Market news

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Material Information

Title:
Market news
Uniform Title:
Market news (Washington, D.C.)
Physical Description:
9 v. : ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Production and Marketing Administration. -- Livestock Branch
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock Division
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Production and Marketing Administration, Livestock Branch
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Meat industry and trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Livestock -- Marketing -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 18, no. 16 (Apr. 18, 1950)-v. 26, no. 52 (Dec. 30, 1958).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Production and Marketing Administration, Livestock Branch, Apr. 18, 1950-Dec. 15, 1953; Agricultural Marketing Service, Livestock Division, Dec. 22, 1953-Dec. 30, 1958.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004691907
oclc - 29653329
Classification:
ddc - 338.105 UNIL
System ID:
AA00012178:00006

Related Items

Preceded by:
Livestock market news (Washington, D.C.)
Succeeded by:
Livestock, meat, wool; market news


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7wd LIV ESTOK, DIVISION Wed





MARKET REVIEWS ANL STATISTICS

Vol. 24, No. 8 February 21, 1959
SWeek ended February 18

Page
Livestock Market Revijws, . 146
Livestock Market Receipts ..... 148
Feeder and Stocker Statistics ..... .. 148
Steer Sale Statistics . 143
E timated Slaughter and Meat Production 150

Slaughter at Major Centers . 151
SEstimated Pezcentaga of Feeder and Stocker
Cattle and Slaughter Cows in Salable RecipV's 151
Cattle Prices . .. .... 152
Hog Prices .... 153
Hog Purchase Statistics .. ...... .. 154
Sheep and Lamb Prices . 155
Wholesale Meat Trade Reviews. 156
Wholesale Meat Prices . 158
Wool Market Review . 159

Special to this issue

Federally Inspected Slaughter by Regions,
January 1956.,,, . 155
Calf Crop Report, 1955. . 160
Stocker and Feeder Cattle and Sheep Receivea in
a Several Corn Belt States, January 1956. 162
Storage Holdings of Meats and Lard,
Jan. 31, 1956 05 FO



Z IKfrarfir >
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
LIVESTOCK DIVISION
Washington 25; D. C.


tl111l-All




i.IDA'EST LIVESTOCK hA},KET hEVlb,


Cattle marketing were larger then during the previous week but daily
euppli-es were more evenly distributed and trading showed increPsed stability.
Prices of fed steers closed steady tc firm at some markets, instances as much
as 500 higher on Choice and Prime, with late trend at several points steady to
50; lowar. Hog prices showed a general decline during the first half of the
week when marketing were fairly large. Part of the downturn was recovered
lattr when runs were curtailed due to unfavorable weather and roads. Butchers
closed unevenly steady to 750 lower, mostly 25-500 off. Late sales of slaughter
lambs were largely 25-50 lower than the previous we 'k's close.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE AND CALVES
Cattle receipts increased moderately but were more evenly distriDuted than
during the previous week and price fluctuations were considerably less severe.
Nevertheless, with further weakness in the wholesale beef trade and with con-
tinued liberEl numbers of old crop steers of heavy weights included, buyers wore
rather selective in their purchases, and a somewhat irregular price trend de-
veloped. At Chicago most Prime steers and Choice offerings under O1100 closed
steady to 500 higher, others steady to 500 lower. at Omaha late sales were steady
to 500 lower, with declines of 500 or more at South St. Paul. At other Missouri
River markets steers closed mainly steady to firm. Trend on heifers was steady
to 50 lower, and prices of cows also weakened at most markets. Good and Choice
steers predominated and average- weights of beef steers at Chicago, Omaha and Sioux
City were all above the previous week. The average of 1168# at Chicago was 74f
above a year ago; the average at Omaha 681 above a year ago, while at Sioux City
thn w3ek's average of 1137: was 52- heavier then a year ago.
At Chicago a small supply of average to high-Prime 1100-1346m steers brouLht
423,75-24.50, one load high Prime 1157# 424.75; bulk Choice and Prime t17.50-
23.0; Good 15.50-18.00. host Prime 1300-1500= steers sold there from t20.00-
23.00; same grade 1600-17C0# 418.00-19.00; load Choice and Prime 1780# t17.00.
At other midwest markets Good and Choice st-:rs which sold from 415.00-19,25
formed bulk of the supply, a scattering high-Choice and Prime 419.50-22.75.
Slaughter of 1,696,893 cattle and 601,938 calves under Federal inspection
in January were both new records for the month.
STOCKER AND FEEDER CATTLE ANJ CALVES
Seasonally small to moderate supplies of stocker and feeder cattle and
calves at terminal markets fell somewhat short of the numbers marketed the previ-C
ous week. Good to low-Choice yearling and two-year-old steers again made up a
relatively large percent cf the overall supplies. Receipts at some markets
included sizable numbers of shortfed cattle which with a more favorable feed-
price relationship would have attracted feeder buyer competition. However, bulk
of the two-way steers went into slaughter channels as feedlot operators were
inclined to proceed very cautiously in tne face of continued weakness on fat
cattle. Shipments of steers to the country from the 10 markets totaled 12,565,
compared with 14,168 head a week earlier and 13,600 a year ago. Trading around
the market circuit was only moderately active and somewhat uneven but for the
most part pices varied but little from a steady basis. Yearling stockers and
calves in a few instances were moderately stronger while feeder steers 8001 up
occasionally~'old weak to 50 lower. At Kansas City the average cost of all
feeder steers 800# up shipped to the country during the week at t16.11 was t4.32
lower than a year ago. However, the week's average price cf all beef steers sold
on that market was only 416.44 or t6.13 lower than a year ago. Consequently,
there is little in the current price picture to stimulate interest in feedlot




147
replacements. A further comparison of bvei ge prices t Kknsis City shows that
the average price of t16.80 for all stacker and feeder steers 500w up was 360
higher than the week's average cost of beef steers on that market.
A few Choice 750-800# feeders at the various markets brought 417.50-18.00,
but bulk Good and Choice 800t up cashed from 415.00-17.00, Choice 900# occasional-
ly down to 1L6.00. At the same time, Good and Choice yearling stock steers 650#
down ranged from l16,00-20.50, few Choice short yearlings to 21.50, and Choice
442# steer calves t22.00. Good and Choice yearling heifers bulked at $14.25-
16.50, with heifer calves up to t18.00. Limited numbers of Medium and Good stock
cows were in good demand at 10.00-12.50.
HOGS
Combined receipts of salable hogs at the 12 terminal markets and the Interior
i.rea of Iowa and Southern Minnesota were slightly below the previous week's total,
but were nearly 20 percent above a year ago. Seasonally large receipts early in
the week along with the slow, mostly weak to lower trend on wholesale fresh pork
prices, influenced substantial declines on hogs, and prices dropped to the lowest
levels in nearly a month. Snow, sleet and slippery roads cut receipts at 12 mar-
kets Thursday and Friday to the smallest volume of the year for those days and
part of early sharp declines were recovered.. Compared with a' week earlier,
butchers closed steady to 75# lower, mostly 25-50# off. The least decline was on
the decreased supply of butchers around 2509 up. Price differentials between
light and heavy butchers narrowed considerably in several sections and butchers
weighing 200-300# often sold within a 41.00-1.50 spread. Sows were steady to 500
lower. Shipping demand, influenced by the narrow dressed pork outlet and the
increase of new crop lightweights in Eastern areas, was rather poor compared with
previous weeks. The slightly larger supply of new crop hogs reduced the average
butcher weights a few pounds at several midwest marketing points. There was
marked price discrimination against weights under 180#, some of these selling 50#-
1.00 or more below comparable 180-220# butchers. Although a few more U. S. No. 1
and 2 grade lots were offered at some markets, these were still in comparatively
small supply. Lots lacking uniformity or grading mostly No. 3 consistently sold
at the low end of the price range for the weight.
Stocker and feeder pigs remained steady at S. St. Paul with Good and Choice
cashing from $10.00,11.00. Prices at Sioux City were weak to 50# lower, bulk Good
and Choice 410.00-10.50, a few 410.75. A few sales of 85-140# at Kansas City
brought $8.00-10.00, Feeders were in small supply at Memphis but demand was
narrow and prices were 50# lower. Medium and Good 70-140r feeders sold late from
t9.00-9.50, some Good offerings early to 410.00.
SHEEP AND LAMBS
Receipts at the 12 markets were slightly larger than last week, but were
again about 20% smaller than the corresponding week a year ago. Trading was
generally slow. Late prices on slaughter lambs were steady to 75# lower, with
most points showing downturns of 25-500. Feeder lambs were steady to 50# higher,
with the exception of Sioux City where early declines of 50-75# were posted.
Sheep sold mostly steady to 50# higher. Lambs weighing over 105-110# continued
to be discounted up to t2.00 and more per cwt. Good to Prime wooled lambs 11U0
down bulked at l17.50-20.00, a limited number Choice and Prime t20.25-21.00. Good
to Prime 112-140# lambs brought t17.00-20.65, a few 150-170# lots 15.00-16.00.
Cull to low-Good lambs brought 10,.00-18.00. Good to Prime shorn lambs 111 down
with No. 1 to summer shorn pelts sold at 417,50-19.50, some with fresh shorn to
No. 2 pelts t16.00-17.50 at Fort Worth. Cull to Choice slaughter ewes realized
t3.00-8.00. Medium to Choice feeder lambs turned at '1k6.00-20.00, a few horn
feeders down to $14.50,
Continued on page 184.





WEEKLY RECEIPTS OF SALABLE LIVESTOCK AT 12 PUBLIC MARKETS


........................- --------------------------------- -------------
Cottle Cal ves N Hs Sheep
-- -- -- -- ------------------------- -
M. Feb. Feb. Feb, Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb.
S 18 19 18 19 18 19 18 19
1956 1955 1956 1955 1956 1955 1956 1955
---....... --...-..-..--- .-.-.-- ---- --....-- .... ................. 1 ..... ... 55
Chicago........... 46,506 41,306 1,333 1,239 51,703 52,865 10,040 16,918
Cincinnati.. ....... 4,193 3,541 1,050 1,092 19,524 19,608 912 486
Denver.... ... 13,835 13,012 661 924 3,004 3,315 22,361 26,513
Fort Worth ... ..... 7,241 8,700 2,173 2,135 2,563 1 975 11,363 12, 841
Indianapolis........ 8,582 8,867 1,054 1,113 54,790 62,485 2,440 11705
Konsas City-..---.- 21,948 15,812 1,190 1,281 12,496 9,581 4,051 3,E88
Oklahoma City..... 11,415 10,103 1,174 1,447 4,441 2,582 2,864 1, 32
Omaha.---.......... 39,956 37,436 929 777 55,130 42,795 15,314 17 439
St. Joseph......... 16,102 14,123 761 829 27,668 21,467 2,712 5,442
St. Louis NSY....... 15,834 14,962 3,280 3,160 62,670 51,746 4,128 4,329
Siox City........... 24,199 22,691 875 244 39,717 38,402 9,916 15,089
S. St. Paul......... --- 20,313 22,199 11,247 11,100 71,215 59,163 11,044 13,422

Total.....---.....- 230,124 212,954 25,727 25,341 404,921 365,984 97,145 119,604
Feb. 11, 1956 199,626 27,777 402,803 92,912
.......... Z -------- .-------------- ft ^----- --- --------------- -------
INTERIOR IOWA AND SOUTHERN MINNESOTA
Week ended: hogsa Sheep
Feb. 18, 1956 .....- .----.- .. 391,000 27,700
Feb. 11, 1956 ........---...... A05,000 30,500
Feb. 19, 1955 ......--.----- 301,000 28,000
.FEEDER AND STOCKER CATTLE: AVERAGE COST, WEIGHT, AND NUMBER
-- - --- --y 8- ?-.---- ---- ----- ----.- .^o- ti. .
Week ended Month I
Feb. 16 : Feb, 9 j Feb. 17 Jan. : Jan.
1956 1956 1955 1956 : 1955
t -........................up. ... ."8 .. ..... ...... 8... .. ---. .... .....-- -L-- -g ............
SteeVs 1001Y up "" 2 682 517 1,891 2,225
901.1000 976 1,920 2,027 6,055 8,611
801.900 2,277 2,618 2,525 16,183 15,367
701-800 2,373 3,037 2,797 17,268 17,526
501.700 6,677 5,911 5,734 34,768 44,818


Total steers 10 mkts.
Av. wts. i
Av.cost*" "
" Chicago
" Ks. City
" Omaha
" "S. St. Paul
" Sioux City
" "Denver
" Ft. Worth
" Okla. City
" S. St. Joseph
" Natl. Stk. Yds.
Total calves-10 mkts.


12,565 14,168
712# 750 p
t16.36 $16.31
16.00 16.65
16.80 17.02
15.82 15.84
15.13 14.98
16.69 16.47
16.42 15.26
16.14 15,65
16.38 16.33
16.54 15.86
16.38 15.84
3,782 4,235


13,600
742w
$19.84
20.23
20.57
19.61
19.14
20.43
19,57
19.00
18.86
18.90
19.21
4,675


76,205
721#
$16,64
16.76
17.13
16.34
15,06
16.54
17.90
16.27
16.25
16.35
16.09
34,140


88,547
711#
$19.79
19.78
20.40
19.58
17.20
20.18
22.36
18.52
18.05
19.54
18.38
49,189


O cows.
heifers, bulls-" 2,005 2,477 2,724 14,560 20,821
* Not odiuted or dfr e~Cs- i grade ofcattle sold at e'ach -ark- et.....


148 '




149
BEEF STEERS SOLD OUT OF FIRST HANDS FOR SLAUGHTER
Percent of Average price
Average weight
Number of head total in dollars
by (pounds) 'r 1 ,
by grades per 100 lb.
--- .----------..... -- I -,-................
Grade ------ Week ended
------ -- -- --------------- ---------- -......... .....................
1 Feb, ": Feb, : Feb. Feb.
16 9 17 16 9 17 16 9 17 16 9 17
195C 1956 1955 1956 1956 1955 1956 :1956 1955 1956 1 .956 1
CHICAGO


Prime
Choice
Good.
Coa'l.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Com'l.
Utility
All grades

Plime
Choice
Good
Com'l.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Com'I.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Com'l.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Co'l.
Utility
All grades


5253 4704 811 17.4 18.2 3.6 1278 1255 1139 22.09 21,52 31.7-
16943 14295 11494 56.3 55.3 50.9 1168 1184 1148 19.14 18.51 26.1r2
6306 5459 8431 20.9 21.1 37.4 1065 1076 1055 17.07 16.48 22.34
1151 11221 1454 3.9 4.3 6.4 1036 987 926 14.79 14.61 17.94
460 282 386 1.5 1.1 1.7 1011 926 919 13.46 13.06 15.25
30113 25861 22576 1168 116.3 194 19.08 .. ,
... ........ ...................OM- AHA. ... ......... ... ................. ....
OMAHA 1/
370 318 10 2.1 2.3 .1 1299 1224 1094 21,35 21,33 31.50
10508 6742 7312 59.4 50.0 49.9 1169 1159 1112 18,14 18.06 24,33
5379 5137 6341 30.4 38.1 43.3 1074 1099 1023 16.18 16.07 21.16
1284 1007 760 7.3 7.5 5.2 1027 1008 958 13.78 13.79 17,,12
151 279 221 .8 2.1 1,5 979 945 943 11.69 11.77 14,7-
17692 13483 14644 1131 1122 1063 17.32 17.00 22 54
.................... .............. .S- -- -- ..---.-..-.....
469 167 34 5.8 2.4 .5 1295 1280 1255 20,28 20.84 31.47
3837 3025 2687 47.5 44.4 38.7 1186 1168 1132 18.32 18.51 24.89
3392 3062 -3721 42.0 44.9 53.6 1072 1090 1060 16.64 16.62 215,0
285 507 311 3.5 7.4 4.5 969 1022 1026 14.24 14.21 17.28
101 59 .185 1.2 .9 2.7 1060 973 981 11.03 11.88 14.98
8074 6820 6938 1137 1123 1085 17.58 17.41 22 53
--- --- --- --- --- --- --- --KANSAS CITY 1/ -- - -- - -
27 37 -- .4 .5 -- 1186 1168 -- 19.89 19.68 --
2849 2871 1908 33.8 41.1 40.9 1097 1134 1120 17.79 17.73 24.26
3891 3077 2594 46.1 44.1 55.6 1054 1087 997 16.27 16.21 21.52
1299 761 119 15.2 10.9 2.6 980 1101 997 14.92 14.49 17.65
377 237 41 4.5 3.4 .9 1080 1046 1042 12.26 12.51 15.14
8.43 6.983 6_2 ..................... ... __ Q7 104.8. 16. 44..16 7. 2 5
.--..-.-....-S......T. LOUIS NSY 1/.....................
23 7 .4 .1 1194 1141 -- 22.12 21.50 -1
1398 595 185 25,3 10.6 5.4 1085 1069 1056 18,39 17.95 25.40
3149 3899 2231 57.0 69.3 65.2 1039 1025 1025 16.54 16.03 22.7"
836 1004 869 15.1 17.9 25.4 963 981 957 14.74 13.85 19.63
120 118 134 2.2 2,1 4.0 919 945 853 12.71 12.12 16.30
5526 5623 3419 1037 1020 1003 16.73 35 80
._.-----..--.. ...- 4. .................... ...---.. ...-_0 ., 2 .. .. _I--.- ..--. .i_
S. ST. JOSEPH 1/
38 -- 1 .5 -- -- 1455 -- 1050 20.00 -- 27.05
2423 1593 2675 32.5 32.3 47.6 1138 1149 1120 17.97 17.63 24,23
3651 2447 2572 49.0 49.7 45.7 1093 1099 1021 16.49 16.16 20.67
1189 795 330 16.0 16.1 5.9 1028 1029 1025 14.62 13.92 17.57
149 93 46 2.0 1.9 .8 935 928 798 12.07 11.89 13.83
7450 4928 .._.5624 ..................... ...9 .. 01 .6.6 1. 2.5.2 .
Continued.





150 BEEF STEERS SOLD OUT OF FIRST HANDS FOR SLAUGHTER
............................f A. -- -- -
SAverage weight erage price
Number of head total v..an in doltrs
( pounds) in d
by grades per 100 Ib.
Grade -------- Week ended
y, ..... ---------------.-----P;-6------ r ---------.. .------- --- ---- -------- -----: "
*eby. 99I IFeb. Feb. I Feb.:
16 9 17 16 9 17 16 9 17 16 9 17
1956 1956 1956 19551956 1956 1955 1956 1956 1955 1956 1956 195E
......... ----- ------- ----- ---- __.1.. ...95..6.
DENVER -
Prime 7-- -7- 1.9 1108 27.00
Choice 3522 1768 2641 69.4 64.3 72.1 1150 1145 1105 18.67 18.92 25.33
Good 1428 895 941 28,1 32.5 25.7 1181 1068 1053 16.93 16.44 23.14
Com'l. 128 76 9 2.5 2.8 .3 1067 930 796 13.85 13.05 15.29
Utility -- 12 -- -- .4 -- 895 -- 11.46
All grades .-787....... 75l -- .............. --- -------- -..l. .l-918.06 -.--,.g-i.L.
/ These summaries developed from data collected on marketing of fed cattle by the Agricultural Estimates
Division.

ESTIMATED FEDERALLY INSPECTED SLAUGHTER AND MEAT PRODUCTION
................- ................ -- .. .. -- -- .. .--;;. .. .l. ; % i.. .T ; I : -
I Prk Lamb and
S Beef : Veal : : Total TotaI
Week (excl. lard) mutton .
Wee... .......---------- .............. -------------.---.......--------------..----------------- meat lard
ended : N.- Nun; Pr_ N :Num-. i Numm.e la d
: Prod.. m- I rod. Ne Prod. prod. prod.
her bher er br
1,-00-l--- ------0 ** J,--------------- l I. lb.------ ---i-i--
I 000 oill. 1 I I 0l0 mil. lb. 000 mil. !b. 1000 mil. 16. i 1 mi. l
Feb. 18, 1956 361 205.4 139 15.7 1, 60 193. 1 266 13.0 427.5 51.1
Feb. 11, 1956 350 199.2 13! 15.3 1,36-7 181.0 276 13.5 409.0 49.2
Feb, 4, 19561/363 203.6 130 14.6 1,378 180.8 295 14.8 413.6 48.0
Feb. 19, 1955 333 178.0 126 13.P 1,189 162.? 2e2 13.9 368.b 43.0
Percentage change from:
Feb. 11, 1956 +3 +3 +3 +3 +7 +7 -4 -4 +5 +4
Feb.3-91,.955_-. +-+8 +15 +10 +14 +23 +19 -6 -6 +6 -.+
.. .. .. ...... ---- -- --.----.. --- -- ---..------..... ..-------- -- ..------.....
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -
,vaje weights (lb.) : Lard
.----.---.-- ------- ........ .. .. S .---------- ------ -
Week 0 i r I Sheep and yield
eek : Cattle Calves Hogs : yield
ended Hlambs Per
-- -... ... ...". ... -"... .... ""------ r ----"9 '-----. P"
ive Dressed Live. .d ."..Live ,Dressed 2.. Lie ..Dressed. 1.00 lb.
Feb. 18, 1956 1,025 569 205 113 232 132 103 49 15.1 4
Feb. 11, 1956 1,025 569 205 113 234 132 103 49 15.4
Feb. 4, 1956 1,020 561 205 112 236 131 102 50 15.3
Feb. 19, 1955 981 535 200 110 240 137 103 49 15.1

I/ Actual slaughter end revised estimate of production. 2/ Excludes lard.





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I



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OOI
0 CM 0


















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eM oa .-I!
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1

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14 I -4 ,
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151




152
CATTLE: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds

Chicago Kansas City Omaha
C.........o .- .. .- .. .r ". ---. -- ---- --- -------- ----- ------ ----------
,, Feb., ,* Feb. 6 Feb, ,
Classification ,
18 11 19 18 11 19 18 :11 : 19
1956 1956 1955 1956 1956 1955 1956 1956 195E
---------- l-----ughte cattle, calvs and veal ers-


Steers -
Prime 900-1100#
1100-1300
Choice 900-1100
1100-1300
Good 900-1100
Com'l. All wts.
Heifers -
Prime 600-8001
Choice *
Good 500-900
Com'l. All wts.
Cows All weights
Commercial
Utility
Canner & Cutter
Bulls All weights -
Good
Utility & Commercial
Vealers All weights -
Choice & Prime
Com'l. & Good
Calves 500f down
Choice & Prime
Com'l. & Good

Steers -
Choice 500-800#
Good I U
Medium 500-1000
Heifers -
Choice 500-750
Med. & Gd. "
Cows All weights -
Medium & Good
Calves 300-500# -
Steers -
Good & Choice
Heifers -
Good & Choice


23.38
22.98
20.38
19.58
17.32
14.90


18.78
16.33
13.98

12.55
11.42
10.20

13.55
15.20

27.80
21.80

19.50
15.00


23.05
22.55
19.95
19.25
17.02
14.78


18.55
16.00
13.72

12.72
11.58
10.38

13.55
15.45

28.00
22.00

19.50
15.00


31.75
33.25
28.00
27.95
21.95
17.70


23.82
20.02
16.62

13.60
11.95
10.40

13.05
15.33

29.00
22.20

22.50
17.00


:21.38
: 20.62
: 19.00
:18.50
: 16.25
:14.50


18.25
16.20
:14.00

S11.98
:10.98
: 9.88


13.50

S22.10
: 17.20

S16.75
:13.75


21.25
20.75
18.95
18.40
16.20
14.45


18.18
15.94
13.88

12.45
11.45
10.22


29.75
29.75
25,00
25.00
20.40
16.82


22.52
18.65
15. 00

13.10
12.00
10.65


22.12
21.55
19.42
19.18
16.25
13.55


18.35
15.72
13.38

12.12
10.88
9.50


-. -- :12.90
13.50 13.82 :13.55


24.70
18.70

16.85
13.85


24.00
18.70

17.70
14.40


:22.50
:17.00

:18.00
:14.00


21.92
21.48
19.30
19.05
16.05
13.78


18.35
15.85
13.42

12.12
10.88
9.50

13.12
13.74

22.10
16.80

18.00
14.00


29.25
30.50
25.45
25.32
20.70
17.25


22.75
18.25
14.50

13.1 i
11.68
9.80

12.00
13.75

23.00
17.50

20.50
16.00


Feeder and stocker cattle and calves


19.25
16.50
14.50

16.50
13.50


19.35
16.60
14.50

16.50
13.50


22.35
19.85
17.00


:18.65
: 17.38
:15.00


18.25 ;16.50
15.25 :14.00


18.75
17.38
15.00

16.50
14.00


22.50
20.00
17.25

19.00
15.50


19.00
17.12
14.62

16.50
13.50


-- -- -- :11.00 11.00 11.25 :10.88


20.50 20.50 22.00 :19.50 19.50 21.50 :20.50

17.00 17.00 18.50 :17.00 17.00 18.65 :17.00


19.00
17.12
14.62

16.50
13.50


22. FO
20.0'0
17.24

18.00
14.25


10.88 11.00


20.50 22.00

17.00 18.25





HOGS: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS '.D6
In dollars per 100 pounds
Interior Iowa and
Chicago southern Miinesota Indianapolis
Classificatiun -- ---- .,---.-.---- "p --------------------- --------
a I # 1 1 Feb. F Feb, Eb
18 11 19 18 11 19 18 11 13
1956 1956 1955 1956 195 1956 15 1956 195 1955
- -- -- -- -- -- --- - ; -, --


Harrows and
U.S.No.1
2 and 3


gilts -
160-180#
180-200
200-220
220-240
240-270
270-300


300-330#
360--400
450-550


11.90
12.45
12.40
12.30
11.92
11.64

11.25
10.92
10.30


12.65
13.22
13.25
13.10
12.50
12.06

11.60
11.10
10.35


16.08
17,05
16.98
16,85
16.05
15.50

15.10
14.82
13.98


10.26
11.69
12.18
11.77
11.25
10.65

10.35
9.85
9.22


10.69
12.17
12.55
12,23
11.67
11.07

10.60
10.10
9.20


15.07
16.45
16.72
16,34
15.72
14.97

14.45
13.79
12.62


11.90
12.54
12.55
12.34
11.85
11.30

10.92
10.50
9.52


12.45
13.25
13.22
12.92
12.50
11.65

11.12
10.55
9.52


16,42
16.90
lc .75
16,50
15.75
15.22

14.82
14.45.
13.90


Pigs Stockerr and feeder)-
Gd & Ch. 70-120# -- -- -- -
Omaha N St. Lois
Omaha Sioux City
National Stock Yards Ct


Barrows and gilts -
U.S.No.1 160-180f
2 and 3 180-200
200-220
220-240
240-270
270-300
Sows -
300-330#
360-400
450-550


12.56
12.56
12.56
12.56
12,05
11.40

10.90
10.90
10.00


13.00
13.00
13.00
12.32
11.60

10.98
10.98
9.90


17,12
17.12
17.02
16.35
15.48


14.50
13.90


s 12.18
: 12.86
: 12.88
t 12.64
: 12,06
= 11.58

S11.05
2 10.55
i 9.90


12,52
13.25
13.18
12.92
12.41
11.70

11.05
10.68
9.95


16.98
17.14
17.02
16.64
16.00
15.49

15.25
14.88
14.00


:12.30
:12.52
12.42
12.00
11.28


10,88
10.48
9.48


12.50
12.85
12.80
12.30
11.60

11.08
10.75
9.88


16.84
16.64
16.05
15.28

14.42
14.22
13.42


Pigs Stockerr & feeder)-
Gd. &Ch. 70--120#
-- ----------------------
| .
- -


Barrows and
U.S.No.1
2 and 3


Sows -


gilts -
160-180f
180-200
200-220
220-240
240-270
270-300

300-330f
360-400
450-550


Pigs Stockerr & feeder)-
Gd. & Ch. 70-120#


-- -- -- -- S -- --

S. St. Paul Baltimore N. Portland
..---. -----. .--...-----------------------------------------


12.00
12.98
12.98
12.78
12.28
11.38

10,48
9,98
9.50


12.05
13.12
13.12
12.95
12.05
11.42

10.52
10.02
9.52


16.82
16.85
16.70
16.32
15.58
14.82

14.22
13.60
12.80


s 13.12
:13.38
- 13.48
S13.18
:12.45
:11.32

: 9.72
: 9.72
: 8.20


13.81
14.22
14.22
13.94
13.31
12.19

10.06
10.06
8.78


18.06
18.06
18.06
17.81
17.19
16.44

15.22
15,19
13.22


S13.88
S14.22
S14.22
:14.03
:13.06
S12.75

:12.00
S11.12
S9.75


14.22
14.91
14.91
14,50
13.38
13.00

12.12
11.38
10,00


19.00
19.25
19.25
19.00
18.12
17.75

16.75
15.75
15.25


20.45 10.45 16.65 :


"? '-'' -`~-- '--------- --- --------------------------------,_,,




154
HOGS: AVERAGE COST WEIGHT, AND NUMBER OF PACKER AND SHIPPER PURCHASES 1/
---------- --- ------ ..r ---------------- r ----.-- --- --........- .... .. .... ...
i
Louis Kan- S.
Chi- NatI. sas Omaha Sioux St. St. Indian- mkts.
Week ended cago Stock City Oma a: City Joseph Paul apolis corn-
Yards I bined
---I------ -- -- -- -- -----------
AVERAGE COST qDolilars p.er 10 pounds
Barrows Feb. 18,1956 12,02 12.49 12.38 12.19 11.98 12.32 12.09 12.36 12.22
and Feb. 11,1956 12.56 12,77 12.80 12.34 12.26 12.78 12.29 12.93 12.56
gifts Feb. 19,1955 16.10 16.63 16.66 16,22 15.80 16.73 15.96 16.29 16.22
Feb. 18,1956 10.59 10.34 10.36 10,42 9.97 10.58 9.98 9.77 10.25
Sows Feb. 11,1956 10.73 10.36 10.50 10.39 10.23 10.54 10.09 9.91 10.33

AVERAGE WEIGHT Pounds


Feb. 18,1956
Feb. 11,1956
Feb.1.9,.955


239
240
252


218
221
223


221
223
230


230 237 219
231 242 221
252 -- 255 231J


Feb. 18,1956 443 415 410 407 424 378
Sows Feb. 11,1956 438 404 431 411 428 413
Feb. 191955 441 4n11 404 434 437 411
...... !t ------ ----- -- --- ----- ------ ----- -----
NUMBER OF HEAD -
Barrows Feb. 18,1956 41921 56620 11324 49771 35289 24101
and Feb. 11,1956 47296 56284 11417 42742 39984 24667
gilts Feb. _19,1955 43221 46045 8642 38433 34345 19866
Feb. 18,1956 4322 3177 850 3014 1220 1639
Sows Feb. 11,1956 3964 3490 670 2502 1613 1675
FebL 19.l19.55...--3183 ._.1687 ...3.4...83-- ...5._ 1 ....1 3799_
sows Percentage of total
Feb. 18,1956 9 5 7 6 3 6


224
224
233


222
223
..226.


226
228
....07.


416 450 423
406 447 423
418 448 431
----- -. --. ---B ..--- 4 1.

63750 49351 332127
60871 51656 334917
52441 58446 301439
2992 3243 20457
2575 3408 19897


4 6 6


Feb. 11,1956 8 6 6 6 4 6 4 6 6
..,.-.. F eb,. 19Q,1955 ....... _7..._....... ... .... ..... .4. .......- ....- ........ 4.
1/ Weighted average.
WEEKLY AVERAGE WHOLESALE VALUE OF HOG PRODUCTS DERIVED
FROM 100 LB- LIVE HOG, COMPARED WITH PRICES OF LIVE HOGS, CHICAGO
-- -- -. -- "- G .. '-" ross spread
SHog products 1/ Hog prices 2/ or margin 3/
..-- .. .-....- -..--------------------------------------------------- .. ...r
Feb. 18, 1956 415.39 t12.45 +t2.94
Feb. 11, 1956 15.40 13.22 + 2.18
Feb. 19, 1955 18.66 17.05 + 1.61
--,- ,,--.-- -,, -- -- ----- ---------------------------------- --~
1/ Value of all edible products, fresh basis (lard rendered) in 100 Ib. of live hog com-
puted from wholesale prices on carlot basis, Chicago, reported by National Provisioner
daily market report.
2/ Mean of daily quotations on U.S.11o. 1, 2 and 3 hogs 180-200t wt. Chicago.
T/ Difference between wholesale product value and hog prices.

HOG AND CORN PRICES AT CHICAGO AND HOG-CORN PRICE RATIO
Barrows and Corn, 1/ Hog-corn
Week ended gilts No. 3, yellow price ratio
Dollars per Cents per based on
100 pounds bushel barrows and gilts
.......... ----------------------------------------------------------------
Feb. 18, 1956 12.02 127.1 9.5
Feb. 11, 1956 12.56 124.6 10.1
Feb. 19, 1955 16.10 150.8 10.7
1_ Simple average price.


Barrows
and
gilts




155


SHEEP A\J LAliBS: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
S- Ogden &:South
Ohicago' Omaha :Kansas : Fort :Den Norh San
I : City : Worth : Salt ;,Fran-


I


Good and
Choice

EWkES (WOOLED)
Good and
Choice

Cull and
Utility

FEED R LAMBS


Good and Feb.
Choice Feb.
Feb.
*Shorn basis.


down (WOOLED) -
Feb. 18, 1956 20,33
Feb. 11, 1956 20.48
Feb. 19, 1955 22.05
Feb. 18, 1956 19,60
Feb. 11, 1956 19.78
Feb. 19, 1955 21.12
)-
Feb. 18, 1956 7,25
Feb. 11, 1956 7.25
Feb. 19, 1955 8.00
Feb. 18, 1956 5.50
Feb. 11, 1956 5,50
Feb. 19, 19.5 6.75


19.20
19.40
21.72
18.40
18. 40
20.72

5.50
5.45
8, 00
4.25
4.70
6.50


18.65
18.65
21.38
17,55
17,68
20.68

4.92
4,62
7.32
4.02
3,62
5,92


-- 018,50


-- 20.75


17.62
17,88
19,42*


16.95
-- 19.00
-- 19400


19.32
19.75
20,96
18,52
18,78
19,72

8.65
8.25
8,12
6,50
6.00
5.75


18.32
18.24
20.25


: : Lake_ cisco


20,00
20.00
-- 20.50
17,50
17.62
20.00 19.50


6,25 6.75
6.50
-- 9.50
4,25 4.00
4,25 --
-=- 5.50



-- 17.00


Region

N. Atlantic St


UNITED STATES FEDERALLY INSPECTED SLAUGHTER BY REGIONS
January 1956 with comparisons
(thousand head)
SCattle ___ _Calve __ ogs_ _:_Sheep_&_lambs_
S- _1.256 I 19.55_:_1956 L ._1955._1956 1955_:_1956 _:1955
1ates.... 135 122 102 92 610 499 234 229


3. Atlantic States.....
N. C. States Eastern.
N. C. States N.Western
N. C. States S.Western
S. Central States......
mountain States........
Pacific States,........
Total .........., ....


45
335
500
175
168
108
229
1,697


Other animals slaughtered
Horses 16,038, goats 4,260;


39
304
431
157
170
102
197
1,521


28
202
109
25
89


40
602


2
19
9
3
8


56


!4 298
;3 .1,500
?7 2,635
54 695
32 523
7 123
44 321


212
1,249
2,351
501
354
102
251


6,705 5,519


145
448
113
89
116
184
1,329


134
412
117
67
88
176
1,223


under Federal inspection, (number of head); Jan. 1956
Jan. 1955 Horses 18,177, goats 4,021.


Data furnished by Agricultural Research Service,


LAi'bS -
Choice
Prime


l10
and


18,
11,
19


1956
1956
1955


I


53




156
NEW YORK WHOLESALE MEAT TPADE REVIEW
Western Dressed Fresh Meats

Aggregate supply of Western dressed fresh meats was normal but mostly in e.-
cess of current demand. Buyers continued to operate selectively, with interest
confined mainly to selected lots of various primal wholesale cuts. Such transl
actions generally netted inadequate carcass returns. Sellers were usually unable
to advance prices, however, due to concerted price resistance. Prices for the
most part, worked downward, with severest declines on fresh pork loins. Compared
with the previous week: Steer beef steady to $1.00 lower; cow beef unchanged;
veal and calf steady to t2.00 lower; lamb $1.00 to mostly $2.00 higher; -pork loins
500 to '3.00 lower; other fresh pork cuts $1.00-2.00 higher.
Steer offerings consisted mainly of Good and Choice carcasses of all weights.
Very few Prime steer carcasses were included but prices of such offerings were
fully $1.00 off. Hindquarter prices were particularly depressed, and were further
weakened by sales of carried--rver lots. Arm chucks moved freely and generally at
upturns but advances were insufficient to offset declines on other wholesale cuts.
Price trend on cow carcasses was very uneven.
Supplies of veal were normal, with. volume of calf relatively small. A weak
undertone blanketed both classes, and while receipts appeared reduced for the
period, the supply was ample throughout. Late prices were weak to $2.00 off.
Daily clearances of lamb were fairly complete, and prices advanced $1.00-2.00 at
the outset, with the advance well sustained on subsequent sessions. Carcasses
under 50# wore promptly absorbed, and found outlet in practically all retail chan-
nels but heavier offerings sold under pressure.
Prices of fresh pork cuts strengthened early. However, demand lagged later,
and fresh loins.showed progressive downturns, while other cuts closed barely
steady.
Locally 'Dressed Fresh Meats_

Trading was fairly active to slow, following the restricted trade on the lion-
day holiday session, but demand for locally dressed fresh meats lacked urgency.
The price undertone generally favored the weak side, but selected lots of boof and
lamb sold on a strong price basis. Prices on wholesale cuts of b^of and veal,
both kosher and non-kosher, hold barely steady, while kosher lamb foresaddles
worked upward. Progressive downturns were shown on fresh pork loins.
Choice steer offerings predominated, with Prime representing only a small orj
tion of daily kills. Prices on most primal steer cuts held about in line with the
previous week, but closing quotations on arm chucks wore slightly higher. Trade or!
rib and loin cuts was generally slow. Demand for kosher steer offerings was slow
to fair, with little change in prices.
Price resistance emanated from practically all retail outlets for veal and
calf offerings. The supply was normal, and fully ample throughout. Trade lr.ckeod
stability from the outset as a result of a lag in buyer interest. Movement of
carcass lamb scaling 50- down was prompt, and bulk of sales averaged $1.00 higher.
Offerings around 55# up sold slowly, however, with bulk marketed in the form of
wholesale cuts. Realizations on kosher lamb foresaddles worked progressively
higher, and closed $2.00 or more up for the week.
Fresh pork production was sharply reduced but supplies were ample on all
sessions. Demand was limited mostly to small retail butcher outlets. Asking
prices were higher on practically all fresh pork cuts at the outset, but demand
lagged, and prices were revised downward on ]-ter sessions.




157
CHICAGO WHOLESALE MEAT TRADE REVIEW

The week's supply of steer and heifer beef consisted mostly of Good ana Choice
grades, with Frime and Commercial in comparatively small volume. Good and Choice
55 to 70,;'- lamb carcasses dominated the lamb supply. Moderate offerings of veal
proved fully ample for a dull trade. The supply of fresh pork cuts at the i-;eek's
opening session was smaller than a week earlier. Later in the week supplies were
fully normal to excessive, however, and prices on pork loins declined, erasing the
upturns made late the previous week. Other pork cuts declined only slightly.
Seasonally small offerings of Prime beef carcasses and equivalent cuts moved well.
Vith that exception the movement of carcass beef was slow. Trading was moderately
active on most beef cuts early in the week, accompanied by price advances on Choice
loins, particularly lighterweights. However, movement of beef cuts slo'.ed consider-
ably on later sessions. Carcass lamb trade was slow all week, with best action on
the limited volume of carcasses 50# and down. In lamb cuts, buyers shoDed prefer-
ence for hindquarter meat. Clearances of fresh meats at wholesale are e.epcctod to
be only fair. Compared to last Thursday's close: Prime beef steady, other grades
500 to $1.00 lower; veal steady to $1.00 lower; lamb steady; pork loins 8-16Gi, $1.00
to $2.00 lower; Boston butts 4-8# 50# to $1.00 off; spareribs 3# down steady.
Choice aaieime squarecut 1tcf chucks brought $27.00-29.00, comparable rounds
$39.00-42.00;71oins $79.00-83,00, Choice t52.00-60.00; Prime ribs $54.00-57.00,
rChoico $37.00-41.00, ribs over 35# down to $32.00; Choice and Prime kosher style
chucks $27.00-29.00.- Lamb hindsaddles sold from $44.00-51.00; legs $42.00-47.00;
loins $50,00-58.00; hotel ribs $48.00-52.00. Pork loins 8-12# cleared at S30.00-
34.00, 12-16- $29.00-33.00; Boston butts $25.00-29.00; spareribs $28.00-32.00.

PACIFIC COAST WHOLESALE IEAT TRADE REVIEW
Boof suvplies were liberal at most points on the West Coast with cow beef in
smallest volume in California. Hindquerter cuts were usually excessive vith brcak-
ers and packers reluctant to break carcasses due to the narrow demand for loins and
rounds. Supply-of veal carcasses was small while calf was more plentiful in Cali-
fornia than elsewhere. Volume of other meats was also liberal with fresh pork
loins soi.iewhat excessive in Los Angeles. Start of the Lenten Season influenced. a
reduced consumer demand with trading on most meats slow. Compared with Inst week's
close: Steer beef steady to veak, instances $1.00 lower; cow mostly steady, few
.1.00 higher at Los Angeles, and Cutter and Utility $2.00 higher at San Francisco;
Seal and calf steady; lamb weak to .1.00 lower; fresh pork mostly steady, some
early advances of t2.00-3.00 on loins lost; cured pork steady, with slab bacon
occasionally $2.00 lower in the Northwest and t2.00 higher at San Francisco; lrd
steady.
Choice steer carcasses under 700# cashed mostly from $29.00-34.00, fow $35.00
at San Francisco, 700-800# $28.00-31.00; Good under 700# $26.00-33.00; Commercial
S25.00-29.00; Utility l.23.00-26.00. Commercial cow beef bulked at $23.00-26.00;
Utility 122.00-25.00; Canner and Cutter $18.00-22.00 and in better demand than
other cow bocf. Good and Choice veal under 150Y sold from $44.00-48.00; same grades
of calf to 300# $34.00-39.00; Commercial down to $29.00 at Los Angeles. Choice and
Primo lamb un.cr 55# brought $35.00-39.00, Good, all weights, $31.00 and up. Close-
ly trimmed pork loins under 16# cashed mostly from $35.00-40.00; shoulders under
16# $23.00-32.00, few above $28.00; Boston butts $29.00-38.00; smoked skinned hams
to 18# $41.00-50.00, some under 16# to $52.00 at San Francisco; 6-10# slab bacon
?30.00-42.00, sliced 1# packages $35.00-45.00; smoked picnics $26.00-33.00; lard
in 1# cartons $13.50-18.00.





WHOLESALE DRESSED MEAT PRICES: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
-----------------------------------------------------------I---------
New York Chicago San Francisco
Classification ----------------- --------
18 11 19 : 8 11 19 18 11 19
.1956 : 19b6 ; 1955 1I956 196 1955 1956 1956 .1955
Beef -
Steer -


Prime 600-700o
700-800
Choice 500-600
600-700
Good 350-600
rift a


WVll I.
Cow, all wts. -
Commercial
Utility


Prime 80-110 o
Choice U
Good "
Lamb -
Prime 40-50f
50-06
Choice 40-50
50-60
Good all wts.
Pork Fresh -
Loins 8-10# av.
10-12 "
12-16 "
Butts 4-8
Pork Cured -
Hams, smk., skd. -
12-16# av.
16-18 I
18-20 w
Bacon, smk.. slab -
6-8# av.
8-10 "
Sliced 1 # pkg.
Picnics, smoked -
4-8# av.
Backs, D. S. -
16-20# av.
Lard, 1# cartons -
Refined
Substitutes


38.00
36.00

33,50
30,00
28.00

26,00
23.00

48.50
43.00
35.00

37.00
34,00
37.00
34.00
34.00

35.50
35.50
35.17
31.50


44.00
42.00



33.00
37.50


23.50 24.00

12.00 15.00


16,00


16.25
--


39.00
37.00

34.50
30.00
28,00

26.00
23.00

48.50
43.00
35.60

35.20
32.40
35.20
32.40
32,50

35.35
35.35
34,20
30.50


44.50
41.00



34.50
38.00


: 37.50
. 37.50
1 32.90
i 32.90
: 28,75
a 27,40


37.50
37.50
33.15
33,15
29.10
27.20


51.70
51.70
41.40
42.85
35.80
32.00


; 34.00
. 32.00
: 31.25
: 28.00


-- : 26.00
-- 22.80


50.00
-
44.25
40.00
33.80

28.00
24.50

48.50
42.00
36.70

42.80
42.80
41.10
41.10
39.70

43.50
43.50
41.00
36.50


46.50
42.20



45,50
49.00


33.00 :28.50

14.00 l 11.50

16.50 :14.55
-- 25.00


45,50
43.00
38.00

35.50
32.50
35.50
32.50
33.00

33.55
33.55
32.00
27.80


48.10
45.55
43.80

34.25
33.15
39.30


47.10
44.30
39.80

42.50
41.00
41.50
38.50
38.00

41.70
41.70
40.10
33.00


48.10
44.80
44.20

52.55
49.15
53.60


:45.00

:39.00
:37.00
:38.00
:36.00
:35.50

: 40.20
:41.00
: 40.20
:35,00


: 50.00
i 47.50


: 4.00
:38.00
:42.50


29.'70 34.00 :30.00


34.00
32.00
31,25
28.00

26.00
22.50



44.20

39.00
37.00
38.00
36.00
36.50

40.00
40.00
40.00
35.00


50.00
47.5.0


40.00
37.00
42.50

30.00


--

-41.00
39.75
39.38
35.50

27.50
24.50


45.00

42.00
40.50
42.00
40.00
38.00

48.50
47.00
44.50
40.00


52.50
48.00
--I

57.50
52.00
56.50

35.00


11.50 11.50 :


14.45
25.00


15.25
28.00


:17.25
9 --


16.50


Notel Quotations at New York exclude locally dressed meats.


t 45.50
t 42.40
37.60

35.50
32.50
S35.50
S32.56
S33.00

34,45
34 45
S33.65
S27.30


S48.20
S45.75
:44.75

3 32.65
: 31.80
:37.75


-- -~






3CSTON WOOL MAhKET REVIEW


Turnover of greasy domestic worsted wools in the Boston market was smaller
than a week ago as approximately six cars of various graded wools were sold.
Integrated mills and topmakers were ccmpeti-,g for limited offerings of combing
wools as prices held about unchanged from last week, Occasional lots of scoured
wc-s and noils moved moderately well at last week's price levels. Shearing had
started in the Roswell Area of New Mexico and in California.
The strike of waterfront workers in Australia was terminated February 14
ano the first sale was held February 16. Up to 250,000 bales are due to be
shipped from Australia as shipping becomes available. Auctions resumed in
Tasmania February 16. New Zealand prices opened strong but declined as general
competition was reported. Buyers competed quite actively in South Africa for
the limited volume of ccmbing wools, while short wools were beginning to be
offered, South American prices remained firm.
Fleece Wools Graded 60/62s short French combing and clothing bright fleece
wool sold at 480 in the grease and was estimated to cost clean around $1.05 while
a 50/54s bright staple fleece wool sold around t1.035.
Territory Wools Graded territory 64/70s good French combing and staple
wool sold at t1,32 clean basis while 60/62s brought -1.25 and 56/58s moved at
$1.15 clean. Two clips of bulk 3/8s and 1/4 blood with about 10% of half blood
and amounting to about 15,000 fleeces, were contracted at 51 and 490 in the
grease to the grower while another clip of approximately 42,000 fleeces of bulk
1/4 blood was contracted at an estimated clean price ranging from 38-1,02
delivered to the mill,
Texas Wools Movement of Texas wool was practically at a standstill, There
were a few sales of greasy lambs wool around l1,25-1.30 clean basis, delivered
Boston.
Mohair A few cars of mohair were contracted in Texas at 83- for adult
and $1.035 for kid mohair to the warehouse. The local trade continued very
dull with little or no demand for kid hair.

Sales of CCC Wools The Commodity Credit Corporation announced on
February 16 that approximately 3,178,000 pounds of C.CC.-swned wool, from bids
received on a totals of abcut 11,000,000 pounds, were sold. The next competitive
bid sale will be held on March 6, 1956. The principal grades, quantity and sales
price ranges (before discounts, if any) follow;

Pounds Price Range
Graded territory fine short French and clothing 99,310 l1,203-1,225
1/2 blood staple and good French 171,878 1.251-1.261
3/8s 155,717 1.166-1.22
1/4 50/54s 60,093 1,102-1.105
1/4 48/50s 363,400 1.07 -1.125
0. B. Texas 12 mos. good French and staple 106,886 1.415-1.442
12 average and good French 181,800 1.371-1.401
Graded fleece 1/2 blood staple and good French 71,374 1.18 -1,19
S 3/8s 651,716 1.111-1,126
S 1/4 50/54s 466,585 1,066-1.076
1/4 48/50s 280,218 1.046-1.076

Foreign Wools A greasy New Zealand 46/48s carding fleece wool sold for
shipment around f1.0185 clean basis, duty paid5. Montevideo shippers were asking
670 grease basis, in bond for sc-per skirted woola ranging from 56s to 60s for
shipment.




r60 1955 CALF CROP REPORT
The united Ststas c.slf crop in 195 totaled 43,001,000 head, I percent more
thsn the 42,601,000 head born in 1954, according to the Crop Reporting Board,
This is the sixth successive increase over the preceding year since the number of
cattle began to show an upward trend beginning in 1949. The 1955 calf crop was
20 percent larger than the 1944-53 average.
The large 1955 calf crop resulted from a record numotr of cows and iieifers
on farms during 1955. The number of all cows and heifers 2 years old and older on
January 1, 1955, was 49,121,000 head--less than 1 percent larger tnan the number
on hand a year earlier. Although cow slaughter was high during 1955, cow herds
stayed large throughout the year to produce the record calf crop.
The number of calves born expressed as a percentage of cows and heifers 2
years old and older on January 1, 1955, was 88 percent--l percentage point above
the previous year, and 4 percentage points above the 10-year average of 84 percent.
This figure is not strictly a calving rate since the January 1 inventory of cows
and heifers 2 years old and older does not include all the heifers which gave birth
te calves during the year. The percentage is calculated to show the trend in
productivity over a long period of time. It may fluctuate from year to year due
to variations in cow slaughter during the year and trends in breeding herd replace-
ments.
The calf crop of 18,133,000 head in the North Central States was 6,000 head
smaller than in 1954, but 15 percent above the 10-year average, Each of the East
North Central States showed fewer calves born in 1955 than a year earlier except
Ohio. All West North Central States, with the exception of Minnesota, North
Dakita, and South Dakota, showed fewer calves born in 1955 than a year earlier.
In the North Central States, the number of cows and heifers on hand January 1, 135?
was 19,877,000 head--an increase of less than 1 percent from the 19,794,000 head
on January 1, 1954. The number of calves born as a percentage of cows and heifers
2 years old and older on January 1, 1955 was 91 percent, compared with 92 percent
in 1954 and the 10-year average of 89 percent.
The Western States showed a calf crop of 7,266,000 head in 1955 compared within
7,056,000 born in 1954. Only three of the Western States, Wyoming, Colorado, and
Arizona, showed fewer calves born in 1955 than in the previous year. All other
Western States reported.larger calf crops, The number of all cows and heifers on
farms and ranches on January 1, 1955 totaled 8,208,000 head--an increase of 2 per-
cent from January 1, 1954. The calf crop expressed as a percentage of cows and
heifers two years old and older was 89 percent compared with 88 percent a year
earl re r
Ie n the South Central States, the calf crop is estimated at 11,202,000 head
compared with 11,089,000 in 1954. The number of all cows and heifers two years
and older on January 1, 1955 totaled 13,151,000 head--a decrease of 1 percent from
1954. The calf crop expressed as a percentage of all cows and heifers two years
old and older was 65 percent compared with 84 in 1954. Texas, the leading cattle
producing State, showed 4,297,000 calves born--1 percent above 4,242,000 head born
in 1954. The number of cows and heifers two years old and older on January 1,
1955 in Texas was 4,828,000 head--2 percent below a year earlier.
In the North Atlantic region, the calf crop totaled 3,095,000 head compared
with 3,023,000 head a year earlier. The number of cows and heifers two years old
and older on January 1, 1955 was 3,599,000 head compared with 3,581,000 head on
January 1, 1954, The calf crop was 86 percent of the number of cows and heifers
two years old and older on January 1, 1955.
In the South Atlantic States, the calf crop was 3,305,000 head--about the
same as the previous year. The number of cows and heifers two years old and older
on January 1, 1955 totaled 4,286,000 head--only slightly larger than a year
earlier. The calf crop was 77 percent of the number of cows and heifers two years
old and older en January 1, 1955.
I/ Not strictly a calvir.g rate. Figure represents calves born expressed as per-
centage of the January 1 inventory of cows and heifers 2 years old and over on
January 1 and not the r:imber of all cows and heifers -givrIn birth to calves during
the year.




161


CALF CROP REPORT 1955


State
and
Division


Calves bor


" 1C-yr.
average
:1044-53
1,000
head


1954
1,000
head


S Cows
n 2 y:

S10-yr.:
: 1955 :average:
. 1944-53


1o000
head


Maine 110 115 116
N. H. 61 64 66
Vt. 236 262 275
Mass. 108 107 109
R. I. 16 16 16
Conn. 99 96 104
N. Y. 1,227 1,300 1,344
N. J. 121 134 129
Pa. 857 929 936
N._Atl. 2,837 3,023 3,095
Ohio 997 1,018 1,021
Ind. 848 906 890
Ill. 1,282 1,408 1,380
Mich. 889 871 848
Wis.- 2,242 2,464 2,452
E. N. Cent. 6,258 6,667 6,591
Minn. 1,610 1,674 1,720
Iowa 1,755 2,052 2,033
Mo. 1,506 1,835 1,810
N. Dak. 712 853 915.
S. Dak. 1,037 1,428 1,508
Nebr. 1,447 1,848 1,813
Kans. 1,412 1,782 1,_ 73
W. N. Cent. 9,479 11,472 11542
N. Cent. 15,736 18,139 18,133
Del. 32 36 36
Pd. 214 258 264
Va. 527 670 658
w. Va. 265 286 293
N. C. 329 441 444
S. C. 173 262 266
Ga. 455 668 683
Fla. 448 673 661
S. Atl. 2,442 3,294 3,305
Ky. -729 898 886
Tenn. 733 897 900
Ala. 561 809 820
Miss. 678 1,005 1,056
Ark. 566 717 703
La. 642 872 966
Okla. 1,298 1,649 1,574
Tex. 3,834 4,242 4 297_
S. Cent. 9,040 11,089 11202
Mont. 819 1,089 1,141
Idaho 382 522 554
Wyo. 429 516 483
Colo. 728 873 846
N. Mex. 554 541 572
Ariz. 363 378 377
Utah 248 334 342
Ne'.. 212 233 260
Wash. 396 493 515
Ore 467 611 619
Calif. 214 1,466 1557
West 5,81 7,056 7 .266
U. -3. 35,867 4,6~'o 3 001
-17 se footnoTe -btTo f f'pjge t6'U.-


and heif
re. & olI
Tanuagy_1


1,000
head
130
73
298
135
21
123
1,441
156
1 006
3,382
1,162
950
1,442
1,034
2,501
7,088
1,785
1,943
1,668
817
1,194
1,642
1,626
10 674
17 763_
40
254
638
313
437
229
609
710
3,230
841
847
738
960
696
865
1,512
4,753
11,213
-923
456
526
857
701
473
302
278
481
583
_1489
7.069
42,657-


eers :Calves born as pot.
Ler :of cows & heifers 1/
- --- 2jyrs.& older Jan.1-
: 10-yr. :
1955 :average: 1954 : 1955
.1944--53


1954
1,000
head
135
74
320
132
20
121
1,512
161
1,106
3,581
1,184
1,029
1,565
1,013
2,621
7,412
1,820
2,137
2,039
937
1,536
1,976
1,937
12 382
19,794
46
311
817
344
566
336
805
1,035
4,260
1,021
1,055
1,064
1,305
919
1,163
1,792
4,932
13,251
1,158
567
580
981
693
478
371
311
536
719
_-L666
8,060
I8.,96


-.L---


1,000
head
132
73
323
128
19
122
1,527
161
1,114 -
3,599 _
1,173
1,000
1,516
998
2665
7,352
1,830
2,140
2,011
984
1,587
2,036
1,937
12,525
19 877_
45
311
803
341
576
345
864
1 001
4,286
995
1,046
1,051
1,408
890
1,164
1,769
4.828
13.151
1,214
602
568
920
689
477
364
317
560
728
1 769
8,208
49 11 -


Pet. Pet
85 85
83 86
79 82
80 81
79 80
81 79
85 86
78 83
85 84
83 84
86 86
89 88
89 90
86 86
90 _94
88 90
90 92
90 96
90 90
87 91
87 93
88 94
87_ 92
89 93
89 92
80 78
84 '83
82 82
85 83
75 78
75 78
75 83
63 65
75 77
87 88
86 85
76 76
70 77
81 78
74 75
86 92
81 86
81 84

84 92
82 89
85 89
79 78
77 79
82 90
76 75
82 92
80 88
82 88
82 88
84- -87'


. P t.
88
90
85
85
84
85
88
80
84
86
87
82
91
835
92
00
94
95
90
93
95
89
90
92
91
79
85
82
86
77
77
79
66
77
89
86
78
75
79
83
89
89
85
94
92
85
92
83
79
94
82
92
85
88
89
^ i~8~





Stoecer land feeder cattle and sheep received in several Corn Belt Stutro 1/
January 1956, with comparisons
*------------------------------------------------
Cattle and Calveo
: Public Stock :-
: Yards : Direct Total Cumulative Total
State Yards - : - - -
State January Jnuary Jan : t Jan.-Dec. incl.
1- : 1956-- 5 : 55 196 19555 : 19: 15 1955 : 194 -
-----------------~------------------- --


Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Minnesota
Iowa
South Dakota
Nebraska
Total
9 States


7,575
5,558
23,244
3,406
2,012
8,891
53,014
5,754
19,587


129,041


9,084
6,079
24,414
3,507
593
9,766
69,906
9,377
39,043


2,494
1,231
41,606
2,132
512
14,148
33,320
783
23,895


779
3,170
43,095
559
243
15,813
31,318
2,090
25,137


10,069
6,789
64,850
5,538
2,524
23,039
86,334
6,537
43,482


9,863
9,249
67,509
4,066
836
25,579
101,224
11,467
64,180


125,107
160,266
794,849
67,261
27,053
272,112
1,214,751
58,703
350,496


171,769 120,121 122,S04 249,162 293,973 3,070,598


139,799
208,929
973,502
87,358
35,353
297,874
1,649,131
134,893
748,760

4,275,59


Sheep and Lambs


Ohio 1,223
Indiana 1,663
Illinois 8,478
Michigan 501
Wisconsin ---
Minnesota 14,018
Iowa 16,892
South Dakota 4,181
Nebraska 5,184
Total
9 States 52,140 1


6,302
1,422
7,151
884
1,214
18,269
30,859
11,461
26,347


1,046
581
7,357
790

5,636
80,322
4,312
7,982


645
2,031
12,614
834

13,696
69,140
5,574
17,715


S2,269
2,244
15,835
1,291

19,654
97,214
8,493
13,166


6,947
3,453
19,765
1,718
1,214
31,965
99,999
17,035
44,062


51,004
94,790
221,236
28,130
17,950
191,886
701,377
94,902
500,363


03,909 108,026 122,249 160o,66 226,158


68,616
117,155
315,686
27,602
34,650
267,502
996,996
187,533
1,032,490


91.901638 3,0,231


1/ Data in this report are obtained from offices of State Veterinarians. Under
WPublic Stockyards" are included stockers and feeders which were bought at stock-
yards markets. Under "Direct" are included stockers and feeders coming from other
States from points other than public stockyards, some of which are inspected at
public stockyards while stopping for feed, water, and rest en route.

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUIa'TUR
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
Agricultural Es-tiates Division
Washington, D. C.


-,~----------




163


COLD STGRAGCS hOLLINGS OF MSATS AND LARD, JANUARY 311 1956
Jtorage gains in stocks of beef brought total holdings up to 210 million pounds
by January 31. A year earlier, holdings totaled 175 million pounds while the
average for this date is 214 million pounds. The seasonal gain in stocks of pork
fell short of the usual January increase by.49 million pounds but exceeded that
of last January by 9 million. Holdings of pork were increased by 61 million pounds
during January which raised total stocks to 482 million pounds as compared with
573 million pounds, the 5-year average for January 31, and 501 million pounds in
storage this time last year.


L'LI rED Ti'TEhS STORAGE HOLDINGS OF HEATS AiD LARD, JAN. 31, 1956,WITh COCrG RISCIlS
(Includes holdings in public, private and semi-private
cold storage houses and meat packing plants)
: Jan. : Dec. : Jan. : Jan. 31 :Jan. 31,1956 as 6 o:
Commodity : 31 : 31 1 31 j 1951-55 : Dec. : Jan. : Jan.;
: 1956 1955 : 1955 av. : 1955 : 1955 _5-yr.
E EF: 1.000 1, 000 100 1,0000
Frozen. ............. 199,125 195,042 165,681 202,238 102 120 98
In cure,cured smkd. 10,687 10,349 9,070 11,665 103 118 92
Total.............. 209,812 205,391 174,751 213,903 102 120 98


PORK:
Frozen.............. 357,435
Dry salt, in cure and
cured.............. 29,392
Other, in cure,cured
and smoked......... 94,725
Total............. 481,552
CTH2R MEATS AND MEAT PRODUCTS;
Sausage ? sausage
room products...... 16,116
Frozen lamb & mutton 10,440
Frozen veal........ 18,374
Canned meats & meat
products............ 46,386
All edible offal.... 67,846
Total other meats &
meat products...... 159,162
Total all meats..... 850,526
Lard, rendered &
refined 1/......... 2/
GOVERNMENT HOLDINGS 3/
Pork .................. 5,3 5
Beef ...... ..... ..... 7,544


f
31
Vy.


307,851 354,483 379,378 116 101 94

27,856 37,147 43,208 106 79 68


8 ,109
420,816


14,460
10,630
19,000

36,649
69,741

150,480
776,687


109,217
500,847


13,848
8,767
19,164

60,035
60,754

162,568
838,166


146,985 124,391


6,152
8,270


12,513
9,678


149,953
572,539


15,924
12,991
17,619

41,854
63,995

152,383
938,825

144,950


2/


111
114


111
98
97

127
97

106
110


I/ In dry and cold storage as reported by Bureau of Census.
2/ Not available.
3/ Government holdings are included in the totals and consist


held by U.S.D.A., the Armed Services and other Government agencies.


87 63
96 84


116
119
96

77
112

98
101


101
80
104

111
106

104
91


87 43
91 78


of reported stocks


B


--
--


- -




164 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
I IlllllllllU1 1 1 II IIIN lll lIII11111l
3 1262 08734 5327















WESTERN LIVESTOCK REVIEW CONTINUED FROh PAGE 147
Trading on slaughter steers and heifers it western terminals was feature
by an uneven price trend. At Portland closing prices were strong to 500 higher,
at 3tockton and S. San Francisco about steady, trend at other centers mainly
we.k to 500 lower. Sales out of California feedlots were mostly steady to weak,
instances 500 lower. Cows closed strong to 750 higher at California terminals
and Portland, but declined 250-t1.00 in the intermountain area. Vealers and
slaughter calves sold 500-$1,00 lower at Denver, firm to 500 higher elsewhere.
Barrows and gilts closed 25-41!.00 lower; slaughter lambs steady to 50# lower,
some late sales l1.00-1,50 off at Portland.
Good and Choice slaughter steers under 1200# cashed at terminal markets from
414.50-19.25, a few loads average-Choice to low-Prime t19.50-20.00. Good and
Choice slaughter heifers cleared from t14.00-17.25, average to high-Choice t17.50,
18.40 at Denver, with one load Choice to Prime 1057F at t19.00. Utility and Com-
mercial cows brought 09.50-13.50; Canners and Cutters t7.50-10.50. Choice and
Prime vealers earned t28.00-28.00, a few up to C30.00; Good and Choice t20.00-
26,00, except at Denver where these grades brought e16.00-20.00. High-Good to
Choice stock steer calves cleared from 417.00-20.75, a small lot Choice $22.50 at
Denver, Good and Choice stocker and feeder steers bulked from $15.00-17.50,
Choice 500-600# stockers t18.00-19.00 at Stockton.
Choice fed steers under 12?0# sold direct out of feedlots mostly from l17.50
18.50, several loads in Southern California 41P.75-19.00. One ten-load string of
longfed lightweight steers was contracted at 419.50 in the latter area, majority
to be delivered by the end of this month, balance by April 1. Good to lbw-Choice
steers for immediate delivery made ~16.00-17.251 Choice heifers t16.50-17.00, few
loads $17.50, some mixed Good and Choice 15.50-16.00; sales f.o.b, feedlots
mostly with 41 shrink.
Mixed No. 1 to 3 180-240i- barrows and gilts bulked at 4la.00.late at S. ban
Francisco; $14.50 at Stockton; l1f.00-14.50 at Los Angeles; 13.00-14.50 at
Portland; tlA.25 at Spokane; t13.00-13.50 at Ogden, and 412.00-13,00 at Denver.
Choice and Prime 91-109v wooled slaughter lambs brought $19.25-19.50 at Denver,
some 111-120* 18.25-19.25. Choice wooled offerings reached 420.50 at S. San
Francisco; load Choice and Prime 1054 t19.00 at Portland. Other Good and Choice
wooled slaughter lambs cashed from 416.00-16.50 at terminal markets. The same
grades of old crop lambs from the Imperial Valley mostly with No. 1 pelts brought
'18.00-18.50, other bids and a few sales at 1le.50 for 105y down, with 103 off
"or each pound over 105 pounds,




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