69
18119 18827 16550 1108 1106 1056 19.05 19.27 20.39
SIOUX CITY j1
271 42 82 2.8- 2.5 .9 1340 129' 1211 22.02 22.44 24.13
6327 6137 6616 65.8 64.3 70.4 1132 1161 1122 19.71 19.74 21.55
2481 2665 1878 25.8 28.0 20.0 1054 1046 1032 18.14 17.93 19.36
522 460 607 5.4 4.8 6.5 982 988 978 16.06 16.16 17.16
15 34 207 .2 .4 2.2 1013 1023 1023 13.98 13.70 15.11
9616 9538 93.0 1109 1124 1094 19,22 13.18 20.78
KANSAS CITY 1/
20 111 41 .4 1.4 .9 1102 1138 1220 21.72 22.27 22.83
2690 3890 23g 7 56.7 50.3 54.2 1129 1112 1050 19.77 19.99 22.34
1848 32F2 1691 38.9 42.0 38.6 1039 1050 1020 18.33 18.:4 19.68
-182 391 20F 3.8 5.1 4.7 1012 984 964 16.09 15.62 16.34
8 90 69 .2 1.2 1.6 991 983 908 13.93 13.62 14.35
4748 7734 4384 1089 1078 1034 19.10 19.08 20.97
ST. LOUIS NSY 1/
a 17 .. -- .4 1171 -- 1163 22.50 -- 25.00
2516 2592 847 36.0 31.9 20.4 1092 1092 1053 19.28 19.73 22.47
2678 3435 2159 38.4 42.3 51.9 977 990 992 18.13 18.09 20.12
1294 16C6 858 18.5 20.5 20.6 875 883 911 16.85 16.50 17.95
501 437 277 7.1 5.3 6.7 855 806 862 14,83 15.01 15.73
6997 8130 4158 991 991 980 18.18 18.24 19.98
S. ST. JOSEPH 1/
95 116 34 1.6 1.6 .6 1216 1229 1044 21.37 21.44 23.22
3564 3704 27?0 59.9 51.6 49.0 1117 1136 1100 19.68 19.84 21.53
1880 2.3!;3 2094 21.6 33.2 36.9 1030 1038 1010 18.09 18.00 19.38
319 959 G-.4 5.4 13.3 11.4 922 956 1021 15.62 16.14 17.03
89 22 119 1.5 .3 2.1 966 831 910 13.83 13.64 14.61
5947 7184 5671 1079 1080 1054 18,_97 18.83 20.16
Continued.















I

(
I


392 BEEF STEERS SOLD OUT OF FIRST HANDS FOR SLAUGHTER
.-- ..------ ---- ....................----..---.....-- --- ;-;-...... --- ....I.---..--..- ----. r .---.----. .
Percent Average weight Average price
Number of head total in dollars
a (pounds)
by grades a : per 100 lb.
Grade- Week ended
-----------;---- '---- ----------------- -- --- ----*^ -----
S:May : May : : ay : jMay
10 3 12 10 3 12 10 3 12 10: 3 12
1986 1956 1955 .1956: 1956: 1955 1956 1956: 1955! 1956: 1956: 1955
--- -. .- --- -- -- -- ----- ---. ---. --- --- --- ---- ----- ---------- -----------.---.-.. -- -
DENVER Y
Prime 239 85 -- 3.2 1.2 -- 1319 1433 -- 21.58 21.82 --
:hoice 5721 5890 4340 75.6 79.9 74.7 1117 1149 1105 19.63 19.76 22.53
;ood 1517 1236 1304 20.0 16.7 22.5 1022 1043 1024 18.21 18.22 20.30
Com'I. 73 90 120 1.0 1.2 2.1 1000 1043 1046 15.74 15.20 16.15
Jtilitv 16 76 42 .2 1.0 .7 854 1050 885 13.74 13.98 12.50


All grades... 75r6 7377 5806 1102 1132 1084 19,40 19.45 -21.87
1/These summaries developed from data collected on marketing of fed cattle by the Agricultural Estimates
Division.

ESTIMATED FEDERALLY INSPECTED SLAUGHTER AND MEAT PRODUCTION
....------. .----------------... --.. -----------..---------------..
: Beef Veal I Lam an. : Total Total
Week (exc lard) mutton
.k (.....,........ ........., .....................-.-.-.-.. ... meat lard
ended -----,,-- ,-----,---_Au--, Hum- ----- ,meat lard
ndedrod. uProd. : u Ur. Num. Pr. pro. prod.
her : ber her Prod. be
------ -------- - -- -------------
1,000. mi i. 003 mit. Ib. ,000 mil. lb. 1 000 il. lb. mil. lb. mil. Ib.
-J J Q Q ^ j y ^ ^ J J ^ 0 0 \ L I A R - --. '- --" n --m~ b .
May 12, 1956 372 203.9 136 16,5 1,157 155,5 244 11,5 387.4 --
May 5, 1956 393 215.4 145 17,4 1,270 170.7 242 11.4 414.9 --
Apr. 28, 19561/ 377 -- 140 -- 1,333 -- 264 -- -- 46.7
May 14, 1955 370 197.9 14ia 17.4 1,013 142.1 302 14.3 371.7 39.1
Percentage change from:
May 5, 1956 -5 -5 -6 -5 -9 -9 +1 +1 -7 --
y..- 4 .5.....----------.... .....-f......- .....-+14......+9 ... 19. .... -20. +4 --
Average weights (Ib.) Lord
Week Sheep and yield
ended Cattle Calves Hogs lab per
ende lambs per
----------- ------ '-- ---.r-- .--1,9J^-'---
.--------. Live Dressed. Live DreQssed Live Live D Dressed 100 lb.
May 12, 1956 990 548 220 121 240 134 96 47 --
May 5, 1956 990 548 215 120 240 134 97 47
Apr. 28, 1956 990 548 210 117 236 132 98 48
May 14, 1955 965 535 217 121 250 140 97 47 15,4

/ Actual sla-----------------------------------------------------ughter and revised estimate of production. / Excl---------ude lrd.
I/ Actual slaughter and revised estimate of production. 2/ Excludes lard.




I 4
* |



.'4
" ;







a I

* S
I .




S*
I I
S I |





30' 4 a


* S
I I






* a
I H rI








----- ------
H ir\








I *'
: r-H

I I



* I


* I
II !












