Service

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Service USDA's report to consumers
Portion of title:
USDA's report to consumers
Physical Description:
: ; 27 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Governmental and Public Affairs
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Communication
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Office of Information
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Office of Governmental and Public Affairs
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Consumer education -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
no. 1- Nov. 1963-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Publication suspended Dec. 1979-
Issuing Body:
Issued Nov. 1963-Feb. 1973 by the Department's Office of Information; Mar. 1973-Dec. 1977 by the Office of Communication.
General Note:
Issues prior to Jan. 1978 were classed: A 21.29:(nos.)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001360420
oclc - 01716336
notis - AGM1835
issn - 0037-2544
System ID:
AA00012167:00031


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USDA'S REPORT TO ERS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICE 0 RMATION WASH4N N. D.C. 20250



SEPTEMBER 1970 No. 80

NATIONAL INCOME POVERTY GUIDELINES '/

Announced For School Lunch Program. National income poverty
guidelines for determining children's eligibility for free or
reduced-price lunches were announced August 4 by Secretary of
Agriculture Clifford M. Hardin. These guidelines, the first on
a national basis, involve lunches under the National School Lunch
Program and in other school lunch programs receiving federally-
donated foods. After January 1, 1971, any child from a family with
an income at or below the national income poverty guidelines shall
be served a lunch either free or at a reduced price not to exceed
20 cents in a school that is receiving Federal school lunch cash
or commodity assistance. The guidelines may be used voluntarily
by schools as their income criteria until January 1 when adoption
becomes mandatory. Private schools with programs administered by
the Department of Agriculture are exempt from the guidelines under
certain conditions. The guidelines are:
48 STATES, D.C. and
TOTAL FAMILY SIZE OUTLYING AREAS* HAWAII ALASKA
One $1,920 $2,210 $2,400
Two 2,520 2,900 3,150
Three 3,120 3,590 3,900
Four 3,720 4,280 4,650
Five 4,270 4,910 5,340
Six 4,820 5,540 6,025
Seven 5,320 6,115 6,650
Eight 5,820 6,690 7,275
For each additional
family member Add $450 Add $520 Add $560
*Outlying areas include Guam, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Virgin
Islands, American Samoa, and the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands.

HOW MUCH DO HOMEMAKERS KNOW ABOUT FOOD AND NUTRITION?

USDA Plans to Find Out. What do U.S. homemakers know about nutritive
values of foods? What are her ideas on handling foods to preserve its
nutritive value, appearance, and flavor? The U.S. Department of
Agriculture is seeking the answers to these and other questions in an
upcoming nationwide survey on the food and nutrition knowledge of
American homemakers. Approximately 2,500 homemakers will be inter-
viewed in the one-year study. Why is this information needed?
Improving the nutritional health of individuals often means changing
eating habits or patterns. To bring about such changes, it is first
necessary to know why homemakers choose the foods they do.





LAYING DOWN THE LAWN


Plant Now For Spring. What's the best time of year to put in a new lawn? According
to a USDA seed expert, autumn is the best time to plant a new lawn. Spring is the
best time to revitalize a poor lawn with new grass. In buying seed for your lawn
this fall, wou will find an array of different kinds, brands, prices, and packages
from which to choose. If it all baffles you, be sure to check the labels on the
packages for quality information. This information is required for all seed (in-
cluding most lawn seed) sold interstate under the Federal Seed Act, which is enforced
by the USDA's Consumer and Marketing Service. Another source of aid is a USDA publi-
cation, "How to Buy Lawn Seed" (H&G-169). Single copies can be obtained free from the
Office of Information, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250.


SEPTEMBER PLENTIFULS

For Back-to-School Appetites. A hard day at the books calls for some hearty dishes
to revive the bodies and souls of the back-to-school crowd. Mothers will find help
in meeting the challenge of whopping appetites with nutritious and tasty dishes made
from foods listed as September Plentifuls--canned peaches, canned applesauce, peanuts
and peanut products, and dry split peas. Plentiful Foods for October will include
applesauce, apple juice, pork, broiler-fryers, dry beans, canned peaches, canned sal-
mon, onions, eggs, potatoes, and dried prunes.


THE THREE "R'S" -- AND A "C"

Conservation Education. It's that time of year when the doors of education open and
Junior takes up reading, writing and 'rithmetic once more. But in this age of envir-
onmental concern there's another vital subject he should be studying -- conservation
education. To help educators and youth leaders locate suitable materials for teaching
conservation, USDA's Forest Service has prepared a list of the forest conservation
teaching materials it has published. Included are charts, posters, audio-visual
materials, and bulletins and pamphlets such as "Teaching Conservation Through Outdoor
Education Areas," "Ranger 'Rithmetic," and "Suggested Questions for a High School
Conservation Quiz." For a copy of the list write to Forest Service, U.S. Department
of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250 and ask for "Materials to Help Teach Forest
Conservation, FS-28."


TRACING AGRICULTURE'S RECORD

In A Changing Environment. Agriculture's record in both exploiting and conserving
environmental values is traced in a new slide set and filmstrip, "Agriculture and the
Changing Environment." The 78-picture presentation, issued by the U.S. Department of
Agriculture, depicts the ways in which conservation and pollution problems have deve-
loped -- from the time the early pioneers first opened up the West, through the Dust
Bowl days, major floods, and the effects on air, soil, and water of modern agricultural
and industrial practices. It also shows how research is solving many of these problems
and what still remains to be done to keep America bountiful and beautiful. The slide
set and film strip are accompanied by an illustrated narrative guide. Copies of the
slide set can be purchased for $12.50 from the Photography Division, Office of Infor-
mation, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250. Copies of the film-
strip can be purchased for $8.50 from Photo Lab, Inc., 3825 Georgia Avenue, N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20011. A taped narration can be purchased with either for $1.50.







