Market news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Market news
Uniform Title:
Market news (Washington, D.C.)
Physical Description:
9 v. : ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Production and Marketing Administration. -- Livestock Branch
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service. -- Livestock Division
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Production and Marketing Administration, Livestock Branch
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Meat industry and trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Livestock -- Marketing -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 18, no. 16 (Apr. 18, 1950)-v. 26, no. 52 (Dec. 30, 1958).
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Production and Marketing Administration, Livestock Branch, Apr. 18, 1950-Dec. 15, 1953; Agricultural Marketing Service, Livestock Division, Dec. 22, 1953-Dec. 30, 1958.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 004691907
oclc - 29653329
Classification:
ddc - 338.105 UNIL
System ID:
AA00012178:00002

Related Items

Preceded by:
Livestock market news (Washington, D.C.)
Succeeded by:
Livestock, meat, wool; market news


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text










JnA LIVESTOCK DIVISION Wee4










Page
Livestock Market Reviews ... .. .. 44
Livestock Market Receipts . 46
Feeder and Stocker Statistics . 46
Steer Sale Statistics .... .. .. 47
Estimated Slaughter and Meat production 48
Slaughter at Major Centers, ... 49
Estimated Percentage of Feeder and Stocker Cattle and
Slaughter Cows in Salable Receipts. . 49
Cattle Prices . . .. .50
Hog Prices . . 51
Hog Purchase Statistics .. 52
Sheep and Lamb Prices . .. .. 3
Wholesale Meat Trade Reviews... .. 54
Wholesale heat Prices . 56
Wool Market Review ... ... .. 57

Special to this issue

Federally Inspected Slaughter by hegions,
December 1955 . . 48
Storage Holdings of Meats and Lard, Dec. 31, 1955 58
Cattle and Calves on Feed, Jtn. 1, 1956 ..... .. 59
Sheep and Lambs on Feed, Jan. 1, 1956 . 61









U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE "
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
LIVESTOCK DIVISION
Waehington 25, D. C.


Ag11-WA1






MIDWEST LIVESTOCK MARKET REVIEW
Livestock marketing expanded considerably following curtailment during recent
holiday weeks, and receipts during the week under review were largest since early
December, Fed steers and yearlings under 1100# were in best demand and sold large-
ly steady to 50# lower, Heavier offerings declined 500-1.00O, a few selling t1.50
lower. Increased receipts of hogs were in fairly good demand and butchers closed
mainly steady to 500 higher. Slaughter lambs were steady to 250 higher at several
midwest markets with declines of 25#-1.00 at a few points.

SLAUGHTER CATTLE AND CALVES
Cattle receipts were largest since early December and despite some improvement
in the dressed beef trade, prices of fed cattle declined, erasing the previous
week's advance. An additional bearish influence was the abundance of fed steers
over 1200# at several midwest markets. Such cattle were under most pressure, the
severity of the decline generally increasing with the weight. Chicago received a
very liberal supply of 1300-150# steers and these together with a dozen loads of
1650-1750# steers declined 41.00-1,50. About 25 loads mostly over 1200# remained
unsold late, Bulk of the 1100-1300# steers there declined 50-.1.00, lighter
offerings including heifers closing mainly steady to 500 off. At other midwest
markets Choice and Prime steers under 1100# varied from steady to 500 lower, most
other steers closing- 5.0-11,00 lower, with a similar break on heifers and cows.
Bulls also declined but vealers and calves showed mixed price trends. A sprinkling
of Prime 1050-1275# steers cashed at Chicago from 423.50-24.60; bulk Choice and
Prime 1100# down t20.50-23.25; same grades 1100-1300# 818.00-23.25; 1300: up
t17.00-22.00. Five loads of Prime 1665-1755# sold late from t17.00-18.50, few
loads Choice 1475-1550 tl16.50. At other midwest markets Good and Choice steers
bulked from 1F5.50-21,25, few high-Choice and Prime $21,50-23.00. At Omaha Prime
1396# steers brought t21,50; 1432# t20.00; 1502# $19.00 and 1516# .18,50. A few
loads of Choice and Prime 1648-1742# sold at other midwest terminals from $18.00-
18.75. Slaughter of 1,617,280 cattle under Federal Inspection in December was
second largest of record for the month.
STOCKERR AND FEEDER CATTLE AND CALVES
Demand for stock cattle held up surprisingly well in the face of a decidedly
bearish outlet for -fat cattle and even though marketing of stockers were moderate-
ly increased, trading at terminal markets was fairly-active at steady to 500 higher
prices. However, prices of fleshy feeder steers and heifers tended to weaken.
Marketing of feeder classes were relatively small but movement of stocker year-
lings and calves was considerably larger than during the two previous holiday-
shortened weeks and also larger than a year ago. Drouthy winter conditions and
resultant fading winter pastures in sections of the West and Southwest forced the
movement of some cattle to market, At the same time, the open winter has been
favorable to the handling Of cattle and tended to stimulate demand for stockers in
areas more favorably situated for both water and cheap winter feeds, Demand from
such localities apparently is more than sufficient to absorb the calves and light
yearling- currently being marketed. The seemingly growing preference for "little"
cattle to rough through the winter and then graze during the summer has created
competition for such offerings which has held price levels up to a point that to
some cattle men'appear too high in view of the current unfavorable price relation-
ship between fats and feeders, The average cost of t17.48 for all steers shipped
to the country from Kansas City during the week was $2.44 under a year ago. At the
same time the average'price of $17.92 for all fed steers on that market was t5.54
below a year ago. Good and Choice feeder steers at the various markets ranged
from t15.50-18.50, few fleshy 700-750# yearlings up to $19.50. A moderate number
Choice light yearling stockers and steer calves sold from 20.00-22.00, few Choice
and Fancy steer calves reaching t23.00.





HOGS


C.LjOinied receipts of aoout 1,064,000 Logs at 12 markets end tne Interior were
large. since the week ended December 17. It was the fifth time this season that
the total has exceeded one million head. Packer buyers were aggressive in nearly
all sections. Shipping demand varied frcm gcod in some sections to only moderate
in others. Prices fluctuated moderately, and in spite of a generally steady to
lower trend in the Eastern dressed pork tiade, butcher prices closed mainly steady
to 500 higher. Price trends cn sows were largely similar to those on butchers.
Sows under 400- often sold in a rather narrow price spread. At most markets there
was little sorting within lots of butchers for either grade or weight. Price
differences of 50-750 or more on comparable weight butchers reflected the uneven
degree of finish, and marked preference for the rather small proportion of No, 1
and 2 grade lots over lots grading mostly No. 2 and 3. Butchers 240-270# sold from
50-tl1.50 below most offerings 230# down, and weights 300# and above sold $2.00-
3.00 below highest prices paid for butchers 230f down. In the Interior area, ex-
cessively fat No. 3 lots were often discounted 15-400 from comparable weight No, 2
butchers. Slaughter of 7,324,456 hogs under Federal Inspection in December was ex-
ceeded only once previously, in December in 1943 when 7,566,817 were slaughtered.
Stocker and feeder pig prices were little changed. Good and Choice feeders sold
at South St. Paul from K8.00-9.00, some Choice .9.50; a few at Kansas City t8.50-
9.001 130-160# feeders at Sioux City from 49,00-9,75. Prices at Memphis were
steady to 50# higher, Medium and Good 70-140# 0P.50-10.00, some Choice under 80#
.'10.50,
SHEEP AND LAMBS
Increased numbers of sheep and lambs were marketed at midwest terminals and
trading continued uneven. At the majority of midwest markets lambs sold steady to
25# higher, but at a few points prices declined 25# to as much as $1.00. Sheep
and feeder lambs brought steady prices in the midwest with feeders weak to $1.00
lower at Fort Worth, Twelve-market receipts were largest in five weeks but still
about 25% short of a year ago. Lambs around 110# and heavier were discounted up
to t2.00 or more a cwt. from comparable grade lighterweights, reflecting discounts
of $3.00-4.0C on 55-65# carcasses over those under 55# in the wholesale dressed
trade. Most Good to Prime wooled lambs under 110# sold at $16.50-18.75, a few
t19.00-19.25; same grades 111-137# $15.00-18.25. Shorn lambs up to 108# with No. 1
to summer shorn fleeces cleared from t16.50-18,00, some freshly shorn along with
130# offerings down to $15.00. Cull to Choice slaughter ewes cashed from $3.00-
7.50. Medium to Choice feeder lambs turned at $14.00-18.50. A few short term
breeding ewes brought $8.00.
WESTERN LIVESTOCK REVIEW
An uneven price trend featured the tr&de on slaughter steels and heifers at
westernn terminals. Inquiry was less urgent than during the previous week and
supplies proved fully ample for the demand. Slaughter steers and heifers sold
mostly steady in direct trading and at California markets with prices at other
terminals steady to 41,50 lower, most declines on steers over 1150# at Denver.
Cows closed steady to mostly 50# higher at California markets and steady to $1.00
lower at other centers. Vealers and slaughter calves were in good demand at all
points at steady to t2.00 higher prices, Stockers and feeders sold fully steady,
instances 500 higher, Barrows and gilts closed steady to 50# lower. Slaughter
-ambs were steady to firm except at Denver where closing sales were 50-75# lower,
High-Good and Choice slaughter steers bulked at Western terminals from $18.00-
20.50, a few loads t21.15-21.50 et Denver; Good steers mainly ~16.00-18,00; Utility
and Commercie. 11,00-16.00. Good and Choice fed heifers cEshed from ,15,00-1..00,
few lots high-Choice to Prime t20.00-20.50 at Denver. Utility and Commercial
heifers brought t10.00-14.50. Canner and Cutter cows cleared from t8.00-10.50,
with cor.siderable numbers at Portland and Spokane from U6.00-8.50. Choice and
Continued on page 53.