* I I
I i
* I I
* ;
S a



I

*I I

SI 0 )
I I I



I I

;S r I
I I
I S










I I







a
S a


L-NO r-- s -t Mi oN r r-K V 0 C 0M %o A'.1 i

SCMN Icu c r- C M N m .- cu -r : ,lb o r4
H r rHH NM %r-i D
ctv
I

r-4 0 O^ Cli ir\ oo rI- c U -N to: cu N
r .O-" C(Uj lN 0% .D f C\ r UQ ,-hI C ,
ir Nrcu it r 3 o c\m %x0 m t r--
SOOH ur
hr H \l ,H rN O f It-lCM O C




I'llH-i t-t0 -t o lN o iN r-M o oo 0 U

,--, i -t o, o w r c, o oo r- ,.o m ri N t ow 1



,-. H 0 r- l.o to 1\ ?" O \ t o t-; ON In


a isaoM
*
I a. a M fts t f a a- a
In 1bO -4 Ao h-tl o. MW MAQ n o b toi ,0 te- 4 -,0 _-tn to
-t Cvi CT, rrN M bs r- %OCuS--m cC -Zr- f H v I
CM cr% r4t 0





H H'i O 0






,._ot,
CH
-cu





,uVoO rw 0 ,t-o I-- o o t'-\--I- o C\ cr-\ I
0 bX r-4 %Z r-l CM(UO r(,NCli to r-4 p.D Lrl













N ,0;- 0
O r- o ONI r-O
a 4- a A ft





ft a a 04 Ob a 0 a a M WkaWaa. a 4w a f
H C MH cN ,o



o cr j r-1 Uic %Z Z C m
P" in c0th-H i\ .D C \ c%10i HM t0'cN W 1 o



H Hi N \H N o
bD-1 CM Ur I-I M c D t ( o C0'I rzI \M
H H CM rH H i rwo r-4C. l H-' *O Q N w
ISCL-' 0N0D H-4 o N:u M-

l hi i (M 3 C r- r-l CM x 0 co


C r41; t-




to m




I ii S



:; .5 3: a
E t 1 S xl0^



lis g G 2! CL v -!
C 04


l :g3(O<2 ol3 r.3 I.
CD 02 0 u wox


I
I






I
I













I
I






1







t



I








N\ Ir- I
SI










N
I



a's Olf
I







I


t


1
ao4sl^^
1-i -i 1

IE&l

as


cuH -tC





















HH







cr oM










r'D r- C



I
NH1














I



















rr .
I.4 .- r--
Iz~;


II






39 CATTLE: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
---------------------r--------------------- ----------------------- ------------------
S Chicago Kansas City Omaha

Classification May May May
12 5 14 12 5 14 12 5 14
.. 1956 1.956 1955 .1956. 1956 1___955.. 1956 _1956 _,_955.
Slaughter cattle, calves and vealers
Steers -
Steers -


Prime 900-1100#
1100-1300
Choice 900-1100
1100-1300
Good 900-1100
Com'l. All wts.
Heifers -
Prime 600-800#
Choice *
Good 500-900
Com'l. All wts.
Cows All weights
Commercial
Utility
Canner & Cutter
Bulls All weights -
Good
Utility & Commercial
Vealers All weights -
Choice & Prime
Com'l. & Good
Calves 500# down
Choice & Prime
Com'l. & Good

Steers -
Choice 500-800#
Good 0
Medium 500-1000
Heifers -
Choice 500-750
Med. & Gd.
Cows All weights -
Medium & Good
Calve 300-500# -
Steers -
Good & Choice
Heifers -
Gcod & Choice


23.58
24.00
21,08
21.08
18.28
15.75


19.82
17.84
15,35

13.50
12.15
10,75

13.00
15.10

24.80
19.80

20.80
16.30


23.78
24.02
20.90
20.88
18.12
15.78


19.85
17.74
15.30

13.32
11.92
10.60

13.00
15.15

24.30
19.10

20.50
15.90


25.55
26.45
23.55
23.55
20.30
17.15


21.72
19.51
16.80

13.68
12.05
10.40

13.00
14.88

25.80
20.40


23.00
S22.45
S20.62
:20,25
S17.95
S15,70


: 19.98
:17.65
:15.25

: 13.20
S11.90
:10,48


22.92
22.80
20.55
20.40
17.75
15.50


19,75
17.50
15.25

12.75
11,50
10.12


: 13.88 13,80


: 21.00
: 18.00


21.50 : 18.75
17.10 : 16.15


21.00
18.00

18.70
15.75


24.58
24.82
22.20
22.20
19.15
16.28


20.80
17,95
15.50

12.48
10.98
9.10


:23.25
:22.98
:20.35
:20.32
S17.38
:15.00


: 20.10
: 17.50
: 15.00

: 12.75
: 11.68
: 10.30


23.70
23.52
20.62
20.62
17.45
15.12


20.00
17.50
15.00

12.75
11.62
10.25


-- : 12.98 13.12
12.85 : 13.65 13.75


20.50
16.10

18.05
15.25


: 21.00
: 16.50

: 18.50
: 15.00


21.00
16.50

18.50
15.00


25.12
25.38
22.08
22.08
18.82
16.50
--
21.42
18.60
15.60

12.32
10.55
8.58

12.25
13.12

20.00
16.00

18.50
14.50


Feeder and stocker cattle and calves


19,88
17.38
15.50


19.75
17.25
15.50


22.55
20.52
17.25


: 20.38
: 18.25
: 16.00


19.75
17.75
15.50


22.50
19.35
16.10


17.25 17.25 19.50 : 18.00 17.75 18.60
14.50 14.50 16.25 : 15.50 15.00 15.45


: 19.75
: 17.25
:14.75

: 17.38
: 14.88


-- -- : 11.50 1150 11.00 : 11.50


21.00 21.00 22.00 : 20,00 19.75 20.85 : 19.50

17.50 17.50 19.00 : 17.50 17.25 17.85 : 16.62


19.22
16.75
14.25

17.00
14.38

11.38


19.25


22.45
19.70
16.80

18.60
15.45

10.40


21.45


16.38 17.90





HOGS: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS 395
In dollars per 100 pounds
-------------------------------------- I olr-pr10-pons------------------------------ --------
Interior Iowa and
Chicago southern Minnesota Indianapolis
------------------------- ---------- ----------------------------- ----------
Classification ..May May ; May
12 5 14 12 5 14 12 5 14
1956 1956| 1955 ,1956 1956 : 1955 1956 1956 1955


Barrows and
U.S.No.1
2 and 3




Sows -


gilts -
160-180#
180-200
200-220
220-240
240-270
270-300

300-330#
360-400
450-550


14.45
15.36
15.74
15.70
15.40
15.05

14.18
13.40
12.28


14.18
15.11
15.46
15.38
15.18
14.88

13.85
13.00
12.05


16.90
17.86
17.85
17.60
16.98
16.42

15.10
14.30
12.95


13.42
14.88
15.31
15.09
14.70
14.13

13.83
13.32
12.22


12.98
14.40
14.87
14.65
14.25
13.75

13.35
12.88
11.82


15.29
16.55
16.80
16.70
16.21
15.58

14.22
13.33
12.08


: 14.42
15.78
:15.88
15.85
:15.42
:14.92

13.45
S12.92
:12.00


14.10
15.40
15.52
15.48
15.02
14.48

13.60
13.18
11,78


17.08
17.95
17.90
17.72
16.95
16.20

14.45
13.68
12.65


Pigs Stockerr and feeder)-
Gd: & Ch. 70-120 --. -- -- -. : -- --
,a St. Louis Sioux
Omah National Stock Yards

Barrows and gilts -
U.S.No.1 160-180# -- -- : 14.95 14.75 17.34 :
2 and 3 180-200 15.72 15.62 17.40 :15.61 15.44 17.65 : 15.46 15.38 16.88
200-220 15.72 15.62 17.40 :15.64 15.43 17.52 :15.78 15.60 17.05
220-240 15.72 15.62 17.40 :15.65 15.39 17.28 :15.78 15.58 16.88
240-270 15.40 15.18 16.75 :15.22 15.14 16.78 : 15.42 15.18 16.32
270-300 15.00 14.78 15.82 :14.58 14.54 16.15 :14.82 14.50 15.45
Sows -
300-330# 14.18 13.90 14.85 :13.58 13.38 14.40 :14.55 14.20 14.45
360-400 13.65 13.55 13.60 :13.20 13.00 13.78 :13.98 13.50 13.25
450-550 12.60 12.60 12.48 :12.40 12.20 12.58 :12.60 12.32 11.82
Pigs Stockerr & feeder)-
Gd. & Ch. 70-120# -- -- -- -- .. ---- -- --
S. St. Paul Baltimore N. Portland