FOOD PREVIEW FOR FALL


Food prices have increased much less rapidly in recent months. Still, for the whole
year prices may average about 5 percent above 1969 largely because of last winter's
steep increases. Nationally, we are paying and spending more for food, but are in-
creasing our earnings at an even faster rate. As a result, the food share of our
after-tax income for 1970 likely will decline slightly to around 16.5 percent. A
decade ago, the comparable rate was 20 percent.

Outlook For Major Foods This Fall--

You will see more pork this fall--output may run a tenth or more larger than
last fall. Beef production is expected to show only moderate gains. The
lower prices for pork may put some downward pressure on beef prices. Ample
supplies of these meats would tend to limit any significant change in lamb
prices and help hold chicken prices at current levels. Poultry meat counters
will be well stocked. Thanksgiving turkeys may cost about the same as last
year.
Price increases for milk and dairy products may slacken. So far this year
they are up nearly 5 percent due to higher wholesale and distribution costs.
Though noncitrus fruit output is down substantially this year, total fruit
supplies are expected to be ample. Processors entered the season with big
supplies. Prices for many processed items are currently running below last
year.
Indicated production of processed vegetables is less than a year ago for most
items. Packers contracted for less acreage because of large inventories at
the beginning of the season. Prices for most items may show firmness.
Indicated potato acreage for fall harvest is up a bit from 1969's bumper crop.
Under pressure of heavier supplies, prices for potatoes dropped seasonally in
mid-August when several areas began shipping simultaneously.

On The Other Grocery Shelves--
Egg prices should hold under levels of a year ago with larger output in
prospect in coming months. There may be further price increases for cereals,
bakery goods, sugar, and soft drinks. Coffee prices are expected to increase
some the rest of the year because of anticipated short supplies of new-crop
coffee.

Food Consumotion Trends--
There will be wider use of canned and frozen vegetables in the 70's largely
at the expense of fresh vegetables. Since 1965, per person use of processed
vegetables has exceeded that of fresh. We like tomatoes more and more, and
buy more of them canned than fresh. In the last decade, per person use of
processed tomato items combined rose 18 percent. Translated in terms of
fresh tomatoes, this means that every U.S. citizen is now eating over 50
pounds of tomatoes annually in some form of processed products. Fast-food
businesses featuring catsup-seasoned hamburgers and french fries, and the
expanding pizza market--catering largely to the younger population--have
helped make tomato products a big volume gainer.




I'iIvvNSI FY OF FLORIDA

A PROPER LIGHT UNTO YOUR PATH 3 1262 08740 0742

Easy On The Eyes. The study desk gets lots of use this time of year. And concen-
trating on the homework is much easier if the study area is equipped with good
lighting --- properly placed. As any dedicated student can tell you, prolonged work
in too little light or in glare can be as tiring as working hard all day. Proper
light all through the house not only makes your home comfortable and easy to live in,
it can enhance the furnishings and colors as well. Whether you are building a new
home or improving your present lighting arrangements, much can be done at surprisingly
low cost when you know and apply the principles of good lighting. "Planning Your
Home Lighting" (H&G-138), a USDA publication, gives tips and suggestions on these
principles and can help you decide where you need light and how much light you need.
It also includes information on how to choose and use portable lamps and home lighting
fixtures, light sources, and how to maintain lighting equipment. Single copies of
this enlightening bulletin may be obtained free from the Office of Information, U.S.
Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250.


LIGHT AND DRY MUSHROOMS

USDA Process Goes Commercial. Air-dried mushroom pieces, prepared by a process
developed by USDA's Agricultural Research Service, are now being manufactured commer-
cially. They are making appearances as ingredients in processed foods such as dried
soup mixes. The mushroom pieces, dehydrated by the very economical USDA method, retain
the distinctive flavor and light color of fresh mushrooms and compare in taste to freeze(
dried mushrooms costing about twice as much. If dried to below 7 percent moisture and
hermatically sealed, the mushroom pieces will keep for at least 7 months without
flavor loss.


NUTS YOU MAY NOT HAVE KNOWN

New Twists On The Old "Shelled" Game. It takes only a little imagination to make
"company fare" of plain food or to make your favorite foods even more delicious: Add
Nuts. Nuts, which can double as a cooking ingredient or as a garnish, snack or
appetizer, contribute rich flavor and crunchy texture to many kinds of foods. Accord-
ing to a USDA bulletin, "Nuts in Family Meals: A Guide for Consumers," nuts can be
used as an added source of protein and food energy in the diet. The publication tells
how to distinguish good quality. In addition, it gives a wide variety of recipes for
main dishes, salads, soups, breads, desserts, sauces, and other nutty favorites.
Single copies of "Nuts in Family Meals: A Guide for Consumers" (H&G-176) are available
free on request from the Office of Information, U.S. Department of Agriculture,
Washington, D.C. 20250.


FOOD PRICES ON THE GLOBAL SCENE

None of the industrial cou reporting consumer price changes to the United
Nations experienced lower fooc :ices in 1969 than in 1968. Close to two-thirds of
some 40 developing countries reported increases of 3 to 6 percent. Eight countries
had greater increases and seven had smaller ones. The U.S. advance was 5 percent.


SERVICE is a monthly newsletter of consumer interest. It is designed for those who
report to the individual consumer rather than for mass distribution. For information
about items in this issue, write: Lillie Vincent, Editor of Service, U.S. Department
of Agriculture, Office of Information, Washington, D.C. 20250.




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