Market news

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Title:
Market news
Uniform Title:
Market news (Washington, D.C.)
Physical Description:
9 v. : ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Production and Marketing Administration. -- Livestock Branch
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock Division
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Production and Marketing Administration, Livestock Branch
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Meat industry and trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Livestock -- Marketing -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 18, no. 16 (Apr. 18, 1950)-v. 26, no. 52 (Dec. 30, 1958).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Production and Marketing Administration, Livestock Branch, Apr. 18, 1950-Dec. 15, 1953; Agricultural Marketing Service, Livestock Division, Dec. 22, 1953-Dec. 30, 1958.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004691907
oclc - 29653329
Classification:
ddc - 338.105 UNIL
System ID:
AA00012178:00009

Related Items

Preceded by:
Livestock market news (Washington, D.C.)
Succeeded by:
Livestock, meat, wool; market news


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ud LIVESTOCK, DIVISION We/4y
';J ='"f


t~ Ui


MARKET REVIEWS AND STATISTICS


Vol. 24, No. 11


March 13, 1956


Week ended March 10


Livestock Market Reviews. .. .
Livestock Market Receipts ....
Feeder and Stocker Statistics .


* C
*


Steer Sale Statistics . .
Estimated Slaughter and Meat Production .
Slaughterat Major Centers. .
Estimated Percentage of Feeder and Stocker Cattle
Slaughter Cows in Salable Receipts. .
Cattle Prices . .
Hog Prices . .
Hog Purchase Statistics . .
Sheep and Lamb Prices . .
Wholesale Meat Trade Reviews . .
Wholesale Meat Prices .. .
Wool Market Review .....


Special to this issue


United States Exports and Imports of Meats,
December 1955 . .
United States Exports and Imports of Livestock,
December 1955 . . .
Early Spring Lamb Crop, Mar. 1, 1956. .


U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
LIVESTOCK DIVISION
Washington 25. D. C.


iAGlI.-Il


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Page
210
212
212
213
214
215

215
216
217
218
219
220
222
223


. 224


225
226





210
MIDWEST LIVESTOCK MARKET REVIEW
Livestock receipts decreased moderately compared with the previous week.
Trading was fairly active on slaughter steers and heifers and daily supplies
were usually well cleared. Fed steers closed largely 50-.41.00 higher while
heifers advanced mostly 50-750. Hog prices fluctuated moderately during the
week, butchers closing steady to 250 higher at most points. Marketings of
slaughter lambs were smallest of the season but demand was also reduced and
late prices were mainly 25-750 lower than a week ago.
SLAUGHTER CATTLE AND CALVES
Outlet for slaughter cattle broadened and prices showed a substantial ad-
vance, largely recovering declines recorded during the previous week. Fed steers
advanced mostly 500-41.00, heifers 50-750, while cows closed steady to t1.00
higher. Trade was fairly active and daily supplies were usually well cleared.
Wholesale trade on steer beef was again rather slow with some further weakness
at New York and Philadelphia. Thus, the week's advance in cattle prices was
influenced to a large extent by a moderate decrease in receipts along with
gradually increasing interest in fed steers weighing upward from around 1250#
even though such kinds are still running quite freely. The week's average
weights of beef steers at Chicago, Omaha and Sioux City were all heavier than
a week earlier, the average of 1168# at Chicago being equal to the heaviest
there in at least 30 years. These heavier than average weights and in some
instances higher killing quality of many cattle compared with a year ago re-
flected the longer than usual term that many cattle have been in feedlots.
Fully 144 of the beef steers at Chicago last week graded Prime compared with
only one percent a year ago. At Omaha about 934 of the beef steers graded Good
and Choice; at Sioux City about 891, while at Kansas City nearly 861 were Gcod
and Choice. Numbers of steers in commercial feedlots near Omaha continued to
decrease, one large operator last week completing the marketing of around 9,300
head. Heifers were marketed in sizable numbers, making up 254 and more of the
steer and heifer receipts at some markets.
Prime steers cashed at Chicago from 419.50-25.00; bulk t20.00-24.00; Choice
$18.00-20.50; Good t15.50-17.50; few Utility and Commercial t12.50-14.50. Sales
there included Prime 1475-179F4 steers at 419.50-22.00; few loads high-Choice
1411-1560# 419.00-19,50; high-Good 1625# t16.00; Commercial 1600* ~14.00. Prime
stesrs mostly under 1200# reached 423.00 at Omaha, Sioux City and S. St. Paul,
bulk Good and Choice at midwest markets other than Chicago t16.00-19.50. Among
sales of heavy steers were Prime 14651- at Omaha &t .22.00; and Prime 1325-1594#
at Sioux City t20o50-21.50. Vealers sold steady to ;l.00 lower at S. St. Paul,
with little price change at other points.
STOCKER AND FEEDER CATTLE AND CALVES
There was considerable variation both in price trends and in numbers of
stockers and feeders at terminal markets. At several points supplies were very
small while at others receipts showed some increase. Although shipments of
steers tothe country from Kansas City totaled A,734, compared with 3,894 the
previous wuek, dealers at that market went into the weekend with a moderate
number stit. on hand. Outgo of steers from the 10 markets totaled 16,970 com-
pared with 16,258 a week earlier. Varying pasture and water conditions were
factors influencing both marketing and demand. At Kansas City, the increased
supply of stockers and feeders found rather slow outlet at steady to 50# lower
prices, Choice under 6004 stockers and Choice, fleshy 750-900r feeders showing
least weakness. At Omaha prices were steady to strong and at Fort Worth strong
to 500 higher. At St. Louis National Stock Yards, feeder steers sold weak to
50# lower while stockers held steady. At other markets prices were mostly




211


steady to weak. There was a moderate demand for Choice stockers 600# down and
such offerings continued to command a very decided premium over the same grades
of steers 700# up. However, during the past several weeks many buyers apparent-
ly have become more than normally "dollar" conscious, showing a tendency, if
necessary to sacrifice somewhat in quality in order to hold per head costs down.
Current price relationship between fats and feeders certainly is not such as to
stimulate an aggressive country demand. At Kansas City, for example, the aver-
age cost of t17.28 for all stocker and feeder steers 500# up was i3,97 lower
than the same week a year ago, while the average price of t16.85 for beef steers
on that market was t5.49 under a year ago. The average price of t18.97 for all
calves on that market was only t1.46 under a year ago, indicating the preference.
for "little" cattle that hold down the dollars-per-head cost, and that promise
substantial weight gains through spring and summer grazing. Choice and Fancy
899* feeders brought t17.75, and high-Choice fleshy 736# yearlings reached
t18.50. However, feeder steers 800# up continued to find relatively limited
outlet above t16.50. Meanwhile, Good and Choice yearling stock steers sold
from $16.00-20.00 with a few loads of high-Good and Choice steer calves and
short yearlings from t20.50-22.00.
HOGS
Demand for hogs remained good throughout the week but prices changed only
moderately in face of the week's liberal receipts and the mostly weak to lower
prices in the Eastern wholesale fresh pork trade. Compared with the previous
Friday, butchers closed mostly steady to 25$ higher and sows steady to 500
higher. Combined receipts at the 12 terminal markets and the Interior-Iowa-S,
Minnesota area were moderately below the previous week's seasonal record number
and around 18~ above last year. For the two months this year, combined receipts
of about 7,300,000 'salable hogs were 224 larger than receipts in the first two
months a year ago. Except for a few sections late in the week, shippers were
only moderate buyers at most terminal markets. On the other hand, some shippers
in the Interior Area were very aggressive throughout the period, Weights 190-
250# made up the bulk of the butcher supply, and in the Interior Area more than
50% consisted of 200-220# weights. Liberal offerings of new crop hogs and
earlier marketing held butcher weights around 10 below a year ago, although
slight increases were noted in average weights at some points as recent price
discounts tended to curtail marketing of lightweight, unfinished hogs. A large
share of butchers graded U. S. No. 2 and 3, but proportion of mixed No, 1 and 2
in weights 2207 down showed some increase. Straight lots of No. 1 butchers were
scarce. Price spread between lightweight and heavy butchers remained narrow.
Weights 190-2504 and evsn heavier often sold within a 500 spread. There was
little sorting for grade, but lots grading No. 1 and 2 usually brought 25-50#
more than mixed No. 1 to 3 of the same weight, and some No. 1 lots brought as
much as 41.00 above more highly mixed lots of the same weight.
Stocker and feeder pig prices closed strong at Sioux City where Good and
Choice 130-150# sold from l10,00-10.50, a few to t10.75. Sales at S. St. Paul
were steady as Good and Choice bulked from 10,.00-10.50, a few $ll.00. The few
100-150# stocker and feeder pigs at Kansas City brought 09,00-10.00. Prices at
Memphis were about steady, small supply Medium and Good 70-120#- 68,00-9.00.
SHEEP ANL LAMBS
Receipts at midwest markets were smallest since last summer and more than
30% under a year ago. Reflecting lower wholesale dressed lamb prices, fat lambs
sold steady to 1l.00 or more lower, declines at most points measuring 25-750,
Slaughter ewes and feeders were mainly steady, Lambs weighing over 110` were
discounted as much as t2.00 per cwt. for around 130# averages, with little or no
discount on lambs weighing up to 10#. Good to Prime wooled lambs 110= down
bulked at 418.50-20.50, with some Good lambs in the Southwest down to t17.50.
Continued on page 227,





212 WEEKLY RECEIPTS OF SALABLE LIVESTOCK AT 12 PUBLIC MARKETS
S...Cattle -- Calves .... Hogs She
Market Mar, Mar. Mar, Mar. Mr Mr Mar. : Mar.
10 12 10 312 10 12 10 12
S1956 : 1955 : 1956 : 1955 1956 ._,1955 : 1956 1955
---------------------------- ------- ----------------------L----------J
Chicago-....-..--. 41,163 43,080 1,072 1,166 53,352 54,819 5,917 11,770
Cincinnati.......... 3,882 3,559 1,104 1,055 21,047 18,352 248 504
Denver............. 14,600 15,233 826 836 2,442 2,863 19,970 26,456
Fort Worth..--...-.. 7,257 8,196 1,579 2,026 3,691 1,987 10,684 16,231
Indianapolis ---..-..... 81084 7,837 1,063 1,305 64,316 62,533 1 219 1,138
Kansas City---....- 22,258 17,533 1,218 1,168 12,333 8,351 7,033 6,965
Oklahoma City...... 12,507 9,867 1,222 1,395 4,637 3,721 2,231 1,993
Omaha.............. 35,132 37,906 1,046 830 43,527 41,935 9,784 18,794
St. Joseph-......... 13,907 15,169 590 1,033 31,743 25,588 2,925 2,996
St. Louis NSY-...... 15,471 16,243 3,200 3,383 72,682 54,259 2,190 2,822
Sioux City.......... 23,228 22,315 377 506 36,891 31,985 4,999 12,338
S. St. Paul...------. 21,320 20,899 10,810 10,038 74,851 46,003 7,392 10,787


Total ..---. ...----- 218,809 217,837


24,107 24,741 421,512 352,396 74,592 112,794


Mar. 3, 1956 234,045 26,018 431,761 101,692
INTERIOR IOWA AND SOUTHERN MINNESOTA
Week ended: Hogs Sheep
Mar. 10, 1956 ................ 424,000 22,200
Mar, 3, 1956 .----...-- ..-... 456,000 27,700
Mar. 12, 1955 --------------- 365,000 26,300
FEEDER AND STOCKER CATTLE: AVERAGE COST, WEIGHT, AND NUMBER
Week ended Month Two months
Mar. 8 Mar. 1 Mar. 10 : Feb. Feb, Jan.- Feb.
.195-6 1956 1J 1955 : 1956 1955 : 1956 1955
Steers 1001 up 321 135 671 1,500 1,917 3,391 4,142
901-1000 1,411 1,093 1,862 5,513 8,202 11,608 16,813
801-900 2,476 2,852 2,756 10,199 10,804 26,382 26,171
701-800 3,505 2,500 2,849 11,081 10,966 28,349 28,492
501-700 9,257 9,678 7,981 32,465 26,110 67,233 70,928


Total steers 10 mkts.
Av. wts. "
Av.cost*" "
" "Chicago
Ks. City
Omaha
S. St. Paul
Sioux City
Denver
"Ft. Worth
Okla. City
SS. St. Joseph
Natl. Stk. Yds.
Total calves-10 mkts.


16,970
698#
$16.58
16.29
17.28
16.53
14.65
17,18
15.73
16,18
16,07
16.49
16,06
4,766


16,258
692f
$16.66
16,58
17,03
17.13
14,78
16.89
16.48
16,34
16,67
16.64
15,98
5,002


16,119
7230
$20,12
19,33
21.25
20,74
17.80
20.76
20.78
19,03
20,08
20.18
18,76
5,116


60,758
7100
$16.54
16.86
17.04
16.38
15.03
16.82
16.11
16.31
16.40
16.41
16.20
18,931


57,999
738f
$19.71
20.24
20.46
19.60
18.10
20.10
20.12
19.02
19.12
19,24
18.81
15,937


136,963
717#
416.59
16.81
17.09
16.36
15.05
16.66
17.53
16.29
16.33
16.38
16.14
53,071


146,546
721f
$19.76
20.02
20.43
19.59
17.59
20.15
22.09
18.69
18.46
19.41
18.61
65,126


cows.
heilers, blls-"" 2,283 2,273 3,143 9,265 9,836 23,825 30,657
* Not adjusted for differences in grade of cattle sold at each market.





213
BEEF STEERS SOLD OUT OF FIRST HANDS FOR SLAUGHTER
Percent of eg weigAverage price
percentt of Average weight
Number of head total in dollars
by grades (pounds) per 100 Ib.
-- -- -- _by grad s- -
---- ---- ;1e-ek ended -- -- -- -- -
------ ---- -- --- ------- -- ------------ ---
M. Mar. Mar :Mar, ML
8 1 10 8 1 10 8 1 10 8 1 10
.1956. 1956 1955 1956 1956 1955 .19E6 1956 1955 195. 1956 1955
CHICAGO


Prime
Choice
Good
:omll.
Jtility


All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Com'l.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Com'I.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Com'l.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Co'l.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Com'l.
Utility
All grades


(

(
L


3915 3974 235 14.2 13.4 1.0 1315 1296 1157 21.73 21.70 30.88
13926 16657 13513 50,6 56.4 57.5 1193 1193 1136 19.04 18.63 25.70
8195 7451 7616 29,8 25.2 32.4 1052 1044 1012 17.05 16.63 21.95
1226 1093 1748 4.4 3.7 7,5 1012 971 949 14.87 14.51 18.12
283 380 373 1.0 1.3 1.6 1039 984 913 13.27 13.20 15.01
27545 29555 23485 1168 1158 1079 18.71 18.45 23.97
...................................--MAH../. ............ ...................................
OMAHA 1/
153 322 20 .9 1.9 .1 1270 1274 1357 22.28 22.13 30.00
9325 9085 7522 57.4 53.4 48.6 1174 1154 1128 18.47 18.27 24.27
5790 6453 6720 35.7 38,0 43.5 1048 1065 1030 16.47 16.33 21.18
853 959 979 5.3 5.6 6.3 979 992 958 14.15 13.79 17.09
109 179 229 ,7 1.1 1.5 922 868 905 11,74 11.67 14.83
16230 16998 15470 1118 1111 1072 17.61 17.37 22.47
-----------------.....------ -- ------- .. .- -------- ---------------
SIOUX GITY
333 130 -- 3.7 1.6 1293 1324 -- 21.40 21.11 --
4351 3982 3507 47,7 49.4 51.1 1205 1187 1133 18.51 18.43 23.81
3789 3358 2947 41.6 41,7 42.9 1103 1093 1068 16.90 16.65 21,08
566 419 371 6.2 5.2 5.4 987 998 993 14.83 14.46 16,87
76 168 44 .8 2.1 .6 952 1034 964 12,80 12.73 13.50
..9_1.5. 8 057. .68.9._ ....................... 0 .15. 11.. 1Q96. 17,5 17. ,4.8..22,J2.7.
KANSAS CITY 1/
32 -- -- .4 -- -- 941 -- -- 20.70 --
2921 2472 1521 38.6 31.0 39.5 1090 1111 1125 17.93 17.81 24.28
3553 3487 2013 46.9 43.9 52.3 1056 1055 1009 16,60 16,39 21.50
1006 1619 290 13.3 20,3 7,5 1000 1010 960 14.72 14.96 17.11
90 350 24 1.2 4.4 .7 1008 1048 896 12.74 13.12 15.18
7570 7960 3848 1061 1063 1050 16,85 16,45 22.34
ST. LOUIS NSY 1/
3 -- -- ,1 -- 1135 -- 20.50
1339 1680 307 22.3 24.8 7.1 1131 1081 1073 18,30 18.01 24.89
2991 3438 2513 49.9 50.8 58.7 1036 1033 999 16.57 16.47 22.13
1504 1409 1366 25.1 20.8 31.5 945 954 938 14.82 14.47 19.16
157 239 118 2.6 3.6 2.7 897 926 826 12.83 12.68 15,54
5994 6766 4334 1031 1025 980 16.51 16.36 21.30
S:SO--- --------------------------------
S. ST. JOSEPH 1/
22 6 -- .4 .1 -- 1196 1124 -- 20,08 20.99 --
2212 2739 1812 35.6 42.5 33.7 1123 1126 1109 18.25 17.97 24.19
3200 2618 3110 51.4 40.6 57.8 1070 1080 1017 16,74 16.45 21.19
713 938 416 11.5 14.5 7.8 989 1045 1012 14,75 14.76 17.22
73 150 39 1.1 2.3 .7 887 982 847 12,64 12.84 14.05
6220. 64 51. 5377 1............078 1092 1046 17.06 16.81 21.92
Continued.





214
214 BEEF STEERS SOLD OUT OF FIRST HANDS FOR SLAUGHTER
-------------.............. ---------------------- ------- i-i ---------------------- -----------....... ........ g ...
SPec Average weight Averge price
Number of head totalrage w i in dollars
,~(pounds) er .
by grades per 100 lb.
------------------------------------------------------
G ................................... Week ended
Grade Week ended

8 1 10 8 1 10 8 1 10 8 1 10
S-----. 1-- E R 0 /
1 :956 1956 1955 .956: 1956_ 1955 956 1956 1955! 195f6 1961955
DENVER I/
Prime -- 34 24 -- .6 .7 -- 1112 983 -- 21.00 25.50
Choice 3854 4002 2688 68.4 73.4 76.7 1146 1153 1095 18.11 18.09 24.36
Good 1620 1339 741 28.7 24.6 21.1 1065 1137 1050 16.58 16.40 22.69
Co'l. 151 76 51 2.7 1.4 1.5 951 1003 1076 13.45 12.85 16.32
Utility 12 -- -- .2 -- 970 -- 12.11 -- --
All grades ...... 563.7.._ .._.-5 ... ..................... 1117. 1147. 1084 17.,57 17. 63 23._91"
I/ These summaries developed from data collected on marketing of fed cattle by the Agricultural Estimates
Division.

ESTIMATED FEDERALLY INSPECTED SLAUGHTER AND MEAT PRODUCTION
-- --------------------------------------------- ------------------------------
S. Beef Veal Park Lamb and Total Total
Week ( exc. lord) I mutton meal lard
.................--------------- -------------- --. --- --------------. meet lard
ended Num. Prod. u Num Pum.- : : u Prod. ro Num rod.
ber ber b her r ber j
.................. M. ----.. .........,. .. .........--..---r ..------- -------- -...1 ........ : ----- --...
1,000 m. b. 000 mil. b. 1000 mil. b. 1~000 mil. Ib. mil. b. miJI.
Mar. 10, 1956 361 206.1 140 15.1 1,595 208.8 264 12.9 442.9 51,8
Mat. 3, 1956 379 214.5 145 16.0 1,634 216.8 293 14.4 461.7 53.9
Feb. 25, 19561/ 338 192.3 138 15.6 1,371 182.1 261 12.8 402,8 46.3
Mar. 12, 1955 335 180.9 140 14.3 1,298 174.9 263 13.2 383.3 43.6
Percentage change from:
Mar. 3, 1956 -5 -4 -3 -6 -2 -4 -10 -10 -4 -4
Mar. _12, 1955 t .+14 .... ... +6 +23 +19 0 2 .+16 +1
Aver e w s (b.) ..............---------------------------------------------------- Lrd
Cattle Calves : Hogs : Land yeu
ended ...-.-.... .. -.... :..-..--..-- H --. :.. lambs .. per
Li--------ve-D- ssd- Live @ Dressed :sed 2 Ds Lre s d: 100 lb.
Mar. 10, 1956 1,025 571 195 108 230 131 104 49 14.1
Mar. 3, 1956 1,020 566 200 110 230 133 104 49 14.3
Feb. 25, 1956 1,025 569 205 113 231 133 103 49 14.7
Mar. 12, 1955 981 540 184 102 238 135 105 50 14.1

I/ Actual slaughter and revised estimate of production. 2/ Excludes lord.





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215





216 CATTLE: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds

Chicago Kansas City Omaha
-"--l-- i ---- I --------
Classification Mar. : Mar. Mar.
10 3 12 10 3 12 10 3 12
--1956 ,1956 1955 1956 1956_1.55 1956. 1956...95 1
Slaughter cattle, calves and vealers
Xmo -----------------------em-----


Steers -
Prime 900-1100#
1100-1300
Choice 900-1100
1100-1300
Good 900-1100
Com'l. All wts.
Heifers -
Prime 600-800#
Choice "
Good 500-900
Com'l. All wts.
Cows All weights
Commercial
Utility
Canner & Cutter
Bulls All weights -
Good
Utility & Commercial
Vealers All weights -
Choice & Prime
Com'l. & Good
Calves 5001 down
Choice & Prime
Com'l. & Good


23.32
23.22
20.12
19.82
17.05
14.75


18.38
16.35
14,20

12.68
11.48
10.62

12.75
14.84

24.40
19.00

19.50
15.00


23.12
22.92
19.75
19.10
16.85
14.55


18.18
15.98
13.85

12.08
10.88
9.75

12.55
14.52

26.10
20.20

19.50
15.00


30.80
31.70
27.00
27.00
21.80
18.00


23.62
19.85
16.65

13.25
11.70
10.08


:21,72
21.25
19.32
18.65
: 16.68
S14,70


18.32
16.34
:14.08

12.32
11.30
10.28


12.75 : --
14.98 : 13.40


25.00
20.00

20.00
15.50


: 21.00
: 17.00

t 16.75
: 14.00


21.12
20.40
18.90
18.30
16.30
14.55


18.12
16.18
14.00

11.98
10.72
9.82


13.58

21.00
17.00

17.00
14.00


28.62
29.00
25.12
25.12
20.88
17.25


22.25
18.85
15.75

13.25
11.75
10.15


: 23.18
: 22.92
: 20.02
:19.72
:16,50
:14.00


:18.28
:16.18
:13.70

S12.00
:11.08
9.75


-- : 12.25
12.90 : 13.18


21.50
16.00

18.00
14.50


: 21.50
: 16,50

: 18.75
: 14.50


22.75
22.25
19.55
19.18
16.05
13.52


18.02
15.75
13.48

11.78
10.60
9.35

12.35
13.14

22.50
17.00

18.75
14.25


29.15
30.05
25.52
25.52
20.72
17.25


22.50
18.30
14.60

13.40
11.78
9.95

11.75
13.49

22.50
17.50

20.50
16.00


Feeder and stocker cattle and calves
Steers -


Choice 500-800#
Good "
Medium 500-1000
Heifers -
Choice 500-750
Med. & Gd. *
Cows All weights -
Medium & Good
Calves 300-500# -
Steers -
Good & Choice
Heifers -
Good & Choice


19.50
16.50
14.50

16.50
13.50


19.50
16.50
14.50


22.40 : 18.75
19.75 : 17.25
17.25 : 14.62


18.88
17.50
15.00


23.50
20.7F
17.75


16.50 18.25 : 16.50 16.50 19.50
13.50 15.25 t 14.00 14.00 16.00


: 19.25
: 17.12
: 14.75

: 16.62
: 13.62


19.00
17.12
14.62

16.50
13.50


-- : 11,75 11.25 12.00 : 10.88 10.88


21.00 21.00 22.00 : 19,50 19.50 22.25 : 20.50 20.50

17.50 17.50 18.50 : 17.00 17.00 19.00 : 17.00 17.00


22.50
20.00
17.25

18.00
14.50

11.62


22.00

18.50





HOGS: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS 217
In dollars per 100 pounds
S Interior Iowa and .
CasfcoChicago southern Minnesota Indianapolis
Cla sifcaton-------- ----- -----------,---------- ^--- --------------------- ^--- ---- ----
Classification Mar. ,, Mar. Nar.
Mar. I lar. ar.
10 3 1 12 10 3 12 10 3 12
156 1?56 .1955 1956 .1956 1955 1956 1956 1955
----------------------------------------------------------------- I-------- 0-----------------


Barrows and gilts -
U.S.No.1 160-180#
2 and 3 180-200
200-220
220-240
240-270
270-300
Sows -
300-330#
360-400
450-550


11.35
12.18
12,22
12.28
1i2.02
11.76

I. 4:

iC, -5


io.eo
12.08
12.22
12.25
11.97
11.68


14.85
15.72
15.74
15.61
15.23
14.94


11.28 14,22
1C.82 13.85
10.25 13.00


10.02 9.79
11.64 11.40
12.13 11.90
11.79 11.52
11.3^ 11.06
10,90 10.50

10.6' 10.32
10.13 9.95
9.51 9.22


Pigs Stockerr and feeder)-
Gd. & Ch. 70-120# -- -- -- -- -- --
Omaha St. Louis
Omaha National Stock Yards Sioux City


Barrows and gilts -
U.S.No,1 160-1801
2 and 3 180-200
200-220
220-240
240-270
270-300
Sows -
300-330#
360-400
450-550


12.88
i2.89
, 12.88
12.40

11. 82
--. 2I
10.82
1:. 2,


12.65
12.65
12.65
12.28
11.62

11.10
11.10
10.12


15.92
15.92
15.82
15.35
14.82


14.05
13.48


12.10 12.11
12.72 12.72
12,?8 12,70
12.61 12,58
12.28 12.22
11.75 11.66

10.72 10.75
10.35 10.38
9.60 9.62


15.42
15.82
15.70
15.42
15.02
14.66

14.25
13. 98
13.25


:12.22
:12.70
:12,68
:12,28
:11.70

:10.95
:10.62
:9.73


12.10
12.52
12.47
12.02
11.40

10.78
10.38
9.50


--

15.90
15.72
15.22
14.58

13.78
13.52
12. 2


Pigs Stockerr & feeder)-
Gd. & Ch. 70-120# -- -- -- -- --
S-------------------------------------------------------
S. St. Paul Baltimore N. Portland
.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Barrows and gilts -
U.S.Nc.l 160-180#
2 and 3 180-200
200-220
220-240
240-270
270-300
Sows -
300-330#
360400
450-550
Pigs Stockerr & feede;)-
Gd. & Ch. 70-120#


12.3 :
13.1i'
13.10
13.10
12.60
11.68


10.42
C, V '


12.25:
12.90
12. 20
12.90
12.52
11.58

10.62
10.12
9.62


15.90
16.02
15.90
15.68
15.12
14.25


13.78 :
13.15 :
12.52 :


12,90 12.75
13.35 13.12
13.35 13.12
13.12 13.00
12.45 12.25
11.69 11.50

10,12 10,17
10.12 10.17
9.C3 9.00


16.56
16.69
16.68
16.22
15.72
15.00

14.48
14.48
12.44


L..25 10.50 15.00 :


:14.00
:14.50
:14.50
: 14.0'
:13.00
:12.75

:12.00
:10.75
: 9,50


13.84
14.34
14.34
13. 94
13.09
12.81

11.75
10.75
9.75


18.25
18.50
18.50
18.25
17.50
16.88

16.12
15.50
14.75


-- -I -


13.78
15.12
15.37
14. -9
14.38
13.62

13.12
12.46
11.26


: 11.08
: 12.35
:12.48
:12.23
:12.00
11.55

10.95
10.75
9.75


10.92
12.32
12.40
12.14
11.82
11.42

11.00
10.75
9.85


15.50
15.70
15.70
15.40
14.90
14.50

13.45
13.25
12.95





218
HOGS: AVERAGE COST, WEIGHT, AND NUMBER OF PACKER AND SHIPPER PURCHASES 1/
----------------------------- ------------ ---------------- ----------------
Louis Kan- S. :. 8-
Chi- Natl. sas Omaha Sioux St. St. Indian- mkts.
Week ended cago Stock City City Joseph Paul apolis com-
Yards bined
------------------------- -----"n pr p-------------------------------------
AVERAGE COST Dollars per 100 pounds
Barrows Mar. 10,1956 11.99 12.39 12.41 12.35 12.24 12.45 12.33 12.13 12.27
and Mar. 3,1956 11.91 12.34 12.22 12.20 12.10 12.39 12.16 12.08 12.17
gifts !ar. 12,1955 15.21 15.43 15.42 15.25 15.01 15.52 15.33 15.27 15.29
Mar. 10,1956 10.64 10.05 10.45 10.62 10.21 10.54 10.18 9.97 10.32
Sows iPar. 3,1956 10.54 10.08 10.41 10.52 9.92 10.61 10.10 9.94 10.29
1-ar. 12.1955 13.46 13.82 13.58 13.66 13,04 13.96 13.36 12.95 13.46
AVERAGE WEIGHT Pounds
Barrows Miar. 10,1956 238 218 218 229 234 218 224 222 225
and Mar. 3,1956 234 219 217 230 234 221 222 221 225
gilts Mar. 12 1955 247 219 225 250 251 230 231 226 235
--- ----- --- ---- 2 --- ---- -- --- t -- -----
Mar. 10,1956 432 420 417 411 410 391 406 435 420
Sows Mar. 3,1956 422 413 454 1407 411 390 407 451 418
r.'. 12 1955 442 405 430 426 417 391 400 446 422
NUMBER OF HEAD -
Barrows Mar. 10,1956 42903 66212 10986 3?856 33011 29086 68832 59019 347905
and Mar. 3,1956 44946 65796 12529 42011 35478 31014 74404 51267 357445
gilts Nar. 12 1955 46592 48176 7722 37497 28295 23201 41277 57696 290456
------,, ,,~= ,, -~,- !F ----- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- --- ---- ---- ---- ----
Mar. 10,1956 5085 3445 596 2830 1134 1439 3059 3775 21363
Sows ar. 3,1956 5813 3427 652 3033 1370 2051 3138 3094 22578
IM.ar._ 12 .195. 3135 ...341 448. 2235 1151 1457 2031 258 5 15383
A --- -- ---, -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -
SOWS Percentage of total
Mar. 10,1956 11 5 5 7 3 5 4 6 6
Mar. 3,1956 11 5 5 7 4 6 4 6 6
ar. 12 955 6 5 5 6 4 6 5 4 5
1/ Weighted average.
WEEKLY AVERAGE WHOLESALE VALUE OF HOG PRODUCTS DERIVED
FROM 100 LB. LIVE HOG, COMPARED WITH PRICES OF LIVE HOGS, CHICAGO
g p ctsg pric / Gross spread
Hog products 1/ Hog prices 2/ or margin 3/
Mar. 10, 1956 $15.25 "12.18 +$3.07
Har. 3, 1956 15.26 12.08 + 3.18
r.. 95 .....17.38 15.7 2 + 1.66
,,,,,,----------------- t -----------------,- -;---I-----------
1 / Value of all edible products, fresh basis (lard rendered) in 100 Ib. of live hog com-
puted from wholesale prices on cariot basis, Chicago, reported by National Provisioner
daily market report.
2/ Mean of daily quotations on U.S.No. 1, 2 and 3 hoge 180-200f wt. Chicago.
3/ Difference between wholesale product value and hog prices.

HOG AND CORN PRICES AT CHICAGO AND HOG-CORN PRICE RATIO
..........------- --. ----------" ---; ; --- --- -- .. .. .. .. -- ;------------- --------- ;:or------ ----
Barrows and Corn, 1/ ; Hog-corn
Week ended gifts No. 3, yellow price ratio
Dollars per Cents per based on
100 pounds bushel barrows and gilts
Mar. 10, 1956 11.99 127.6 9.4
Mar. 3, 1956 11.91 124. 5 9.6
Mar. 12, 1955 15.21 143.3 10.6
1/ Simple average price.





219
SHEEP AND LAMBS: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIO'S
In dollars per 100 pounds
a : : t t :Ogden &:South
SChicago OmahaKansas : Fort r :North :San
Chicago Omaha -Denver
I City : Worth :;Salt ;Fran-
:Lake_ _-cisco


down (WOOLED) -
Mar. 10, 1956
Mar. 3, 1956
Mar. 12 1955
Mar. 10, 1956
Mar. 3, 1956
Mar. 12, 1955


iEES COOLEDD) -
Good and Mar. 10, 1956
Choice Mar. 3, 1956
Mar. 12, 1955
Cull and Mar. 10, 1956
Utility Mar. 3, 1956
Mar. 12, 1955


20.60
20.65
23.50
19,75
19.90
22.80

7.75
7.75
8.25
5.95
5.75
6.75


20.10
20,60
22.62
19,30
19.65
21.75

6.50
6,00
8.50
4.50
4,45
6.75


19.40
20.25
22.28
18.45
19.35
21.15


18.
18,
22.


19.60
-- 20.08
-,- 22.20
30 18.78
45 19.00
75* 20.55


5.15 -- 9.50
5.00 9.25
7,75 -- 9.50
4.10 -- 7.12
4,25 -- 6.75
6.25 -- 6.38


--


17.25
17.60
20.50

7,00
6.50

4.50
4,00
--


FEEDER LAMBS -
Good and Mar.
Choice Mar.
Mar.
*Spring lambs.


10, 1956
3, 1956
12, 1955
*Shorn


19.00
-- 21.00
basis.


16.75
-- 17,20
-- 19.00


USDA ANNOUNCES CHANGE IN COMMERCIAL BEEF GRADE, EFFECTIVE JUNE 1


The Commercial grade of beef will be divided into two new grades designated
as Standard and Commercial, the U. S. Department of Agriculture announced today.
The present grades for beef are Prime, Choice, Good, Commercial, Utility, Cutter
and Canner. The new grades will become effective June 1, 1956.
The division of the present Commercial grade is being made on the basis of
maturity and the grade name "Standard" will be applied to beef from younger animals
of the grade. The name "Commercial" will be retained for beef from mature animals
falling in the present Commercial grade,
The present Commercial grade includes carcasses from animals within the
full range of maturity as animals are marketed. It differs in this respect from
the Prime, Choice and Good grades which are restricted to carcasses from relatively
young cattle.
3/6/56.


LAMBS 110
Choice and
Prime

Good and
Choice


18.50**
21.25
18.75
18.00**
20.25


a

9.00


5.50


18,00
18.45
20.75


~


- - - -





220
NEW YORK WHOLESALE MEAT TRADE REVIEW
Western Dressed Fresh Meats

Trading was slow at all wholesale centers in the New York area. Available
stocks were for the most part in excess of demand. Offerings of beef and veal
were normal, but current unloads of the latter were supplemented by carried over
lots. supply of calf was seasonally small. Fresh receipts of lamb were sharply
increased, and along with a fair-sized carryover proved burdensome. Packers and
wholesalers endeavored to arouse buyer interest in lamb and veal but lower prices
failed to promote movement of these classes. Prices on early days held about
steady for nost Western dressed fresh meats, but as the supply of preferred steer
and cow beef and lamb weighing around 45# dwindled, price resistance expanded to a
degree that resulted in a generally lower trend. Compared with the previous week:
Steer beef weak to 500 lower; cow beef steady to $1.00 higher; veal $1.00-4.00
lower; calf unchanged; lamb steady to 1l.00 lower; pork loins steady to $2.00
lower, other fresh pork cuts steady to t3.00 lower.
Carcasses grading Good and Choice made up the major portion of the steer beef
supply with only a small number of Prime carcasses included. Bulk fell within the
700-950 veeight range. Prime steer beef sold steady. Choice was mostly vroa to
50# lower, while Good sold late at a tl.00 decline. Prices of high-Commercial cow
carcasses reflected the week's upturn, while sales otherwise were generally steady
to weak,
Stocks of veal were excessive and included all grades and weights. Buyer
interest lagged from the outset with late trade mostly a peddling affair. Lamb
sellers encountered little difficulty in clearing carcasses 45# down at steady
prices. Sales of the bulk of 50-70# offerings were made at unevenly weak to $1.00
lower prices with indications of a sizable carryover.
Prices on most primal fresh pork cuts declined on early days as the volume of
sales was insufficient to clear daily offerings. Prices leveled after midweek,
however, but bulk of fresh loins were committed in retail channels at lower prices
for the week. Very few fresh skinned hams were included in the supply as the
greater portion were assigned to processing operations.
Locally Dressed Fresh Meats
Local slaughterers operated conservatively in most instances, and volume was
somewhat reduced during the first half of the week. Prime steer beef was in very
small supply. Bulk of the lamb consisted of weights 50# up. Vealers predominated
in the calf and vealer supply. Trading at wholesale levels was only fair at best
for kosher and non-kosher offerings. Steer beef prices held mostly steady while
veal and calf prices were weak to lower, Weakness also featured the lamb and
freah pork trade.
Movement of primal steer cuts was of about the same volume as during the pre-
vious week. Demand centered on Prime offerings along with cuts out of lightweight
carcasses. Prices averaged around steady despite some variation on wholesale cuts,
notably arm chucks and rounds. Small advances were registered on Prime hindquar-
ters while other Prime cuts sold steady to strong. Sales of kosher foroquartors
and related wholesale kosher cuts were made at prices comparable to those prevail-
ing a week earlier.
Demand for veal and calf hindsaddles was limited and prices were revised
downward on the bulk of offerings. Daily clearances were indomplote as the supply
exceeded the demand throughout. Lamb carcasses scaling 50-70# were liberally
represented in local sales coolers as these made up the bulk of daily kills.
Carcasses 45Q down and lamb hindsaddles under 24# moved dependably at steady
prices. Heavier offerings wore 02.00-3.00 lower for the week. Outlet for most
primal fresh pork cuts was rather limited up to midweek when buyer interest in-
creased. Clearances appeared fairly complete despite the early lag and prices
leveled at declines posted on opening days,






CHICAGC P~,OLYSALE MIAT THREAT REVIEW
Supplies of steer and heifer beef were abcut normal and well in line with re-
cent volume. Good and Choice offerings predominated. The supply of veal of all
weights and grades increased compared to recent weeks, and proved excessive for a
slow trade. Lamb and fresh pork cut offerings were normal most of the week.
Weights 55-654 made up bulk of the lamb, with pork loins mainly 8-12# aver-aes.
Trading in pork was dull.early but on later days participation by volume buyers
influenced some strength, particularly on pork loins. Prime beef found dependable
outlet, but trading on other grades of carcass beef and cuts was rather slow.
Slightly higher beef prices were realized mostly in carload selling. Carryover of
carcass lamb and veal, and lamb cuts, along with dull outlet locally and in the
East were all factors in the week's lower prices on lamb and veal. The reduced
volume of carcass lamb under 50# and lamb forequarter cuts cleared best. Chain
stores and hotel and restaurant supply houses took bulk of the week's fresh meat
offerings. rresh pork clearance at wholesale is expected to be good, other
classes only fair. compared to last Thursday's close: Beef mostly 50, higher;
veal $1.00-2.00 lower; lamb $1.00-1.50 lower; pork loins 8-16# 50 to $1.50 higher
other pork cuts 50 to $1.00 lower.
Choice and Prime sauarecut beef chucks brought $26.00-28.00, comparable
rounds $37.00-41.00; Prime loins $80.00-84.00, Choice $52.00-60.00. Prime ribs
from 600-800-' carcasses cashed at $55.00-57.00, Choice $36.00-40.00; Choico and
Prime kosher style chucks *.27.00-29.00. Lamb hindsaddles cleared at $45.00-52.00;
legs $40.00-47.00; loins t52.00-58.00; hotel ribs $48.00-52.00. Lamb stews ranged
from $14.00-18.00; shoulders $21.00-28.00.

PACIFIC COAST WHOLESALEE MEAT TRADE REVIEW

Supp-lics of most fresh meats were fully adequate to liberal for the current
limited demiand at all points on the West Coast. Cow carcasses were the nost
limited in the beef line while calf carcasses were practically out of stock in
the Northwest although sufficient in California. Incoming shipments of beef into
Southern California were soLewhat.smaller than recently but local slaughter was
sufficient to satisfy all demands. Fresh and cured pork cuts were liberal. -'emand
for smoked skinned hams broadened slightly due to pre-Easter bookings. Cooler
supplies were in fairly fresh condition but coolers were more heavily stocked than
at the previous week's close. Trading was slow on most.classes of fresh and cured
meats. Outlet for beef loins improved at Los Angeles while briskets were in good
demand at San Francisco. Prices compared to last Friday: Steer beef $1.00-2.00
higher at Los Angeles, steady at San Prancisco and weak to $1.00 lower in the
Northwest; cow beef mostly steady, instances on Cutter 51.00 higher at San Fran-
cisco; veOa.l nd calf steady; lamb steady to $1.00 higher at Los Angeles and $1.00
lower in the Porthwest; fresh pork loins steady to tl.00 higher; oth-.r fresh pork
steady except instances $1.00 lower in the Northwest; smoked skinned hams $2.00-
5.00 higher; slab bacon steady to $1.00 lower; other smoked meat and lard about
steady.
choicee steer carcasses under 700A brought $30.00-33.00, 700-800, $29.00-31.0C
Good under 700" $26.00-31.00, few sales to ^32.00 at San Francisco; iomnercial
426.00-30.00. Commercial cow bulked from $23.00-26.00; Utility $22.00-25.00; Can-
ner and Cutter *18.00-22.00. Good and Choice veal under 150# brought $40.00-50.00
in the northwest, $38.00-44.00 at San Francisco; same grades of calf under 200-
$32.00-39.00 in California only; Commercial $29.00-33.00. Choice and Prime lamb
carcasses under 55# cleared from $33.00-39.00; Good, all weights, $30.00-38.00.
Closely triLimed pork loins under 16:' brought 34.00-40.00, few up to .~42.00 at
San Francisco; shoulders under 16# t22.00-32.00; smoked skinned hams under 18#
$45.00-52.00; slab bacon under 10- $28.00-42.00; sliced 14 packages of bacon
$34.00-45.00; lard in 1 cartons $13.50-18.00.





222
WHOLESALE DRESSED MEAT PRICES: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds

New York Chicago San Francisco
--------------------------------------------------
Classification Mar. : Mar. Mar.
10 3 12 10 3 12 10 3 12
1956 1956 1955 1956 1956 : 1955 1956 1956 1955


Beef -
Steer -
Prime 600-700r
700-800
Choice 500-600
600-700
Good 350-600
Com'l. *
Cow, all wts. -
Commercial
Utility
Veal -
Prime 80-110#
SChoice *
Good p

Prime 40-501
50-60
Choice 40-50
50-60


Good all wts.
Pork Fresh -
Loins 8-10# av.
10-12 "
12-16 *
Butts 4-8 "
Pork Cured -
Hams, smk., skd. -
12-16# av.
16-18 v
18-20 "
Bacon. smk.. slab -
6-8# av.
8-10 "
Sliced 1 f pkg.
Picnics, smoked -
4-8# av.
Backs. D. S. -
16-20# av.
Lard, 1# cartons -
Refined
Substitutes


38.00
36.00

34.40
31.00
28.00

26.00
24.00

41.00
35.50
31.00

37.10
35.20
37.10
35.20
35.00

33.60
33.60
32.70
29.10


47.00
44.90



32.50
36.50


38.00
36.00

34.80
31.00
28.00

25. PO0
24.00

44.20
38.50
33.00

38.20
36.00
38.20
36.00
35.00

35.10
35.10
34.00
31.00


45.50
42,00



34.50
37.00


-- : 37.Q00
51.50 : 37.00
-- : 32.95
43.50 : 32.95
37.70 : 27,95
33.50 :26.75

29.00 :
25.50 :

43.00 :41.30
35.00 :36.80
31.00 :33.60

44.00 :36.85
44.00 :33.90
41.50 :36.65
41.30 : 33.90
40.50 33.40

38.70 :31.75
38.70 : 3175
38.20 :31.35
36.20 : 25.10


46.00 :50.15
42.80 :49,20
-- :48,65

-- 31.25
43.00 :30,00
49.50 :34.30


24.00 24.50 33.00 :29.300

13.50 13.50 14.00 :11.75


16.00 16.50


16.50 :14.75
-- : 25.00


37.25
37.25
33.00
33.00
28.20
26.60


50.50 : 0
50.50 :
40.25 : 32.50
42.10 : 31,00
35.00 : 30.50
32.00 :28.00


- : 26.00
-- -- : 23.00


42.90
38.70
35.40

37.75
34,25
37.75
34.25
34.00

31.85
31.85
31.65
26.75


49.65
47.80
47.55

32.60
31.05
36.80


41.30 :
38.10 :
34.00 : 43.00

43.00 :38.00
41.00 :37.00
42.00 38.00
39.00 :35.00
38.00 :35.50

36.70 :38.00
36.70 : 39.00
36.50 :33.00
29.90 : 34.00


47.15 : 0.00
45.75 :47.50
45.20 : --

47.65 : 40.00
43.70 :38.00
51.60 : 42.50


28.85 33.70 :30.00


32.70
31.00
30.50
28.00

26.00
23.00



43.80

38.00
37.00
38.00
35.00
35.50

38.40
39.40
39.00
34.00


50.00
47.50


40.00
38.00
42.50


--
40.70
39.20
39.05
36.00

30.00
27.00


43.00
42.60

43.00
41.00
43.00
41.00
38.50

46.50
43.50
41. 00
40.50


51.00
48.00


53.00
47.50
51.00


30.00 34.00


11.55 11.50 :


14.75
25.00


15.25 :1 .25
28.00 : --


17.25


17.50


Note: CQuotations at New York exclude locally dressed meats.


________________________________________


I


I





BOSTON WOOL MARKET REVIEW223
Movement of greasy domestic worsted wools in the Boston market was very slow
as approximately eight cars were moved. Prices held unchanged for all classes of
combing wools. There was very little interest on the part of mill buyers and top.
makers. Scoured wools and noils were slow to move at unchanged prices. Activity
in the west increased slightly as a few sales and contracts were made in the
territory States and Texas, Country buyers also were operating in the fleece wool
States for future delivery.
Cabled reports early in the week showed fine Australian wools firm while
crossbreds were definitely easier. The United Kingdom and the Continent were the
main buyers supported by local mills, Japan and United States representatives,
New Zealand prices were definitely easier with general competition, In the new
season for short wools in South Africa prices held firm under good general compe-
tition with Bradford, Germany and Japan dominating. Trading in South American
markets remained quiet.
Fleece Wools Graded 3/8s good French combing and staple fleeces sold around
$1.08 clean basis while 56/58s baby combing fleeces sold for future delivery at
960 and medium seedy and burry wools at 86# clean. Country buyers paid 440-454
grease basis to the growers early in the week.
Territory Wools Graded 64s good French combing and staple territory wool of
average style sold around $1.28 clean basis while a small quantity of average to
short French combing 64s brought l.18 and a 64s clothing wool moved at t1.12
clean. A small lot of choice light shrinking graded 56/58s good French and staple
wool sold at 41.15 while a graded 50/56s good French combing and staple brought
t1.07 clean.
In Wyoming, bulk fine and half blood wools were purchased in the basin area
at 430-48# and were estimated to cost around 41.24-1.25 delivered Boston. A mixed
clip in Idaho at 450 f.o.b, was estimated around $l.15 clean, delivered Boston.
New Mexico, bulk fine wools were estimated to cost clean from 1.25-1,28, delivered
Boston. Bulk fine, good French combing and staple Arizona wools were purchased at
48#0 f.o.b. and were estimated up to 1.37 clean, landed Boston.
Texas Wcols Original bag 12 months Texas wool, bulk average to good French
combing sold at 41,35 clean basis. Recent sales of 1955 choice good French comb-
ing and staple 12 months wools in Texas were estimated to cost up to 1t.45 clean
basis, delivered Boston.
Mohair Several cars of mohair were sold in Texas early in the week at 81-#
for adult and 1l.01 for kid mohair to the warehouse. Late in the week activity
had subsided and few sales were made,
Sales of CCC Wools The Commodity Credit Corporation announced on March 8,
1956 that about 626,000 pounds of C.C,C.-owned wool from bids received on a total
of about 6,276,000 pounds, were sold. The principal grades, quantities and sales
price ranges (before discounts, if any) follows
Pounds Price Range
Graded territory 1/2 blood staple and good French 8,829 $ ..1.251
3/8s short French and clothing 54,092 .85 1.06
1/4 staple and good French 48/50s 36,871 1,06
S" low 1/4 blood 33,167 .955. .97
0. B. Texas 12 months average and good French 18,201 1.35 1.372
Fall Texas, best length 56,372 1.11 1.121
average to short 30,039 1.002
Graded fleece, fine average and good French 14,599 1.18
3/8s blood staple and good French 43,206 1.07
Scoured shorn territory 3/8s blood staple & Gd.French 124,774 1,15 1.214
1/4 50/54s 5,465 1.18
fleece 3/8s blood staple & Gd. French 67,096 1,145-1.2125
1/4. 48/50s 34,042 1.055-1.162





224
UNITED STATES EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF MEATS

Commodity Dec.
1955 _


EXPORTS (Domestic) -
Beef and veal -
Fresh or frozen. ... .. ,
Pickled or cured . .
Pork -
Fresh or frozen. .. ,
Hams & shoulders, cured or cooked. ,. .
Bacon. .
Other pork, pickled, salted or otherwise cured,
(includes sausage ingredients) .
Sausage, bologna & frankfurters, (except canned)
Other meats, except canned .. .
Canned meats -
Beef and veal ... .. ... .
Sausage, bologna & frankfurters. .
Hams and shoulders .. .
Other pork, canned . .
Other meats & meat products, canned i .
Lamb and mutton (except canned). .. ..
Lard, (includes rendered pork fat) .
Tallow, edible ... ..
Tallow, inedible .. 0 .
Inedible animal oils, n.e.c., (includes lard oil).
Inedible animal greases & fats(incl. grease stearin)
IMPORTS ,
Beef, fresh or frozen. . .
Veal, fresh or frozen. . .
Beef and veal, pickled or cured. .........
Canned beef (includes corned beef) .
Pork, fresh or chilled or frozen .
Hams, shoulders, bacon & other pork 2 .
Canned cooked hams & shoulders .. .
Other pork, prepared or preserved 3/ ..
Meat, canned, prep. or pres. n.e.s.. .
Lamb, mutton and goat meat .
Tallow, edible ... ... .
Tallow, inedible ,. . .


Pounds


1,342,801
1,607,951

802,355
1,511,464
139,533

3,306,229
250,912
8,146,172

792,450
1,132,502
213,262
384,855
344,711
103,786
69,813,093
441,148
87,133,867
105,781
18,474,373

2,745,451
1,052
451,297
3,715,300
2,441,583
479,863
8,038,442
822,028
327,954
119,446

474,420


Dec.
1954
Pounds

5,045,095
744,350

570,522
1,400,435
134,914

1,499,476
126,153
5,740,050

928,284
637,382
137,430
293,937
321,563
29,938
57,323,826
86,744
80,148,012
189,226
10,967,312

1,023,958
44,349
615,361
4,111,728
4,062,984
623,44
9,984,414
1,403,426
283,096
45,860

119,800
119,800


1/ Includes many items which consist of varying amounts of meat.
SNot cooked, boned or canned or made into sausage.
3 Includes fresh pork sausage.

Compiled from official records, Bureau of the Census,





225


UNITED STATES EXPORTS AND IMPORTS OF LIVESTOCK

: Dec. t Dec.
: 1955 : 1954
Number Number


EXPORTS (domestic) -
Cattle for breeding. ..
Other cattle .
Hogs (swine) .
Sheep. .
Horses, for breeding .
Other horses .
Mules, asses and burros .


. 3,061
. . 4,840
. . 1,147
. 734
. . 10
. . 283
a a a a a a a --


3,783
412
143
336
19
36
6


IMPORTS -
Cattle for breeding, free -
Canada L/ -
Bulls. . .
Cows . . .
Other Countries -
Cows a .
Cattle, other edible (dut.)-
Canada -
Over 700 pounds.. .. (Dairy
(Other
200-700 pounds . .. .
Under 200 pounds . .


Over 700 pounds .. (Other
200700 pounds .. ... .
Hogs -
Edible, except for breeding (dut.) 2/. .


Mexico -


irn 7 .


Horses -
For breeding, free . 94 34
Other (dut.), . .. 203 122
Sheep, lambs and goats, edible (dut.) 114 --

/ Includes Newfoundland and Labrador.
J/ Number of hogs based on estimate of 200 pounds per animal.


Compiled from official records, Bureau of the Census.


43
1,123


1,643
32
71

--

1,129
15,317

45


58
1,189


1,415
2,619
1,095
3


633
63

633






226


EARLY LAMB CROP 1956

The 1956 early spring lamb crop in the principal early lamb States is
estimated to be about 2 percent below last year, according to the Crop Report-
ing Board. The smaller early lamb crop is due to a smaller number of breeding
ewes. The percentage of ewes lambing early this season is about the same as
last year. The number of breeding ewes was down from a year ago in Texas,
Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. In the rest of the early lamb States ewe
numbers were the same or larger than a year ago. California, the leading early
lamb State, and Texas showed a lower percentage of the ewes lambing early than
a year earlier, while in other States the percentage of early lambs was the
same or larger than a year ago. In the early lambing States, the 1956 lambing
percentage (lambs saved per 100 ewes) is about the same as a year ago,
Mild, open winter weather in most areas, except the Pacific Northwest, has
been favorable for early lambing and holding down losses. The feed situation
has also been favorable in most sections, Some supplemental feeding has been
done to maintain condition of ewes and promote growth of lambs, but carryover
stocks of feed are ample in most areas. Feeding of hay has been heavy in the
Northwest and may be in short supply if there is'a late spring. New feed
prospects are sliw and uncertain in some important producing areas. New feed
prospects are most favorable in Tennessee, Idahoi and California. The outlook
is less favorable in Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, Texas, Washington, and
Oregon.
In the Southeastern States the number of early lambs saved is larger than
a year ago due to a larger number of ewes lambing and also a higher proportion
lambing earlier than a year ago. In the Pacific Northwest the early lamb crop
is only slightly larger than a year ago.
California: The early lamb crop in California is smaller than last year.
The inventory of breeding ewes on farms and ranches is larger than a year
earlier, but the lambing percentage and the proportion of ewes lambing early
is below a year ago. Death losses have been relatively low, although somewhat
larger than a year ago. The California lamb crop is making good progress and
is in excellent condition. Present feed supplies are adequate, with prospects
good for further development of pastures. If present feed prospects materialize,
there should be a normal movement of lambs to market at good weights. Recent
rainfall has benefited many areas in the Southern San Joaquin Valley and Coast
Range. Much of northern California still shows the effects of excessive
moisture and cold weather. In the Iml-erial Valley, alfalfa pasture has been
excellent and old crop lambs from this area have been moving steadily to
slaughter, These lambs should b gone before new crop lambs are available.
Arizona: Early lambs have been making good gains, and a large proportion
of them are ready for market now. This is better progress than a year ago.
Weather conditions have been highly favorable, with very little cold weather
and rain.
Texas: The number of breeding ewes on January 1 was 4 percent lower than
a year ago. The proportion of ewes lambing early was also lower, resulting in
a smaller early lamb crop. Feed prospects are uncertain at the present time
due to limited amounts of rainfall. Rains in the main sheep areas in early
February started growth of small grains and grasses, but rain is urgently
n:seded to maintain development of green feed.





227
Southeastern States: Reports from the three Southeastern States indicate
that the number of early lambs will be about 13 percent larger than a year
earlier. The numoer of breeding ewes on farms January 1, 1956, was up 3 per-
cent, and the proportion of ewes lambing early was above last year. Tennessee:
Dry weather until late January caused rather poor winter pasture conditions,
but rains during February have promoted a rapid growth of grass and winter
grains. Shortage of pasture feed caused more supplemental feeding than usual,
but lambs have made fair to good development. Marketing is expected to start
late in March but the peak movement is not expected until early June. Kentucky:
The early lamb crop in 1956 is expected to be larger than a year earlier because
of a larger number of ewes bred for lambing and a higher proportion of ewes
lambing before March 1. Supplies of old feed are ample, and most flocks are
being fed liberal feed rations. Pastures are supplying only a limited amount
of feed, but prospects are excellent for spring grazing. Virginia: The number
of early lambs is slightly larger than a year ago due to more breeding ewes on
farms and more ewes lambing earlier than a year ago. Supplies of old feed are
ample, and grain crops are beginning to develop which should furnish new feed
soon east of the Blue Ridge Mountains. West of the mountains, there will be
little grazing until the end of March.
Missouri: Due to an 11-percent increase in ewe numbers, the 1956 early
lamb crop is expected to be larger thEn last year. The proportion of ewes
lambing early is about the same as last year. Feed supplies have been ade-
quate, End after an open winter, sheep and lambs are in excellent condition.
Dry weather has limited feed from small grain pastures,
Northwestern States: Weather conditions have been generally unfavorable
in this area for early lambs. Prospects are for a slightly smaller early lamb
crop this year than last. Ewe numbers are below a year ago, but about the same
proportion of ewes have lambed early. Washington: Weather has been unfavorable
for early lambing. Temperatures averaged much below normal and snowfall was
unusually heavy. Breeding ewes and early lambs have been maintained in good
condition due to supplemental feeding of grain and hay. Soil moisture sup-
plies are ample in all parts of the State, promising good spring and early
summer feed when the weather becomes warmer. Oregon: Pastures are in poor
condition due to extremely cold weather and the continued snow and rainy
season. Mild open weather is needed for grass growth, as present soil moisture
conditions are very favorable throughout the State, 3r-eding ewes are in only
fair condition and losses of early lambs have been above average. Idaho:
Breeding ewes and early lambs are in generally good condition, although losses
have been heavier than a yezr ago due to adverse weather conditions. Prospects
are good for early pasture. Hay supplies are still adequate, but a late spring
would bring shortages in many areas.

SHEEP AND LAMBS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 211
A few Choice and Prime lambs brought $21.00-21.50, and occasional lots of spring
lambs reached t22.25. Most 115-140# wooled lambs realized t17.50-19.25. Cull to
low-Good lambs sold from 48.00-18.50. Good to Prime shorn lambs carrying No. 2
to summer shorn pelts brought 417.00-20.25, some fresh shorn t16.00 and below.
Cull to Choice slaughter ewes sold at $3.50-8.50. Good and Choice feeder lambs
brought 18.00-20.00, while bred ewes sold at t14.00-25.00 a head and some ewe
and lamb pairs realized 125.00 a set.
Continued on page 228.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
22 8IIIIIIB III1 IIIIIII llllllllll llllllllFl IIIIIIFI1i111I
3 1262 08734 5335
















LIVESTOCK REVIEW CONTINUED FROM PAGE 227
WESTERN LIVESTOCK REVIEW
Improved action featured the week's trade on slaughter cattle and hogs
throughout the West and prices advanced at most points. Slaughter steers and
heifers sold 50-t1.50 higher at Los Angeles and Spokane, steady to 500 higher
at other terminals. Cows showed a steady to 500 higher trend, vealers and
slaughter calves closing mostly steady. Butcher hogs sold 25-750 higher,
slaughter lambs steady at California terminals, steady to 504 higher in the
Northwest, steady to slightly lower at Denver and Ogden,
High-Good to Choice fed steers ranged from t16.00-20.50 at terminal markets,
bulk Good k15.00-17.50, low-Good down to tla.00 at Ogden. Average-Good to Choice
heifers cleared from t15.50-17.75, 4 loads high-Choice 1025-1100 $1l8.00-18.40 at
Denver. Utility and Commercial cows brought 410.00-1.50; Canners and Cutters
$8.00-11.50. Good and Choice vealers and slaughter calves under 350# bulked from
420.00-25.00, Choice vealers at Spokane and Portland 526.00-30.00, Medium and
Good stocker and feeder steers cashed from t1F.00-17.50; same grades heifers
13,00-15.00, 2 loads 716- shortfed heifers cashing at Los Angeles for further
feeding at 15.75. Medium and Good stock steer calves earned $15.00-17.00, Good
400+ at Stockton 418.50; Good and Choice at Denver f18.00-20.75.
Good and Choice fed steers sold direct at California feedlots from t18.00-
19.50, 200 head Choice and Prime 1050-1075* in Southern California t20.00, some
bids of '20,50 in that area refused. Good and Choice fed heifers bulked from
$15,75-17,50, around 600 head Choice 950-975# heifers realizing $18,50 in Southern
California. Good and Choice stocker and feeder steers brought tl5.50-17.00; same
grades stock steer calves 419.00-19.25.
Mixed U. S. No. 1 to 3 180-240# barrows and gilts brought $14.25 at South
San Francisco late; 4la.50 at Stockton; $13.50-14.50 at Los Angeles; $14.00-
15.25 at Portland; t13.75-14,25 at Spokane; t13.50-14.50 at Ogden; and $13.25-
14.00 at Denver. Choice and Prime 95-111# wooled slaughter lambs brought $19.25-
20.00 at Denver; Good and Choice at oth-r terminals t17.00-19.50. Choice 108-
119# lambs with No. 1 pelts sold at Denver from 17.50-18.00, few lighter weights
1.8,50, In the Imperial Valley, Good and Choice lambs with No. 1 pelts bulked
at t17C,0, few loads on a sliding scale at 417.50 for 105# down and 100 per pound-=-
off for each pound above that weight. Direct sales f.o.b. Valley at 44 shrink.




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