Barrows and
U.S.No.1
2 and 3




Sows -


gilts -
160-180#
180-200
200-220
220-240
240-270
270-300


300-330#
360-400
450-550
Pigs Stockerr & feeder)-
Gd. & Ch. 70-120#


15.98
16.18
16.18
16.15
15.88
15.18

14.38
13.38
12.50


15.12
15.80
15.80
15.75
15.48
14.55

14.12
13.12
12.20


17.28
17.40
17.40
17.02
16.35
15.68

14.72
13.75
12.52


14.20 14.05 17.50 :


16.00
16.31
:16.31
:15.94
:15.50


12.78
12.56
11.56


15.97
16.56
16.56
16.19
15.72
14.59

12.69
12.56
11.50


18.25
18.62
18.62
18.25
17.59
16.62

14.09
14.09
12.12


:16.72
: 17.22
:17.22
:16.84
:15.72
S15.34

14.00
:12.88
S11.50


16.62
17.00
17.00
16.75
15.62
15.25

14.00
12.68
11.50


19.50
19.88
19.88
19.75
18.62
17.88

16.00
15.12
14.25




396
HOGS; AVERAGE COST, WEIGHT, AND NUMBER OF PACKER AND SHIPPER PURCHASES 1/
-------------------------- ----------------------- ------------------------.-
St.
Louis Kan- S. S. 8-
Chi- ,Natl. sas Omaha Sioux St. St. Indian- mkts.
Week ended cago Stock City City Joseph Paul apolis corn-
Yards bined
------- ----------------. I ---
AVERAGE COST Dollars per 100 pounds
Barrows May 12,1956 15.29 15.42 15.39 15.36 15.38 15.36 15.58 15,68 15. 45
and May 5,1956 15.16 15.19 15.23 15.22 15.14 15.27 15.14 15.30 15.20
gilts May 14,1955 16.95 17.26 17.01 16.72 16.36 16.93 16.49 17.50 16.94
May 12,1956 12.87 12.84 12.97 13.40 13.61 13.47 13.42 12.05 13.02
Sows May 5,1956 12.66 12.72 12.74 13.34 13.16 13.17 13.09 12.15 12.81
May_. 11AE5. 1.3 WE.9. .GH,19.T..1 .- 13.Pound ..s.. -3 L,. .154 -,2..5..13.31
AVERAGE WEIGHT Pounds


Barrows May 12,1956 232
and May 5,1956 231
gilts May_ .14,1955..... 244 ....
May 12,1956 419
Sows May 5,1956 419
NUMBER OF HEAD.5 4.6---
NUMBER OF HEAD -


Barrows May 12,1956 27338 58295 12004
and May 5,1956 31581 56896 11053
gilts May. _1 55. ,36269 _42_110_ _695.8
May 12,195C 6525 4010 652
SoWS May 5,1956 7323 3684 660
.Jay. _14 5 ....2_7... 2.982..... 482.
SOWS Percental
May 12,1956 19 6 5
May 5,1956 19 6 6
-----Ma.y 1. 19.5 13 7 6
1/-Weighted average. ----- ---
I/ Weighted average.


217 219 225 227 216 224 224 223
218 218 224 229 216 225 224 223
218 .....26 ....- .__ ....2 225.... .233_ ......5.....30-.
413 412 382 375 385 378 439 401
408 413 389 379 382 383 439 405
.II..... .... .85. ....3 387.... .3. _.-69- 450 -402.


27481 18500 23892 37439 34216 239165
27030 21022 22056 41191 38403 249232
_ -2593 _18827._ 20747 _28685._ 78_ _21 Q90 .
5247 3234 2067 5960 4838 32533
4535 2743 1865 5865 5300 31995
65..... 84. ... 3 7 5.. 20Q3.5_ 8 0..._4.-._ i ?,..
,e of total
16 15 8 14 12 12
14 12 8 12 12 11
20 17 9 17 12 13


WEEKLY AVERAGE WHOLESALE VALUE OF HOG PRODUCTS DERIVED
FROM 100 LB. LIVE HOG. COMPARED WITH PRICES OF LIVE HOGS, CHICAGO
-- -- -- --" -i ,' r .... --. ---- ----- -- Gro -ss spread
SHog products 1/ Hog prices 2/ or margin 3/
----------------------------------------------------- r-----~-
May 12, 1956 $17.34 t15.74 41.60
May 5, 1956 17.22 15.46 1.76
a ..1955 19.69 17.85 1.84
,y j, 9_ jpp ---------------------------------,,,, -;=;,,----,,----;--------,-----
1/ Value of all edible products, fresh basis (lard rendered) in 100 lb. of live hog com-
puted from wholesale prices on carlot basis, Chicago, reported by National Provisioner
daily market report.
2/ Mean of daily quotations on U.S.No.1, 2 and 5 hogs 200-220# wt.Chicago.
3/ Difference between wholesale product value and hog prices.

HOG AND CORN PRICES AT CHICAGO AND HOG-CORN PRICE RATIO
Barrows and Corn, I/ Hog-corn
Week ended gilts No. 3, yellow price ratio
Dollars per Cents per based on
100 pounds bushel barrows and gilts
May 12, 1956 15.29 151.6 10.1
May 5, 1956 15.16 153.2 9.9
May 14, 1955 16.95 148.6 1.4
i/ Simple average price.




