Wheat situation

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Title:
Wheat situation
Uniform Title:
Wheat situation (Washington, D.C.)
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
Publisher:
The Service
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wheat trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Wheat trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WS-1 (Nov. 1936) - WS-254 (Nov. 1980)
Issuing Body:
Issued, 1936- by the Bureau of Agricultural Economics; <Oct.-Dec. 1953>-Feb. 1961 by the Agricultural Marketing Service; Apr. 1961-Nov. 1977 by the Economic Research Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; Feb. 1978- by the Economics, Statistics and Coopertives Servie, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; <Nov. 1980-> by the Economics and Statistics Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.
General Note:
Cover title.

Record Information

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University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000349017
oclc - 04015593
notis - ABY6688
lccn - 78643652 //r812
issn - 0364-2305
Classification:
lcc - HD9049.W3 U66a
ddc - 338.1/7/3110973
System ID:
AA00012162:00008

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Succeeded by:
Wheat outlook & situation


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Full Text




THE



BU
UNITED ST
:WS-109_





EUROPE AND THE NEAR EAST
3 WHEAT
I- YIELD PER ACRE
I 7'


FOR RELEASE
FEB. 12. A.M.


SIT U,.TDN

REAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMY I15'
ATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

DE6.1948 JAN.- FEEF.1949;o
---^ H[----------,I


The Low Countries, Denmark, and the United Kingdom are centers of the highest yields
per acre. Here the heaviest applications of commercial fertilizer are used. Yields ex-
ceed 30 bushels per acre and, in some large areas, even 40 bushels, Outside this terri-
tory, only the rich Po Valley and several areas in Turkey show such high yields.
Yields of 5 bushels per acre, or less, are obtained on the outskirts of the Sahara
Desert and in areas of the Near East with a similar climate. In Europe proper, the
lowest yields--slightly less than 10 bushels per acre--are in small areas in Portugal,
Spain, Italy, Greece, Rumania, Turkey, and a large area north of the Caspian Sea in the
U.S.S.R.
(In the United States, state yields (1937-46 averages) ranged from 11.4 to 27.3
bushels per harvested acre. Kansas, the leading wheat State averaged 14.5 bushels. The
average for the United States was 16.1 bushels.)


T


.ss ......... .


*1




i. ta 35! ] 20 I C. ,* I5.' z i 20' 2' 3(' Y' 4"' C5 '5 8''



EUROPE AND THE NEAR EAST '

WHEAT ACREAGE







'ac o G p 'e sets
5,000 aoc'ves












Figure I.- Europe, the ear East, and North Africa accounted for about 170 million acres of sheat, or
r acreage fr wheat. .. .










id .HREf YEAR AVERAGES Of 4RO5 T.AR. Y#04 '93 a8
"0 2 I0- 0. 30. ,-.4







any Ien, acreage frQI.wbeat. ----j... ... ......







































?i ] 4 k .:I- Li ...

U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTuRE NEG fAE+ OFFICE OF FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL RELATIONS

Figure 2.- Five areas stand out as the most important for wheat production: (I) The Danube Valley,
where the soil is rich and the rainfall moderate. (2) The Po Valley, where only drainage is necessary. (3)
Central Germany, where the soil is naturally rich and cultivation Is intensive. (4) Northern France, where
soil is rich and cultural practices modern, and where production Is encouraged by a high tariff. (5) Egypt,
where richness of soil is proverbial.
Soil conditions, and rainfall, temperature and other physical factors cause very wide regional varia-
tions in yields per acre. These variations account for the great differences il the acreage (figure 1) and
production (figure 2).

























r
,'at~y-,-... <.'&-r .
.- '-. ,,..--..
*^-- a-"T,- a


--r-t-- ., .. i" ,,r .*_.___i..


X .. I
4- : '


Figure 3.-'Except In eastern U.S.S.R., practically all wheat sown In Europe, the
Near East, and North Africa Is fall sown. The annual acreage of fall-sown wheat in
this part of the world averaged about 133 Billion acres during 1935-37.
Insignificant quantities of wheat are grown In areas with little more than 10 Inches
of annual precipitation, unless the land Is Irrigated. The 60-degree Isotherm of July
temperature Is the northern borderline for winter wheat in western Europe. Farther
east, shortness of the growing season and hard winters push the line considerably below
the 60-degree Isotherm.


Figure 4.- The U.S.S.R. had about 90 percent of the 38 million acres of spring
wheat sown in Europe and the Near East during 1935-37. West of the U.S.S.R., spring
wheat Is grown sparingly and only under exceptional'conditions, such as for replacing
fall-sown wheat. lost by winterkill or by a dry or excessively wet fall.





09-5-


T H E W EA T S I T U A T I ON
..- Including Rye-....


Approved by the Outlook and Situation Board, February 2, 1949

SUIM.ARY

After advancing from August to late December, w'heat prices declined
in January. Number 2 Hard "Winter, ordinary protein, brought $2.19 per
bushel at FYnsas City an February 1 compared with 14.,228 on Decembe;r 29 and
the loan equivalent of $2.23.

About 120 million bushels of ",1eat still nced to be procured if
1948-49 exports are to reach 500 million bushels. CCC stocks on July 1
plus purchases .through January 31 totaled about ?20 million bushels.
Since July 1 private concerns have purchased about 90 million for export.
CCC purchases through January 31 are sufficient to cover the agency's
export program for Voth wheat and flcur through February, Of the 120 mil-
lion bushels still to be procured, ab I t 95 million bushels, mostly wheat,
would be procured by CCC. The rest, almost all flour, irwould be handled
by private concerns.

On December 31, the closing date for the programs, there were about
235 million bushels of 1948 heat under CCC loan and 108 million under
purchase agreement, or a total of about 343 million bushels. Ordinarily
it would be expected that prices at this time of the year would be above
loan rates. If prices should advance enough to cover loan costs, selling
by farmers would follow and this couldd reduce the quantity of wheat
delivered to CCC. Under such conditions, the possible 300-million-bushel
carry-over could be expected to include sizeable market stocks necessary
for mills and transit before new crop supplies become available. If,
however, prices continue below loan levels plus costs, it would be ex-
pected that such wheat would be delivered to CCC, and market supplies would
become limited. Domestic disappearance for the year ending June .30,1949,
may be about as follows: Food, 490 million bushels; seed, 95 million and
feed, 100 million. If exports are 500 million, disappearance would total
about 1,185 million bushels. Since the 1948-49 supply is 1,484 million
bushels -- July 1 stocks of 196 million and a crcp of 1,288 million --
carry-over July 1 would be about.300 million bGshels, which compares
with the 1932-41 average rf 535 million.

A winter ,heat crop of about 965 million bushels was forecast as
of December 1 by the Crop Reporting Board, Assuming a spring crop like
that of 1948 of about 300 million bushels, the total crop would be 1,265 mil-
lion bushels. Y'ith a carry-over of about 300 million bushels, total
supplies would be about 1,565 million bushels. With domestic disappearance
of about 700 million bushels, about 865 million bushbls would be available
for export in 1949-50 and for carry-over July hl1950,If generally favorable
harvests occur in other areas, exports in 1149-50 are expected to 1e less
than in 1948-49.







Reports to date indicate some expansion in world winter wheat
acreage. Increases are expected .in Europe, including the Soviet Union.
Growing conditions in late 1948, while generally satisfactory, were
not as favorable in some areas as a year earlier. Australia harvested
another good wheat crop but. the Argentine harvest' is well below average.
Moisture reserves in the Prairie Provinces of Canada up to freezing time
were reported at only 64 percent of normal, compared with 121 percent
a year earlier. As a result, one of the factors affecting yields per
acre of the 1949 crop of spring wheat is distinctly unfavorable. Winter
wheat acreage in Canada is small, usually accounting for only about
3 percent of the total. The acreage seeded last fall was only 748 thou-
sand acres 19 percent below that a yean earlier.

Rye

Rye prices this year are sharply below those of a year ago, but
are still relatively high compared with long-time levels. Reduced
demand, and increased supplies have resulted in lower prices.

THE DOMESTIC WHEAT SITUATION

BACKGROUND:- An abnormal world demand for bread grains made
it possible to export the excess over domestic needs from
four successive record wheat crops in the United States.
Furthermore, the carry-over was cut down to very low levels
on July 1, 1946 and 194" (table 5).

In 1932-41 the supply of wheat in continental United
States averaged 982 million bushels consisting of carry-in
of old wheat, 235; production, 738, and imports for domestic
use, 9. Total disappearance averaged '721, consisting of food,
475; feed, 122; seed, 81; and exports and shipments 43. Carry--
over stocks at the end of this period were much larger than at
the beginning.

Net exports from the United States have exceeded 300 mil-
lion bushels only in 1914-15, 1920-21, and each year since
1944-L5. Very small United States wheat 'rops in 1933-36
together with drives toward greater self-sufficiency in many
countries greatly reduced exports in the 3,'s and the war
curtailed shipping in the early 40's. In 1921-30, net exports
from the United States averaged 177 million bushels. In the
35 years since 1909, leaving out the years of net imports,
net exports averaged 169 million bushels.

Wheat prices to growers advanced from an average of
68 cents per bushel in 1940-41 to a record of $2.81 in mid-
January 1948, and a record season average of $2,29 for the
1947 crop (table 4). From 1938 to late 1944-the loan pro-
gram, which reflected the general rise in prices farmers pay,
was the most important factor in domestic wheat prices. In




-7

S" contrast, from 1944 until the I14N harvest, very heavy
export of v.heat and flour was un important factor
affecting price. I/ However, domestic uce was large
from 1942-43 through 1947-4,3

In 1947-48, United States ."heat prices reflected
the unavailability of feed grains for export, the ad-
ditional world dunand resul]tins from short crops in
importing countries, as well E.s the. continued, rise in
the general price level. With the harvest of the near-
record crop in 1943 and favorable crops in .mporting
countries, the loan program again became an important
price factor. 2/

Exports Now Expected to Total About 500 Mil-
lion And Carry-over About 300 i',illion eushicls

Domestic disappearance of wheat during the- first half of the current
marketing year was 356 million bushels, while exports and shipm,-nts 3/
for the same period totaled 271 million bushlsj, Domestic disanparance
for the ycar ending June 30, 1949, may be about as follows: Food, 490 mil-
lion bushels; so d, 95 million; and f.cd, 1i00 million, Thc gr.crtlv.
reduced wheat feeding, small even compared .:ath pr:v.ar, results frcm the
record supplies of corn and oth r feed grains, both t-t-Al and :,er grain
consuming anirMal unit, and from high wheat prices compared ',ith fc'.Cd
grain prices. If exports are 500 million, total disal.pearancc vo.uld
amount to about 1,185 million bushels, Sin.,_ tnrie 191t,-49 SL,uplry I 1,484 mil-
lion bushels --July 1 stocks of 196 million and a crop of 1,2?L millic.n ./--
carry-over next July would b. about 300 million bushels. The hiTh.'st
carry-over was 651 million bushels in 1942 and the lowest 84 million
in 1947, The 1932-41 average was 205 z.illion.

Stocks of wheat on January 1, 1Q-19 wver estimated at 857 million
bushels indicating an Octobur-Dec emb.r disappearance of at ut 291 mil-
lion bushels." This was distributed alout as follow's: Food, 130 million
bushels; seed, 32 million, feed, 1- million; and exports and s'.ipmcnts .1/,
116 million, Stocks of ..hcat on January 1 in the '.,ari.us positions, .rih
comparisons for earlier years and other quarters are shov-n in t-l C.

Wheat Prices Below Loan Lvel; 343 I'.,illion
Under Loan and Agreerecnt Compared v.r-th
Likely Carry-ovcr of 601 Iiil ion 'L:isirl.Is

After advancing from early August to lat: Dcemrb.r, 'hcat prices
declined in January., No. 2 Fard Winter, ordinary protein, brought 1'2.19
per bushel at Kansas City on February 1 compared '4th c$2,?8 on Decermb.r 29
and the loan equivalent of $2.23.
L7 The figure on page 8 and table on page 14 in Th.e "Tccat Sitiuation, issue
of May-July 1948 show the price of No, ? Hard Y;inter v-ho-t at ransas City
and the- annual loan rate beginning vith July 1937,
2/ Loan rates for 1948 vwith comparisons are shovm in The "'Theiat Situation
issue of May-July 1948, table 5, page 14.
3/ Shipments arc to outlying tLrritoric.s of the United States *.nd usually
total'the equivalent of about 4 million bushels a year.
/ Estimated production vas revised roia 1,283,8 million bush,.ls to
1,288,4 million by the official crop report of Decembir 17,

:... ..







About 120 million bushels of wheat still need to be procured if
1948-49 exports are to reach 500 million bushels. CCC stocks on July 1,
plus purchases through January 31 totaled about 290 million bushels.
Since July 1 private concerns purchased about 90 million for export.
CCC purchases through January 31 are sufficient to cover the agency's
export program for both wheat and flour through February. Of the 120 mil-
lion bushels still to be procured, about 95 million bushels, mostly wheat,
would be obtained by CCC,h The rest, almost all flour,, would be handled
by private concerns. The quantities-to be procured by the CCC will be
obtained in part by deliveries under the loan and purchase agreement
programs. Allocations through March total 405 million. bushels, With
380 million now purchased, it leaves 25 million to be purchased to
complete the March program.

There were about 235 million bushels of 1948 wheat under CCC loan
on December 31, the closing date for the program. In addition, there
were 108 million bushels under purchase agreement, making a total of about
343 million bushels for both programs.

Ordinarily it would be expected that prices at this time of the
year would be above loan rates. If prices should advance enough to
cover loan costs, selling by farmers would follow and this would reduce
the quantity of wheat delivered to CCC. Under such conditions, the possible
300 million-bushel carry-over would be expected to include sizeable market
stocks for mills and transit before new crop supplies become available. If,
however, prices continue below loan levels plus costs, it would be expected
that such wheat wiuld be delivered to CCC. The maturing date for loans is
April 30, while under the agreements, CCC will accept delivery at the loan
rates between May 1 and May 30, 1949. With deliveries to CCC heavy, market
supplies would become limited, and it might become desirable for CCC to
release some of its holdings in the domestic market.

To establish a price floor for a situation of this kind the CCC
on December 10, 1948, announced that during the 1949 calendar year domestic
sales of CCC-owned or controlled farm commodities generally will be made
at not less than the lowest of the following: (1) a price that will re-
imburse CCC for its cuts; (2) 90 percent of the parity price; and (3) a
price halfway between the support price and parity. 5/

If the index of prices paid by farmers including interest and
taxes, which was 240 on January 15, 1949, is the same on June 15 (the
period for determining wheat parity for the loan) the rate on the new



5/ This policy coincides with restrictions included in section 202(a)
of the Agricultural Act of 1948 and thus eliminates che need for
any change .on January 1, 1950, when compliance with section 202(a)
becomes mandatory. Action on minimum sales prices for 1949 was
taken because of present restrictions (section 2 of the Act of A
April 12, 1945) expi.-ed on December 31, 1948, and the restrictions
imposed by the Agricultural Act of 1948 are not mandatory until 1950.'




F -9-

crop at 90 percent of parity would be about $2.21 for No. 2 Hard Winter
at Kansas City. 6/ The comparable rate this year is $2.24 per bushel,
allowing 1 cent for the increase in freight in 1949.

Large Wheat Crop
Indicated for 1949

A winter wheat crop of about 965 million bushels was forecast
as of December 1 by the Crop Reporting Board. Assuming a spring crop
like that of 1948 of about 300 million bushels, the total crop would
be 1,265 million bushels. l'ith a carry-over of about 300 million
bushels, total supplies would be about 1,565 million bushels. With
domestic disappearance of about 700 million bushels, about 865 million
bushels would be available for export in 1949-50 and for carry-over
July 1, 1950. If generally favorable harvests occur in other areas,
exports in 1949-50 are expected to be less than in 1948-49.

In its January 10 report, the Crop Reporting Board stated that
the 1949 winter wheat crop was growing under conditions at least as
favorable as the average for the last 7 years when production has been
exceptional. Since the issuance of that report conditions for the crop
have continued generally favorable. The most unfavorable outlook in early
January was in Texas. Subsequently, with few exceptions, practically all
areas of that State received general moisture, o0 that the situation there
is now uniformly more encouraging than at any time since late May of 1947.

THE WORLD HEAT SITUATION

BACKGROUND.- On July 1, 1943, stocks in the four
principal exporting countries were a record of 1,737 mil-
lion bushels. By July 1945, however, they were down to
318 million bushels. They were 387 million in 1946 and
385 million in 1947. Greatly increased disappearance
was caused by wartime depletion of feed supplies in im-
porting countries and by poor crops in many areas. Stocks
in these countries on July 1, 1947 were the smallest since
1938. About 16 percent lesci than the 1935-39 average of
458 million bushels. On July 1, 1948 these stocks had
increased to 535 million bushels.

Expansion in World Winter
Wheat Acreage Indicated

Reports received to date indicate some expansion in world winter
wheat acreage. In addition to the larger acreage seeded in the United
States, increases are expected in Europe, including the Soviet Union. In
India and Pakistan, some of the lands which could not be planted


6 Parity is dctermin'ed by multiplying the base pricc of 88.4 cents per
lbushel (average 60 months from August 1909 to July 1914) by the index
of prices paid, interest and taxes (1910-14-100) which in mid-June
1948 was 251 percent. The loan at 90 percent of the resulting $2.22
parity equalled $2.00 at the national farm level. The equivalent ol
this was $2.23 for No. 2 Hard Winter at Kansas City.






last summer because of floods are reported to be seeded to winter crop.
An acreage increase is indicated for trance. Growing conditions in. 1948, .M
while generally favorable, were. not a Tfavorable in some areas as a year
earlier. Many countries have reported that, because of favorable con-
ditions for fall work, the proportion of land already prepared for spring
crops is greater than usual.

Moisture Reserves in Canadian
Provinces Nuch Below Normal

Moisture reserves in the Prairie Provinces of Canada up to November 2
were reported at only 64 percent of normal, compared with 121 percent a year
earlier. They were 65 percent of normal in Alberta, 60 percent in
Saskatchewan, and 79 percent in" Manitoba. These reserves include moisture
which fell on stubble land between harvest and the time the ground froze
(Au'gust-November) and took account of rains which fell on summer-f.llowed
land the previous growing season and fall before that. The per-
centages for the various districts were we:Lgh'ted on the basis of acreage.
Low moisture reserve is a distinctly unfavorable factor affecting yields
per acre of the 1949 spring wheat crop.

The crop in Australia just harvested is estimated at about 200 mil-
lion bushels, which compares with 178 million, the 1930-39 average.
Atgentina had another small crop, estimated at only about 165 million
bushels compared with the' 1930-39 average of 233 million. Table 7 shows
carry-over, production, domestic disappearance and nut exports, as well
as acreage and yield for Australia and Argentina, and also the United States
and Canada.

World Wheat Exports May Be
Above Year Ago

World wheat and flour exports for 1948-49, are expected to be
somewhat above the 922 million bushels exported in 1947-48 (table 8).
Exports from the four principal exporting countries -- United States,
Canada, Australia and Argentina -- arc- expected to total about 900 mil-
lion bushels, assuming 500 million bushels from the United States and
about 240 million from Canada. Other countries, including the Sovi.tt
Union, may possibly export another 50 million, about the same Ps in
1947-48.

Three Exportingr-Countries Have
Special Pricing Arraneements

The handling and pricing of wheat are under strict Government
control in Canada, Australia.and Argentina. This is admihistered by
Wheat Boards in Canada and Australia and by the Argentine Trade' Pro-
motion Institute in Argentina.

The Canadian Wheat Board-pays, producers a guaranteed price and dis-
tributos'back to the producer any profit resulting from res-nles. Any'loss'
rro -absorbed by the Dominion Government. The. initial payment to .producers.







1.56 per bushel. The agreed export prisc to the United Kingdom is $2.00
j for tho current' mrrketinr scqson and. dlso for 1949-&b. Th', price toothc.r
Countries on January 31 s $2..26, hansirio. L' ?drthc.rn, in store .1Villiam,
- *Port Arthur- br'Van uvcr

In Australia, a "stabilization" pl-n bases minimum guarantr.od prices
to prod'uccrs on production costs. 1ro.uc,.rs -irt. -aid the equivalnt of
$1.07, bulk, f.o.b. basis. VWhn the export price is hi-hr t,an the
guanrn-tc./d price, taxcs are imposed on e'xpnrts it 50 pr.r.c.nt of T:,' dif-
fe'ronco bct..cn t:.( ..xport and the gurrantc',:d price, ,-ut not to uxmi.:d the
equivalent of about 35 crnts. Exports'to countries not under contract .*crc
at 4'.19 for Dcfmbcr-January dcliv.ry, blilk, f.ob. b-isis.

Fric-s to producers. in Ar.-entina'for the.. current crop ar'-: on the
bais of $1,96 on track ait bunrcs AiL-.s Th'. nominal pticr- for c.roort is
ourrt.ntly at $4.86 per bushf.l.

THE RYE ZITJ.ATTCIO

Ry( Sunplies above and
Prices c'.elnw Ycar Ago

Total domestic rye suplios for 1948-49, including -July 1, 19148
stocks of 3,3 million bush. Is :n.1 a cro-) of' 26.4 million bushi-Is, are
29.7 minllion'bush(ls. Imports through :Tov-mbr amounted to h.bout 0.5 mil-
lion Fushcls, making total supplies 'about .5;,".2 million busIhEls. On
January 1, stocks in all positions totail-d 17.2 million bushrls, rrll.ing
total disappearance for July-Deccmbe:r 1.0 nd lion bushclso Of this about
2.6 million wirc used for food, 2.7 mil.linn for fecd, 4.5 for sc-.d,
2.9 for alcohol and spirits, and cxpor-s 0.3 million. Table 11 shows
supply and distribution of ry': for r,.cent yc-rs. Tible 9 shore quart rly
stocks for a number of years.

Rye prices this ycar arec sharply brcleo: thnsc of a year ago (fable 10),
but the',y aru still rslabively high eomprnrcA vrith th- long-time series.
*Reduced demand and increased supplies have resulted in lower prices.

Rye Acrr-aro -lc.uccd; 40 Percent
Below' 10-Y.ar Av. rage

The acr'.age of rye sovn for all purposes in +he fall of 1949 is
estimated at 3,381 thousand acrrs, 11 -,:rc. -t l.:-s than thr 3,790 thousand
Sacres sr:ducd in the fall of 19:7, P;o :c',.a'-c hi.s 1i n declining for
several years. The current acreage, i." 4t percent btloVr the 10-ycar avcrago
and the lowest since planted :st'mntes were first made in 1931. Dry
weather in the thr':. major pro.uc!in Stat,', North Dakota, South Dakota
and Nebraska, at seedinF time caur..d some ired,ction in acrcs4 Hovr-vcr,
competition of grain and', ford crops that return norc cash income per acre
also was a factor in tht acrg.a.c reduction. The condition of ryn on
December 1 was 86 percent, th' samc .is that reported a :.'"ar earlier, but
7 points above the 10-ycar av,.ragc.







II '" .




DEC. 194&F-JAN.-F r. i9e9 J.2

Table 1. Wheat: Prices per bushel in three exporting countries,
Friday nearest mid-month, Jan. 19407Jao.19" id '
weekly Nov. '1948-Jan. 1949


__ HARD WHEAT :HARD WHEAT SOFT WHEAT
: United States.: Canada :United S-ates:UrLited .


Date
(Friday)


Friday mid-month
Jan. 16
F.-b. 13
Mar, 12
Apr. 16
May. 14
June 11
July 16
Aug. 13
Sept.17
Oct. 15
Nov. 12
Dec. 17
Jan-. 14


: No. 1


: No. 2


: Dark : Manitoba :
:Northern Spring: at
: 13 percent : Fort Williams


protein at .:
Duluth 1 .
Dollars

3.23
2.52
: -2.62
: 2,70
2.62
2.57
2.40
2.32
2.33
2.34
2.43
: 2.33
: 2.30


2.45
2.43
2.39
2.37
2.33
2.33
2.31
2.29
2.29


U


No. 1
Dark
Winter
Galveston
.;'


:States

: No. 1
:Portland


Dollars Dollars Dollars


3.34
2.59
2.61
2.69
2.71
2.55
2.47
2.44
2.35
2.33
2.37
2.35
2.32


2.42
2.41
2.44
2.O40
2.34
2.35
2.34
2.27
2.22


3.13
2.345
2.555
2.615
2.525
2.375
2.33
2.38
2.39
2.405
2.46
2.445
2.44


2.525
2, 51
2.515
2.455


2.40
2.42
2.37 5


2.91
2.10
2.25
2.40
2.37
2.30
2.18
2.185
2.185
2.185
2.225
2.225
2.225


2.255
2.24
2.265
2.25
2.24
2,22
2.21
2.22
2,16


:
: Australi
1/


Dollars'
"---~


3.30



2.89
2.75


2.50
2.50
3/ 2.50


---
i-i
---


2.50


I/ 2.50


_/ F.O.B. spon to arrive.
2/ Fort WilLiam quotation is in store.
2/ 2.50 for Britian, other countries 2.66


: The maps reproduced in this issue are from

: "Agricultural Geography of Europe and the Near

: East," Miscellaneous Publication No. 665, of


: the Office of Foreign Agricultural Relations,

: U. S. D. A.


S.--- ------- --------- ------ -- ----------


4 "'.i


Weekly


Nov.
Nov.
Dec.
Dec,
Dec.
Dec.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan.


.






Table 2.-Wheat: Weighted average cash price, specified markets and
__ dates 1947-49
:All classes:No. 2 Hard ;No. 1 Dark 1Io. 2 Hard :No. 2 ed : Soft
btitht :and grades :Winter 4/ N. Spring :Amber Durum: Winter : White
>and :six maricets:Kansas City:Minneapoliu.iinneapolis. St. Louis :Portlajid 2/
ate 1949-7.-: 194.- 19--7-i1 -1947-8-- 19 19-7-: i-:l9 -:I--8-: 19-7-:19he-
S 194l8A :1949 :1g48 :149 91948 9i :9h8 l':9 9 :;19.8 9i 149 :19q8 .1949
: Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars 'Dollars

ember .: 3.15 2.37 3.00 2.28 3.23 2.47 3-04 2.46 3.02 2.36 2.92 2.23
member ,: 3.11 2.31 3.01 2.29 3.16 2.40 3.11 2,38 3.09 2.44 2,.S7 2.24
nuary ..3 3.15 --- 3.19 --- 3.20 --- 3.19 --- 3.12 -- 2,85 2.21
ik ended:
ot.'-T: 3.10 2.32 2.93 2.24 3.17 2.43 2.96 2.42 2.94 2.32 2.84 2.20
S 13 3.13 2.36 3.00 2.27 3.21 2.50 -,02 2,46 2.99 2.36 2.93 2.22
20 e 3.18 2.39 3.00 2.30 3.28 2.52 3.07 2.49 35.07 2.45 2.95 2.24
27 .: 323 2.39 3.09 2.32 3.30 2.47 3.19 2,47 3.18 2.40 2.97 2.25
lec. 4k.. 3.15 2.35 3.04 2.33 3.19 2,45 3,14 2.44 3.13 2,45 2.88 2.25
11 .~ 3,14 2.35 3.03 2.352 3.1 2.h4 3.12 2.42 3.09 2.47 2.91 2.25
18 .: 3.20 2.29 3.02 2.27 3o14 2.76 3.10 2.36 3o15 2.38 2.q2 2.24
25 3.07 2.26 5.00 2.27 3.12 2.37 3.07 2.36 308 --- 2.80 2.24
Jan. 1. : 3.05 2.29 2.95 2.27 3.10 2.38 3.08 2..*4 3.04 2.28 2.79 2.23
8 9 3.12 2.31 2.97 2.27 3.15 2.36 3.15 2.36 3.06 2.29 2.81 2.22
15..: 3.21 2.50 3.10 2.27 3.27 2,535 3.24 2.40 3.13 --- 2.88 2.22
22 .* 3.15 2.27 3.02 2.24 35.19 2.35 3.19 2,32 3.10 2.52 2.Q0 2.22
29. .: 3,10 2,25 2.97 2.23 3.15 2.32 3.18 23-2 3,04 2.;4 2.88 2.-18


Beginning July 9, 1947 sales of hard and dark hard winter combined.
Average of daily cash quotations.


Table 3.-Wheat: Average closing prices of May wheat futures,
Specified markets and dates, 1947-4M
: Chicago : Kansas City : Minneanolis
Period 1947-4 9 1948-49 : 1.947-4 19h48-.49 47-4 1948-49

.3 ."M. _il'rs. Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars


ovember. .
december a
january a
eek ended:
Fovr. S77
13 .:
S 20.:
27 -:
Dec. 4 .:
.11 ..
iS.. *
25 .3
Ian. :1 .1-
8 .:
15 .;


2.90
2.97
2,96
2.96

. 2,81
. 2.87
. 2.93
3.01
2,96
2.98
2 985
2.91:


3.04
2.97
2.89
r


2.35
2.39


. 2.22
2.25
.2.30
2.30
2.31
2.V
2,27
2.27
.2.28
2.26
2.26
2.24
2.20


2.81
2.87 .
2.85

2,72
. 2.78 .
2.34
2.91
2.87
2,87
2.87
2.85
2.884
2. S1
2.93
2.85
2.78


2.24
.2.26


.2.12
. 2.15 .
2.19
2.20
2.21
2,20
2.16
2.17
2.17
2.15
2.13
2.12
2.08


2.82
2.91
2.92


2.74
.2.79
2.85
2.94
2.90
2,93
2.92
2,90
2.89
2.90
2.99
2,92
2.86


2.29
2.29


2.16
2.20
2.24
2.25
2.26
2.25
2.21
2.21
2.22
2.19
2.18
2.17
2.13






Table 4.- Wheat. Average price per bushel received by farmers
and parity price, United States 1931-49 1/

Year : : : : : : : : : : : :lM.rl
be- : : : : : : : : : ". : Ing
gin- :July : Aug. :Sept.: Oct.: Nov.: Dec...Jan.. Feb.: ..Mar.; Apr.: May :June : yee
ning : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 5 : 15 : : ava
July : :__ : : : : : : : : : : ag
:Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Qents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cen-
: ,Ave2age Price 27 ..
1931 : 36-3 35.4 35.7 36.1 50.5 44,1 44.1 4470 44.2 43.1 42.4 37.3 39.
1932 : 35.6 38.5 37.4 34.6 32.8 31.6 32,9 32.3 34,5 44.8 59,0 58.7 38.1
1933 : 86.9 74.7 71.1 63.6 71.1 67.3 '69.4 72.0 70.9 68.7 69.5 78.9 74,1
1934 : 78.8 89.6 92.2 88.5 88.1 90.6 89.3 87.9 85.5 90.2 87.8 77.3 84..
1935 : 76.4 80.8 85.1 94.8 87.5 88.9 92.0 91.1 89.3 85.4 81.6 79.9 "83.S
1936 : 94.1 104,8 104.3 106.8 106.4 114.5 123.6 124,9 123.2 126,6 118.3 108.9 102.'
1937 :112.8 99.4 93.0 88.7 81.9 83.6 83.6 86.6 80.3 75.0 71.4 69.7 9
1938 : 60.8 50.7 52.5 52.2 52.0 53.6 !7.1 56.9 56.7 57,8 63.0 62.53/56.,
1939 : 55.7 54.5 72.7 70.3 73.1 82.4 84.5 84.1 85.0 88.9 80.7 67.4 69.1
194o : 61.4 60.1 62.6 68.2 72.5 71.5 73.0 67.8 71.8 76.0 79.4 83.1 68.a
1941 : 85.6 88.5 95.8 91.0 93A4 102.2 106.1 10o4.9 105.1 99.7 99.8 95.7 94..
1942 : 94.6 95.4 102.8 103.5 104.4 110',3 117.5 119.5 122.7 122.3 122.8 125.0 110,0
1943 :126.0 127.0 130.o 135.0 137.0 143.0 146.0 146.0 146.0 147.0 147o0 143.0 136-0
1944 :139.0 135.0 135-0 142,0 1Jl3o0 14:.0 i46 C 147.0 1J,8.0 149.0 149 0 150.0 141.,
1945 :146.0 145.0 145.0 151.0 153,0 154.0 154.0 155.0 18.0 1538.0 170,0 174.0 150.q
1946 :187.o 178.0 179.0 188.0 189.0 192.0 191.O 199.0 244.0 240.0 239.0 218.-0 191.0
1947 :214.0 210'.0 243.0 266.0 274.0 279.0 281.0 212.0 221.0 229.0 222.0 211,0 229.(
1948 :203.0 196.0 197.0 198.0 204.0 205.0 202.0
__ PP~arity Price 4/
1931 :124.6 122.9 121.1 120.2 T8.5 IT.5 T_.o0 1I4.o 112.3 111.4 109.6 1i8.7-
1932 :108.7 108.7 107.3 107.0 106.1 105.2 100,o8 100, 99.9 100.8 100.8 101.7
1933 :105.2 108.7 112.3 112.3 112.3 112.3 109.6 111.4 112.3 112.3 113.2 113.2
1934 :113.2 115,8 116.7 116.7 116.7 116.7 114.9 115.8 115.8 115,8 115.8 115.8
1935 :114.9 114.0 113.2 113.2 112.3 -112.3 111.4 111.4 110.5 113.5 110.5 109.6
1936 :112.3 114.9 114.9 114.9 114.9 115.8 116.7 113.5 118.5 120.2 120.2 120..2
1937 :119.3 118.5 116.7 115.8 114.9 114.0 114.0 114.0 113.2 113,2 113.2 112.3
1938 :111.4 .110.5 109.6 109.6 109.6 109.6 108.7 108.7 1.08.7 108.7 108.7 108.7
1939 ':108.7 107.8 110.5 110.5 110.5 110.5 110.5 110.5 111.4 111.4 111.4 111.4
1940 :110.5 110.5 110.5 110.5 110.5 111.4 110.5 110.5 111.4 111.4 112.3 114.9
1941 :115.8 118.5 121.1 122.9 124.6 125.5 127.3 129.1 130.8 1-31.7 132.6 132.6
1942 :133.5 133.5 134.4 135.3 136.1 137.0 137-9 139.7 140.6 141.4 143.2 144.1
1943 :145.0 145.0 145.0 146.0 147.o 148.o 149.0 49.0 149.o .149.0 149.0 15o.o
1944 .150.0 150.0 150.0 150,0 151.0 151.0 152.0 152.0 153.0 153.0 153.0 153.0
1945 :153.0 153.0 154.0 155.0 155.0 156.0 156.0 156.0 159.0 16o.o 164.0 166.0
1946 :176.o 180.0 177.0 183.0 187.0 188.0 190.0 195.0 201.0 203.0 202.0 203.0
1947 :203.0 207.0 210.0 211.0 213.0 217.0 222.0 219.0 218.0 220.0 221.0 222.0
1948 ;222.0 222.0 221.0 220.0) 219.0 219.0 219.0
1 D-ta for earlier years in The Wheat Situation as follows 109-47 Jan. Feb. I
page 11, prices received.. 1922-30, August 1945, pages 20-21, parity prices.
2/ Monthly prices by States weighted by production to Obtain a price for the
united States; average for year obtained by weighting State pIioe'averages for
the marketing year.-
3/ Beginning 1938 includes unredeemed loans at average loan Value.
/ Computation of 'parity price: Average price in base period (August 1909 to
July 1914) x monthly index nf prices paid by farmers, interest and taxes, Exam p
for Jan. 1949 = 88.4 x 2,48 9 2.1 : .






*1VS-109


Table 5,- ?.tioat:


15 -

Supply and distribution, Uz-it:d Sta:es, by quarters, 1945-48 i/


S __ Supply Distribution
S : : : : I : Domestic rlisal pearaLncO
a n : : : ~ :Total PxFOrts: :Proc-: : :
rs by Stocks' Crop : Im-: Total :disap- : 9d : :essed: : In- : Poed
Srers :ports supoly:pear- : ip- .Total: for :.oed : dus-: 7_/
rters.. 'Sance f. n *s f:ed4 : :Lrial.
i/ i 2/.
". : : : 2 .a I
' il rl, nn :il. +:il, mfl 1 7 'Tilr,-nilo :'.li!i- .' 1~7~;iir~^n7l


bu.
45-465
Spta 279;2
t.-Deo:1,020,0
.-,ar: 682.0
..-June: 3321
IUNE : 279.2
946-47.
l-Sept:: 100.1
t.-Dec: 949.3
an.-Mar: 642,3
r,-June : 308,6
LY-JJNE : 100.1
947-4 A
ly-Sept: 83.8
ot.-Dcc: 1,129.1
an.-Mar: 801.6
r.-June: 48041
1LY-JUNE: 83,8
1948-49Y:
lly-Septs '195.9
*.t,-Dec:1,148.3
an.-Mar: 857.0


bu.

1,108.2



1,108.2

1,13.0



1,153,0

1,367.2



1,6N7.2

1,288.4
--- ,.


bu. u.,

1.3 1,383.7
0.5 1,020.5
0.1 682.1
0.1 332.2
2.0 1,389.4

4/ 1,253.1
--- ,49.3
--- 642,5

/- 1,253.1

--- 1,451.0
--- 1,129.1
01.6
480.1
./ 1,'451-0

--- 1,484.3
--- 1,148.".
--- 857.0


bu.
1!-
36857
,388.5
557,0



7 3.







.27,5
21,35
521.9


284.1
1,255.1


, b.bu b lbua ii


94,8
107.2
105.7
87,4
755.1

79,7

Ii1.5

100,7

1410.7
116. 2
118..6
114.0
489.5


2';6.0 15,0
291.3 116.0


273.9
231.3
244,3
144.7
394.2

224.1
223',3
212.2
109.0
768.6

181,?
211.3
2n2,9
170.2
735.6


125.4
137.2
14,4
90.4
487.4

129.7
13' .5
140.?
5/87. 1
491.5


125.9
110,-1
110.1
-A '169


32.1
27.0
1.5
21.4
28.0

34.2
?8.8
1.6
21.9
86,.5

29,,0
38.9
1.6
21,,9
91.4


181.0 125.7 77.0
175.Z 130.6 52.0


16.4
3.0
1.6

21.0


100.0
64.1
106.8
32.9
303.8

60,2
60.0
70.4
0
190.6

19.5
36,1
87.9

191,6


--- 18.3
-- 12.7


/ 1942-44 in The "Thent Situation, M-rch-April 1918, paje 2.
/ Exports July 1, 94T to date revised to .'.ncludc sEmolina, ind macar6ni and
elated products, thereby reducing the quantity shown for domestic food.
/ Residual.
. Less than 50,000 buchelso
1 7.2 million bushels cstinatc.d as in process from 1947 crop wheat included in
re for July-Septemb.;r 1947.
Preliminary.


I







DEC, 19L.8-JAN.-FEB. 1949


16 -
Table 6. Wheat: Stockis, by quar. -. UIJttad SLat,., 19,?-4.E


*Januar) 1


:Interior : : C.C.C. *
; rtmnrnal: aill, : Merchant: not :
..,-, : nrrlnet .elevator,: mills otherwisee:
: L :and -are-: a,/ :accounted:
.:rnoe 2I' : : for 4i :!


bushels
6.6,3.3
88,581
1 .,351
182,226


22., '
167 ,i,',
132, '1


7t, ',L

1 .,- :, .





. ..,l .



1'2, 11


1h ,i '?
l .'4I8


1,0m0
bushels



---
---

---

8?,559

78,L63
7%,.8i5
i1U,081
li3tO1
1.2 ,566

iO7,727
221,708
:2?, 12S

Ico,.432

108,777b
119,i)0.
111,130
202,082


1,or ')
nusrhels
--





115,65b.
122,223
115,035
106,392

i09,b3)&
102,832
115,567
107,706
114,231

1'it, 303
135,6.)1
131 'i,3
11.2,130
11 ,387

95,276
o6,779
116,8?7
103,248


2 ',r,':30

: 207,3'))
201, 4'
2 ".,066
21b,841

21.48,828
: 322,,n.2
: 27b,06 4
: 185,302
46b, #.t


1: 27', .,


r ". '7".


: 37 ,1. 7 ?





S 7 L

i .. ..
'I


1,0%)>
bushels
--
---


---
45 000)
L 1,i.00
b1,8.7

1,778
L,L.04
3,1 00
3,701


Total


1,000
busnels
---
---
---


---
---


4.31,8834

0.2?, J. U
370,9 1
533,2.39
6b.,805
606,013

723,77P.


817, i '
828,347

681,992
6L.2, -277
8)31,612
8!7,0)6


Funr


bushels
101,C2&.
87,292
130,58L
133,2'X0

116,553
172,9-Y
181,652
113,790
:i8'9814

48,878
71,075
12 ,5940
182,8801





219,13?
321, i
-12, '3M
23),85.b



2',t,,'St.


: Interior:
terminal : mill, : Merchant
market :elevator,: mills
/ : and ware-: 3/
:house ", :


1,1:00
bushels
.9,910
68,791
12.,756
153,122

213,583
207,215
135,552
17,132
51,882


3L.,7'41

82,t 87


I.1,8971
237,777
212,111
113.70)



32,78
70,174


bush,,Is
b--h-i


bt., 1i.

L8,143
",il 308
73,180
1,807"
83,750

1'.,24.?

176, 5 1
66,5 1
10o, 3t.

36,477

'?,38:


S1, .y)
cushels

---


: C..C. :.
: not :
:otherwise:
:accounted:
: for L/ :


i,000
bushels

---


S 1,000
bushels

---


---2 -- -- t
11,420
10r,267 -- --
'1,720 -- --.
74,852 --- 291,8L7

7 2,04b --- 269,036
Sb5,983 --- 211,107
7',81 --- 331,053
82,481 -- 439,769
'i4,'85 --- 433,569

7t,,75 --- 5"5,987
12z2,.61 --- 809,868
123,4 L.. 62,712 896,068
%r,,388 38,515 5U.,275
7?,788" 15,770 558,44. ,

55,,80- 1S ,'h1 332,135
71, *", 2,903 308,549
73,7 L. 3,8.5 L80,101


OJ:tcter 1


21,776
19,277
Li, 5.L.6
60,166

30,252
L1,5823
6W.,2134
LPI, 128
3'0,163

21,5,5.4
11,77b
31,2144
36,eL2
,3 142


40,038
34, 120
5.1,279
59,170

U ,202
71,71
107,0?52
83,11 .
9, 521.

50, 50O
&0,399
.0,71Q
bl,'0%5
80,050


73,780 81l,98 --
1.2,366 06,837 4.,409)
103,80L 104,378 58,990
30,332 67,30C 32,381
L2,129 58,063 23,70'3

8,376 12,838 7,351
10, llo ?4.,50. ,30
30,57N 3.,,24.') 2,530


109,1.56
112,756
226,821
291,115

312,505
375,257
377,7O
272, E -
1.5,889-

1. 0, 433
./ E9,16 b
15., 107
250,0,15
209,721

38.,733
630,) 775
toie,807
3l6,5
279,180 )

100,088
23,810


't.t,153

3 38,5'58
38, 574.

1. 9,292
4L0,7i9
2e6,7'2e
;3<,P87
272,.oU.

217,5to
323,297
393,930
;27,61'
?,118


632,573
523, 394
421 ,13
517,823

i51,069
tili,350
'il.o,11


78,811
114,1.bQ
198,211
220,6,0

2'.6, 327
111,858
15b,6'2
120,075"
7'9,7.1

82,89?
14.l,.9t.
139,273
lbl,87
186,5:3

28L,920
269,290
1Q9,5q2
1QQ9,75
170,305

IC', 5S *
175., (i
2 l1.;l1


---
---
---
11-.,77
11' ,374

115,8788
152,978
175., 3
160,209
Q.2,176

238,526
263,466
210,751
198,l*13
181,410


125.81b
127,772"
13&,750
126,597
.237905.

114,35s.
138,160o
13':,19)8
137,332
13.3,319

15, -'Q02
I11,9V27
L26t,255
137,818
128,P61


---
55,096
5.,500
22,365
22,189


---

55,331
578,628

535,928
755,931
839,291.
787,3".
877,096

1,162,270
1,372,352
1,11L,h92
1,079,19q
1,01,988-


177,351 ll.,4&l 2,18L 94.9,262
2,"3,338 135,1'6 3,990 1,129,099'
2'9,817 120,233 3,960 1,11.8,272'


11 From re..c.rt:, if lrl- 'rain Branch, Production and Marketing Adminlitration.
/ Data riot ravlable by quarters for October 1, prior to 1934., or for January 1 and Apri 1 1, prior to 1935.
2/' Estlisaed Lotal based upon Bureau or Census report of Item "In mills and il11 elevators attached Lo mills," for 1927 through
April J.'1. Datra not available by quarters for October prior to 1931, or for January and April prior to 1932.
4' fpjria.j.n; luly 1, i'-.i, owned by Commodity Credit Corporation in .ransit rnd I.n steel and wooden bin:. Additional Government
stocks are included in reports for other positions.
5/ Beginnlnr with l'I37 only old crop wheat shown in all positions. For the years 1927-36 Inclusive, some new wheat Is included
in terminal ana merchant. mill stocks. The figure for July 1, 1937, including the new wheat, is 102,842.000 bushels.


April 1


July 1


1 '? ,1
1928 : 1 ,'4

1)30 : 0t',4.:

1'13 : 37, i





1936 : 1.1,i7
1937 ?l,Q?:'
1938 : '. P.7
l',3) : Q 88,0.6
191.0 7.,57'

1.1 : 80, i75
1&.2 : 16' 72
1' :4 Ip...c t.
19LL : i,'i,.',z2
1945 : 87 ,0'l

19L6 : Li ,'.'.
191.7 L: .,,,7?
1948 '9 .,ll
19i.9 :


S1 ,1.'52
I-,537

h0",' 37

203, '67

12 3,7i'



.5,?20:
*,,322

.- 103
8L.4.187


22a.,ae7



,7,2185
,17
S12
t3., 18'


* *







17 -



Table 7.. E2pply and dtitrliotlan, UlBted jtalse, anorda, AustrallB and Argeantia, averages, 1910-11, 191.-19, 19?0-29, sad 1?Wu39. anqua., I1920-*.


UNTIT SITATIB


lear : Acnm.ge Tila per: p,r. a'"-. e. *i'T'rte Dt sienl
SSeeded areto d action .
: Mi Ll-rM Million i LlJoan ll:z. K iL11 sn MI l'r.
Sacred =a-e B2-b.le b2s1,15 rushala bLuelB IiAtelep

A 1 i1t. 14' 5C 11. 724.1. 117.0 1' .t '.. A


1920 u 9.1 16.0
192. 9.7 13.3
1921 9.8 11.2
193 95 13.2
192 10.8 15.2
195 10.a 11.2
1996 11.7 13.7
1977 I 12.3 9.6
1928 1.8 10.8
1020 19.0 B.


A,. 1920-29

1930
1931
1932
1933
193k
P. 1935
1936
1937
1938
1919
AI 1910.-


115.9 116.0 2/ 29.9
129.1 o.0) 81.5 1.6
109.5 f5.0) 62.1 13.9
12. 0 8.5 81.2 12.61
161.6 (9.91 U19.3 0.6
116.5 b.6 71.6 37.8
160.8 6.9 1Ca.7 :0.9
.Ld.3 12.1 80.7 1.0o
15.9 7 6.0 1,.,. "?. 7


: 11 12.0 i13.. 7.7 4 1 .

16.2 1U1.7 kl: L i. i.6.? .
1.h.7 13.0 l '".r; 'I 1:':.. c 1
15.0 13.5 13.0 ic.& 31. .7
14.9 11.'* 177.3 1B.3, 1..: ol.-
12.5 10.7 13. 1.0o.1 101.. 52.3
12.0 12.0 IJ..2 16.7 07.5 .
12.3 12.3 ll.. 8.61 9..1 I.F'
: 13.7 137 187. 8.9 130.? ,.
: 14.3 10.' 13 .1 13. 90 9 ;.
I 1..1 210.5 21. _9..j ___ .J


1910 : 12.6
1941 : 12.0
1962 9.
191.3 : 7.9
196LL : 8.=
19. : .1*
1966 132
197 13.9
1948 13.0


82.? 77 fl 78.1 ).t,
itt.? '4.0 41.. ,9.6
1 ..: I.: 3p7.3 t6.9
109.7 1:1..0 i3.2 l.t "
"2.9 77. 139. I>).3
112.1. 11.7 57.1 70.6
U17.3 27.. &6.1 67.9
21,. i3.. (130.01 80.0
200.OJ


T-L cro : Ita, Pro- Carry- let Bnrrlp. 1oisestil
L t rl.' "' .r ,e ste 4-retr a cre d t- ion ve r I C I uL d i a ep -
A. 1 : KAut-1 flIIr .Perane
MIul. MKLIon 11m l:OL KM1ll1on KMillon
acre luehla lt..bsin battle b'abel bushbela

A. .-0.11. L 1A 7 14,b. I' 4P 07.1


10,-1 0 L 1


Fr-M prevToun arope.
Inaluol s liMments to 0. B. territories.
net uIports.
bsan-lwar awrage, with years of et imports wetted.
No alloimaMe for aangea lan stocks.
took as of Septamber 1.
When ambiand, figures for rgentina are uuelly need with those of the previous year for orthner BemaIphere coustrles. lor eurpl, the January 19919 Lrgentina
Maltloon IsB cMbiled with the 1918 pro'ctl'n of Uthe United States and Canada.
Statitlul daflecit results frc ass or new-orop eatL prior to January 1.


A'. 1915-19: "' 1. I.__3 '1 ._I__ r lo ,

1920 6.0: L8.0 l.., 6 -i.. -. _c o.6 ".7.
1921 : t7.7 &L*.c 1S.7 l.' C12 .' eC. 1.
1 9 2 2 6 7 2 ,-. 1. 1 6L ... '9 '. '. ? .. 1 .::" "
1923 (4.b 5o..9 13.3 7"" 1. I L'.L .1
191 : .0..; 2,5. 1E.O .l1 137 n ?.: ', 1 .
192 i td.7 52.4 1.8 a '30o67 I -
1926 60.7 ,b.6 11.7 832.2? 7.u .3 '-I
1927 : 65.7 ".9 c .? 7 1 1 u Ivi Q I
1928 71.2 ,Q 2 15 16.*' U.- L. ,
1929 : 17.2 [. 1.. .;.. 7 ? 7 i: 11 '
At. 1920-.29, ;.5.O ..9 1.. A:.. 1 .... ?

1930 : 67.6 o2.6 1L 2 Btc..= ?1.1 L1 1 7. .0
1931 6b.'. :7.7 16 .5 L .1 11 1:2?.9 :Y. .
1932 : 60.3 57.9 L3.il ?0.3 375.3 i1.9 721.
1933 : 69.0 g9.. 11.2 5;,52. 3T7.6 .1. '1 h'
193k : b..0 3 ]3 12.1 2tc..1 Wf.9 Ij' ... cf:..1
1935 69.i 51.3 12.2 -"8. 1 '.- 0' -OO. c'. I
1936 : 71 0 '9.1 12A.6 629.9 1.C 1 -L 7.,
1937 8. ".6 '* .2 13.t. 8 ..9 i 'J. L ,1 ,
1938 : 7'.. 1 .2 13.2i 91.i9 15..L IOc L l'r r
1939 : 62.a 2.7 11.1 "i _ir. ~
A..1930.39 7: u. 5.7 1'.' 71L-.: I. 77., 'j: "

19.0 : 1.6 7.i 1,... 611..c ?-?.7 ,.l .
191 : 62.7 5.3 16.A ?i.2.( 316.7 i1. '71
191.2 : 3.0 9.6 19.: Wv.-b 6p0.6 x7.3 ,.L.
19k3 1 36.0 51.1. 16.1' 813.6 618.9 I 73. 1,219.
194 :4 6,.? S 7 17.7 1,060.1 31c.6 1:;.; 991t.
19k5 69.1 65.1 17.0 1,108.2 279.2 3 .:' 6y-..
19J6 I 71. 67.1 17. 1,5l.lo. 100.1 321.1 77L..2
1917 78.2 74.4 16.4 1,367.2 83.6 479.1, 77,.7
19 : 77.7 71.9 17.9 1,288 195.7



AUTRALIA

ear : Pro Crr- :et e'rp'orta: fDmetio
begineng s : u : r. :d Pr. over 1. Including Almp-
a 1 hartestedea. 1 flour d 1ear:
Million kils Milan a MillIon M'Llion
i are Biuh s fmale lm o lunatel busmela

Av. 1 ..3.h, 12. "9- 77.4 "- 3.. .,' 3J.6

AV. 1215-191 9.6 u.s 111.6 66.3 W5 '7.3


I-: II. 1. 5> :: ? Ic /.i 96.1
Li 1 23. i. Q :' 16.1 16 107.5
1.. ." .8 t./ 1 2/ 130.7
1 1.- ;.; 1. 12. )Lr. 1 92.2
j4 :. 11.3 -'1 1 1 1i.1 6s71.
: 1 .. : .. 61.9
:. ? .:7.i L. 99.1
1 21 7 111.6
', :1. I 2 1.. L r. 121...
__ 13 1 1 1 1.. 0.2
I'.1 -' 8 A.'2. 7. iB Qi 103.2

iit e..9 16.W o.c 7`0.1. 150.3
l11 ?6 3 12 .-1. t 16 c :.': 8' 117.2
19';- '1.I 1'. '4i).1 13 .9 :t 1 07.2
l3 ." ?6. 10.8 l.0 217.7 191..1 102.3


.' 7.-L..: 3.l 1' O: .9
1l. : ..". 11.6 1.' l 6 ; .:0 t. 2 9 196 .9





1t .I 1M. ,.? 230. 210.1 13.




1.1.-8 24.1 1. 39 1 76. 0
1i1.1 ".l.3 .1 l"1 160.1 221.9 11.9.2
10.* A '. 23.6 : ..- h i?.-.8 202.7 185.2
191.3 U.8 16.3 l1. 59*'..6 318.0 171.6

1a : 7 .: 13.6 316. a 2.1 335.9 167.1al
A..-19 .- 21.1 17 2 1. 13.7 7.6 239.6 16.1

















1 91 2 2 1 .,1 13 5 1 9 1 0 29 h 1 h A .3
193 : 16.1 : 1.2 19.8 10.7 : 33.8 65.1
191.7 7.0 13.9 336.8 67.1 199.95 68.7
19. 0 12.1 30 6. 393.3 76.0





Iea Aareage. TIell htso- ~Crry- 'et exports' Dns-tie







beisg6l h stsd per en uoton:~" 1.2 I 8nold.g : lp.
:Millon MiLlion Millaon MillIon ilion


A.1910-li 1.1 10.2 15I.7 1n..7 293. / 1.

A..19-19, 13.1 11.7 1 .77.0 .. 97. / 79.7
1921 I 13.2 11.8 156.1 5.9 67.8 66.6
1922 17.1 13.7 191.0 29.1. l5.l 6h.3
1923 16.1 12.2 195.8 10.7 160.8 6l.1


1926 : 17.6 10.8 191.1 13.6 82.0 87.1
19.7 : 19.0 12.1 930.1 35.3 163.9 83.3
1926 120.2 31.0 2241 16.2 203.1 89.7
1929 : 12.6 11.6 399.1 12.7 22 .9 66.2
1930 15.7 10.? 11i. 6 25.7 86.0 I86.2
A*.191-30b 0 7.? 12.8 23).7 f.2 1. 7.1. 7.3

ll31 19.7 1.9 232.3 ,1:. 1736.I 93.1.
1932 : I0.' 13.7 219.7 16 3 A .'. 95.6
19'3 1 17.6 ,13. i. 0.9 11.0 119. 96.0
1931 : 18.0 153.9 36.1 i6. 181.7 95.5.
193 : 17.2 Ut." 2.0.7 l15.0 1'6.3 92.1
1996 : 11.7 12.1 161.5 17.7 63.2 99.2
1937 : 17.6 10.2 219.9 8, -3.2 197. 99.3
1936 : 17.2 12.0 207.6 .0. 75.5 99.2
1939 20.1 16.6 319.1 32.7 179.1 101.0
190 .0 12. 0 10.4l 1h). 131 1. .0 11 .1
.193.47 1.9 1Li.9 206.j 2.0 lit.- 9l24 .
191.1 16.6 16.0 299.; ;.7 >7' 0 100.6
1942 16.7 16.A3 238.5 i.6 83.0 U7.1 9
191.3 : 12.0 19.5 230.2 l. 6 76.1 120.61
19y1 1.6 12.0o 219.9 194.3 96.7 166. "
1925 : 10,8 13.9 1ol.1 160.0 o-3. ll,66
191, : 10.0 11.4 113.;. 63.0 -,3.0 162.5
1927 : 13.9 11.9 206.3 26.0 89.7 121.6
1928 11.7 21.1 230.0 25.0 179.0J 3
1929 7/' 12.0 15.0 16 .0


Aw 1 1 -1 Ir i li 5 ? L '








Table 8.- Wheat and flour exports from principal exporting countries, 1920-47


Tear begin- :Total WorlI
Tear begin- July United States : Canada : Australia : Argentina : countries total
ning July countries 1


1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,G ,. ",.>
bushels Percent bushels Percent bushels Percent bushels Percent bushels bush,.'

1920 : 12,621. 41.1 167,217 22.0 87,340 11. j'2193,099 21.- "70,281 A:,. et
1i21 : 20S,S 0 39.3 185,768 27.4 116,466 1".2 108,966 lr..l o76,"' .,
1022 : ,,,77q 30.. 274,886 40.? 49,625 7.4 145,428 23.c, ,1 ,l '2.,
Q23 : 146,006 19.6 343,781 4b.3 83,384 11.2 170,009 2:.Q Fi,1 ',,,
1Q2& : 25, 968 36.5 iq4,849 27.9 124,112 17.7 125,289 17.9 6'0,2i8 8., ,o:
19q2 : 9,617 16.0 320,649 54.1 77,234 13.1 99,803 16.8 '02,,'' 6P.,&09
1926 : 206,011 27.6 304,948 40.9 96,548 13.0 138,240 18.S 7?L,"&" p86,t.
1927 : 101,227 25.9 305,658 41.4 72,962 9.9 168,214 22.8 738,Ob1 7,', .11
1928 : 41,220 15.7 &22,732 07.0 107,785 12.0 227,059 25.3 898,796 OS,,t?
1q29 : 40,354 25.6 184,213 33.6 61,776 11.3 161,265 2Q.5 547,608 611,01i
Average 1920-29: 195,770 27.7 270,470 38.2 87,723 12.& 153,737 21.7 707,700 774,685

1930 : 112,428 17.5 267,365 41.5 IA3,296 22.3 120,638 18.7 643,727 828,182
1931 : 122,897 19.7 199,563 32.1 155.451 25.0 1 4,290 23.2 622,201 796,6q0
1932 : 31,866 5.6 267,342 47.1 148,552 26.1 120,272 21.2 568,032 620,576
1933 : 25,598 5.6 198,555 43.6 86,509 19.0 44A,854 31.8 455,516 542,066
1934 : 10,531 2.2 169,630 35.7 108,009 22.7 187,000 39.4 475,170 522,650
1935 : 4,207 1.0 237,447 56.0 105,479 21.9 76,577 18.1 L23,710 500,127
1936 s 9,267 1.9 213,028 4h.1 97,712 20.2 162,977 33.8 h82,984 608,555
1937 : 100,060 25.8 94,546 24.4 123,454 31.8 69,670 18.0 387,730 519,208
1938 : 106,645 22.3 159,885 33.4 96,423 20.1 116,116 24.2 479,069 579,095
1939 : &&,868 8.8 210,212 41.1 79,015 15.4 177,246 34.7 511,301 598,889
Average 1930-39: 56,837 11.3 201,757 40.0 11.4,390 22.6 131,964 26.1 504,948 611,603

190 : 33,622 7.9 209,555 49.2 82,402 19.4 99,907 23.5 425,486 V/463,501
1941 27,714 7.2 234,881 60.5 41,308 10.6 84,390 21.7 388,293 1/396,684
1942 : 28,278 8.5 194,781 58.5 38,235 11.5 71,584 21.5 332,878 3/338,698
1943 : 62,813 11.2 341,764 60.9 61,436 10.9 95,425 17.0 561,438 /571,274
1944 : 147,974 23.6 319,895 51.0 57,992 9.3 100,717 16.1 626,578 3/632,688
1945 : 389,937 45.3 360,423 42.0 36,310 4.2 72,691 8.5 859,361 865,583
1946 : 394,111 53.6 232,338 31.6 46,692 6.4 61,939 8.4 735,080 757,124
1947 : 479,619 54.0 208,749 23.5 96,752 10.9 102,737 11.6 887,857 922,198


- .... .d i.......wa ..... w: 4 '.. .. r;:.5.....


1/ Soviet Union net exports of wheat including flour averaged 8.9 million bushels in 1920-29 and 33.8 million in 1930-39.
Calendar year.
F@our countries plus Danube Basin, calendar year and excluding Yugoslavia for which data are not available. A





r WS-109


19 -

Table 9.- Rye: Stocks by quarters, United States, 1934-48


: Januo

Year: Farm :Terminal:m:
;: : market :

: 1/ : 2/ :
:1,000 bu. 1000 l ,
1934: 1 o-o-0 13,735)
1935: 6,600 12,572
1936: 24,5.00 8,893
1937: 12,000 4,859
1938: 18,300 4,724
1939: 26,000 8,369
1940: 21,000 Ic.0, ,40
1941: 24, -00 6,640
1942; 22,400 17,474
1943: 30,500 19,889
1944: 13,500 21,01 .
1945: 9,250 12,207
194b: 6,553 4,544
1947: 4,000 2,4176
1948: 7,200' 4,072
194t,: 8,700 4,740
: July'
1934: 3,400 11,452
1935: 2,250 8,560
1936: 13,350 6,379
1937: 3,800 1,406
1938: 7,500 1,000
1939: 14,520 7,384
1940: 10,100 9,506
1941: 13,1003 5,639
1942: 12,100 17,034
1943: 15,300 23,309
1944: 5,000 20,150
1945: 3,030 6,;')99
194b:: 1,050 322
1947: 600 1,024
1948: 1,700 531


ry 1i
Interior :
1ll, elev-:


ator, and.
warehouse e
3/
-i-----










7,5'7
4,133
2,221
2,02d
,162-
3, 764
1


2,5 3-
go'"






722
1--16
1,116


Totrl :


April 1
: : Intemior :
Farm :Terminal:mill, elev-: Totel
: market : ator, and :
: ; warehouse :


____ __/ / : _
1 00, 1u .100 bu 1000 tu. 1,000 tu. 1.0:: bu.
24,135 --- ,621 --- ---
10,172 --- ?, 52
33,393 --- 7,62u ..
1,8.9 : 3,022 --- ---
23,024 : --- ,13
34,369 : --- 7,6'.
31,540 : 14,50 10,13, -- 24,638
31,140 : :., OO 5,26 --- 24,269
39,874 : 16,4- 17,.51 --- 33,951
:.,:,, 2.)h l, 20,4),3 ,03o 50,294
42,1i, : ,325 21,1468 ,io 3),619

13,31 : 2,995 3,113 1,3,9 7,481
50':4 ,: I,"o 2,149 1,244 c,083
14,434 4,434 1,521 ,211 8,166
.1--1 -CJ--


14,8>2
10,.10
19,729
5,206
8,500

19,6- 6
18,739
2e-,134
47,114
30,935
-I-,i'.'--
12,16
2,277
2,346
3,347


m---



31,5000
35,000)
*i)'-, O* -
42,00'"
21,500
13,95.9
12,961
9,29:
13,h7>
14,189


October 1
11,776
8,407
6,515
5,673
7,761
9,657
8,52:'
17,243
18,47T(
22,907' 8,
14i,28 4,
4,732 3,
1,126 2,
3,824 4,
4,46, 5,


6---


m--




56'
881
301
213
328
280


---
---
I---
m---

40,657
40,020
52,243
60,477
52,975
33,563
20,994
1~, 68
21,627
2?,938


I/ Data not available for October prior to 1939, nor for A/pr2l prior to 1940.
2 From reports of the Ornin Branch, Production and Market'n Administration.
Quarterly data not available prior to April 1943.


I, J







Table 1).- Rye: Average price per bushel received oy farmers, parity price
price of No. 2 at Minneapo lis, by mcnths, 1939-08 1j


Tear
beginning
July


:S3et aber,'

Cents

44.0
38.3
57.3
55.2
94.5
102.0
131.0
191.0
248.0
139.0


1


January February
15 15


Centa Cents
rice to farmIer 2/


October
15
Centa

45.1
40,5
51.3
52.9
101.0
108.0
138,0
199,0
24.9.0
143.0


March
15
-anLs

55.6
43.1
64.3
68.9
111.0
109.0
175.0
281.0
21..0


, and


April
15
Cent.a

57.1
46.5
60.7
69.5
112.0
111.0
195.0
247.0
217.0


Kay
15
Cents

52.4
0.8.1
59.4
71.9
111.0
112.0
192.0
245.0
212.0


June
15
Cents

40.3
4.7.1
52.4
79.7
105.0
121.0
1&5.0
24.0.0
191.0


1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948

1939
1940
1941
1942
1963
1944
1965
1946
1947
1948

1939
1940
1941
194,2
1943
194&
1965
190.6
1947
1968


52.1
47.8
60.0
59.1
108.5
114.8
164.3
239.2
285.3
16,.5


51.0
50.2
6.1l
59.3
111.0
113.1
183.9
267.6
282. L
173.1


66.9
50.0
67.8
70.3
120.2
114.3
175.2
279.3
276.9
167.6


70.3 66.5
52.6 50.2
80.3 78.1
74.7 79.2
127.0 122.5
122.8 123.5
198.& 212.9
285.7 310.8
276'.3 241.0


66.5
52.4
75.5
82.9
123.5
127.2
235.9
353.9
25,b.2


69.5
56.5
71.8
80.9
127.1
133.9
269.8
310.8
253.0


58.8
58.1
69.3
87.2
119.4
139.2
284.2
319.2
241.2


44.9
56.6
60.3
94.1
112.1
155.3

302.9
221&.7


I-.
'.0



'-I

I-.
"0
"0


55.9
50.8
65.1
73.4
108.1
122.2
171.t
255.2
26&.7


11 Data in previo-us -ea', Itnalions as follows: Averag jca t.o farmers 130-.: A sat 19.8, .ge 18; 1938-29, Septeaber-OcLober 19.5,
;age i4. Parity orice to farers 1922-38, September-October 1 page i. P f c. : n i Hineapolie 133-38, Karch-April 1.45, page .*
1915-32, June 1937, pare l-.
2." Monthly and annual prices by States weirhte? bv production to obtain United tat averages. includes an allowance for unredeemed loans at
average loan values.
S/ Monthly average of daily prices weighted by carlot sales. Compiled from Hinneapolis Daily Market Record.

ht~ ^ ^e ^ *.. ......: .ii,**'^ .E""-'" *:7, .':,,f:. ,


July
1
Cent_ s

3/1.3
38.3
46.4
51.3
90.9
107.0
122.0
176.0
236.0
172.0


Auguast
15
Cents

34.2
36.8
1.9.4
4.9.2
88.6
108.0
124.0
162.0
211.0
146.0


MNovembe.r
15
Cent..

U.6
42.8
54.2
50.1.
102.0
108.0
150.0
207.0
269.0
151.0


* December
15
Cents
Average
52.3
41.3
57.8
56.3
107.0
106.0
113.0
218.0
245.0
147.0


Parity price to farmers
88.6 87.8 90.0 90.0 90.0 90.0 90.0 90.0 90.0 90.0 90.0 90.0
90.0 90.0 90.0 90.0 90.0 90.0 90.0 90.0 90.7 90.7 91.4 92.9
94.3 96.5 97.9 100 101 102 103 104 107 107 108 108
108 108 109 109 110 112 112 113 114 115 116 117
117 117 117 108 119 120 120 121 121 121 121 122
122 122 122 122 122 122 123 123 121 124 124 124
12. 124 125 125 125 126 127 128 129 130 132 135
142 145 143 148 152 153 155 159 163 165 164 166
166 168 171 172 174 176 181 179 178 179 180 181
181 181 180 179 178 179 179
Price of No. 2 at Minneapolis 3/


43.1
43.9
54.9
60.6
101.2
113.0
152.8
209.0
25L.1
178.3


41.7
41.2
61.7
58.8
95.4
112.1
1. .2
195.2
2&6.6
159.8


52.7
43.6
67.8
64.6
101.4
103.1
151.3
223.5
281.7
150.3


56.7 55.7
0-3 6 41.2
65.2 66.0
61.3 64.1
111.0 111.0
109.0 108.0
150.0 164.0
218.0 233.0
267.0 194.0
14".0


SCrop
: yea.
:averaZg
Centa,

43.9
&2.0
5 .2
60.3
98.2
109.0
135.0
192.0
226.0


a


J


-----I


I


I-- ............. !






- 21 -


Table 11 .- Ryes supply and distribution, United States,
1934-48

Tear te- Supply a Diptribution I E Total
s StOoks *ro: u- Total ood isFeed Y/ Alohol T I ats -

1 llon M111iin llion million Million million Mlilln a1nIon Millan L111af tilln1
bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels buhel el bushel s hels bushels bahela bushels bushels


1934 a 14.9
19385 10.8
1936 19.7
1937 5,2
1968 a 8.5
W989 21.9
1940 19.6
1941 18.7
1942 a 29.1
1943 47.1
1944 31.0
1945 12.2
1946 2.3
1947 2.3
1948 G/ 3.3


16.3
56.9
24.2
48.9
56.0
38.6
39.7
43.9
52.9
28.7
22.5
24.0
18.9
26.0
26.4


11.2 42.4
2.3 70.0
3.9 47.8
6/ 54.1
64.5
60*5
1.4 60.7
8.8 71.4
1.5 83.5
8.3 84.1
4.1 57.6
2.0 38.2
1.6 22.8
Y/ 28,3
29.7


M 1934-42, fan and oommrolal stooks only. Beginning in 1945, the figures also noluda interior mill
and elevator stocks.
SEtimates based on trade Information related to the Census of 1939.
Residual Item.
Include flour.
Less than 50,000 bushels.
Preliminary.


Table 12.- Uheat and Rye: Percentage of total sales by farmers,
from each orop, by months, United States, 1938-47


Beasonts eroentage of Mtoal sales during a Total
begin-. s a a a a : a a a a sales
ang : June a July s Aug. i Sept.: Oct. s Nov. r Dee. i Jane : Feb. a Mar. : Apr. s May :June a by
June s a a a : a : a a : : a : farmers
a Per- Per- Per- Per- Per- Per-Per- 'Per- Pr- Per- Per- Per- Per- 1,000
es ont cent cent cent cent cent cent cent cent cent cent cent oent bushels
|


a Wheat
5.8 24.9 17.2 11.6 7.8 4.7 4.7 3.6 3.2 3.7 3.9 5.2 3.7 717,520
a 7.6 25.0 13.4 9.0 5.7 4.1 5.2 3.5 6.6 7.9 10.5 2.4 1.1 578,204
a 5.6 22.0 13.0 8.9 6.1 4.1 3.8 3.8 3.3 6.2 8.8 8.6 5.8 643,279
s 5.0 21.9 14.4 11.4 7.4 5.2 6.1 6.2 6.1 5.1 4.0 4.1 3.1 780,075
3.3 14.5 9.0 9.0 7.4 5.2 6.6 7.5 8.1 11.2 9.2 4.9 4.1 815,767
s 5.9 16.9 10.8 8.5 6.A 7.2 8.3 10.1 7.9 5.9 5.5 4.7 3.5 686,751
s 7.0 22.4 12.5 9.1 7.9 4.9 4.8 6.4 4.9 5.6 4.9 6.0 3.6 886,577
1 6.1 22.7 18.4 10.2 8.6 4.8 3.6 8.1 3.2 2.0 1.7 9.3 1.3 937,781
s 10.1 18.8 13.5 10.2 6.9 5.8 5.1 10.4 6.6 5.1 2.8 3.2 1.5 995,004
a 6.7 235.7 16.2 10.5 7.7 4.53 3.4 6.5 3.5 3.5 5.1 5.9 35.0 1,192,730


SRye


1938 a 0.1 13,3 32.5 15.1 9.3
1939 0.6 15.2 20.5 13.7 10.5
1940 r 0.7 10,9 21.4 12.2 7.8
1941 s 0.5 16.1 23.2 17.2 9.8
1942 a 0.7 9.4 15.7 12.2 10.7
1943 : 0.9 23.5 19.9 12.4 9.1
19S44 1,3 20.8 24.0 12.8 8.8
1946 s 1.4 13.0 31.5 16.0 11.7
1946 s 0.9 16.3 28.3 16.6 10.4
1947 y. 0.9 14.4 33.0 14.6 9.0


4.1 3.4
8.4 5.3
3.9 3.4
4,.2 6.9
5.0 3.9
5.9 6.3
4.2 4.5
3.7 4.0
4.6 5.5
3.3 3.6


2.2 3.3
4.8 5.5
3.0 4.8
4.4 3.7
5.7 7.2
4.5 3.7
3.7 3.5
2.9 3.1
4.1 3.4
2.9 4.0


4.0 4.9 29,738
2.5 1.4 18,600
8.7 11.6 19,926
3.1 2.3 23,545
7.4 10.0 28,794
2.4 2.4 12,338
4.6 3,8 11,693
2.3 0.7 15,652
1.3 0.6 13,188
3.4 2.3 19,595


AL Preliuiaary.


4.8
21.9
13.8
18.0
19.8
20.2
19.9
19.4
27.2
33.5
18.8
9.2
5.3
5.0


8.6
8.7
10.0
9.1
9.7
7.4
8.1
8.3
6.8
5.8
5.4
4.5
4.9
8.0


10.2
12.8
11.6
6.0
5.5
5.6
6.7
6.8
2.1
4.6
10.3
8.3
4.2
6.7


31.6
60.3
42,4
39.0
41.8
40.2
41.8
42.3
44.4
52,5
42.5
28.7
19.9
22.3


0,2
6.6
0.8
0.7
0.2

0.5
0.6
3.1
7.2
0.6
2.7


31.6
50.3
42.6
45.6
42.6
40,9
42.0
42.3
44.9
53.1
45.4
35.9
20.5
25.0


1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947




U. S.' Deatmn of AgricultureB:.-..


U. S. Department of Agriculture
Washington 25, D. C.

OFFICIAL BUSINESS

BAE-WS-109-2-49- 3100
Permit No. 1001


Penalty for private use to avoid
payment of postage $300
Ur l IE ll T I OF FLORIDA

3 1262 08862 6402


UNIVErSr op PoLz0J
L BRAJY

9-13-48


- 22 -


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OiCE[ OrF FOR[EGM AbILuLTURAL CRELal*OS


Figure 5.- Nearly 44 percent of the total arable land of the area shown above is
in European Russia and less than 0.5 percent in Norway. Cereals are grown on more than
40 percent of the total, and wheat is the most widely grown crop. Wheat, however, Is
surpassed by oats In some northwestern countries, by rye in Poland, Germany, and the
Baltic States where it is grown in the poorer soil areas, and by barley in Morocco,
North Africa.


I I.




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