46 WEEKLY RECEIPTS OF SALABLE LIVESTOCK AT 12 PUBLIC MARKETS
----------.. ^ .^------ ---- ..----- --- --- --- ----------- ----------I.--------- --- .......
Cattle a Calves Hogs Sheep
a------------------- I -
Jan: Jan, Jan. n. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.
Market 115 14 15 14 15 14 15
1956 951955 1956 1955 1956 1955 1956 : 1955
------------------------------ I---------- ---------------------- L----------------J-----
Chcogo-......... 54,047 49,669 1,941 1,945 85,207 69,115 .15,453 18,871
Cincinnati........... 4,509 4,825 879 949 18 710 14,927 937 820
Denver............. 22,206 28,935 4,185 6,891 5,620 6,068 13,950 17,009
Fort Worth.......... 10,829 9,319 2,438 2,892 2,389 2,306 9,578 10,748
hldiaNapolis.---- 10,590 11,454 1,024 1,496 58,026 47,473 4,241 6,14C
Kansas City ..-.-.. 27,653 24,336 2,143 2,504 13,937 10,695 5,729 9,06"
Oklahoma City...... 15,252 12,460 1,357 1, 626 2,800 2,913 1,615 3,365
Omaha.............. 45,599 48,509 992 2,357 82,736 64,987 10,439 24,351
St. Joseph......... 18,990 16,649 889 1,174 39, 470 34,306 4,429 9,343
St. Louis NSY....... 19,073 18,409 3,887 4,104 72,093 50,654 7,316 8,654
Sioux City--........ 31,837 30,242 2,753 3, 420 74, 377 58,973 9,618 13, 286
S. St. Paul...--..... 26,119 24,480 14,133 11,405 96 629 70,176 19,053 16,864

Total--...---..- 286,704 279,287 36,621 40,763 551,994 432,593 102,358 138,518
Jan. 7, 1956 219,461 29,813 450,510 91,674
INTERIOR IOWA AND SOUTHERN MINNESOTA
Week ended: Hogs Sheep
Jan. 14, 1956 ................ 512,000 29,000
Jan. 7, 1956 ..----.--------. 456,500 32,300
Jan. 15, 1955 ................ 398,500 37,500
FEEDER AND STOCKER CATTLE: AVERAGE COST, WEIGHT, AND NUMBER
- .-- --- --- ------- --- -------- - ------ ------ --------------_-----".. ^ ". .^ .1 0" ." .'.
Week ended Month Six Months
''-'-' -- ----------------''' -- ---------- ---------------------------------''
Jan. 12 Jan. 5: Jan. 13: Dec. : Dec. July Dec.
1956 i 1956 i 1955 1955 : 1954 1955 : 1954
Steers o1001 up 472 187 E07 2,510 2,359 18,86 16,330
901-1000 1,553 816 2,184 7,296 7,2 a0 44,506 44,636
801.900 4,211 2,567 1,427 16,377 16,641 96,543 104,540
701-800 4,368 2,777 4,552 18,445 18,036 165,797 170;277
501-700 9,417 4,208 10,988 31,876 40,166 347,402 381,136


Total steers 10 mkts. 20,021 10,555 21,658 76,504 84,442 673,084 716,$19
Av. wt. 717# 735* 710f 74 O 722# 711# 706f
Av.cost*" $16,62 $15.96 $19.61 $15.42 $18.38 $17.30 $18.19
" "Chicago 17.05 16.68 19.37 16.18 19.14 18.14 19.17
" Ks.City 17.48 16.93 19.92 15.89 19.23 17.52 18.38
"Omaha 16.30 15.68 20.01 15.35 18.24 17.70 18.94
"S. St. Paul 15.10 13.93 17.14 14.12 16.64 15.71 16.25
"Sioux City 16,72 15.55 20.51 15.32 19.08 17.45 18.75
S" "Denver 16,47 16.27 21.12 15.67 20.35 18.16 19.80
"Ft.Worth 16,57 16.44 18.54 15.63 17.04 17.12 16.43
"Okla.City 16.30 16.03 18.14 15.30 17.05 16.14 15. 9
St. Joseph 16.67 16.02 18.75 15.29 18.09 16.62 17.27
"Natl. Stk. Yds. 16.05 15.39 18.79 15.39 17.51 16.80 1/16.60
Total calves-10 mkts. 11,058 4,733 13,701 43,440 67,888 368,856 480,327
cows.
heifers, bull- 4,466 2,325 5,689 21,521 27,704 202,981 228,336
SNot adjusted for differences in grade of cattle sold at each market.
1/ Five months Aug.-Dec.


c----~---.------------~--------I-------------------------


- i --------





BEEF STEERS SOLD OUT OF FIRST HANDS FOR SLAUGHTER Z.
--------------------------------.......................----r .............e t of Averg price
Average weight
Number of head total Avee in dollars
,bytot (pounds) per 100 l.
.--.- .....-- ...---- ....... .-- --------------------------- ; ----------------
Grade Week eneed
Ja. --------------------------- .-------- ---------------- ----'"an."- ",. ." Jan.
Jan. Jan. : Jan. Jan.
12 5 13 12 5 13 12 5 13 12 5 13
.---------1956 ._ 19.56. 1955 :1956 :1956 1955 1956 196 1955 1956 1956 95
-- --- .-~~C-----.. --.... .ICA .. ------------
CHICAGO


Prime
Choice
Good
Com'l.
Utility
All grades


Prime
Choice
Good
Com'l
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Com'l.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Com'l.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Com'l.
Utility
All grades

Prime
Choice
Good
Coal.
Utility
All grades


8988 6197 2854 26.1 27.0 11.5 1237 1221 1138 21,89 22.28 32.39
16890 11874 12824 49.0 51.9 51.8 1157 1144 1130 20,34 20,51 27.39
7597 4225 7509 22,0 18,5 30,3 1051 1041 1036 18.18 17.89 23.72
846 501 1250 2,4 2.2 5.1 965 956 941 15.16 15.10 19.10
178 95 315 ,5 .4 1.3 911 980 906 12,74 13.04 15.17
34499 22892. 24752 1149 1141 1090 20.20 20,.46 26.,44
- --. ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ .............................. .-.-...--- ---
OMAHA 1/
682 478 422 4.1 3.1 2.6 1214 1208 1124 21,67 21.58 30.30
9566 10124 8349 57.9 65.9 51,5 1121 1143 1126 19,82 19.70 25.76
5067 3634 6752 30.7 23,7 41.6 1078 1089 1071 17,22 17.22 22.29
918 904 548 5.6 5.9 3,4 10311094 941 14,66 14.51 17.40
286 219 142 1.7 1,4 .9 934 947 886 12.80 12.42 14.15
16519 39 121 1103 1127 1095 18.75 18.81 24.14
....... ----------- ........................ .......................................
741 1130 280 8.2 14.3 3.6 1213 1201 1172 21,63 21.46 30.32
4476 3733 3698 49,5 47.1 47.5 1133 1124 1118 20.10 19.85 26.22
2973 2570 3475 32.9 32.4 44.6 1069 1046 1077 17.87 17.94 22.64
731 449 222 8.1 5.7 2.8 1008 970 993 15.15 15,01 17.91
124 42 117 1,3 .5 1.5 942 933 930 12.38 11.88 14.82
9045 7924 7782 1106 1100 1097 19.08 19.24 24.45
KANSAS CITY 1/
76 171 -- .9 2.2 -- 1220 1140 -- 21.01 21,32
3807 3360 2796 44.0 44.1 52.3 1139 1146 1133 18.99 19.50 24.87
4376 3710 2428 50,6 48.7 45.4 1050 1093 1014 17,16 16.94 21.95
348 300 114 4.0 3,9 2.1 947 1034 1012 14,56 14.64 17.36
48 81 9 .5 1.1 .2 938 1010 931 12.28 12.43 15.01
_.8.6. 5 602. ?.4?.........................09 ..3 ....,.9.2. .8Q7. 0,
........8 .. ... ..2.. 7....... J.' ..............1 ....1.4 .0_7 .... .....8....Q?.......
ST. LOUIS NSY 1/
-I- -~-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --- -
26 63 -- ,4 1,2 -- 1098 1094 -- 22.71 22,33
1733 1061 1083 29.2 20,0 26.0 1103 1062 1061. 19.66 19.56 25.42
3029 2940 2531 51.0 55.4 60.7 1033 1053 968 17,27 17,44 22.09
1037 1170 465 17.4 22,0 11.1 981 971 986 15.42 15,31 18.74
119 72 94 2.0 1.4 2.2 876 862 912 12,63 12.46 15.54
5944 50~_6 _4173 --............. 1.041-.10315 9,93._ A,765 17..44 I.?, 51
--------.. ---.-... -......- .........t....... ---------- ------...........---- ........ .
14 7 26 .2 .1 .4 1014 971 1156 21.40 22.66 29.91
4142 3402 3167 55.8 55.0 50.3 1133 1126 1095 19.02 19,37 25.13
2599 2249 2798 35.0 36.3 44.4 1058 1071 1028 16,77 16.71 21.71
580 489 252 7,8 7.9 4.0' 1044 1024 978 14.57 14.70 17,37
84 45 57 1.2 .7 .9 889 806 913 11.98 11.90 14.90
7419 6192 6300 19710951059
...........7612...63..............................P.... 1 P.. ?.. .. 0 ..7 .5.. 2C3.o 3.
Coatianed.





48
BEEF STEERS SOLD OUT OF FIRST HANDS FOR SLAUGHTER
...---------........---------------------...................... ...... --.......----------------...------ ---------------------- ...
Sercent Average weight Aveage price
Number of head total (pound) in dollars
( j pounds) 61
by grades per 100 lb.
Grad .................--------------------.........................................
J an. Jan. Jn.: Jan. Van. :Jan, :Jan. Jan. Jan. 'Jan. Jan. Jan.
12 5 13 12 5 13 12 5 13 12 5 13
561--------- L19. 195 95& 6 195 1956 1956 1955 1956 .1956 :1955
DENVER /
Prime 294 254 4 7.3 7.2 .1 1134 1167 939 22.46 22.98 27.00
Choice 2487 2277 2783 61.9 64.5 78.0 1154 1131 1082 20.07 20.14 25.45
Good 1211 987 745 30.2 27.9 20.9 1092 1146 1023 18.30 17.98 23.35
Com'l. 23 14 23 .6 .4 .7 1189 1195 867 13.92 15.00 17.65
Utility 11 -- .3 1016 14.32
All grades....... 4015 ..35a6.. .................. ....... -1134 J11JQ L$jQ60.. L9 7-Q ,S2.-.-
1/ These summaries developed from data collected on marketing of fed cattle by the Agricultural Estimates
Division.

ESTIMATED FEDERALLY INSPECTED SLAUGHTER AND MEAT PRODUCTION
Beef .Veol Pork Lamb and Total Total
Week Beef Veoal (xc. lard) mutton me oto : Total
Week .-.. ...... ... ---------------------------- -----. moat lard
ended Num- Pr Nu. i Prod. Num Prod. Num- :. pr prod.
be.r er er p bar: or. .
----------- -------------- L------------------ I-------- ---------I
1,000 mil. l. 00 mil. 1b. 1,000 mil. b. 000 m il. mil. Ib. mil. lb.
Jan. 14, 1956 416 228.8 151 17.2 1,742 231.0 304 14.6 491.6 64.5
Jan. 7, 1956 342 187.4 141 16.1 1,435 190.3 267 12.8 406.6 51.4
Dec. 31, 19551/314 172.7 105 11.7 1,333 176.8 260 12.0 373.2 51.9
Jan. 15, 1955 386 205,9 144 16.8 1,374 191.8 318 15.2 429.7 50.8
Percentage change from:
Jan. 7, 1956 +22 +22 +7 +7 +21 +21 +14 +14 +21 +25
Jan. 15.l .5 .+. 8. +.11 .. +5 ._+2 +27 +20 -4 4 +14 +27
---------------------------------------ft-----------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------ -- -------- ( -- -- -- -
Average weights (.) .La.....rd
Week .Catte Sheep and yield
S Cattle C: alves Hogs s Pr
ended l uambs per
-------------I-------I-------- -------- r ------
S---Live --Dr.ss. Live Dressed Live Dressed2; Live Dressed .. 100 lb..
.................~- -.---- -- -- -- -- -- -- : .. ... .. .t.r;.. .. .Li .... ; ? ....... .. ..... .. .L .

Jan. 14, 1956 1,010 550 210 114 242 133 100 48 15.3
Jan. 7, 1956 1,005 548 210 114 241 133 100 48 14.9
Dec. 31, 1955 1,000 550 205 111 239 133 99 46 14,9
..em5.-.- ...--9J0_ _...5A.....1 214 17. 248 140 100. q48 14.9


_/ Actual slaughter and revised estimate of production. 2/ Excludes lard.
UNITED STATES FEDERALLY INSPECTED SLAUGHTER BY REGIONS
December 1955 with comparisons
-- -- --- -------i .thousand hJeadl ___ ___
Region : Cattle Calves_ _: Hos :_Sheep_&_lambs_
S_:_1955 1. i954_: 1955 : 1954_ : 55 1954 :1955_ 1954
N. Atlantic States..... 129 136 112 104 637 527 225 230
S. Atlantic States.,... 40 42 27 24 271 208
N. C. States Eastern. 327 325 210 225 1,598 1,413 144 137
N. C. States-N,Western. 487 444 117 113 3,026 2,655 399 399
N. C. States-S.Western. 178 160 29 36 801 590 95 .102
S, Central States...... 158 183 92 93 538 373 61 61
Mountain States........ 97 100 7 7 131 113 81 79


Pacific States......... _202 193 39 36 323_ 239 150 160
Total................ 1,617 1,583 633 639 7,324 6,119 1,155 1,167
Other animals slaughtered under Federal inspection, (nu'mbez of headT: Dec. 1955 -
Horses 19,289; Goats 4,495; Dec. 1954 Horses 24,996; Goats 3,557.
Data furnished by Agricultural Research Service.





. I
I '
I LrI
-a



r -i






* I

S I I
3 a
* --------
I I
* I I
* I i


S,-------

* I,
II I

- -------
! r-- 1,-
* I H.
I I


I I
r-4
1 -1I






I-----------


,i H

n D-I

I I I
* I I a(


II I
S I---------


S I rI


I I

I I

i I
i a






I I




* U
.-! -- --



s
I
I
I
u


rc- ',r- r-,)W co O m N li ,mtm .. %srD,
N- U r- 4l M OI 0 0 I 0 O C M N I4D
0 -I W% n--- 1 W W WeU% H W W N,

rL r r CM r4 H r- I*
s I I
,HMlH-.t DO U o' r-t- W.o 000 o t
,o-t Ur-iNre OrO4OOO ,-l H OV--0"N rONNW, W
u- cN r-iD .=4 cI t O Io IS tS n


H H ; r-4 i H H -- W w

a N


a" 1 u o -i-o 9r- a" oa acI 00 A r
1-9 W HW N 1"CUL H o HL LrlI


. Ho H r. ir r i' n 0I
Cur3lr--o ^O r-tl^0 PC\r- t-D b0 t0 N 7




L. e OJ a-"0 0 "a ta.nna- r-a i' aC o
L1CW W'D N1 I- n0 -D N H C




O"" c \- O .-a o r K-oO,. \J n W Wi ,, K H"l U"%
u-,'- w o t J w N w L\ r--- %,,,- w, i of
LC OrH- N- r~W- H o W f r .- rH CM oM DO. C0

U 0\HW aHH,%O0 n. N Or-4 14JCU
r-~ H H' n cl

oN 0c O~ 1 c 0 ICU U-\ W H W- H=t r W '-% ,ml O
c I,- r-o L. r (\H mw ?M% 0 r-4 D- N N -r, OI-



W r" H W W N te% N U\ I 0eN C1
H Hr- H V% I
C H -t i. w ur t W ~o NCU. o ow-t N H. oI




r-% Ln\-- UJ Hl ,-t W- M t%,- DO N- r-tr- Owl W
IN Hr-0 i ~O'L I % N m "%W r0 I %D %
Sa a a a a a a I I
H H Is : 0J
H H a f
Un W V\ r-4 N I- P




, '1 r-H IU \ r0l W 0-I i r 'I Xi X% W U- 0 0 I
peOH r- h- o
I r -t O N U H iU I' m u II n i 0 r


wC (iN r4 L r -It CU r- I O n 14 X0 0 l CA


. a . I

H1-1 i'fl r- ,t I -1onN x r- r-! .O %
St l r. b 404 r;l % C3 r' 4 r i, C '. I




a a m ,. i a a ia \ i %-o aa a a o ,) a ,,- H ,



il _-, tI l CU i i r l CM. ,,. W iW l 0 b I
0l N CU 4H CU Nq -O H M 0
Ot nCLOit r-N5 w H -H WH HE aS V






H i Hd II Ii K)H H H r%' I






l-i gas .0 %
- f "l H h O O A ~ N l ON < ,) LrC n








Zo e z EE.= c<=!
m o a a ac a a a a M a a
r i MO u0 tr b l b rN r'w i- C






c- c

*z ,d @ o*id a a. a
*t a a a r- .










i.E .. .2Eg0lie o8
mm ug- Ia IVlJla WI
0 i : c 0


ooEn"c* JQ


I I

I I



1 I
I I
I.. I




tl t













141
4')












we to
NI .
o ** *l|






























I I



I I
I. sal




























I I
' "I



I I
I '


I ,,














Ito I







a)
> 5*



I I
I* **



I I




I I





I0








IMI


I
n mI






o l
R I














01t LC( 1-










Ur r-ll


H r-4
I v,
1w
I



co























NM rC
H I




H rqY
o I-






















b> S
r-1 4i

H^ Hi
U3ID~
LnLnL


Irr
p I


oa oo




KMO .t










ocu m-a a








I




I
1
0 "o "I
N r-1t CY J









IND





H r-4 C I.




r- 0 '4
I


I













r1 MU'














ID z0 P-L
dda I
1-1 1-1

:L^d~
Ct J(
I- -


I I





50 CATTLE: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
-------------- ------------------------ i--------------------------------------------------
I I


Classification


Chicago Kansas City Omaha
------ --r --------.------- r ...- ---.---_... ....... r -----........ .._ ... ... ......
n Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. : Jan. Jan. :Jan.
14 7 15 14 7 15 14 7 15
S1956.1 1956 1955. .1956 1.956.. 1955 .:1956 1956 :1955
Slaughter cattle, calves and vealers
emm m l me O m I I Iwemm m


Steers -


Prime 900-11001
1100-1300
Choice 900-1100
1100-1300
Good 900-1100
Com'l. All wts.
Heifers -
Prime 600-800#
Choice "
Good 500-900
Com'l. All wts.
Cows All weights
Commercial
Utility
Canner & Cutter
Bulls All weights -
Good
Utility & Commercial
Vealers All weights -
Choice & Prime
Com'l. & Good
Calves 500f down
Choice & Prime
Com'l. & Good


23.32
22.75
21.15
20.02
18.10
14.95


20.00
16,78
13.75

12.32
10.92
9.50

12.90
15.22

28.00
22.50

19.00
14,50


23.53
23.03
21.44
20.44
17.97
14.94


20.19
16.94
13.75

12.50
11.28
9.91

13.19
15.32

28.00
22.50

19.00
14.50


32.25
33.17
28.70
28.60
23.32
18.62


25.88
21.74
17.18

12.08
10.62
9,12

12.90
15.06

27.40
81.00

21.50
16.00


s 22.12
: 21.65
: 19.58
S19.30
: 16.55
: 14.50


: 19.18
: 16.30
14.00

:12,42
S11.05
S9.52


22.12
21.75
19.75
19.50
16.88
14.50


19.38
16.50
13.94

12.50
11.50
10.00


S13.80 12.74
: 13.80 12.74


i 22.00
:17.50

? 16.80
: 14*30


22.00
17.50

17.00
14.50


29.98
30.22
26.08
26.08
21.42
17.65


23.65
19.48
15.20

12.10
10.60
8.92


:22.50
:22.28
:20.28
:19.68
:17.38
:15.00

2 --
:19.62
:16.75
:14.12

:11.70
:10.45
: 9,18


22.31
22.22
20.06
19.63
17.19
14.66


19.47
16.47
13.69

12.13
10.81
9.50


-- :13.20 13.13
13.12 :13.76 13.62


22.90
17.30

18.80
15.30


:19.00
:15.50

:17.00
:14.00


18.50
14.50

16.00
13.00


Feeder and stocker cattle and calves
Steers -


Choice 500-800#
Good "
Medium 500-1000
Heifers -
Choice 500-750
Med. & Gd. '*
Cows All weights -
Medium & Good
Calves 300-500# -
Steers -
Good & Choice
Heifers -
Good &' Choice


19.75
17.50
14.75

17.05
13,80


19.75
17.50
14.75


22.45 : 19.25
20.20 : 17.50
17.18 : 15,00


19.00
17.25
15.00


22.25
19.50
16.75


17.25 18.90 : 16,25 16.19 18.25
14.00 15.65 s 13.75 13.69 15.00


:19,50
:17.50
:15,00

:16,50
:13.50


19.00
17.00
14.50

16.25
13.12


-- : 10,50 10.22 10.50 :10.62 10.25


20.50 20.50 22.00 : 19,50 19.5C 20.75 :20.50 20.12

17,25 17.25 18.45 : 16.50 16.50 17.25 :17.00 16.75


22.00
20.00
16.75

18.00
14.25

10.38


21.88

17.5C


31.12
31.80
27.48
27.25
21.70
17.40


24,65
20.28
15.80

11.62
10.15
8.52

11.88
13.30

18.50
14.50

17.50
13.75




HOGS. WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS 51
In dollars per 100 pounds
Interior Iowa and
Chicago southern Minnesota Indianapolis
Classification Jan. Jan.. Jan. Jan. : Jan Jan an Jan.
J an : *
14' 7 15 14 7 15 14 7 15
------------------..... ........ .... .... ..19..


Barrows and
U.S.No.1,
2 and 3




Sows -


gilts -
160-1800
180-200
200-220
220-240
240-270
270-300

300-330#
360-400
450-550


11.15
11.78
11.60
11.45
10.70
10.20


9.70
9.20
8.50


11.25
11.78
11.74
11.44
10.56
10.16

9.69
9.28
8.66


17.28
17.94-
17.78
17.44
16.58
16.08

15.32
14.90
13.92


9.09
10.55
10.93
10 52
9,94
9.35

9,16
8,52
7.89


8.90
10.40
10.72
10.33
9.78
9.22

8.98
8.38
7.75


15.51
16.86
17.11
16.74
16.11
15.37

14.99
14.31
13.10


:11.25
:11.88
:11.88
11. 62
=10.90
:10.18

: 9.20
: 8.75
7 7.85


11.44
12.03
11.91
11.56
10.94
10.16

9.25
8.91
7.88


17.82
18.18
18.12
17.72
16.95
16.32

15.20
15.00
14.30


Pigs Stockerr and feeder)-
Gd. & Ch. 70-120# -- -- -- ..-- ..---- --
--Omaha ,St. Louis Siox
,mhaNational Stock Yards


Barrows and
U.S. No.l,
2 and 3




Sows -


gilts -
160-1800
180-200
200-220
220-240
240-270
270-300

300-330f
360-400
450-550


10.38
11.18
11.18
11,18
10.70
10.08

9.089
9.08
8.45


10.38
11.19
11.19
11.19
10.53
10.12

9.16
9.16
8.60


17.62
17.62
17.35
16.50
15.65

15.18
15.18
14.05


11,50
11.95
11.92
11.62
10.90
10,28

9.25
8.88
8.38


11.72
12.15
12.06
11.78
11.16
10.42

9.32
8.95
8.42


17.82
18.06
17.88
17.44
16.65
16.02

15.58
15.20
14.32


:11.01
:11.01
:10.94
:10,32
9 9,68

: 9,38
= 8.95
t 8.18


11.28
11.28
11.16
10.44
9.75

9.28
8.81
8.09


17.40
17.25
16.42
15.68

15.15
14.78
13.78


Pigs Stockerr & feeder)-
Gd. & Ch. 70-120# .. --
S. St. Paul Baltimore : N. Portland
------------------- ------------------------------------------- .- -----------------------


Barrows and
U.S.No.1,
2 and 3


gilts -
160-180f
180-200
200-220
220-240
240-270
270-300


Sows -
300-330#
360-400
450-550
Pigs Stockerr & feeder)-
Gd. & Ch. 70-120#


11.42
11.55
11,55
11.30
10.60


8.98
6.48
8.20


10.69
11.31
11.31
11. 03
10.28


8.56
8..31*
7.91


17.68
17.68
17.50
17.08
16.35
15.60

15.58
15.07
14.15


12.62
12.94
12.91
12.47
12.03
11.12

9.58
9.54
8.25


8,90 8.50 18.20 a


12.71
12.97
12.97
12.71
12.25
11.44

9.66
9.62
8,38


19.09
19.09
19.09
18.56
17.94
17.19

16.00
16.00
14.00


:12.38
:12.97
:12.97
:12.69
:11.88
:11.62

S10.75
:10.25
: 9.75


12.50
12.83
12.83
12.67
11.92
11.62

10.75
10.25
9.88


19.31
19.67
19.67
19.31
18.31
17.69

17.12
16.69
15.69


-- I -- -- --


*Revised.


r I I I I





b2
HOGS: AVERAGE COST, WEIGHT, AND NUMBER OF PACKER AND SHIPPER PURCHASES 1/
------------------------------------------------'---------' ""r' '
St.
Louis Kan- S. S. 8-
Chi- Natl. sas naha Sioux St. St. Indian- mkts.
Week ended cago Stock City City Joseph Paul apolis corn-
Yards bined
---------------------- ------ ---------~ ------------ -------------------------
AVERAGE COST Dollars per 100 pounds
Barrows Jan.14 .1956 10,92 11.35 10.99 10.70 10.48 11.04 10.70 11.34 10.90
and Jan. 7, 1956 10,85 11,36 11.05 10.83 10.68 11.17 10.37 11.34 10.88
gilts Jan.15, 1955 16.70 17.34 16.90 16.51 16.29 16.80 16.74 17.46 16.79
Jan,14, 1956 8.69 8,63 8.72 8.69 8.66 8.96 8.60 8.03 8.60
Sows Jan, 7, 1956 8.87 8.69 8.61 8.87 8.61 9.02 8.34 8.09 8.65
Jan.15, 1955 14.29 14.63 14.61 14.35 14.03 14,48 14.36 ;14~.5 14.L4
AVERAGE WEIGHT Pounds
Barrows Jan.14, 1956 243 227 231 7 235 236 227 226 231 233
and Jan, 7, 1956 242 230 231 233 234 223 223 230 231
gilts Jan.15, 1955 248 227 235 249 253 237 235 233 241
Jan.14, 1956 451 438 433 417 409 419 421 477 435
Sows Jan. 7, 1956 444 438 446 413 412 404 425 477 434
Jan 15, 1955 455 441 443 445 448 431 437 479 450
N M E OF"E D ----------------------------------------------------------- ----
NUMBER OF HEAD -
Barrows Jan.14, 1956 71418 63939 12557 74320 67622 35532 86262 53385 465035
and Jan. 7, 1956 56804 48273 8602 57585 54333 28312 74881 42754 371544
gilts Jan.15, 1955 58673 45657 9428 59496 53483 31315 63309 43277 364638
Jan.14, 1956 7580 4132 1084 5829 3044 2513 4796 3934 32912
Sows Jan. 7, 1956 6847 3399 647 4858 1866 2178 4439 3467 27701
Jar,. .19 5 .... 495..o ,2_642..... 49.3..3 .3.6_? ._ _7 2094 ...1870 .. .2 89... Q.. 0 0.
SOWS Percentage of total
Jan.14, 1956 10 6 ----8 7- 4 7 5 7 7
Jan. 7, 1956 11 7 7 8 3 7 6 8 7
Jan.15, 1955 6 5 5 5 4 6 4 7 5
I/ Weighted average.
WEEKLY AVERAGE WHOLESALE VALUE OF HOG PRODUCTS DERIVED
FROM 100 LB. LIVE HOG, COMPARED WITH PRICES OF LIVE HOGS, CHICAGO
....... ,-' "." ', '- "' Gross spread ------
Hog products 1/ Hog prices 2/ or margin 3/
------------- f --- ---- ---- ----- ---- ---- ----- ---- ---- ----- rz ....
Jan. 14, 1956 $14.47 $11.78 +$2.69
Jan, 7, 1956 14,77* 11.78 + 2.99*
Jan.955.. 1971 .............17.94 + .1.7
dYU.-c----r-Z-------------- -------,,,,,,,,-- ;'r -'---r-------
1/ Value of all edible products, fresh basis (lard rendered) in 100 Ib. of live hog com-
puted from wholesale prices on carlot basis, Chicago, reported by National Provisioner
daily market report.
2/ Mean of daily quotations on U. S. No. 1, 2 and 3 hogs 180-200# wt. Chicago.
3/ Difference between wholesale product value and hog prices.
T-Revised,
HOG AND CORN PRICES AT CHICAGO AND HOG-CORN PRICE RATIO
Barrows and Corn, Hog-corn
Week ended gilts No. 3, yellow price ratio
Dollars per Cents per based on
100 pounds bushel barrows and gilts
Jan. 14, 1956 10,92 124.5 8,8
Jan. 7, 1956 10,85 126.0 8.6
Jan. 15, 1955 16.70 153.3 10.9
I/ Simple average price,
I/ Simple average price,





SHEEP ,ND LAMBS: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF LAILY -QUOTTIUIMS
In dollars per 100 pounds
: : :Ogden &: South
Chicg Omaha Kansas : Fort De North : San
: City : worth e : Salt : Fran-
------------ -_:_ _-_ -- -- -.- J. -. :_ L-ake _t_ qigco


110 down (WOOLED) -
and Jan. 14, 1956
Jan. 7, 1956.
Jan, 15, 1955
Id Jan. 14, 1956
Jan. 7, 1956
Jan. 15, 1955


EaES (WOOLED,
Good and
Choice

Cull and
Utility


FEEDER LABS
Good and
Choice


Jan. 14, 1956
Jan. 7, 1956
Jan. 15, 1955
Jan. 14, 1956
Jan. 7, 1956
Jan. 15, 1955


Jan.
Jan.
Jan,


14,
7,
15,


1956
1956
1955


18.52
18.75
21.06
17,90
18.12
19.95


6,12
6.12
6, 12
-.75
4.75
4.75
5.50


18.08
18.75
20,58
17.35
17.50
19.70

4.38
4.38
6.50
3.50
3.50
5.15


-- 16.75
-- 16.88
-- 20.25


17,40
18.44
19.75
16,50
17.44
18.75

4.62
4.62
6.38
3,62
3.62
5.12


-- 18.75
-- 19.50.
20.55
16.25 18.12
16,75 18,88
18.92* 19.55

7.12
-- 7.03
-- 8.25
-- 5.25
-- 5.25
-- 6.12


-- 16.45 17.50
-- -- 17.50
16.15 16.70 19.25


-- 19.25
-- 19.25
-- 21.00


17.25
16.50
19.45


20.00
20,00


6.00
6.00


3.75
3.75 4,50
4.50


16.00
14.50 --
-- 15.00


*Shorn basis,
-- ------------- -------------------------- --- ----- -- --

WESTERN LIVESTOCK REVIEW CONTINUED FROM PAGE 45
Prime vealers brought t21.00-28.00, Good and Choice vealers and slaughter calves
A18.00-21.00, a few Choice 300# calves 423.00. Good and Choice stocker and feeder
steers sold from 16,00-18.50, Choice 500* stockers reaching $19.00 at Ogden;
limited volume Good and Choice stocker and feeder heifers $14.00-16.50; same grades
stock steer calves mostly $18.00-21,50,
Choice steers under 1200# sold out of California feedlots mainly from $19.00-
19.50, few loads 975-1075# 420,00-20.25; Good to low-Choice 116.00-18.50; Good and
Choice fed heifers 116.00-18,00; 2 loads young Commercial cows $14.00. These sales
were made f.o.b. ranch at 41 shrink, A few loads of Good and Choice stocker and
feeder steers cleared from 116.00-18.25, around 60 head 550-750# stock steers
t19.00; one load Choice stock calves reaching t19.50 in Northern California. A
few loads of mostly Choice steer calves brought $18.25 in Oregon. Stocker and
feeder sales f,o.b. ranch from none to 2% shrink.
Mixed lots U. S. No. 1 to 3 180-2404 barrows and gilts sold at South San
Francisco late at 412.50; at Stockton 413.00; at Los ,.ngeles 412.00-13,00; at
Portland 412.25-13.50; at Spokane 412.00) at Ogden 412,50, and at Denver $10.50-
11.75.
Good and Choice fall shorn to full wooled slaughter lambs brought $17.00-
18.75, with a limited showing at Denver from t19.00-19.50. More than 15 loads of
Choice full wooled lambs, some lots carrying a sprinkling of Prime, sold out of
Idaho at $18.50, a few loads t19,00,


LAMBS -
Choice
Prime

Good ar
Choice


I II I ..........


-,,-





NEW YORKX I CHLESALE MEAT TRADE REVIEW
Western Dressed Fresh Meats

Weak and declining prices featured the week's trade on Western dressed fresh
meats. Supplies of beef, lamb and fresh pork were fully normal and somewhat in
excess of trade requirements. Veal supply was moderate and consisted mainly of
Good and lower grades. Trading was uneven, with unfavorable weather and icy roads
on Monday preventing many retailers from participating. Demand on subsequent ses-
sions was fair to slow. A sizable supply of lamb and some veal was still unsold
late, with clearance doubtful. Compared with the previous Friday: Steer beef
steady to $2.00 higher; cow beef steady; veal steady to $5.00 higher; calf $4.00
to $6.00-up; lamb steady to $3.00 lower;.fresh pork loins t2.00-3.00 off; other
fresh pork cuts weak to $1.00 lower.
Receipts of steer beef included all grades from Commercial to Prime, with
weights over 750# predominating. Demand centered on Good to Prime carcasses around
650# and lighter, but stocks of these were depleted early. Rounds were in depend-
able demand, but outlet for other wholesale cuts was rather restricted, with prices
weak to lower, Prices of cow beef held about steady under pressure.
Veal prices turned upward early, but after midweek, trade was less active.
Supplies were seasonally small and well-balanced with demand, although relatively
few high-Choice and Prime carcasses were included. Calf numbers were small. A
sizable accumulation of lamb was available in wholesale coolers late in the week
as buyer interest lagged. Weight was an important factor in most sales. Prices
showed a downward trend, influenced by the prepondLrance of Good to Prime carcasses
scaling 55 i and up. Some carryover was anticipated. Fresh pork supplies continued
fairly liberal. Movement was slow but dependable. Prices on fresh loins declined
as sellers endeavored to effect clearances rather than divert stocks to freezers.
Locally Dressed Fresh Meats

Local slaughter was of more nearly normal proportions following some curtail-
ment during recent weeks. Supplies were fully ample in most instances. Small
accumulations of heavyweight steer and lamb carcasses were noted in some coolers.
Demand for veal was less urgent than recently, with late prices showing easiness
after opening slightly to sharply higher. Prices of steer cuts, except rounds,
worked lower, particularly on weighty selections, while lamb prices cased, with
kosher lamb foresaddles sharply lower toward the close. Fresh pork cuts sold at
about steady prices under severe pressure.
Steer beef production consisted of all grades, with high-Prime offerings
rather scarce. Demand was fairly broad for Choice and Prime hindquarters scaling
170# down, with bulk of heavyweight offerings diverted to cutting accounts. Tradec
on.rounds was active throughout, with firm price stands maintained by packers anld
Wholesalers. Short loins, ribs and arm chucks all lost price ground, particularly
primal cuts carrying excess fat. Trading on kosher steer cuts was rather slow iand
highly selective. Prices averaged about steady.
Vealors comprised the greater part of the veal and calf supply as calf numbers
were scant, quality showed some improvement but buyers continued to operate
selectively. Prices were sharply higher at the outset, but an easier tendency
developed after midweek. Increased lamb supplies pr. ed burdensome in a quiet
trade. Carcass prices turned lower early, with weight. an influencing factor as
offerings scaling 55# up were hard to move, even at sharp discounts. Prices de-
clined daily on most weights and grades of kosher lamb foresaddles.
Production of fresh pork was fully normal, with most cuts selling at about
steady prices. Locally cut loins received preference from many buyers, in view of
a relatively slow movement into consumer channels. Prices were fairly well main-
tained despite some pressure on early rounds. Other major fresh pork cuts showed
little change.




C'-TIAGO WHOLESALE MEAT TRADE REVIEW


Steer and heifer beef supplies consisted mainly of Good and Choice carcasses.
High-Choice and Prime veal were in relatively small supply, but average-Choice and
below were about normal in volume, with weights under 90# predominant. Lamb
supply proved fully adequate, carcasses 55-65# making up the bulk. Fresh pork
offerings were plentiful, and excessive in spots early in the week. Trade on car-
cass beef and lamb was slow with clearance doubtful. In beef cuts, squarecut
chucks and rounds cleared quite readily, while Choice and Prime ribs 32,- c-l over,
and Choice loins were rather slow. Lamb loins and ribs were most wanted among
lamb cuts. veal trading was mostly dull with price advances early in the week
influenced mainly by higher replacement costs. Pork trade opened slowly but be-
came fairly active after Monday, and clearance was expected to be good. Compared
with last Thursday's close: Commercial beef steady to 50# higher, other grades
steady to 504 lower; veal steady to $2.00 higher, full advance on Good and Choicei
lamb $1.00-2.50 lower; pork loins 8-12# steady, 12-16# $1.00-2.00 lower, other
pork cuts steady to $1.00 lower.
Choice and Prime squarecut beef chucks ranged from $28.00-30.00, rounds
$40,00-43.00; Prime loins $73.00-79.00, Choice $60.00-66.00; Prime ribs $54.00-
57.00, Choice $46.00-50.00. Choice and Prime kosher style beef chucks sold from
$29.00-31.00. Choice veal hindsaddles realized $55.00-59.00, comparable fore-
quarters $23.00-25.00. Lamb hindsaddles cashed at $45.00-52.00, lamb logs $40.00-
47.00; loins $68.00-62.00, and hotel ribs $50.00-55.00.

PACIFIC COAST WHTOLSALE MEAT TRADE REVIEW
Supplies of most steer carcasses were adequate for the demand on the West
Coast, with Choice and Good carcasses under 600# in limited supply in the Los
Angeles area. Cow beef, veal and calf were in moderate to small supply while lamb
carcasses under 50# were in small volume at San Francisco and adequate at other
points. Pork continued liberal to excessive. Trading was fair on most steer car-
casses, fairly active on cow beef, calf and lamb, slow on fresh and cured pork
cuts. Prices compared to last Friday: Steer beef steady to 500 lower in northern
California and the Northrest, uneven but mostly steady in the Los Angeles area;
cow beef steady to $1.00 higher, instances $2.00 higher at San Francisco; veal and
calf steady to M3.00 higher; lamb mostly steady, few $1.00 lower at Los Angeles;
fresh pork steady to t2.00 lower, instances $4.00 lower on loins at Los Angeles;
cured pork steady to weak, few smoked skinned hams $1.00-2.00 lower and slab bacon
$1.00-5.00 lower at Los Angelos; lard about steady.
Choice stocr carcasses under 700# sold mostly from t32.00-36.00, few to $37.00
at Seattle and down to t31.50 at Los Angeles, 700-800# $31.00-32.00 in California;
Good 500-700- t29.00-35.00; Commercial 27.00-31.00. Commercial cow carcasses
bulked from $23.00-26.00; Utility $22.00-26.00; Canner and Cutter'$18.00-23.00.
Choice veal under 150# sold from $41.00-48.00; Good and Choice calf under
200# $31.00-39.00; Commercial, all weights, $29.00-33.00 at Los Angeles only.
Choice and Prime lamb under 55#: brought l37.00-40.00, few $41.00 at Los Angeles;
Good, all weights, $35.00-39.00. Fresh pork loins under 16# cashed from $30,00-
37.00, few to $39.00 at San Francisco; shoulders under 16# $20.00-26.00; snokcd
skinned haus under 18# $41.00-50.00; slab bacon under 10# $28.00-40.00, sliced Il#
packages $36.00-42.00; lard in 1# cartons t14.00-18.00.


-- 1 r I





56 WHOLESALE DRESSED MEAT PRICES: WEEKLY AVERAGE OF DAILY QUOTATIONS
In dollars per 100 pounds
---- -"----------------------------------------------------------------------------
New York Chicago San Francisco
Classification I---------------------------------------------
Classification Jan., Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.: Jan. Jan.: Jan. : Jan.
14 7 15 14 7 15 1 7 15
1956,
.......-.......-..........-... .......19 .1-5-... 9 56-.... 2 196. 1 56 ... 6. 6... ..195
Beef -
Steer -


Prime 600-700#
700-800
Choice 500-600
600-700


Good 35(
Com'l.
Cow, all wts. -
Commercial
Utility
Veal -
Prime I
Choice
Good
Lamb
Prime


Choice 40-50
50-60
Good all wts
Pork Fresh -
Loins 8-101 av.
10-12 "
12-16 "
Butts 4-8 "
Pork Cured -
Hams, smk., skd. -
12-151 av.
16-18 '
18-20 *
Bacon, smk.. stab -
6-8# av.
8-10 *
Sliced 1 # pkg.
Picnics, smoked -
4-8# av.
Backs, D. S. -
16-20# av.
Lard, 1# cartons -
Refined
Substitutes


22.00 23.00

15.00 13.50

16.00 16.00


49.00

45.50
41.00
36.50


:37.75
:37.75
:36.10
:36,10
:30.55
:28.20


36.75
36.75
36.25
36.25
70.69
28.00


50.25
50.25
44.75
44.70 :
37.20
32.50


40.50
38,50

37.00
31.50
29.50

27.00
23.00

48.50
43.50
36.20

36.80
33.60
36.80
33.00
31.30

31.90
31.90
30,80
28.90


43.00
41.50



34,00
38,50


35.50 35.50 42.00
33.85 34.00 40.50
32.75 32.75 39.00
29.00 29.00 36.00


39.00
37.00

36.00
31.50
29.50

25.00
22.00

46.00
41.00
36.00

38.62
34.50
38.62
34.00
32.25

34.00
34.00
33.25
29.25


41.50
41.00



35.00
40.00


29.00tt -
24.50 : -

46.50 :44,50 44.50
44c50 :41.00 39.50
37.50 :37.00 35.50

45.60 :36.40 37.38
45.60 :32.85 34.12
44.00 :36.40 37.38
44.00 :32.85 34.12
41.00 :32.35 33.56

43.50 :29.65 31.75
43.60 :29.65 31.75
40.90 :28.25 31.06
3'.60 :25.20 25.44


54.00 :45.55 45.00
48.50 :43.00 42.00
-- ::42.85 A2.62

-- :35.85 36.12
52.00 :33.35 33.88
53.50 :38.30 38.50

35.00 :26,50 26.88

16.00 :11.00 11.50

17.00 :14.05 14.25
-- : 24,80 25.00


29.00
25.00



43.00

41.00
39.50
41.00
39.00
37.00

46.50
43.00
43.00
44.00


56.00
52.00
50.00

57.50
54.00
58.50

36.00


18.90


Note: Prices are based on sales by slaughterers, packer branch houses, and wholesale dealers to retail
dealers and hotel supply houses. Quotations at New York exclude locally dressed meats.


>-600
U


30-110#
jr p
U U

40-50#
50-60


35.10 : 30.00 30.00

15.75 : -- -

16.75 : 17.50 17.50
27.50 : --


45.80
41.30
36.75

44.30
42.80
43.30
41.80
40.00

40.90
40.90
37.70
34.50


51.55
48.15
47.45

56.30
52.50
55.50


26.50 26.50
24.50 23.50



44.00 43.00

39.00 39.00
37.00 37.00
39.00 39.00
37.00 37.00
36.50 36.50

37.60 38.50
37.70 38.00
35.80 37.00
32.50 32.88


48.50 48.50
46.00 46.00


38.00 38.00
37.00 37.00
40.50 40.50


.






BOSTON WOOL MARKET REVIEW
Trading in the Boston market was quite brisk for the limited volume of greasy
domestic worsted wools offered. All classes were in demand with particular
emphasis on graded 56/58s combing wool as integrated mills and topmakers partici-
pated. A strong tone was evident as prices advanced in some categories and ap-
proximately twenty cars were moved. The good demand and limited supplies of
scoured wools and noils influenced a stronger price tone for these items. Turn-
over in the Western States was slower than in recent weeks as most of the better
wools had been purchased for consumption and unsold wool was held in strong hands.
A few cars of territory wools were sold for Eastern delivery.
Cabled reports from Australia at midweek indicated strong general competition
at firm prices, while New Zealand was 2% to 54 higher under keen competition.
Prices at the Cape markets advanced 2A to 2-% under general competition while
South American prices were very firm and trade active.
Fleece Wools Graded fine staple Ohio fleeces sold at $1.34 and t1,35 clean
basis while a small quantity of graded fine, average to good French combing fleeces
brought $1.16. Graded 56/58s good French combing and staple wool moved at l1.10
while 50/54s staple fleeces sold at 41,02-1.04, Medium grade short French combing
and clothing fleece wool brought 96# clean while medium grade seedy and burry wool
moved around 500 in the grease and medium grade gray fleeces at 440-450 grease
basis.
Territory Wools Graded territory 60/62s good French combing and staple wool
sold at A1.20 clean basis while 56/58s good French combing and staple moved at
1l.08-1.13 depending on style and character, An original bag lot of bulk fine,
average to good French combing territory wool sold around 1.25 clean basis.
In the West, a graded 60/62s good French combine and staple territory wool
sold at an estimated clean price of $1.22-1.24 delivered Boston, while 56/58s cost
clean from l1.10-1.12 delivered.
Texas Wools Original bag 12-months Texas wool, bulk good French combing and
staple length brought from 1.33-1.35 clean.
Mohair The Boston mohair trade was quiet while occasional small spring
clips were contracted in Texas at 81 -83 for adult and from $1,01=1.,03 for kid
mohair to the warehouse.
Foreign Wools Greasy Montevideo super skirted 60s sold at 65# grease basis,
in bond, A fair weight of spot greasy 10 to 12 months spinners and topmakers Cape
64/70s sold around $1.48 clean basis, duty paid. Buenos Aires 5s fleeces were
offered for shipment at 880 clean basis, in bond. Cabled reports at week's end
showed New Zealand closed 2- to 5% higher while Australia and South Africa closed
2- up. Quotes follow: New Zealand type 93 at 950; 834 at 930; 100 at 90#0; 107
at 890; 114 at 89# and 128 at 90.#, Australia type 56B at $1.28; 57B at $1.23;
58B at $1.18; 59B at 41.15; 432 at t1.14; 433 at $1.06; 434 at $1,01 and 435 at
930. Cape type 7 at t1.24; 8 at 1.22; 12 at $1.22; 47 at $1.22; 48 at $1.19; 52
at 41,19 and 53 at $1.17. Short types 27 at 1l.19; 28 at $1.17; 32 at $1.17 and
33 at ;1.15. Above quotes based on clean U.S. yields in bond.
Carpet Wools Some carpet wool dealers found business in spot or nearby
wools a little better compared to last week. Spot Buenos Aires November second
clips sold at 870 clean fibers present. Good white Pakistan/India carpet wools
were quoted for shipment around 94# clean fibers present and super yellows at 87#
while Buenos Aires November second clips were priced at 87#. New Zealand carpet
wools were 1 to 2 pence higher. Approximately 7,400 bales of carpet wools will be
auctioned at Liverpool on January 17 and 18.







COLL STORAGE HOLDINGS OF MEATS AND LARL, L},CE1-i3hh 31, 19f5
Refrigerated stocks of red meats increased seasonally to 782 million pounds. The
December increase of 181 million pounds of red meat stocks was 12 percent greater
than the increase in 1954 but was 6 percent below average for this time of year.
An above average gain in beef stocks raised warehouse holdings to 209 million
pounds or 1 percent above the holdings of December 1954 but 2 pLrcent under
average for this time of year. Pork stocks increased seasonally to 422 million
pounds. This quantity compares with 4A9 million in December 195A and the December
E-year average of 463 million pounds.


UNITED STATES STORAGE HOLDINGS
(Includes hol
cold stl
: Dec.
Commodity : 31
1955 _
BEEF: 1,000 lb.
Frozen.............. 197,668
In cure,cured & smkd, 11,017
Total.............. 208,685

Frozen.... ......... 310,625
Dry salt, in cure and
cured.............. 27,352
Other, in cure,cured
and smoked.....,... 83,647
Total..... ........ 421,624
OTHER MEATS AND MEAT PRODUCTS:
Sausage & sausage
room products...... 15,394
Frozen lamb & mutton 10,722
Frozen veal........ 18,800
Canned meats & meat
products........... 36,958
All edible offal..,. 70,119
Total other meats &
meat products...... 151,993
Total all meats..... 782,302
Lard, rendered A
refined 1/........ 2/
GOVERN,. ENT HOLDINGS 3/
Pork................ 3,995
eef .............. 7,541
i/ In dry Er.- cold storage as
2/ Not available.
3/ Governnm nt holdings are in
held b3 U. S. D. A., the Armed


OF hEATS AND LARD, DEC. 31, 1955,WITH COb FAhISDNS
dings in public, private and semi-private
orage houses and meat packing plants)
: Nov. : Dec. : Dec. 31 :Eeg,_31,_1955 as__of
S 30 : 31 : 190-54 :Nov. :Dec.: Dec. 31
:_ 1955 1954 av. :1955:1_95.4; 5-yr. av.
1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.
149,925 178,269 201,715 132 111 9
10,288 9,579 11,061 107 lle 100
160,213 187,848 212,779 130 111 96


183,A12 314,311 293,469 169


99 106


2A,222 35,905 37,968 113 76


99,080
306,714


13, .58
9,884
16,400

31,266
62,990

133,998
600,925


98,429
448,645


1 ,601
9,714
20,532

5^,001
6^,621

133,469
799,982


131,087
A62,524


1.,50P
13,611
19,135

37,423
63,119

148,794
824,097


8A.
137



lib
11b

118
111

113
130


85
941


105
110
92

6SI
109


72

64
91


99
79
98

99
111


93 102
98 95


98,426 104,125 12^,16^A


5,558
6,928


12,602
10,973


172
109


32
69


reported b. 3urecu of C'unsus.


eluded in the totals and consist of rep.'-rteiJ stocks
Services oni other Govern-m: -nt agencies.


21
2/






CATTLE ATD CALVES ON FEED, JANUARY 1, 1956

The number of cattle and calves on feed for market in the Tnited States on
January 1, 1956 was 1 percent larger than a year ago, according to the Crop Report-
ing Board. The estimated number was 5,823,000 head, compared with 5,786,000 head
last year and the 1950-54 average of 5,001,000 head. The number on feed in the
North Central States was about the same as a year ago. In the 13 Western States,
it was up 3 percent.
The Corn 3elt total on January 1 was estimEted at 4,178,000 head. The western
Corn 3elt States declined 4 percent, while feeding in the eastern Corn Belt was up
9 percent from a year earlier. Iowa, the leading feeding State, was the same as a
year ago. Decreases in South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas more than offset in-
creases in all other western Corn Belt States. Illinois, the second ranking feeding
State this year showed a 5 percent increase. Feeding in each of the other eastern
Corn 3elt Stetes was also larger than a year earlier.
Shipments of stocker and feeder cattle, during the period October to 7cccc.bcr,
into the 9 Corn Belt States for which State inspection records are available were
less than 1 percent below the same period a year ago. For the July-December period,
inshipments vere 2 percent smaller than for the corresponding period a -ear earlier.
Outside the North Central States, the number of cattle on feed was 3 percent
larger than a year ago. California, the leading State in the West, showed an in-
crease of 5 i-ercent, while Colorado, the second leading western State, was 18 per-
cent belov a year earlier. In Nontana, Idaho, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, and
Oregon, the number of cattle on feed was greater than a year ago, while other areas
of the '!es.t rere down. Penisylvania was down 2 percent, while Texas was up 8 pct.
For the 13 States in which quarterly estimates of cattle on feed are made, the
number on feed on January 1, 1956 was down 1 percent from a year earlier. On
October 1, 1955, the number was 19 percent larger than a year earlier. The lower
level of feeding on January 1 relative to October 1 resulted from heavy marketings
of fed cattle and fewer replacements during the past quarter as compared with the
corresponding period in 1954. In 11 States where quarterly estimates for both
October and January are available, marketing during the period October-Decembcr
1955 were 15 percent greater than the same period in 1954. Placements during this
same period ',ere down 10 percent.
Detailed estimates showing classes of cattle, their weight, expected narlzot-
ings and length of time on feed are presented in this report for 14 States.
The data for the 14 States reveal that the number on feed over 3 months is 30
percent above last year, but those on f-ed less than 3 months show a decrease of 9
percent. As a percent of the total on feed, the number on feed less than 3 months
was 72 percent compared with 79 percent a year earlier. Cattle on food 3-6 months
were 24 percent of the total, compared with 19 percent last year. About 4 percent
of the total had been on feed more than 6 months, compared with 2 percent a year
ago.
Estimates by weight groups and kinds of cattle on feed this year indicate less
interest in feeding calves and lightweight cattle than last year. Cattle wei'-hing
under 600 pounds comprised 29 percent of the total number on feed, compared with 33
percent a year earlier; those weighing 600-900 pounds were 44 percent of the total
compared with 45 percent last year; and those weighing over 900 pounds wore 27 per-
cent and 22 percent last year. Steers represented 57 percent of the total corinpred
with 53 percent last year; hcifers 21 percent and 19 percent; calves 21 percent and
26 percent; cows and other cattle 1 percent and 2 percent. Cattle feeders in
these 14 Stctes intend to market fed cattle at a faster rate than intended a year
ago, with 51 percent of the January 1 number to be marketed by April 1.
Revisions of cattle on feed estimates are published in this report for the
1950-55 period. These revisions were based on a review of current data obtained
from cattle feeders along with data relating to movements of feeder cattle and nrr-
ketings of fed cattle which were not available at the time current estimates vere
made.