397
EARLY LAMB SITUATION, MAY 1, 1956
Early lambs on May 1 were generally in good condition in most early lamb
States, according to the Crop Reporting Board. Lambs made good progress despite
the slow growth of new feed in some sections. Dry, cold weather earlier this
spring held back development of pasture and range feed, but conditions improved
during April in most areas, with marked improvement in the West. In California,
the early lamb crop developed reasonably well, although feed supplies were short
in some range areas due to dry, cold weather. In Texas, lamb condition has been
maintained by heavy supplemental feeding since pastures in the sheep areas have
been extremely short. Cold weather and lack of moisture in the pacific northwest
retarded pasture feed until about April 1. Since that date, however, feed has
developed rapidly and lambs responded with good progress. In the Southeastern
States, the condition of lambs is reported good, although pastures made slow
progress in most areas until mid-April.
Throughout most of the early lamb States, weather conditions were generally
unfavorable for development of pasture and range feed until about April 1. Since
that date, both temperature and moisture conditions have improved, and pasture feed
supplies are becoming more abundant. Rainfall in California about mid-April broke
a prolonged drought in the range area and feed supplies improved. Ranges and
pastures in the sheep areas of Texas have been very dry. Rains in the lastorn
Plateau area about the end of April brought some relief, but more moisture is needed.
Pastures have made good growth since April 1 in the Pacific Northwest. Weather
conditions have been cold and dry in the Southeastern States during early spring,
however, pastures have made rapid recovery since mid-April.
Marketings of early lambs from most sections will be earlier than last year.
All of the Arizona lambs have boon marketed. Eastern shipments of California lambs
are about equal to a year ago, with larger marketing occurring in March, but a
sharply lower volume in late April. In Texas, a larger proportion than usual of
the total marketing consist of new crop lambs. In the Pacific Northwest, market-
ings are not expected to reach peak proportions until late July. In the South-
eastern States movement to market may be a bit earlier than last year due mainly to
the more uniform lambing season this spring.
Conditions in early lamb States about May 1 are reported as follows:
California: The early lamb crop has developed reasonably well. The range
area has improved since mid-April. Good rainfall has helped to prolong the season
in the Sacramento Valley and San Joaquin Valley. Early feeder lambs are moving to
irrigated pastures which should have good feed this season. Most of the remaining
lambs should move to market quite uniformly. High quality feed is producing lambs
of good finish, but at lighter weights than usual.
Arizona: The early lamb crop has been marketed. Weather conditions were
favorable with very little cold weather and rain.
Texas: Marketings of spring lembs and yearlings during April were substantially
below a year ago because of the smaller number carried over. Feed supplies, are
short over most of the sheep producing areas. Heavy supplemental feeding has been
necessary to get yearlings or early lambs in slaughter flesh. Rains over the
Eastern Plateau at the end of April started grass, but additional rain is needed to
maintain development of green feed.
Southeastern States: Pastures wore slow to start this spring in most areas
due to dry, cool weather. However, more normal rainfall and warmer weather in April
stimulated pasture growth rnd lambs showed marked improvement. Marketing are ex-
pected to be earlier than last year due to more uniform lambing season throughout
i the area. Kentuck: Pasture grass is short due to cool weather and supplemental
feeding has been necessary to develop lambs for early market. Marketing will be
earlier than last year when lambing was late. Tennessee: Favorable spring weather
has produced ample feed and lambs have made gooT grwwTYh The movement of lrmbs is
earlier and heavier than last year, with the peak of marketing expected in early
June.
Continued on Page 398.






SHEEP AND LAMBS: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
:: : :Ogden
Chicago Omaha :Kansas : Fort :Denver :North
Chicago Cmaha Denver
: City : Worth : :Salt
: :- : :Lake


LAMBS (SPRIKC
Choice and
Prime

Good and
Choice


Good and
Choice

EWES (SHORN) -
Good and
Choice

Cull and M;
Utility

FEEDER LAMBS -
Good and
Choice Mi
M'L


*Wooled basis.


ay 12, 1956
ay 5, 1956
a 14. 1955
ay 12, 1956
ay 5, 1956
ay 14, 1955
own (SHORN) -
ay 12, 1956
ay 5, 1956
ay 14L 1955
ay 12, 1956
ay 5, 1956
ay 14. 1955

ay 12, 1956
ay 5, 1956
ay 14 1955
ay 12, 1956
ay 5, 1956
ay 14, 1955


1956
1956
1955


19.


18.


-- 26.75
-- 25,90
72* 21.42
-- 24.80
S 24,05
72* 20.50


24.62
22.45
18.58
23.88
21.75
17.65

5.50
5.60
6.00
4.25
4.25
4.75


23.90
22.45


22.52
21.30
16.38

5.50
6.00
4.58
4.00
4.38
3.25


a-
--
-- m


27,60
26.28
21.28
25.90
24.72
20.08

23.85
23.22
16.30
21.85
21.25
14.75


-- 27.52
25.35
-- _21.78
24.95 25.75
23.65 23.88
20.05 20.28


25.4C
23.0C
20.00
24.1E
21.75
18.7E


&:South
:San
:Fran-
:cisco

24.69
23.12
20.75
5 24.06
22.50
19.75

L, --"--
-m
--


- 24.30 19.25
-- 22.49 18.75


7
21.30 22.75
19.50 20.90
15.15 --


5.38 --
5.32 --
5.18
4.12 --
4.08 --
3.92 --

-- 15.75
-- 15.40
I


6.62
6.62
6.75
4.00
4.00
4.62


17.5C
17.25E
15. 0

5.75
5.5C

3.25
3.2E


4.50
4.50

3.00
3.00


)


3
m
*


EARLY LAMB SITUATION, MAY 1, 1956 Continued from page 397.
Virginia: April w.as much colder than normal. Pastures were slow in starting, and
not until tho end of April wore they providing much forage. Feed supplies, however,
were generally ample. Lambs have made satisfactory progress, better than usual in
the eastern counties. Marketing of lambs will be earlier than last year, with the
peak movement coming in June.
Missouri: Early lombs are in good condition. Pastures have been slow in start-
ing in the southern part of the State and rain is needed to improve pastures. Sheep
are still on winter feed in the northern half of the State. Marketings will be
earlier than last year,
Noathuestern States: Growth of lambs was slow earlier in the season, but made
rapid improvement with mild, open weather during April. Idaho: Weather conditions
have been favorable, and although grasses have been dry and have set back lambs in
some of the lower sections, lambs have maintained their development for the most
part. Marketings are expected to reach a peak about mid-August. Washington: Early
lambs on May 1 were in good condition. Lack of green feed before April 1 slowed
the development of early lambs, but they have made good gains since that date.
Losses of lambs were higher than last year. Early marketing are expected to be
smaller than last year, with a peak movement coming in August. Oregon: Range and
pasture feeds started late, but made more than usual seasonal improvement during
April as mild open weather prevailed. Early lambs made good gains during April and
marketing are expected to be a bit earlier than last year, with the peak coming in
mid-July.


398


LABS -
Choice
Prime


1057
and


ay
ay


12,
5,
14,


M
M
M


(


.


-- ,


--m


:--


--m
m-mm




399
NEW YORK WHOLESALE MEAT TRADE REVIEW
Western Dressed Fresh Meats

Supplies of Western dressed steer beef were normal. Veal unloads were moder-
ate early, but subsequently assumed normal proportions. Volume of cow beef and
fresh pork was moderate, with the lamb supply mostly moderate to small. Movement
of beef was rather slow and this class was under pressure. Action also lagged on
upper grades of veal. Sellers encountered little difficulty clearing lamb and
fresh pork storks although resistance was encountered on the former in some
instances in the face of higher asking prices. The current week's trade was
featured by daily advances on lamb and a strong trend on most other.classes.
Compared with the previous week: Steer beef unevenly 500 higher to $1.00 lower;
cow beef unchanged; veal steady to $1.00 higher; calf $2.00 up in spots; old crop
and spring lamb $2.00 to $5.00 higher; pork loins steady to $1.00 or more higher;
other fresh pork cuts steady to $2.00 higher.
Prime steer carcasses closed about $1.00 lower. Good carcasses declined 500,
but small advances were noted on Choice 700-800# carcasses. Forequarter meat,
particularly arm chucks, moved at a disappointingly slow pace despite sharp price
concessions.
All grades and weights of veal and calf were represented, with veal making up
the bulk. Buyer preference centered on lower grades which sold strong to higher,
but action on upper grades lagged, with prices weak toward the close. Trading was
active on lamb, but purchases were held to essential requirements. A moderate to
small supply consisted mainly of spring lamb carcasses. Sharp upturns wore
registered, with greatest advance on offerings around 56#.
Early clearances of fresh pork seemed assured as demand expanded somewhat
after Wednesday. Favorable weather and relatively attractive prices wore stabili-
zing factors. Loins closed mostly higher as prices bounded back following some
easiness on Monday.

Locally Dressed Fresh Meats

Slaughter of cattle and calves reached the largest weekly volume of the year.
The hog kill was slightly larger than that of the previous week with a moderate
incroaso in the lamb slaughter. Local wholesale interests encountered a generally
fair demand for locally dressed offerings and prices of most classes held steady.
Principal exception was a progressive upturn on lamb. Trading on kosher meats was
fair to slow with prices carrying a weak undertone.
Steer beef supply included all grades and weights. Prime offerings increased
but fewer heavy carcasses were included than recently. Rounds moved dependably,
but easiness developed on loin cuts, and movement of arm chucks was disappointingly
slow. Declines of around $2.00 were registered on kosher forequarters and arm
chucks, with slow action late in the week.
The supply of veal and calf hindsaddles was normal, but price trond was uneven.
The practical top was about $1.00 off, but lower grade offerings cleared readily
at strong to $1.00 higher prices. Conditions on kosher veal foresaddlos wore
comparable. Prices on all grades and weights of spring lamb turned upward. Early
upturns on kosher spring lamb foresaddles were well sustained.
Most primal fresh pork cuts closed higher for the week. Early full clearances
seemed assured, with fresh loins setting the pace as most retail outlets competed
actively for this item. Fresh loins of all weights closed strong to instances
higher for the week.




400
CHICAGO WHOLESALE MEAT TRADE REVIEW

Tioderate to normal beef, veal and fresh pork supplies were fully sufficient
for demand. Choice beef predominated with some increase in Prime. Veal carcasses
over 80N represented bulk of the moderate supplies. Volume of both spring and old
crop lamb was well below normal, and virtually lacking in many wholesale houses.
Although local pork trading was slow, prices of most cuts worked higher after mid-
week on the strength of broadened shipping outlets. Below normal volume and daily
advancing replacement costs influenced higher lamb prices in spite of buyer resist-
ance, with closing quotations highest since May 17, 1954. Lamb forequarters and
loins cleared readily, other cuts slow. Lamb salesmen held carcass cutting to a
minimum because of inadequate prices of most cuts. Veal carcasses under 801, par-
ticularly those in the lower grades, usually sold dependably, otherwise trading was
only moderately active. Trading for carcass beef and cuts was slow. Squarecut
beef chucks and loins were especially hard to move, but persistent selling and
small price concessions kept daily clearances close to normal. Beef rounds were
in best demand, followed closely by ribs which were much improved over last week.
Some beef loins and chucks may be carried over, otherwise fresh meat clearances
will be good. Compared to last Thursday's close: Commercial beef about steady,
other Grades 50# to $1.00 lower; veal $1.00 higher; lamb $3.00-4.00 higher; pork
loins 8-16# $3.00-3.50 higher; spareribs 3# and down steady to 500 higher; Boston
butts 4-8- steady to $1.00 lower. Choice and Prime squarecut beef chucks cleared
at t26.00-28.00; same grades rounds $41.00-43.00; Prime loins $80.00-86.00, Choice
$59,00-64.00; Prime ribs $55.00-57.00; Choice $40.00-43.00; Choice and Prime Kosher
style chucks $27.00-29.00. Lamb hindsaddles brought $60.00-66.00; logs $50.00-
55.00; loins $75.00-78.00; hotel ribs $65.00-70.00.
PACIFIC COAST WHOLESALE MEAT TRADE REVIEW
Supplies of most beef were liberal, Good and Choice above 600# predominated.
Veal and calf carcasses continued in moderate to light supply with spring lamb
barely adequate. Fresh and cured pork cuts were liberal to slightly excessive.
Trading was slow to fair on most beef and pork, while veal, calf and spring lamb
trade was fairly active. Compared with last Friday: Most beef steady; veal and
calf steady to $1.00 lower; spring lamb strong to $4.00 higher; pork mostly steady
except loins $1.00-2.00 lower in California and $2.00 higher in the Northwest; lard
steady to 50# lower at Los Angeles and $1.00 higher in the Northwest.
Choice steer carcasses under 700# brought $32.50-36.00, 700-8001, $32.00-33.00;
Good 500-700# $31.00-34.00. Commercial cow beef brought $25.00-28.00, few soft-
boned to $30.00 at San Francisco and in the Northwest; Utility $24.00-28.00; Canner
and Cutter $20.00-25,00. Good and Choice veal carcasses sold from $38.00-43.00 in
California and $40.00-47.00 in the Northwest; same grades calf under 3000:' $34.00-
39.00. Choice and Prime spring lamb under 55# brought $47.00-52.00, over 55f
scarce. Closely trimmed pork loins under 16# brought mostly $42.00-50.00; shoulders
$25.00-32.00, the higher price at San Francisco only; fresh skinned hams under 18#
$44.00-50,00; Boston butts under 8# $32.00-38.00; spareribs under 3L $34.00-44.00,
few to $46.00 at San Francisco; smoked skinned hams under 18# $46.00-56.00; slab
bacon under 10# $29.00-42.00; sliced 1# bacon $36.00-44.00; lard in 1# cartons
$14.50-19.00.




401
WHOLESALE DRESSED MEAT PRICES: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds

New York Chicago San Francisco
Classification------------ ------------------------- ----------------- --- --
Classification Mayay May
12 5 14 12 5 14 12 5 14
...............1956 1956 1955 1956 1956 1955 1956 : 1956 1955
-------------- -- -----------------~LYYY;_ I-I------------;-------------------------
Beef -
Steer -


Prime 600-700F
700-800
Choice 500-600
600-700
Good 350-600
# h, Il a


om I.
Cow, all wts. -
Commercial
Utility
Veal -
Prime 80-110 f
Choice a *
Good "
Spring lamb -
Prime 40-50#
50-60
Choice 40-50
50-60
Good all wts.
Pork Fresh -
Loins 8-10# av.
10-12 *
12-16 "
Butts 4-8 "
Pork Cured -
Hams, smk., skd. -
12-16# av.
16-18
18-20 '
Bacon, smk.. slab -
6-8#av.
8-10 "
Sliced 1 # pkg.
Picnics, smoked -
4-8# av.
-Backs, D, S.-
16-20# av.
Lard, 1# cartons -
Refined
Substitutes


40.50
39.50

36.00
32.75
28.00

28.00
26.50

41.00
38.00
34.50

52.60

52.60

49.70'

