Service

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Service USDA's report to consumers
Portion of title:
USDA's report to consumers
Physical Description:
: ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Governmental and Public Affairs
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Communication
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Information
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Office of Governmental and Public Affairs
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Consumer education -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
no. 1- Nov. 1963-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Publication suspended Dec. 1979-
Issuing Body:
Issued Nov. 1963-Feb. 1973 by the Department's Office of Information; Mar. 1973-Dec. 1977 by the Office of Communication.
General Note:
Issues prior to Jan. 1978 were classed: A 21.29:(nos.)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001360420
oclc - 01716336
notis - AGM1835
issn - 0037-2544
System ID:
AA00012167:00076


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Full Text







IT TO CONSUMERS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE* OFFICE OF CO* WASHINGTON, D.C. 20250
;;2/./. 2_1 -D'


APRIL 1974 NO. 120


THE FOOD STAMP PROGRAM

New Visual Available. A new~ 151 set about food
stamps is designed to be either ne- or a two-part
presentation. The 61-frame color slide set, "The Food
Stamp Program and You," has been prepared so slides
No. 1 through No. 31 and slides No. 32 through No. 61
can be shown independently or as a complete set. The
first part, which gives a general introduction to the
Food Stamp Program, is directed to potential food
stamp users. The second part is directed to persons
already participating in the program, telling them
how to use their food coupons and giving some tips on
shopping and nutrition. Copies of the slide set can
be purchased for $18.50 from the Photography Division,
Office of Communication, U.S. Department of Agriculture,
Washington, D.C. 20250. A filmstrip is also available
and can be purchased for $10.50 from the Photo Lab,
3825 Georgia Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20011.
Prices include copies of an illustrated narrative guide
and a soundtrack on cassette with 1,000 Hz tone to
change frames automatically.


DANDY CANDY

Full Of Nutrition. USDA scientists have made a dream
come true: Candy that is good for you. The new candy,
still as delicious and full of quick energy as the com-
mon variety, has the added features of being nutrition-
ally balanced and protein-rich. Scientists developed
the candy by adding nutrient fortification mixtures and
dry protein to recipes of sugar sirup, fat, and flavor-
ings. Nonfat dry milk was the usual protein source,
but soy protein isolates and casein mixtures were also
used. They report that cottonseed, peanut, and fish pro-
tein concentrates also offer possibilities. Synthetic
vitamin and mineral supplements can be added although the
researchers selected yeast, believing a natural source
would be more appealing. Some vitamins, notably A and C,
have to be added directly. Taste-tested at a school car-
nival, the new candy passed with flying colors.




UNIvERSIT V OF ~ ,:,RiP
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3 1262 08740 1021
"USED" CAN BE A GOOD BUY

When The Budget Is Limited. If you are buying furniture for your
first apartment; if you need a piece of furniture for that empty cor-
ner in the living room; if your daughter is beginning to sew in
school -- and if your budget is limited -- think "used". Two publi-
cations recently issued by USDA's Extension Service point out that
used items for the home -- specifically used furniture and used sew-
ing machines -- can be bargains if you choose carefully. "Used Sew-
ing Machines A Good Buy" (PA-1045) provides checklists on where to
buy and what to look for in a used sewing machine. It discusses
briefly the various types of machines -- including a treadle machine
which might be an idea during an.energy crisis. The second booklet,
"Used Furniture Can Be A Good Buy" (PA-1061) gives some basic tips
on choosing used tables, chairs, sofas, beds, and other furniture;
what to look for in construction; some suggestions on where to buy
used furniture; and a few ideas on restyling and repairs. Copies of
either booklet may be purchased for 25 cents each from the Superin-
tendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington,
D.C. 20402.


THE INS AND OUTS OF FOREIGN TRADE

Agricultural Products Come And Go. Foreign agricultural trade has
come a ways from spice-laden camel caravans or tramp steamers haul-
ing copra from tropical islands'. But while the transport methods may
have changed, agricultural products in international trade still in-
clude some pretty exotic goods. Take ginseng. According to a statis-
tical report from USDA's Economic Research Service, this medicinal
plant is a big item in Hong Kong which bought almost $9 million worth
from us last year. Then there are pickled pimientos. We bought $13
million worth last year from Denmark alone. Also on our shopping
list were $15 million worth of canned Mandarin oranges from Japan;
9 million pounds of fresh garlic from Mexico; and nearly 1 million
gallons of sparkling champagne from France. We bought cinnamon from
the Seychelles, cashews from Mozambique, and more than $1 million
worth of fine animal hair -- mostly cashmere and camel hair -- from
Outer Mongolia. Besides ginseng to Hong Kong, we sold licorice to
Denmark and West Germany, which is also one of our prime buyers of
muskrat, and nearly $30 million worth of beef liver and tongue to
France. Japan, by far our biggest customer, bought everything from
fresh lemons to feather meal. The ERS report on foreign agricultural
trade does include some of the better known products -- such as the
wheat flour, fresh apples, and dried raisins we sold to Iceland. But
right along side you can trace the origins of spices, soy sauce, sa-
ble, sisal, and sausage casings. Somebody, somewhere uses them all.


SERVICE is a monthly newsletter of consumer interest. It is designed
for those who report to the individual consumer rather than for mass
distribution. For information about items in this issue, write:
Lillie Vincent, Editor of SERVICE, Office of Communication, U.S.
Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250. Telephone
(202) 447-5437. -2-




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