CATTLE .d;D CALVES ON FEED JANUARY 1, 1950-56 1/
(Fevised Tstimates 1950-55)


State : -year : 1950 1951 1952 1953 1951
tavorage :
:(1950-64) :


1,000
head


1,000
head


1,000
head


1,000
head


1,000
head


1,000
head


1955 1956 :1956 as
S:;peraont
: :of 1955


1,000
head


1,000
head


Pc rccnt


Pa. .
Ohio. .
Ind. .
Ill. .
1Hich. .
Wis .
E.N.C.

'inn. .
Iowa. .
Mo .
N. Dak. .
S. Dak. .
Nebr. .
Fans. ..
W.N.C.
N.C. .
Okla. .
Texas .
Month. ..
Idaho .
Wyo.
Colo...
N. Mex.
Ariz.
Utah. .
Nov.
Wash..
Oreg. .
Calif..
Western.

U.S. .


89 88
137 125
205 185
532 489
100 90
96 87
1,070 976

306 294
1,064 955
231 242
66 57
196 180
546 420
251 252
2,660 2,400
3,730 3,376
62 55
169 161
36 25
92 78
25 15
255 206
22 17
93 59
48 40
22 22
27 22
29 30
301 196
1,182 926

5,001 4,390


1/ Estimates include only cattle being fattened for market as a more or less dis-
tinct agricultural enterprise, and excludes small operations incidental to dairy
and general faring. Cattle thus fed are presumed to produce carcasses that will
grade good or better.
In addition there have boon a number of cattle finished on distillery slop,
mostly in rontucky, and on by-product feeds in other States not shown as woll as
large numbers being winter-fed in West Virginia, Virginia, Kontucky, and some
other States to be marketed as grass fat in late summer.





J


90
125
176
489
86
91
967

300
955
230
54
180
450
252
2,421
3,388
62
177
26
76
17
229
16
87
46
22
24
26
248
1,056

4,534


90
130
180
504
99
96
1,009

300
1,003
207
65
189
522
265

2,551
3,560
55
186
32
85
24
300
28
97
50
20
25
26
383
1,311

4,961


90
143
225
600
109
100
1,177

318
1,274
253
72
227
731
270

3,145
4,322
70
193
45
110
33
296
32
102
51
22
31
30
327
1,342

5,754


86
164
259
580
114
104
1,221

318
1,134
223
80
204
607
216

2,782
4,003
70
129
54
110
35
245
18
120
53
26
33
32
350
1,275

5,364


84
164
272
609
114
108
1,267

321
1,225
234
76
214
625
227

2,922
4,189
68
132
45
135
30
275
29
169
57
30
40
36
467
1,513

5,786


-82
180
321
639
131
112
1,383

337
1,225
281
110
210
450
182

2,795
4,178
61
143
58
150
25
225
37
204
59
29
38
45
-489
1,563

5,823


98
110
118
105
115
104
109

105
100
120
145
98
72
80

96
100
90:
108
129
111
84
82
128
121
104
97
95
124
105
103

101






SHEEF AND LAMBS ON FEED, JANUARY 1, 1956


The number of sheep and lambs on feed for market in the United States on
January 1 was 8 percent smaller than last year according to the Crop Reporting
Board. The number is estimated at 4,100,000 head, 345,000 head less than last
year. Most of the decrease occurred in the Western Corn Belt and on wheat
pastures in the South and Central Great Plains States. The majority of the
Western States also showed decreases.
In the 11 Corn Belt States, the number of sheep and lambs on feed is estimated
at 2,145,000 head, 13 percent below a year ago. Lamb feeding was less than a year
ago in all of the Corn Belt States except Indiana and Illinois which showed an in-
crease of 12 percent each, and Ohio, Missouri and South Lakota which reported the
same number on feed as last year. Elsewhere in the Corn Belt reductions are as
follows: Kansas, down 33 percent; Nebraska, down 26 percent; Iowa, down 20 per-
cent; Wisconsin, down 13 percent; Minnesota, down 3 percent; and Michigan, down
2 percent.
Shipments of sheep and lambs into the 9 Corn Belt States for which State
inspection data are available for July through December 1955 were 7 percent below
the same months for 1954,
The number of lambs on feed in the wheat pasture areas of the Great Plains
was down sharply from lest year. In Kansas, the number of sheep and lambs on
wheat pastures on January 1 is estimated at about 84,000 head, compared with
147,000 head last year. Rains in October in the Central Plains started wheat, but
lack of rain since October has limited growth and only a limited amount of acreage,
mostly irrigated, was available for pasture, Total lambs on feed in Kansas were
down 33 percent; in Oklahoma, 10 percent; and in Texas, 25 percent.
The number of lambs on feed in Colorado, the leading Western feeding State,
was 10 percent below January 1 last year. In Northern Colorado, 335,000 head
were on feed compared with 397,000 head last year. The Arkansas Valley in Colorado
showed an increase of 32 percent. In California, the second largest feeding State
in the West, sheep and lambs on feed are estimated at 320,000 head--3 percent
larger than on January 1, 1955. Lamb feeding in the North Platte Valley of
Nebraska and Wyoming was below year ego. Elsewhere in the West, numbers on feed
this year were lower than a year ago in most States. Washington is estimated to
have 22 percent fewer sheep and lambs on feed. Idaho, Utah and Nevada were each
down 9 percent; Arizona, down P percent; Oregon, down 5 percent; and Wyoming, down
2 percent. MIontana had 22 percent more sheep and lambs on feed this year than a
year ago.
Farmers in Alabama had approximately 42,000 lambs on pastures on January 1
this year. In North Dakota, the number of sheep and lambs on feed at 122,000, is
52 percent larger than a year ago.
Weather conditions to January 1 have been generally favorable for lamb feed-
ing, except in the Great Plains States where lack of rainfall has restricted
development of wheat pastures. Outside of parts of the Great Plains and Western
Corn Belt, feed supplies are ample. Prices of feeder lambs on the Denver market
advanced from the low point of t16.25 reached during mid-August to a high of
t19.00 the last week in November, The average price of Good and Choice feeder
lambs at Denver for the week ending December 31, 1955 was $17.50 per hundred pounded
compared with t18.00 for the same week a year earlier.


Continued on next page.


I




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08734 5459


SHEEP AND LAMBS ON FEED, JANUARY 1, 1950-56 I/
(Revised Estimates 1950-55)


S1950 : 1951


1952 1953
r----L


1954 : 1955


- J. i


: 1956 :1956
; .. of


New York..,,
Ohio.........
Indiana......
Illinois. .0
Michigan...,,
Wisconsin...,
Minnesota....
Iowa,... ....
Missouri.....
South Dakota.
Nebraska...,.
Kansas.......
Corn Belt..
North Dakota.
Alabama......
Oklahoma.,.,
Texas........
Montana. ,...
Idaho.,......
Wyoming......
Colorado..,..
New Mexico...
Arizona....,,
Utah...... ..
Nevada.......
Washington...
Oregon,, ...
California...
Western...
U. S.......
- --- --


20
210.
84
180
89
60
165
344
130
130
420
-_ -460
2,272
52

40
118
120
75
83
545
28
10
60
8
28
18

_167

3,644


19
189
70
155
70
57
127
323
120
113
580
308
2,112
46
--
50
10E
135
60
71
435
52
24
60
7
26
15
S 165
1 251
3,382


T h ou sa


_- 21
204
80
217
90
51
210
404
145
164
632
206
2,403
62


65
117
160
65
115
62 5
31
45
73
10
28
20
198
1 614
4,038


nd head


2


20
239
95


239
98
71
28
505
135
185
590
190
,632
75


40
200
135
83
130
556
30
35
90
10
37
18
_216_
1 655
4,307


21
215
86
196
90
60
234
412
100
196
555
266
2,410
82

75
300
143
90
122
505
52
40
105
12
34
21
265
1 846
4,277


20
211
77
161
90
62
225
441
130
230
588
239
2,454
80

60
305
150
95
133
542
6%3
65
98
11
32
25
312
1 971_
4,445


Percent
20 100_
211 100
86 112
180 112
88 98
54 87
218 97
353 80
130 100
230 100
435 74
160 67
2,145 87
122 152
42
54 90
229 75
183 122
86 91
130 98
490 90
71 112
60 92
89 91
10 91
25 78
24 95
320 1_03
1.935 98
4,100 92


i/ Includes sheep and lambs on f
Agricultural Estimates Division.


eed in commercial feed lots.


State
An4d Livision_


Percent
1955


___




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EOU69YBMU_JMBQY4 INGEST_TIME 2012-10-22T15:06:25Z PACKAGE AA00012178_00002
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES