Wheat situation

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Title:
Wheat situation
Uniform Title:
Wheat situation (Washington, D.C.)
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
Publisher:
The Service
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

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Subjects / Keywords:
Wheat trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Wheat trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WS-1 (Nov. 1936) - WS-254 (Nov. 1980)
Issuing Body:
Issued, 1936- by the Bureau of Agricultural Economics; <Oct.-Dec. 1953>-Feb. 1961 by the Agricultural Marketing Service; Apr. 1961-Nov. 1977 by the Economic Research Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; Feb. 1978- by the Economics, Statistics and Coopertives Servie, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; <Nov. 1980-> by the Economics and Statistics Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.
General Note:
Cover title.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000349017
oclc - 04015593
notis - ABY6688
lccn - 78643652 //r812
issn - 0364-2305
Classification:
lcc - HD9049.W3 U66a
ddc - 338.1/7/3110973
System ID:
AA00012162:00032

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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
WASH I NGTON


MARCH 23, 1938
-- -- -- -- ---- a----------------------- --

THE WHEAT S I TUATI O N
INCLUDING RYE


THIS ISSUE HAS BEEN PREPARED WITH PARTICULAR REFER-
ENCE TO THE REPORT OF THE CROP REPORTING BOARD OF THE
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS ON PROSPECTIVE PLANT-
INGS FOR 1938. IT BRINGS UP TO DATE THE 1938 OUTLOOK
FOR WHEAT, WHICH WAS ISSUED LAST NOVEMBER BY THE BUREAU
IN COOPERATION WITH FEDERAL AND STATE EXTENSION WORKERS.

ALL WHEAT: ACREAGE SEEDED. YIELD PER ACRE.
AND PRODUCTION. 1919-38


SEEDED ACREAGE















YIELD PER SEEDED ACRE











- PRODUCTION



PRODUCTION


1919 1921 1923 1925 1927 1929 1931 1933 1935 1937
*PRELIMINARY


U S, DERtITUIMT OF AGRICULTURE


MNI 2l1f1t nURIAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


THE WHEAT ACREAGE SEEDED FOR HARVEST IN 1938 WAS AL-
MOST AS LARGE AS LAST YEAR'S, WHICH WAS THE LARGEST ON
RECORD. PRODUCTION DURING THE PAST SIX YEARS HAS BEEN
GREATLY REDUCED AS THE RESULT OF SMALL YIELDS PER ACRE
CAUSED LARGELY BY DROUGHT AND RUST.


WS- 17


ACRES
(MILLtONS
80

75

70

65

60

55
BUSHELS


15


13





9


7
BUSHELS
I ILLIONS I


1.000


800


600


400





- 2 -


THE WHEAT- S I T U ATI 0 N
Inic_,l iL'ig Rye


/.,'p, .ry

If farmers seed the acreaFe indicated in the prcsrective-plantings re-

port, and if average yields are cbta.ined, this year's spring wheat crop including

durum will amount to about 200 million bushels. This, together with the winter

wheat crop indicated at about 630 million bushels on the basis cf the December 1

condition, would point to a total wheat crop of apprrximrtely 830 million bushels

in the United States this ye-ir, the Bureau of Agricultural Eccnomi'cs points cut.

A crop of 5.3 million .bushels would be 160 million in excess of the 5-year

(1932-36) average disappearance of 670 million bushels, and would increase the

carry-over at the end of the year. With prospects for a carry-cver on July 1

*of about 200 million bushels, and assuming that experts in 1938-39 will not ex-

ceed 50 million bushels, the carry-over in 1939 would be around 300 million

bushels. Stocks exceeded this figure during 1931-33, and reached 378 million

bushels in 1933. Methods of checking large accumulations are now provided under

the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938, through acreage adjustments and market-

ing quotas if approved by growers.

While prospective spring wheat acreage has been interpreted in terms of

average yields in order to summarize the situation, such an interpretation must

not be considered as an estimate. The Crop Reporting Board will indicate a

probable range in production in its report on June 10 next and -.rill issue its

first estimate on July 11.

Weather conditions since December 1 suggest that prospects for winter

wheat have improved slightly. Generally speaking, while surface moisture is

adequate in the hard winter wheat and spring wheat areas, subsoil moisture


17S-17





WS-17 3 -

remains deficient in these sections. Moreover, there is an abundance of grass-

hopper eggs over a wide area, the possible damage from which will depend upon

weather conditions. It is still possible, therefore, that production may not be

greatly in excess of domestic utilization.

Official reports received to date covering winter wheat acreage in 20

countries show a total of 160,878,000-.acres compared with 161,512,000 acres in

these same countries a year earlier. The acreage seeded to winter wheat in 14

European countries is placed at 61,811,000 acres compared with 61,111,000 acres

last year. Growing conditions in Europe are reported to be favorable.

It is too early to forecast the 1938-39 world wl.?,eat crop, but if better

yields are obtained in Europe and more nearly normal yields are secured in Canada

and Argentina than in 1937-38, a larger world production with lower prices may be

expected. Any increase in purchases by European countries for the purpose of

building up reserve stocks, or a general increase in commodity price levels, how-

ever, would tend to offset any decline.in world prices due to larger supplies,

World wheat production in 1937 was about equal to the 5-year (1930-34)

average, and large enough to increase world carry-over stocks by about 75 million

bushels. Ev-:n with this increase, however, world stocks in July 1938 will be only

about equal to the average of 1922-26, prior to the time when the world surpluses

accumulated.

The peak of wheat shipments from the Southern Hemisphere countries probably

was reached in late February. As offerings and receipts et Furopean markets are

reduced in April, it is expected that foreign takings of United States wheat will

increase temporarily. Then, as crop prospects become more clearly defined, prices

will adjust toward the new crop basis. Exports .and shipments of United States

wheat and flour expressed in terms of wheat, July 1 to March 12, this season,are

estimated at about 65 million bushels.





WS-17


THB.WHEAT OUTLCCKr FOR 1938-39

BACKGRnUND.- /.The acreage seeded to wheat for harvest
in 1937, estimated at 81 million acres, was the largest
in the history of the country. The acreage.seeded for
harvest in 1919 was the largest on record up to that time.
For the 1919 to 1924 crops, seeded acreage declined from
77 million to 56 million acres. Then it rose to 71 mil-
lion acres-in 1928, and during the 1927-36 period averaged
68 million acres. The acreage seeded to spring wheat has
fluctuated widely in recent years largely as the result of
variable weather conditions at seeding time. In 1934 it
was only 19 million acres while in 1936 and 1937 it was 24
million acres. The 1927-36 average was 22 million acres.

Acreage and Production in the United States

On the basis of the March 1 reports from farmers regarding their seeding
plans, an area of 22,282,000 acres is indicated for seeding to spring wheat. This
acreage would be about 6 percent below the actual seedirgs in 1937 and about 1
percent above the average during 1927-36. Th. total includes prospective seedings
of 3,613,000 acres of durumn wheat, which is 12 percent above the acreage sown in
1937, and 18,669,000 acres of other spring wheat, which is 9 percent below last
year. In comparison with average, this year's probable seeding of durum wheat
is 14 percent below the acreage seeded annually from 1927 to 1936, while probable
seedings of other spring wheat are 4 percent above the average for this 10-year
period. The acreages actually planted in 1938 may turn out to be larger or
smaller than the indicated acreages here shown, by reason of weather conditions,
price changes, labor supply, financial conditions, and the agricultural conserva-
tion program.

The largest decrease in prospective spring wheat seedings is in the Pacific
Northwest where about 800,000 acres less of spring wheat are planned. This is
nearly offset, however, with about 500,000 acres more of winter wheat seeded last
fall in this area and with present condition excellent compared with very poor
condition and heavy abandonment a year ago. A decline of about 160,000 acres in
the prospective spring wheat acreage in Montana was also about offset by an in-
crease of about 135,000 acres of winter wheat and a much better condition than a
year earlier. The all-spring-wheat prospective seeded acreage in North Dakota
decreased 2 percent with no winter wheat offset, while an increase in winter
wheat seedings in South Dakota more than offset a small decrease in spring seed-
ing prospects in that State. Table 11 shows the prospective seedings of durum,
other spring, and all spring wheat by groups of States, compared with recent years.

Because of the wide range in the annual percentage abandonment of spring
wheat, it is impossible to forecast the acreage forlharvest with any degree of
accuracy at this time. During the period from 1924 to 1933, the abandonment of
all spring wheat averaged only 6.9 percent, while during the years from 1927-36
the average abandonment was 18.8 percent. The abandonment in 1934 and 1936 was
approximately one-half of the seeded acreage. Assuming that abandonment for 1938


1/ See also background statements on pages


- 4 -


9 and 13 *






- 5 -


will approximate 15 percent, the average from 1929-37 but excl'linf the heavy
loss years of 1934 and 1936, th.e indicated acre ,ie for harvest of durum wheat would
be around 3,200,000 acros; other spring wheat about 15,800,000; and all spring
wheat 19,000,000 acres.

If average yields per harvested acre during this same period are used to
interpreted this acreage, a crop of close to 200 million bushels would be indicated.
The average yield for 1929-32 was 10.7 bushels, and that for 1933-35-37 was 9.6
bushels, while the average for the 7 years was 10.2 bushels.

If abandonment of winter wheat should turn out as indicated in the Board's
December 1937 report and if about 19 million acres of spring wheat arc harvested,
the total wheat acreage for harvest in the United States in 1938 would be about 66
million acres. This compares with 64,460,000 acres harvested in 1937 and an aver-
age of 55,325,000 acres during 1927-36.

Winter wheat production was tentatively indicated at 630 million bushels
in the December Crop Report. Weather conditions since this report was issued
suggest that prospects for winter wheat have improved slightly.

United States Carry-over Stocks July 1, 1938

Cn the basis of present prospects, the carry-over of wheat in the United
States on July 1, 1938,is expected to be approximately 200 mi-11-ion bushels. The
total domestic supplies in the United States 2/ for 1937-38 have been estimated at
965 million bushels, consisting of a carry-over on July 1, 1937 of 91 million
bushels and a crop of 874 million bushels. Exports and shipments of wheat and
f1cur in terms of wheat are still forecast at 90 million bushels and utilization
at 675 million bushels.

Prospective United States Supplies' in 1938-39

If farmers plant the acreage indicated in the prospective-plantings report,
and if average yields are obtained, this year's spring wheat crop would amount to
abo~t 200 million bushels. This, together with the winter wheat -crop indicated at
about 630 million bushels on the basis of the -Ducmber 1 condition, would point to
a total wheat crop in the neighborhood of 830 million bushels in the United States
this yeur. A crop of this size would be 160 million bushels in excess of the
5-year (1932-36) average disappearance of 67Q mill-ion bushels, and would increase
the carry-over at the end of the ye'r. With prospects for a carry-over on July 1,
1938, of about 200 million bushels, and assuming that exports would not exceed 50
million bushels, the carry-over in 1939 would be -ex:ected to be around 300 million
bushels. Conditions as favorable for exporting wheat as during the current season,
when exports may approach 90 million bushels, probably will not be repeated next
year, due to prospective larger supplies in exporting countries. Unlike the previ-
ous period of large stocks, 1931-33, methods of checking further accumulations are
now provided under the Agricultural Adjustment 'Act of 19'38 through aere-.,s adjust-
ments, and through marketing quotas if approved by growers.
2/ Supply and distribution of wheat by classes, average for 1929-30 to 1933-34 and
6rop years 1933-34 to 1937-38, is shown in table 7 of the Fe-bruary issue of "The
Wheat Situation".


WS-17




- 6 -


While prospective spring wheat acreage has been interpreted in terms 3f
average yields in order ti better summarize the situation, such an interpreta-
tion must not be considered in th,, li-ht if an estimate. The Crop Reporting
Board will indicate a probable rpn.-e in production in its report on June 10
and will issue its first estimate on July 11.

W)rld Wheat Crop Prospects for V19g- 9

The total area sown to winter whet f3r harvest in 1938 in the 20
countries for which estimates are row avnilarble, is 160,873,000 acres compared.
with iul,512,000 acres a year ao. (Table 1). This is a slight decrease from
the acreage sawn t> winter wheat in these co-ntries a yeer Pio bat is about 7
million acres more th-n that sown for harvest in 1936. A millimn-acre decrease
in l]orth Africa more than offsets a 700 th)usanP.-acre increase in Europe. Smell
decreases ar. reported far Iorth mnerica arnd India.

Table 1.- Winter Wheat: Area cown in specified countries, for harvest
in 1936, 1937 and 1939


C -untry


193o


937


193'


: 1,000 acres


1,0'0 qcres


1,000 acres


United States .. ....4.......... 49,765 57,612 57,492
Canada ..........................: 155 __ 731 690
Total (2) .............,...: 50.350 53,.13 53,182
Be! iurm ......................... : 420 422 423
But;eria ........................ : 2,596 2,345 2,S74
Czechoslovakia I1/................: 2,206 1,994 2,023
. -land and Wales ...............: 1,704 1, 72 1, 07
France 2/................ ........: 12,536 12,772 12,352
Greece 2/......................: 2,011 2,076 1,900
P3Ge1mfnv .............,.....-: 4,757 4 335 4,507
Huongary ..........,.............: 4,o45 .1 3,727 3/ 4,139
It".l ...........................: 12,43 1, 2 12,0 5
Liohuania .......................: 349 357
Poland ........................ : 3,730 3,7"6 3,781
Portugal .. .....................: 1,157 1,0D 3 / 1,310
Rui mania .......................: 7720 7, 8 C 27
Yugoslavia 5 ......................: 5466 ? 3 5.436
Total (14) .................... 61,137 60 ,1\1 r:1,1I
Total (16) ........... .... ...: 111,34k7 11i ,,5 11 95,993
Morocco .........................: 3,194 ,7'13 1/ 3,089
Algoria .........................: 4,2`7 4,311 4,083
Tunisia .......................: 1,221 o,4'?9 h/ 1,310
India, second estimate ..........: 33,331 32,575 32,403
Tot.l,20 countries .......... 153,520 161,512 160,373
1/ Includes spelt. 2/ To January 1.
Y Estimate of the Belgrade office of the Bureau of Agricultural Econom-ics.
Estimate of the Paris office of the Bureau of QAFricultural Ec',nomics.


, TS-17






WS-17


- 7 -


The arpa so~r. in the 14 Eur'penj countries repnrtinc is about the same
or slightly larger than the -re- of last year when it represented over SO
percent of the total wheat area harvested in Europe. Increases in the area
seeded in Hungary and in Rumania bring, ; th-' total for the Danubian Basin above
that of last year. Weather conditions have been favorable throughout most of
Eur)pe and the condition of the crop is gonw:--llv gocd.

In Soviet Russia winter seedings are reported in generally satisfactory
condition for this season of the year. Some regions, however, "ppoar to have
entered the winter period with below normal moisture supplies a sno'fall
in many re--ions has been below average, so timely spring reins will be a
significant factor for crop develop::ment. According to the recently announced
spring sowing plan in Soviet Eussia the spring wheat acrepge will be smaller
than last year. The plan provides for a spring acreage of 63 million acres
this year comn-pred with the 1937 plan. 5f 64 million acres which is believed t.
have been exceeded by about 2 million acres. The new plan provides for an
extension of crop rotation practices with an attendant shift from c'rl-.'ls to
fora,-e crops. Spring planting oper tions are behind schedule.

In North Africa the area sown is below that of a year ago. Morocco
reports an increase but this is more than offset by decreases in Algeria and
Tunisia. The acreage in Tunisia is only a little over 50 percent of the 1937
acreae-e. Crop conditions are variable, bein- very favorable in Morocco and
in Alr ria but unfev rable in Tunisia.

The second estimate shows the acreage in India to be very slightly less
than that of last year. Harvesting. will be zin next month, and above aver,,-
yields are expected on an .acrer,-'- of 32,403,000 acres.

The Sh~n-Th..i office of the Bureau of A7ricultur,.l Economics rennorts that
the wheat acr-ca.e in China is believed to be decreased by at least 10 percent
from the small acr.--e of last ye.r, because of the unsettled conditions,
fis.htin having occurred in virtually all of the important wheat prjucing
provinces. Weather conditions have been favorable for first st. e growth,
hv.:sver, and if they continue fa-orable the 193' cr)p racy not be greatly different
from last year when the yield per acre was small. Indications point t an
acrean-e in Japo-n equa-l to the large acrea-:- sown last year, when 1,770,000
acres were reported.

Conditions in Canada for the spring wheat cr:p -are o d. compared with
conditions in recent years, with the exception of southwestern Saskatchewan
and southeastern Alberta where there is still a moisture deficiency.

Heavy rains are needed in Austr-.al.i where continued dry weather is
delaying seeding preprrrations.

rarld t.e-let Price Prospects for 19~9-

It is too early to forecast the 1593-39 world ."'a- t crop, but if averr-e
yields are obt-ined in Eurle .r.,,. more nearly normal yields are secured in
Canada and Argentina than in 1937-3', a larger world production and lower prices
miiht be expected. Any increases in purchases by EuropePn countries for the






1S-17


purpose of building up reser-e stocks, or a general increase in corimoclity price
levels, how.,-evr, would tend to offset ary decline in prices due to la.rer
supplies. The world wheat production in 1937 was about equal to the 5-year
(1930-34) averre, and lar-e cnx ' stocks by about 75 million bushels. H-we.-er, e-en with this increase w-rld
stocks in July 1939 will only be about equal to the rv-r.-.re nf 1922-2r, prior
to the time when the world surpluses accumulated.

THE WORLD IVWEAT SITUATION IN 1937-7-

BAYC.GOUNiD.- Totcal world supplies of a'heat, after increasing
from 1929 to 1933, declined sharply followin.- successive years
of cnall production and. increase world. dcm-nd. The apparent
world 1isy.npearance has averaged about 3,770,G)C,0:,0 bushels
during the past 10 years. World, prices of whea-t moved steadily
upward fr.)r the spring of 1933 to the summer of 1937, reflect-
ing higher world cormodity price levels, four successive below-
average h-rvests in I'orth Anerica, end tie 1935-3o sh.rt
Southern Hemisphere cr)p. In 1936-37 vhec*t prices adv._aned
sharply as a result of increased dr.-and a1nd the smallest supplies
in recent years.

World wheat production, excluding that of Soviet Russia
and China, in 1937-3S is estimated t.t 3,8l6,000,0Co' bushels
(table 14), or about 2-':0 million bushels larger th-'n in '93G-37.
However, w-orld stocks )n about July 1, 1937, exclu.1in,: those of
Soviet Russia and Asia, were about 210 million bushel, smaller
than a year earlier, resulting in total supplies in l37-33
about 70 million bushels larger than the s-i.ll supplies in 1936-37.
Net exports from Soviet Ruassia in 1937-33 may' be about 35 million
bushels compared with 4 million bushels in 1930-37.

W0or.d. Tra,.e in Wheat

The world net wheat imports has been about in line with Bureau expec-
tations, and. the September forecast of net inrorts of 4z5 million bushdls,
comp~ted. with 563 million bushels in 1936-37, has not been changed, minor
revic.ions having offset one another. The 1937-38 imports by the net importing
countries of EurJpe'are now forecast at 395 million bushels while shipments
to non-.'Europe1.n countries, which corresponds to the Bro:chll series and which
reflects fairly well the year-to-year changes in imports by non-European
countries, is forecast at 90 million bushels. The European fi.-ure represents
a decrease of 5 million bushels, compared with the September forecast, which
is offset by an increase of the same amount in the non-European figure.

Tekins by Europcan countries during the remainder of the yen.r nre
expected to be well below those of the corresponding period of a year earlier.
paring the second half of the 1936-37 season Italy -an Gerrany were very
important importers of wheat. T:.s season, however, it is unlikely that they
will import anything; like the quoatity they did during tn." second half
of last year.


- g -








ws-17


Tables 3, 10, 12 and 13 show fiunires on the movement of wheat in inter-
national trade this season compared with corresponding period and totals for
other years.

Supplies and exports

Table 2 shows the estimated wheat surplus for export or carry-over on
March 1 in the four princir-al exporting countries, together with United Kingdom
port stocks and afloat. These total 490 million bushels compared with 327
million bushels a year aLo and 534 million bushels 2 years ago. On the basis
of these estimates, assumi.: total exports for the 1937-35 se-se-n of 485
million bushels and small carry-overs in all countries except the United
States, exports for the March-through-June period are forecast to be approxi-
mately as fellows: 30 million bushels from the United States, 10 million
bushels from Crnada and 85 million bushels from the Southern Hemisphere
countries. In addition, the Danubian countries may be expected to export in
the neighborhood of 30 million bushels and other countries about 10 million
bushels. It is estimated that the total.exports from July through February
have amounted to about 325 million bushels.

Table 2,- Wheat surplus for export or carry-over in the four
principal exporting countries, United Kingdom port stocks
and stocks afloat, :.orch 1, 1935-39 1J

Position 1935 1936 1937 : 1938
_: 1935_ : : .*: ., --


: Mil. bu.


Mil. bu.


Mil. bu.


Mil. Du.


United States:
In United States ...........: 136 112
In Canada .................: 1 0
Canada:
In Canada .................: 254 226
In United States ...........: 21 23
Argentina ......... ........: 129 51
Australia ........ .... ** o**: 91 75
Total .... ............. .. .... 632 497
United Kingdom port stocks ...: 12 9
Stocks afloat to:
United Kingdom .............: 12 22
Continent ........ .... ... 8 8
Orders .t..... ...........: .14 34
Total ...................: 74
Grand total .............. : gg -53-4


74 229
0 1

76 49
17 2
s5 62
75 92
327 .435
----10 11

18 l 16
.17 16
24 12

396b 490


I_ For other than the United St-tes: C-rry-over at the begi:--ing of the year
(Canada, July 31; Argentina, January 1; Australia, December 1 of the previous
year) plus production, minus domestic utilization for the year, minus monthly
exports to date. For the United States: Year-end stocks minus imports for the
year plus March-June exports and shipments (193S figure based on carry-over on
June 30, 1938 of 200 million bushels and March-June exports of 30 million
bushels).


- 9 -




ws-17 10 -
It is probable that net exports from Soviet Russia may not greatly exceed
about 35 million bushels. Shipments to date from the South Russian ports ap-
proach this amount. The Soviet Union has recently expressed interest in charter-
ings for fair sized spring shipments, but at the same time that country pur-
chased about 4 million bushels of Australian wheat for shipment to Vladivostok.
Prospective spring exports may about offset these purchases, which were made to
facilitate distribution of grain within the country. Exports by Soviet Russia
after January 1 are usu.all;. very small.
Imports by European countries
Table 3 includes a col-mn which shows the 1937-39 forecasted net imports
of the importing countries of Europe. While it is possible to compute the
statistical deficiencies by countries and make the nost reasonable allowances
for political anl economic conditions, imports into some important countries are
so tied up with goverrmental policy that forecasts are largely a matter of con-
jecture. France is one of the countries in which governmental policy is largely
the determining fact-r, and it seems desirable to revise downward the figure on
net imports by about 5 million bushels.
Table 3.- 1Tet innorts of wheat, including flour, into European countries,
year beginning July 1, 1936-37 and 1937-38
: : TNet imports reported
Country : 1976-37 :1_937-3%': July 1 : 1936-37
: :forecast : to :1936-37 1937-3
Million Million Million Million
: bu .hels bushels buchols bushels
Austria ..............: 10 10 : Dec, 31 :4 3
Belgium ..............: 4o0 40 : Dec. 31 : 2 23
Czechoslovakia...'4....: 2/-11 2/ -1 : Jan. 31 : 2/-3 2 -3
Denmark .............: 7 6: Dec. 31 : 3
- Tinland ..............: 4 3: Dec. 31 : 2 1
France ...............: 7 21: Nov, 30 : 2 6
Germany ,.............: 23 29 Jan. 31 : 3/ 29
Greece .............: 21 13 : Dec. 31 : 10 7
Ireland ..............: 14 13 : Jan. 31 : 9 S
Italy ..............: 54 5 : Jan. 31 : 11 5
Latvia ...............: 1 1 : Dec. 31 :/ I
Netherlands ..........: 21 24 : Jan. 31 : 12 1
Norway ...............: 9 8 : Jan. .31 : 4
Poland ...............: 2/ -62 0 : Dec. 31 : 2-4 3_/
Portugal .............: 3 : Nov. 30 : 3 3/
Sweden ...............: 2/ -1 : Jan. 31 2/ -1 2/ -1
Switzerland ..........: 19 16 : Jan. 31 : 11 S
United Kingdcm .......: 199 200 : Jan. 31 : 113 111
Total imports ofabove.: 429 392 :
Spain ................: 6 3 :
Total imports .......: 35 395 : : 205 222
Total exports .......: 17 2 : : 4
Total, net imports ..4: 1 393 : : 197 218
Cqmpiledi from official sources except as otherwise stated.
]/ Forecast by European offices of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
7 Net exports.
Less than 500,000 bushels,
Net exports of less than 500,000 bushels.






res-17


- 11 -


According to recent calculations annual needs in F:-'rnce amount to ap-
proximatcly 231 million bP:hels i. To supply these needs during the 1937-39
c -nsuving year there was a crop estimated at 254 million bushels. Th-- net
exportable supplies fr-. Northern Africa for France were forecast at approxi-
mately 19 million bushels, thus leaving a net deficit excluding colonial
supplies of S million bushels. At the and of January the Council of the Wheat
0oard surveyed the situation and declared that there appeared to be no need to
import wheat with the possible exception of small quantities of durum.
The deficit, it was believed, could be cover--. by a reduction in stocks.
With stocks on August 1, 1937 estimated at about 27 million bushels, a reduc-
tion of 8 million b'u;Iils wculd still love approximately 19 million bushels on
August 1, 193 While there appears to be an exportable surplus in the northh
African colonies of 19 million biushels, it r.':.- be that somewhat less than this
amount will actually be released. An effort nay be -ade by Algeria to retain
a part of its surplus in governmental stocks if n.-uficient money is available,
and exports from Tunisia might be restricted by fears of an aprraching light
harvest.
Accumulation of reserve stocks

It now appears quite evident that both Germ-;.- and Italy have been re-
plenishing their depleted bread grain stocks to some extent .and will end this
season with increased coarry-ov-r supplies ccmpsred with a year ago. Stocks
data in Germana- do not appear to fully reflect the stocks position so that it is
not possible to clearly follow this movement. The very heavy German purchases
of what and especially corn during the first half of the season must be re-
garded as a move to conserve rye and partly rebuild stocks. Though the emphasis
appears to have been placed largely upon r e stocks thus far, it seems quite
likely that in case of a good grain crop this year and more favorable wheat
price levels, increased attention will be given to wheat stocks.

rn C-.:r--ny the formation of non-reported emergency stocks of bread grains
seems to be indicated by the size of the calculated disappearance figure.
In view of the fact that it is unlikely that human consumption of wheat so far
this season has exceeded the monthly average of last season, it is probable that
more than 6 million bushels of wheat reserves have been ac.-umunlated. The total
disappearance of wheat A1ugust-January naicou.ted to about 111-1/2 million bushels.
If about 19-1/2 million bushel-Is are assigned to seed and loss, human consumption
roughly estimated e.t S4 million bushels on the basis of consumption last year,
and feeding 2 million bushels, about 6 million bushels would not be accounted
for. Moreover, if human consumption of wheat flour is much less than last year,
which may well be the case because of poorer quality due to ar.,ixtures of corn,
the surplus unaccounted for might be significantly larger than 6 million
bushels.
In the case of rye the rv.rplus unaccounted for is uach greater than for
wheat. Considering a maximum r,-. consumption 'cnT-'h-.t larger than last year and
that potato flour was mixed with the rye flour, the calculation is as follows:
Total rye disappearance from August thro-ur January amounted to about 165
million bushels. If about 37 million bushels -re asi-.ncl to seed and loss,
human consumption roughly estimated at 97 million bushels, which is so.,eiewhat
heater than the monthly rate last year, and feeding,- about 12 million bushels,
-f Reported by foreign offices of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics.







- 12 -


the sirplus not accounted for would 9 ar:ount to about 19 million bushels.

Consumption reduced by flour adrnixtu.ros

One of the interesting features of the coniumption-sttuation this season
has been the marked increase in the number of countries requiring special ad-
mixtures to wheat and rye flour. This noo-, which was re-i-trnduced by Germany
just about a year ago and applied in a general way to wheat flour, has now been
taken up by Italy, Austrip anrl Portugal. In sone cases corn flour is mixed with
wheat flour, Pnd is a res.1t cf the large potato crons in Central Europe, potato
flour is now a rather coamon ad.ixture. German:y this season is requiring an ad-
mixture of pot-to flour to rye flour and corn flour to t/heat flour and the
quality deterioration has bel-n very marked.
Foreign T~heat Prices

World heat prices, after s:c',1ing strength toward the and of February,
declined sharply, uri.n: the week ended February 25, the influence of increased
inquiry from European importers and he .vy purchases by Soviet Russia for ship-
ment to Vladivostok more tL-in offset the price-effect of improved prospects
resulting from benef'i2'il 7,:,istur3 over nuch of the dry southwestern heat area.
During the first 2. 7c]ks rf March., price- were denressed by largo stocks of
Southern Hemicphcre wheat on occan passage, offerings of Indian wheat, and im-
proved domestic winter wheat prospects.
Table 4.- Prices of imported wheat at Liverpool


: Har______. % -he.t .


: U.S. :
: (Gulf):
:'To,2 -dr.:
: Winter :
: Cents


125.1
129.4
12?.7
12e.7

12: .1
125.
121.9
122.3


Sort whents


* "nr n. a TT ~


Can.d. : : U. S. :
Argen- : !1o.3 : Ruszian : (Pacific): Austra-


tine :]
RDsafe :
Cents

129,7
134,I
137.5
126.7

129.2
129,5
12. .1
123,1


tani tobr:
I/ :
Cents

153.9
154,
14 .4
152.0


143.3
144,4

144.3


12E,9
121.2
117.0


: Wite :liar.
: Cents: i/ e
Cents Cents Cents


132.6



123.5
1.17.3
114.6


ll4.l
113.1
112.5
112.6

114.4
113.0
109.3
112,1

110,6
105.!
10o4.6


l16.4
117,O
116.4
116.5


116.9
115.0


113 5
112.b
106.9


1/ Empire wheat qualifying for Imperial
approximatingj: 6 cents per bushel) under
2/ No. 1 Dark Hard Winter.


Preference is exempt from duty
Ottawa Agreements of Nrnveuber 1932.


Date
(Friday)


1Jan.
Jan.


*





VS......:
asgeugs.



S *uuu.:t
.EIuegIg
.......:
.....l.:*

.Ii~lI*


Feb.
4'
11
18
25
Mar.


.......: i .2


India
choice
Karachi
ent
Cents


116,5

115,1
113,S
112.4
1141,l

107,4
104.2
103.0







WS-17


- 13 -


Table 4 shows Friday prices of imported wheat at Liverpool from six
countries ane the United Stat s. '.c.hio a div"-icon is rou-'hly rade between
hard and soft .heats, no direct co,;..,rabilJ.it is i -rlied bet-eon the various
wheats in each division. Ceinadia:r No. 3 Lj.nitoba is a su -rior what to
United States No. 2 Hard Winter. Araentinc Rosafe is directly competitive
with United States No. 2 Hard Winter, but while it is currently somewhat
higher priced, over a period of time the Rosafe may run softer than the No. 2
Hard Winter. Rosafe refers to the district in Argentina where the wheat is
produced, in which district soft, sumi-hard and hard wheats are raised.
Russian wheat is sold on ~iaiple and the quotations are not strictly com-
parable even for Russian wheat.

Table 6 shows the closing prices of May futures in Winnipeg, Liverpool,
and Buenos Aires, together with those at Chicago, Kansas City, and Minneapolis.

THE DOMESTIC WHEAT SITUATICH

BACKGROUND.- The carry-over of wheat in the United States
for the 5-year period (1924-28) averaged about 115 million
bushels. Stocks which began to accumulate in 1929 reached
the record peak of 37g million bushels in 1933. Four small
wheat crops since that time, however, reduced stocks to
about 100 million bushels by July 1, 1937.

Domestic wheat prices from the spring of 1933 to that
of 1937 were unusually high relative to world -iarket prices,
because of four small domestic crops caused largely by ab-
normally low yields per acre. During 1936-37 both world and
domestic prices advanced sharply as a result of increased
demand and the smallest supplies in recent years.

Early in the 1937-38 season, domestic and foreign wheat
prices rose sharply following reports of serious damage to
the Canadian crop and the threat of rust damecre in the United
States, and it was thought possible at that time that world
prices might re-.inij sufficiently above the 1936-37 levels to
offset the decline in United States prices to an export basis.
However, with an increase of ovor 100 million bushels in the
estimate of the world crop, excluding Soviet Russia and China,
the likelihood of large ship'.c:nts from Soviet Russia, a slow
European demand, disturbed business conditions, and a falli-g
general commodity price level, wheat prices in ..orld markets
have declined, and the price of wheat at local United States
markets, weighted by monthly sales, is now exp-ct d to avirge
so.-.ewhat rnder $1 a bushel in 1937-38 courearad with $1.03 in
19 56-37.

Domestic W']-at Supplies ar~ Di Ltribution

There have been no cha.ges in the estimates of the domestic supply and
distribution since the last issue of "The ?!heat Situiation" (pages 9 10).




WS-17 94 -

Domestic Wheat Prices

Domestic wheat pric,;s i Febr.:ar an c arl'-y '..arch *.re influenced by the
same factors as prices in other counrri.s. For the wveeak erdad March 18, when
the Liverpool market continued to decline under pressure of heavy Australian.
off eringi domestic markets fluctuated sharply, being more disturbed by the
foreign financial and politic]. .-,itatior_ than foreign markets themselves.

The peak of wheat shipments from the S.uthern Hamisphere countries
probably was reached in late February. As offerings and receipts of wheat from
these countries at European markets are accordingly reduced in April, it is
e::pected that takings of Unit-'d States whaat .vill increase temporarily. Then,
as new world crop prospects become more clearly defined, prices Aill adjust
toward the new crop basis.

Tables 5 and 6 show wheat prices at specified domestic and foreign markets.

AREA AND CONDITION OF FALL-SOTT RYE

The arei. sown to wiw'-tir rye in the 11 countries for which reports are
available is slightly bolo.v that reported for these countries last year. The
9 European countries, however, show a sLall increase. Germany, Poland, and
Czechoslovakia, all important producingr countries, show slight increases in
acreage (table 7).

The conUition of the crop in Germrany is noticeably better than at this
time last ':ear when winter kill had been so heavy. Tnc crop is now in above
average condition. In Czecho.loaveIia the crop condition is reported to be
satisfactory and is well above that of laet year as is the case in Poland.

Table 5.-Weighted avorare cash pricu of ,'.heat, specified markets and
dites, 1936-37 aEid 1937-38

:All class-e: n-o. : Io. 1 N: io. 2 Hard: ITo. 2 : Western
stand ,rA es lardd W.i:ter:D'.N.Spring:Amber Durum:RBd Winter : White
Date tsix. r-.et.:,..ns s :it:;:;rinnenolis:Minrier i ois:Ct. Louis :Seattle i/
1C. ,.:.-: S3,7-. :I -;. '7-:l 1 3b-:13 -l7-: 1 6- 13' -J7-1-: 9 37-3-.93b-' 1937-
SJ37 u 33 "_i : 37 : _6: 37 I 37_ 3 a 37 3o
Month sCents Cente Dents Ccnts Cents Cents Ce-ts Cents C its Cents Cents Cents
Dec. :139.3 6.2 134.2 96.5 159.0 119.6 17C.5 105.3 13iY 95.0 112.7 85.5
Jan. :144.3 102.14 135.0 102.7 1-5.9 127.0 171.3 105.7 139.6 100.2 112.2 88.9
Feb. :13-.5 95.5 9 6.5 99. 15 1.4 125.1 170.O 110.1 143.2 99.3 114.4 90.0
Week
ended- :
Feb. 5 :136.9 99.6 136.0 100.6 129.0 10-.2 i4o.o 100.4 112.4 90.5
12 :142.0 100.2 1433.9 102.6 161.5 124.5 202.0 110.1 144.6 100.2 117.1 90.3
19 :14o.2 97.2 137.5 99.0 164.S 117.0 173.2 o107.4 143.4 9%.2 116.4 59.0
26 :134.9 99.2 133.4 90.3 155.6 12c.1 157.? 112.3 135.6 95.8 111.5 90.5
Mar. 5 :139.2 57.5 13s.o 36.4 151.5 129.5 153.7 ,111. 142.1 96.5 112.6 g8.5
12 :138. 9-4.l 13.3 31.6 13)4.4 113.3 203-..2 10)4.2 142.3 91.2 116.0 S6.7

High 3/ :149.6 105.2 13.39 I4.3 167.5 131.1 20e.2 112.3 1444.6 101.7 117.1 90.5
Low 3/ :134.9 94.1 133.4 91.6 151.5 113.3 153.7 104.2 136.6 91.2 109.5 86.7

Weekly average of daily cash quotations, basis To. 1 sacked.
No quotations October 31 December 1936 due to strike.
3J January S to MLarch 12, 193 and corres!.onding dates for 1937.




- 15 -


Table 6.-Average closing prices of 'ay7 ,.,h-.Lt futures, specified -arkets ard
dates, 1)36-37 and 1937-3_

"i.-iipe. : Liverpool: Ducnos : Chic 'uo : Ke-sas : innap-
Date : / A: res : : City olis

S37 3 3 3 3 _7 3 3.7 _J_7 3 3 3 L 737 7s


: Cents
Month- t
Dec. :120.5

Jan. :124.3
Feb. :126.1
Week :
ended :
Feb. 5:124.2
12:128.9
19:127.4
26:124.1
Mar. 5:127.6
12:130.6

High 4:130.6
Lo4 J/:120.0


Cents Cents


! 'nts C ent"_ri;s Cents Cents Ce2nts Cents Cents Cents


116.3 125.6 112.6


126.3
127.7


126.7
123.4
127.1
123.3
125.5
120.6

123.4
120.6


127.2
126.5


125.6
128.5
126.5
125.7
129.3
132.2

132.2
122.0


113.9
112.3


112.8
114.2
111.3
111.2
110.7
10o.4

114.3
108.4


-- 128.3 92.1 122.5


-- 131.2
-- 133.3


2/
57.44 09.6
100.5- 08.9
99.S -o6.8
100.0107.3
o104. o-0o6.5
105.5'103.7

103.5, -2.0
94.7503.7


130.9
135.9
135.4
131.2
134.o
136.3

136.3
127.6


95.5
94. i


.4.2
95.3
93.2
93.8
92.3


97.4
8;?. S


124.7
125.6


123.7
123.7
127.4
122.9
125.2
127.3

123.7
120.7


89.3 136.4 99.7


94.2
92.9


93.2
94.3
91.9
92.4
39. 6
36.0

96.3
36.0


13c.4 105.4
139.4 104.8


136.8
141.9
141.6
137.6
139.0
14o. 7

141.9
133.8


105.6
106.3
103.4
104.3
102.0
97.7

107.3
97.7


. JConve-rsions at noon bu":ying rate of e::chb2o. 2/ March futures. 3/ April
futures. 4/ J-nuary 3 to March 12, 1935, and correspon-in- dates 1937. 5/ March
ahd April futures.

Table 7.- Winter rye: Area sown in specified countries for harvest
in 1936, 1937 and 1938

Country : 1936 1937 : 1933
: 1,000 acres 1,000 acres 1,000 acres

United States ........ ..........: 6,494 7,593 6,:69
Canada ..........................: 48s3 799 517
Total (2) ............... 6,977 8,392 7,326
Belgiu .........................: 385 375 3SO
Bulgaria .......................... 402 426 436
Czechoslovakia ..................: 2,466 2,358 2,423
France 1/ ....................... 1,611 1,620 1,621
Germany ............... ..........: 11,006 10,122 10,285
Greece ........................... : 160 160 1/ 171
Lithuania .......................: 1,207 1,251 1,327
Poland ..........................: 14,346 14,076 14,471
Rumania ..........................: 1,021 1,052 1,102
Total (9) ................ : 32,604 31,11 32,216
Total (11) countries .....: 39,531 39,S32 39,602

I/ Sovings to JTanuary 1.




- 16 -


Tuble 8.-Acreage seeded, yield ;,er acre, and production of all
.,ripe3t, 191y to date

: Seeded : Yield per seeded :
Year r:aearee :ace Production
: 1,000 1,C0O
: acres ? ushels bushels


1919
1920
1921
192 .
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928.
1929
1930
1931
19,32
1933
1934
1935
'.936
1937
193


77,440
67, 77
67 1,31
C7,163
64 ,10
55,7 06
61,733
60,712
C5, .61
71,152
66 '.?40
67,150

65,9 q13
69, "35
63 ,62
69 ,07
73,721-
81,362
79,77.1


:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
1/ :


12.3
12.4
12.1
12.6
13 .8
15.1
10.8
13.7
1 '7
12.9
." '-
1" .2
14.2
11.5
8.1
8.z
9.0
?.5
IC .7


952,097
943,277
318,964
946,649
759,482
841, 617
668,700
83P, 113
'375,059
914,3 73
335,217
8F6, 70
941 ,574
756,927
551,683
526,393
626,344
626 ,766
873,993


1/ FPreliminary.


Table 9.-Seeded acreage,
spring and


yield per acre, and production, durum, other
i-all spring wheat, 1926-38


: rurtrrum / Other spring
Year : : i :Fruc-: : :Produc-
Acrea-e Yi-1d :rcres.-c Yieldr
S.:. : tion : :_ : tion
: 1,000 1,C000 1,000 1,000
: acres Bushels buhi-ls acres Bushels bushels


1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938


4, 968

6,515


5,9^9
4, 1841
3,00
1,928
2,427

3,226
3,613


r", r
14.3
13.9
9.5
12.0
5.5
9.7
5.4.
3.3
9.7
2.3
2. 4


7.,059
95, 266
5 170

21,069
*+.0,' ,5
16,41.33


7 07391
27,791


15,240
16, 06
15, R66
17,15
17,?735
16, 92.

20,970
17,049
19,716

20,524
13,669


10.4
15.5
15.1
10.7
11.3
5.8
1 .2
7.6
1.8
7.0
4.8
7.83


158,257
248,812.
240,041
132,508
195,699
95,209
2?4, 69
158,702
82,077
1.57,560
98,819
161,100


: All spring
:, : :Produc-
:Acreage Yield :Pod
: : : tion
1,000 1,000
acres Bushels bushels


20,10-3
21, 527
22,721
22,073
22,113
20,351
22,542
24,040
18,977
22,143
23,959
23,750
22.282


10.0
15.2
14.83
10.4
11.4
5.7
11.8
7.3
4.7
7.3
4.5
8.0


200,606
326,871
335,307
236,978
252,865
116,278
265,132
175,165
88,450
161,025
106,892
188,891


WS-17


1/ Figures on durum apply to three States only Minnesota, North Dakota, and
South Dakota, Durum production in other States is not important and figures
are included with "other spring".






WS-17


Table lO.-Movei \rnt of wheat, incl-ding flour, fror principal export-
in(g countries, 19-,4-t5 to 1957-58


Country -


-: -T7 V s -ivpn by ff4.ci-l sooures
: Total : July 1 to date shown : Date
:1954-55 :1935-56 :1S56-77 :1'-- -6 :1936-Z7 :1937-38 "
:1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 :
:bushels bu-hels baylhe3 s bushels bushels bushels :


United States i/ ...
Canada .............
Argentina ..........
Australia ..........
Russia .............
Hungary ............
Yugoslavia .........
Rumania ...........
Bulgaria ...........
British India ......
Total ..






North American 2/ ..
Canada,4 markets 5/.
United States ......
Argentina ..........
Australia ..........
Russia .............
Danube & Bulgaria 4/
British India .....
Total 6/ .........
Total European ship-
ments 2/ ..........
Total ex-European
shipments 2/ ......


: :21,532 15,929 21,584 8,973 12,497 53,042: Jan. 51
: 169,630 257,447 213,028 157,282 178,088 75,921: Feb. 28
: 97,000 76,577 162,095 59,726 98,396 42,964: leb. 28
1: 08,007 102,258 95,970 40,619 32,928 37,371: Dec. 31
4,286 29,704 4,479 11,301 800 9,969: Sept.50
:12,499 14,644 27,428 7,902 16,984 5,415: Dec. 31
: 4,401 728 17,502 106 9,750 4,535: Dec. 51
S ,432 6,591 55,540 9,706 19,307 20,695: lHov. 30
375 988 7,273 924 4,654 4,607: Dec. 31
: 2,318 -2,556 14,674 656 855 1,082: Aug. 31


blJ3,480 487,222 5.99,7.63
: Shipments as given by trade sources
SL'tal : ":-k e-.ded 1957-38: July 1 Mar. 12
:1 00-oo :1 ,6-e7? :F -. '., :2i r.B:'.i'r.12: 197.6-.73 : 1 `7-38
1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
bushels bushels bushels bu. bu. bushels bushels

220,464 225,902 3,600 5,317 2,372 176,040 151,489
246,199 194,531 577 576 591 162,620 64,282
7,219 10,049 2,079 1,505 1,550 6,421 56,615
78,512 164,678 3,304 2,582 2,208 108,054 44,102
110,576 105,836 3,888 3,028 4,512 64,808 69,668
29,024 88 128 80 408 88 34,528
8,312 65,544 680 7 C4 456 46,976 30,536
:5/ 2,556 5/14,674 296 112 0 7,936 11,370
: 449,244 576,722 403,902 321,693
: 7/ 7/
360,264 484,600 11,264 305,552 258,152
: 7/ 7/
: 131,760 127,192 1,280 91,872 59,280


./ Includes flour mill..d in bond from foreitri wheat.
2/ Broomhall's Corn Trrde -T.'Tis.
,/ Fort Willian, Port .Xrtuii.r, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and New '.iestminister.
4/ Black Sea shipments only.
5/ Official.
_/ Total of trade figures includes 'orth America as reported by Broomhall's
but does not include items 2 and 3.
7/ To February 26.


- 17 -





- 1z -


Table 11.- Seeded acreaCe 6f spring wheat by areas, average 1927-36,
annually, 1334-3g


: A-erage :
: 1927-36 : 1934


: 1935
; 1935 :


1936 : 1937


: 193
:prospective


: : : : : : seedings 1
: 1,000 : 1,0 1 1,000:,0 ,CO 1,000 : 1,000


Spring wheat other: acres


than durum
Miiar.. IJ.D. & S.D. i
Wrsb.,0re. & Id.. :
All other states a


11,319
1, 52
4,762


Total ......: 17,933


Durum wheat 1/...:


S


192
4,192 :


Total all :
spring ....: 22,125


acres :

11,460 :
1,527 ,
4,062 a

17,0o49

1,923 :


18,977 :


acres I

13,822 :
1,310 :
4,5,34 :

19,716 :

2,427 :


22,143 :


acres :

12,872 :
2,170 :
5,3o2 :

20,404 :

3,555 :


23,959 :


acros :

12,366 ,
2,668
5,490 :

20,524 :

3,226 :


23,750 :


acres


11,8s41
41,62
4,966


3,613


22,282


1/ Note same as table 9.

Table 12.-Exports of wheat and wheat flour from the United States,
1936-37 and 1937-3-
(Includes flour milled in bond from foreign '.':heat)


Period


S1956-37


: 1,000
' bushels


July-Jan.
Week ended-
Feb. 5
12
19
26
Mar. 5
12


1,766


22
0
0
20
13


Wheat


23 i-3d I
1 OC'0


1, 000
bushels

39,451

1,3-47
2,o47
3,20
1, Jl
1,167
1,253


: "Then.t flour


1936-37


1,000
barrels

22,832

15
28
50
34
37
30.


:Wheat including flour


S1 037-3 iq1 6- a7 :


1,000
barrels

2,92

65
39
445
57
72
59


1,000 COO
bushels

12,497

92
132
235
160
194
154


- --. r r -.1,000


1,000
bushels

53,042

1,653
2,230
3,472
2,079
1,505
1,530


Compilcd from reports of the Department of Comuerce.


Area


: i-31-3j-7 r


NS-17




- 19 -


Table 13.- Shipments of wheat, includi-.g flour from principal reporting
countries, specified dates, 1.36-37 aind 1937-31

Period : Arwtin. : Audalui, : Mub : :7r th America
.... .- o- -.! -- .1 ,x o- .1 -, ..... 7 .1. 7 3


: 1,000 1,000 1,03 1,C30 1,O0 1,000
:bushels e bushels bushels bushels bushuls


July-Jan.
Week ended-
Feb. 4
12
19
26
Mar. 5
12
19


1,000
bushels


27,292 47,432 43,496 44,760 26,688 160,224


2,660
2,616
2,408
3 ,1432
3,736
2,524
3,42-S


2,176
3,460
3,444
3,`
3,028
4,512
3,342


752
624
296
232
136
176
3s4


920
504
504
6so
7-4I
456
s64


3,000
3,112
2,200
3,352
2,344
1, )08
2,192


1,000
.:-3 shels

110,280

3,704
3, 64
4,352
3,600
3,317
2,372
3,590


Compiled frur Broomhall's Corn Trade News.


Table 14.-


',7.eat: Production, 1932-33 to 1935-36


Country


: 1,000


1935-36 :


1,000
bushels


1936-37 :
*


1,000
bushels


North America:
United State-s ........
Canada ...............
Mexico .... ............
Total (3) ........
Europe l
Burop'c e.6ol. D,_nu''e
Basin (26) ........
Danube Basin (4) .....
Total (30) .......
North Africa (4) .....
Asia (6) .............


526,393
275,&49
10x,950
813,192


1,298,855
24'5 300
1l,-34:,l5-


626,344
281,935
1.0,712
918,991


1,274,724
301,5 '3
"1,9E, 3


13170 113DJ,,-2
l 525.776 53L-j


Tot-l 35 countries 3,021,303


3,145,771


626,76:
219,21.8
13,606
359,590


1,097,074

1,41,351


95,791
565.01l


3,001,763


373,993
:'.'2,410
11, 216
1,067,619


1,195,693
559, 213
1,554,911


114,593
59 .160


3,326,283


Souther-n H{emis: --re
Argentin ............... :
Australia ....... :
Union of So. Africa
Estimated .'vorld total:
excluding Soviet :


2.40,V
1,3<4
- Ir. 7


Russia and China 1/..: 3,143,C00


141 ,4'2

20,.1 -
2O '


3,5:2,000
0 q


249,193
150,559
16,077


3,538,000


184,o47
174,630
9,723_


3,816,000


compiled from official ,'lata.
!j Includes, besides countries liirtc, its
the world for which reports arc not available.


for wheat producing countries of


.WS-17


I 60,136


7,:96
7,024
7,596
8,760
9,108
7,232
8,420


3,016
2.220
3 L,10
3,304
2,532
2,208
1,969


1937-33

1,000
bushels


__.


_


i


_______





3 1262 08861 8383




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