Service

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Service USDA's report to consumers
Portion of title:
USDA's report to consumers
Physical Description:
: ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Governmental and Public Affairs
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Communication
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Information
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Office of Governmental and Public Affairs
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Consumer education -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
no. 1- Nov. 1963-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Publication suspended Dec. 1979-
Issuing Body:
Issued Nov. 1963-Feb. 1973 by the Department's Office of Information; Mar. 1973-Dec. 1977 by the Office of Communication.
General Note:
Issues prior to Jan. 1978 were classed: A 21.29:(nos.)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001360420
oclc - 01716336
notis - AGM1835
issn - 0037-2544
System ID:
AA00012167:00073


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USDA'S REPORT TO
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE* OFFICE OF CO

OCTOBER 1973


HOW TO BUTTER BREAD -- ONE-HANDED 4


SUMERS

l<9 ON, D.C. 20250


Self-Help Gadgets For The Handicapped.ia g r-inch square
of one-inch plywood, cover the top with formica, and nail four
stainless steel nails in the corners. Press a slice of bread
onto the nails and butter away. With the help of gadgets such
as the bread holder, people with disabilities -- either short-
or long-term -- can perform many routine homemaking and grooming
tasks. A catalog of gadgets, tools, and clothing ideas to assist
handicapped people to help themselves has recently been compiled
by the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service. The collec-
tion of items, many of which can be easily and cheaply made by a
home handyman, include a "grabber" that enables a chairbound per-
son to pick up things from the floor or from a shelf; kitchen
aids to help peel, cut, and grate vegetables and to wash glasses
using only one hand; an apron that can be put on with one hand;
special handles to make it easier for arthritic fingers to grasp
spoons, forks, toothbrushes, and pens. The illustrated catalog,
with instructions on how to make many of the items, is available
for 25 cents from Extension Publications, 318 Ricks Hall, North
Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C. 27607.


BUSINESS IS BLOOMING

For Clippers, Trimmers, And Planters. If you can cure a sick maple,
are good at climbing trees, know how to stomp out crab grass, or
can plant a bulb and get a bloom, maybe you should consider horti-
cultural service as a business. More and more people are hiring
professionals to take over the chores of planning and maintaining
their lawns and gardens. Horticultural services have grown into a
sizable business in recent years with receipts for 14,000 firms to-
taling well over $500 million in 1969. These services include the
planning, planting and care of ornamentals, landscape planning and
counseling, lawn and garden services, and shrub and tree services.
Lawn and garden services involve the greatest number of firms while
shrub and tree services gross the most money. Value and types of
services vary widely by State but over half of the 1969 business was
concentrated in only five States: Pennsylvania, New York, California,
Ohio, and Florida. This information is from a recent report of USDA's
Economic Research Service, "Horticultural Service Business: Dollar
Volumes and State Rankings" (ERS-526). Single copies are free from
the Office of Communication, USDA, Washington, D.C. 20250.






WHAT IS SAUCE FOR THE GOOSE 08740 1062

May Be Puree For The Gander. No matter how you slice it, tomato catsup, sauce, pu-
ree, and paste are all made from the pulp and juice of red ripe tomatoes. They are
all concentrated -- cooked to remove water. But there are noticeable differences
among the four and each one has its own thing to do. The differences come in the
amount of water removed and in the spices used. Basically, the more water that is
removed, the more concentrated the product and the more it costs per ounce -- but
the less you need to use. Of the four, tomato catsup or ketchup is usually the most
spicy. It is flavored with sugar, salt, vinegar, spices, and sometimes onion and
garlic. It is probably the most popular considering the number of hamburgers, hot
dogs, and french fries eaten with catsup. Tomato sauce is not as concentrated as
catsup and has less sugar. It is a timesaver since it can be used directly from
the can to make spaghetti and other sauces. The amounts of spices and seasonings
used in tomato sauce varies and you may even find specially seasoned sauces for
making spaghetti, chili, barbecue sauce, and pizza. Tomato puree has only salt
added. It is a little thicker than tomato sauce and, unless the label says other-
wise, can be used without adding water to make spaghetti and other sauces. Tomato
paste is the thickest of the lot. Salt is usually the only seasoning added. It is
too thick to use straight from the can, but adding water and some spices to tomato
paste can produce some delicious tomato-based sauces.


CLOTHES MAY YAKE THE MAN

But Don't Ask Him What They're Made Of. A USDA report of a nationwide survey points
up misunderstanding among men about fibers and permanent press finish in their dress
shirts. This, of course, is hardly news to the wives and mothers who bought the
shirts for almost half of the men interviewed. Men taking part in the survey were
asked to show the interviewer a sample of the type of dress shirt he wore most of-
ten; about one in four described the fiber and finish features incorrectly. The
survey also indicated some points to keep in mind when buying clothes for the men in
your life. Most men said style and color usually mattered most to them in dress
shirts, light-weight sport shirts, and slacks. But fiber ranked second to style in
undershorts. Brand name was least important for all four items. In general, the
men interviewed indicated 100 percent cotton fiber was more comfortable on the skin
and absorbed moisture better than 100 percent synthetic fiber. For dress shirts,
light-weight sport shirts, and slacks they gave highest marks to a blend of cotton
and synthetic fiber with a permanent press finish. Copies of the USDA report, "Men's
Attitudes Toward Cotton and Other Fibers in Selected Clothing Items," are available
free from the Office of Communication, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington,
D.C. 20250.


PICK AUTUMN BOUQUETS CAREFULLY

Don't Fall For Poison Ivy. That attractive bright red-orange vine would be lovely
in a Fall arrangement. Be careful. If it has three leaves, it could be poison ivy.


SERVICE is a monthly newsletter of consumer interest. It is designed for those
who report to the individual consumer rather than for mass distribution. For
information about items in this issue, write: Lillie Vincent, Editor of SERVICE,
Office of Communication, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250.
Telephone (202) 447-5437.
-2-




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