41.90
41.90
41.40
32.00


48.50
46.00



32.00
38.50C


41.40
39.90

35.75
32.70
28.00

28,00
26.50

41.00
37.40
34.00

49.10

49.10

47.40

44.20
44.20
44.00
30.70


49.00
46.00



32.00
38.50


37.90
:37.90
:34.00
:34.00
31.95
29.00


--
43.90

40.20
35.60
31.80

30.00
27.50

43.50
37.40
34.00

43.00

40.50

38.12

52.10
52.10
50.30
34.90


52.50
48.50



40.50
49.00


25.50 26.50 31.50 :30.85

14.0 14.00 15.50 :12.45


17.00 16.62 17.00


:16.55
:*-


38.90
38.90
34.75
34.75
32.15
29.00




42.50
38.00
35.00

44.90*
43.20*
44.90*
43.20*
41.35*

41.10
41.10
40.05
28.85


51.95
50.10
50.10

33.20
31.55
38.60


43.60
44.85
38.10
38.50
35.40
32.40


:35.50
:34.00
:33.00
30.00


-- :28.50
-- :25.50


43.50
40.10
37.60


: --0

:41.00


41.00*: 49.00
37.90* .47.00
40.00*: 48.00
36.90*:46.50
34.90*:46.00


50.40
50.40
48.20
32.50


50.95
49.45
47.90

43.80
41.50
50.60


:48.00
:49.50
:48.50
:36.00


:54.00
:52.00


:40.00
:38.00
:42.00


30.75 34.35 :30.00


35.50 40.50
34.00 39.50
33.00 38.00
30.00 35.00


28.50
25.50



41.00

45.20
43.50
44.20
42.90
42.20

50.00
51.00
50.50
56.00C


54.00
52.00


40.00
38.00
42.00


30.00
26.50
--

39.00

41.00
39.00
40.00
38.00
38.50

56.00
55.40
55.00
39.50


57,00
54.00


51.00
48.00
51.00


30.00 38.00


12.35 11.50 :


16.50 15.75
-- 27.00


:18.25


18.25 18.50


Note: Quotations at New York exclude locally dressed meats.
*Old-crop lamb.


:42.90
:38.40
:35.40

:48.95*
:47.00*
:48.95*
:47.00*
:45.00*

:40.65
:40.65
:39.60
:2P.05


:51.85
:50.25
:50.05

:33.50
:32.00
:38.75




402
BOSTON WOOL MARKET REVIEW
Turnover of greasy domestic worsted wools in the Boston market continued slow
as approximately twenty-five cars were sold. Prices held firm with most trading
on 3/8s and 1/4 blood fleece wools. Very little spot territory wool was available
on the Boston market. Movement of scoured wools and noils nas been fairly active
with prices about steady. Continued activity featured trading in the territory
States with topmakers buying the wool as shorn. Buying in the fleece wool States
was moderate. A little more activity was reported in Texas on 12 months wool.
Prices at Australian markets were firm; New Zealand unchanged and firm; with a
slight advance in the Cape markets. Japan dominated with Bradford supporting in
Australian and Cape markets. South American prices were unchanged from a week ago.
Fleece Wools Delaine wools sold at 1.30 while fine graded, good French
combing brought t1.25, clean basis. Graded fleece 1/2 blood cashed from l1.13--
1,15. Three eighths good French combing and staple sold for 41.02-1.05 and 1/4
blood wools brought 96-t$1.00 clean basis, l'iixed lots of 3/8s and 1/4 blood wools
ranged from 49-54# grease basis and estimated to cost from 954-t1,02 clean basis.
A small lot of exceptionally choice 3/8s baby combing sold for 98# clean.
Territory Wools Supply of spot territory wools was limited and slow to move.
However, a fair quantity of graded good French and staple 1/2 blood wools sold for
$1.18-1.20 clean. A New Mexico 64/70s good French and staple brought $1.30 clean.
Buyers for topmakers were still active in the West, buying the wool as shorn and
doing some contracting in the Northern areas. Several thousand fleeces were re-
ported sold in Montana for 46-7/84, Wool was selling in Idaho for 440. Further
activity was reported in Utah, Nevada and Wyoming. Quarter blood Williamette
Valley wools were reported selling for 47 to the grower and estimated to cost
around 980 clean landed Boston.
Texas Wools Some 8 months wools sold in Texas at firm prices. More activity
was reported in 12 months wool although rain in some areas halted shearing. Aver-
age to good French combing wools were reported as selling around $1.27-1.28 clean,
delivered Boston. Good French combing and staple was quoted at 4l.30.
Mohair A fair weight of mohair sold for export at 87 while other sources
quoted 86- for adult hair and 9714 for kid hair.
Sales of CCC Wools The Commodity Credit Corporation announced on May 10,
that approximately 778,000 pounds of C.C.C.-owned wool were sold from bids receive
on a total of about 2,454,000 pounds. The principal grades, quantities and sales
price ranges (before discounts, if any) follow:


Graded territory 1/2 blood average and good French
1/4 staple and good French 48/50s
t" 1/4 average French 48/50s
low 1/4 blood
Graded fleece 3/Ps blood staple and good French
1/4 I 50/54s
1/4 1" 48/50s
Tags, crutchings, locks, eyebrows, karakul


Pounds

33,429
59,025
129,476
122,286
79,000
114,901
44,945
10,878X


Price Range


$1.103
1,04
S.85 .93
.87 .93
1.06375
.983-1.0025
.971- ,973
.10-.20 grease


Scoured shorn territory 3/8s blood staple and gd. French 14,497
woolen type 12 months 60/64s 46,750
Pulled grease worsted type 56/58s 23,156
" scoured "4 58s 15,702
" 56/58s 17,243
" n 50/56s 23,742X
(X go more of this class left in inventory)


1,08
1,00 -1.05
1.04
1.10
1.05 -1.08
1.001




403


LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER MEAT AND LARD PRODUCTICL:, 1954 19L5
Red meat production in 1955 reached a new all time peak at 26.9 billion pounds,
according to the Crop Reporting Board. Total meat production (commercial plus farm
slaughter) for the year was 7 percent more than the previous record of 25.2 billion
pounds in 1954. Beef production in 1955 reached a new record of 13.6 billion pounds,
exceeding the previous record of a year ago by 5 percent. Veal production totaled
1,578 million pounds, 4 percent less than a year earlier., button and lamb totaled
758 million pounds, -3 percent greater than a year earlier. Pork production totaled
11.0 billion pounds which was 11 percent more than in 1954. Beef accounted for 50
percent of the total meat produced in 1955, while pork made up 41 percent. Veal
accounted for 6 percent and mutton and lamb contributed 3 percent. Lard production
in 1955 totaled 2.7 billion pounds, compared with 2.3 billion pounds in 1954.
The number of cattle slaughtered in 1955 was 3 percent above 1954, Cattle
slaughtered under Federal inspection was up 3 percent; other wholesale and retail
was up 2 percent, while farm slaughter was down 1 percent. Calf slaughter for 1955
was 3 percent less than a year earlier. Slaughter of calves under Federal inspec-
tion down 1 percent; other wholesale and retail down 6 percent and farm slaughter
down 7 percent from a year ago. The total number of sheep and lambs slaughtered in
1955 was 2 percent more than the previous year. The number slaughtered under Fed-
eral inspection was 2 percent above a year ago; other wholesale and retail slaughter
was up 3 percent and farm slaughter was up 1 percent. Compared with a year ago, the
1955 total slaughter of hogs was 13- percent greater. Slaughter in Federally in-
spected plants was 16 percent greater than in 1954; other wholesale and retail
slaughter was up 8 percent and farm slaughter was up 3 percent from a year earlier.
Cattle and sheep and lambs were slaughtered at heavier weights than a year ago, but
calves and hogs were slaughtered at lighter weights. Slaughter cattle averaged
15 pounds heavier than in 1954. Sheep and lambs averaged 1 pound heavier than a
year ago. The average live weight of calves was 3 pounds less than the previous
year and hogs averaged 2 pounds lighter. The 1955 lard yield at 13.8 pounds per
hundred pounds of live weight compares with 13.6 pounds in 1954.

UNITED STATES LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER, 1954-55
S1954 : 1955
Species and class : : Av. i Total : : Av. : Total
of slaughter : Head : live : live : Head : live : live
: : weight : weight : : weight_ weight
CATTLE Thous. Lb. Mil.lb. Thous Lb. Mil.lb.
Federally inspected 18,476 958 17,704 19,055 975 18,578
Other wholesale and retail 6,541 834 5,454 6,66' 843 5,623
Farm 872 813 709 861 807 695
Total 25,889 922 23,867 26,583 937 24,896


CALVES
Federally inspected 7,573
Other wholesale and retail 5,173
Farm 524
Total 13,270


223 1,689
217 1,122
319 167
224 2,978


7,499
4,878
489
12,866


218
217
324
221


1,632
1,057
159
2,848




404
UNITED STATES LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER, 1954 1955
--------------------- ----------
: 1954 : 1955
Species and class : : Av. i Total : : Av.
of slaughter : Head a live : live : Head a live
a weight a weight : : weight
SHEEP AND LAIBS THous. i M 1. Thous. b.
Federally inspected 14,148 96 1,354 14,383 96
Other wholesale and retail 1,772 90 160 1,832 92
Farm 35 AS 29 3 8 86


Total
HOGS
Federally inspected
Other wholesale and retail
Farm
Total


16,255


1,543


16,553


: Total
:live
: weight
M3I .-
1I nj-i9PI I


169
29
1,585


52,894 244 12,902 61,370 241 14,778
11,933 222 2,652 12,846 220 2,825
S6,668 245 1_ 634 6 842_ 244 1,667
71,495 240 17,188 81,058 238 19,270


UNITED STATES MEAT AND LARD PRODUCTION/ 1954-55
----- - --- -----
:1 954 1955
Kind of meat and : Av. Total : Av. a Total
class of slaughter : dressed : dressed dressed2/: dressed
i weight+. t weight iw eight4 : weight


t A igh* f we ih Ia--


BEEF
Federally inspected
Other wholesale and retail
Farm
Total
VEAL
Federally inspected
Other wholesale and retail
Farm
Total
LAMB AND MUTTON
Federally inspected
Other wholesale and retail
Farm
Total
PORK (EXCLUDING LARD)
Federally inspected
Other wholesale and retail
Farm
Total
TOTAL MEAT


Lb.
526
447
415
502


124
120
183
124

46
43
39
45

140
131
141
138


Mil.lb.
9,681
2,920
362
12,963


931
620
96
- -- 1647

645
76
-13
734

7,369
1,563
938
9,870
25,214


Lard per I
100 pounds
LARD 3/ Liveweight
Federally inspected 14.2 Lb.
Other wholesale and retail 10.9 "
Farm 12.8 "
Total 13,6 "
i- Excludes animals condemned under Federal
is pork production per head excluding lard.
j/ Includes rendered pork fat.


Production
Mil.lb.

1,831
290
209
2,330
inspect


Lb.
537
453
412
512


121
120
187
123

46
44
40
46

137
129
141
136

In Lard per
100 pounds
Liveweight
14.5 Lb.
11.0 "
12.5 _
13.8 "
on. 7For 4ork, I


Mil.lb.
10,195
3,018
355
13,568


903
584
91
91- -
1 578

663
81
14
758

8,366
1,661
964
10 991
26,895
Production
Mil.lb.

2,140
312
208
2,660
the average


95


96
96


-----




405
Stocker and feeder cattle and sheep received in several Corn Belt States I/
April 1956, with comparisons


.Cattl e._.alcL.alvegs


-~-------------------------
: Public Stock Direct
State Xad- -- -
S_ Ap ril A__ .ril _
2 1956 : 1955 : 1956 : 1955 :


Total Cumulative Total
-April Jan. APr. incl.
1956 : 1955 : 1956 1 1955


Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Minnesota
Iowa
South Dakota
Nebraska
Total
9 States


7,371
10,437
20,602
5,055
1,185
7,402
38,393
5,810
20,353


7,818
9,263
26,501
4,100
391
10,902
57,062
5,673
35,153


116,608 156,863


4,438
3,136
35,812
2,928
860
6,056
23,571
4,859
17,807


2,618
4,017
33,071
1,900
907
5,778
23,819
9,952
33,205


11,809
13,573
56,414
7,983
2,045
13,458
61,964
10,669
38,160


10,436
13,280
59,572
6 000
1,298
16,680
80,881
15,625
68,358


40,990
36,498
210,066
19,506
7,821
66,786
295,056
30,322
137,203


32,672
41,579
205,861
16,055
3,453
72,84C
316,57
45,367
215,057


99,467 115,267 216,075 272,130 844,248 949,461


Sheep and L.ubs


Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Minnesota
Iowa
South Dakota
Nebraska
Total
9 States


498
229
4,256
277

1,707
23,644
2,746
4,659


5,827
924
3,297
466

2,283
13,698
608
17,181


5,053
1,755
8,170


4,319
34,578
2,595
20,251


3,337
797
31,183
216

6,344
27,434
10,437
32,432


5,551
1,984
12,426
277

6,026
58,222
5,341
24,910


9,164
1,721
34,480
682

8,627
41,132
11,045
49,613


13,527
6,519
48,915
3,605
1,511
55,684
261,896
30,783
112,530


19,394
9,627
71,776
4,794
3,366
72,711
235,509
52,984
167,361


38,016 44,284 76,721 112,180 114,737 156,464 534,970 637,522


I/ Data in this report are obtained from offices of State
"Public Stockyards" are included stockers and feeders which


Veterinarians. Under
were bought at stockyards


markets. Under "Direct" are included stockers and feeders coming from other States
from points other than public stockyards, some of which are inspected at public
stockyards while stopping for feed, water, and rest en route.

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
Agricultural Estimates Division
Washington, D. C.




406
COLD STORAGE HOLDINGS OF MEATS AND LARD, APRIL 30, 1956
Refrigerated stocks of red meats declined seasonally during April to 855 million
pounds. A year earlier, holdings totaled 822 million while the average for April
30 is 916 million pounds. Beef holdings, at 171 million pounds, were down 17 mil,
lion from the month before. Pork, at 509 million pounds, was down 5 million, and
holdings of other meats declined 1 million pounds to total 175 million pounds at
month's end. Frozen pork was down to 395 million pounds or a reduction of 3 mil -
lion since March 31. Last April, stocks totaled 400 million pounds while 409 mil-
lion is average for this date. Dry salt pork stocks at 25 million pounds compare
with 38 million a year ago April 30 and the average of 45 million pounds.



UNITED STATES STORAGE HOLDINGS OF MEATS AND LARD, APR. 30, 1956 WITH COMPARISONS
(Includes holdings in public, private and semi-private
cold storage houses and meat packing plants)


*
Apr. Mar.
Commodity 30 31
1956 1956

BEEF: 1.000 lb. 1.000 lb.
Frozen, 161,736 178,672
In cure,cured & smkd. 9,465 9,776
Total. 171,201 188,448
PORK:
Frozen. 395,214 398,631
Dry salt,in cure and
cured. 25,479 29,099
Other,in cure,cured
and smoked 88,114 86,394
Total. 508,807 514,124
OTHER MEATS AND MEAT PRODUCTS:
Sausage & sausage
room products. 16,072 15,427
Frozen lamb & mutton 8,847 9,875
Frozen veal 16,029 17,300
Canned meats & meat
products 75,782 70,945
All edible offal. 58,558 63,126
Total other meats &
meat products 175,288 176,673
Total all meats 855,296 879,245
Lard, rendered &
refined ~/ .. -/ 232,719
GOVERNMENT HOLDINGS 3/
Pork. 7,531 7,344
Beef. 3,211 6,197


Apr. Apr. 30 Apr. 30, 1956 as % of
30 1951-55
30 1951-55 Mar. : Apr. :Apr. 30
1955 av, s 1956 : 1955_:5-r.avy.
1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.
123,491 159,487 91 131 101
8,416 10,084 97 112 94
131,907 169,571 91 130 101


399,534 409,166

37,875 45,374


102,025
539,434


14,433
9,677
11,942

60,012
54,269

150,333
821,674

140,352


140,783
595,323


16,097
10,914
12,211

55,554
56,242

151,018
915,912

151,928


99

88

102
99


104
90
93

107
93

99
97


99

67

86
94


111
91
134

126
108

117
104


97

56

63
85


100
81
131

136
104

116
93


9,457 2/ 103 80
7,192 2/ 52 45


1 In dry and cold storage as reported by Bureau of Census.
2 Not available.
3J Government holdings are included in the totals and consist of reported stocks
held by U.S.D.A., the Armed Services and other Government agencies.


--




400?


LIVESTOCK MARKET REVIEW CONTINUED FhOM PAGE 389
SHEEP AND LAMBS
Receipts at the 12 markets were about 1S percent larger than last week but
were still below most recent weeks and were about 24 percent smaller than a year
ago. The increase in receipts ov*:r last week was due to expanded marketing at
Fort Worth which received approximately half of the 12-market supply. At most
points slaughter lamb prices continued to advance through Wednesday, reaching new
high levels since June 1953 at some markets. Later, however, the trade was very
erratic, with closing prices ranging from as much as t1.25 lower to $2.50 higher.
Wholesale dressed lamb prices advanced $2,00-5,00 and at Chicago late week prices
were highest in two years. Receipts included an increased propcrtion of spring
lambs, while wooled lambs became too scarce to quote at most points. Good and
Choice old crop shorn lambs carrying No. 2 to fall shorn pelts brought t22.25-
24.50, including Choice 1214 averages at 424.00 Some Good offerings sold toward
the close as low as $19.0O, but there were Choice fall shorn up to $25.75 at
Chicago. Most Good to Prime spring lambs cleared at t23.00-28.50, a few $29.00-
30.00. Cull to low-Good offerings sold in a "12.00-22.00 range. Cull to Choice
shorn slaughter ewes brought t2.F0-6.00, mostly 43.00 and above.
WESTERN LIVESTOCK REVIEW
Prices of slaughter steers and heifers .shwed a steady to 250 lower trend at
Western terminals, instances 500 off at Los Angr:les an. Spokrne, Cows sold steady
to 500 higher for the week; calves and vealers stedy;d stocker and feeder cattle
and calves steady to 500 higher. The price trend on barrows and gilts was steady
to 500 higher; spring and old crop lambs closing 50-.1,75 higher.
Choice slaughter steers ranged from 19.00-21.00 including numerous loads up
to 1150 pounds in the Far West at t2J.00-20,75, two loads high-Choice 1040 pound
steers t21.00 at S. San Francisco. Several loads of average to high-Choice 1020-
1340 pound steers were included at 419.85-20.50 with two loads 1170-1310 pound
steers carrying an end of Prime at $21,00 at Denver. Good steers bulked at Western
terminals from t17.00-19.00; Commercial largely t16,00-17.50, Choice slaughter
heifers up to 1070 pound cleared from $18.50-20.00, Good $16.50-19.00, Commercial
$15.00-17.00. Most Commercial cows brought $13.00-14.50; Utility 11.50-13,00;
Canner and Cutter t9.00-11,50. Choice vealers cleared from 425,00-27,00 in the
Northwest, same grade elsewhere 420,00-25.00, Good 18.00-24.00, Commercial 415,00-
1.00. Good and Choice slaughter calves brought $16,00-21.50. The same grades of
stocker and feeder steers cashed from $16,50-15.50, Choice fleshy feeders up to
$18.85 at Denver; Good and Choice stocker and feeder heifers $15.00-17.25, several
loads Choice 700-790 pounds at Denver $17.75-18.25. Bulk Good and Choice stock
steer calves brought $18.00-20,00, with a few mostly Choice from $19.00-21.00 at
Denver.
Direct trade on slaughter steers and heifers out of California feedlots was
steady to 250 higher with host Choice steers up to 1200 pounds at $20.00-20,50, at
least six loads 1050 pounds at $20.75 and six loads high-Choice and Prime at
$21.00-21.25. Good steers sold in the direct trade mostly from t18.00-19,50.
Several loads of Good and Choice heifers cleared from $17,00-19.50. A few loads
of Utility and Commercial cows brought steady prices ranging from $12.00-13.50.
Stocker and feeder trade was slow at mostly steady to weak prices. Numerous loads
of Good and Choice fleshy 1000-1100 pound feeder steers brought $17,00-17.50, a
few 700-800 pounds $17.00, Good and Choice 500-600 pound stocker and feeder
heifers cleared from $15.00 to mostly $16,00 for immediate to May 20 delivery.
Above sales f.o.b. ranch or feedlot at 3 to 44 shrink.
Continued on page 408.




4B UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
lIllIMllll11111 lIlill
U. S. Department of Agriculture Penalty for private 3 1262 08734 5640
Washington 25, D. C. payment of postal -*ouu.

OFFICIAL BUSINESS

Form AlviS-5/15/56
Permit 1001.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORTBA
LIBRARY
DEPT OF GENERAL INFOR & SIRT
3-15-56
LS-CLS GAINESVILLE FLA



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---'----------------.
4k
WESTERN LIVESTOCK REVIEW CONTINUED FROM PAGE 407
U. S. No. 1 to 3 180-240 pound barrows and gilts brought $17.25 at S. San
Francisco and Stockton; $16.25-17.25 at Los Angeles; l?7.50-18.25 at North Portv4
land; $16.25-17.00 at Spokane; l15.00-16.FO at Ogden; 15.50-16.35 at Denver.
Slaughter spring and old crop lambs continued in good demand and trading was
active. Choice and Prime 86-98 pound native spring lambs brought $26,50-to mostly
$28.00 late at Denver, Good and Choice $24.00-27.00. Choice shorn lambs with No.
1 and 2 pelts sold there from 823.50-24.75. Choice and Prime spring lambs brought
$25.50-26,00 at North Portland, selling up to $25.75 at Ogden; and from $24.75-
25.00 at S. San Francisco. Choice old crop lambs earned $18.50-19.00 at North
Portland, some Choice offerings with No. 3 pelts $18.50-18.75. In the direct trade
on California spring lambs Choice and Prime sold late in the week from $23.50-
23,75, some out of second hands up to $24.00.




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EFJ45FTQH_1EYOX8 INGEST_TIME 2012-10-22T13:54:55Z PACKAGE AA00012178_00018
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES