Wheat situation

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Title:
Wheat situation
Uniform Title:
Wheat situation (Washington, D.C.)
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
Publisher:
The Service
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Frequency:
quarterly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wheat trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Wheat trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
statistics   ( marcgt )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
WS-1 (Nov. 1936) - WS-254 (Nov. 1980)
Issuing Body:
Issued, 1936- by the Bureau of Agricultural Economics; <Oct.-Dec. 1953>-Feb. 1961 by the Agricultural Marketing Service; Apr. 1961-Nov. 1977 by the Economic Research Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; Feb. 1978- by the Economics, Statistics and Coopertives Servie, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; <Nov. 1980-> by the Economics and Statistics Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.
General Note:
Cover title.
Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000349017
oclc - 04015593
notis - ABY6688
lccn - 78643652 //r812
issn - 0364-2305
Classification:
lcc - HD9049.W3 U66a
ddc - 338.1/7/3110973
System ID:
AA00012162:00005

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Full Text

A 3 (o


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


.IAN FEB. 1950


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Canada, with average exports of 1S2 million
bushels during 1935-36 to 1939-40, as thie
leading exporter of wheat including Hlour. The
United States, with an average of only 53 million
bushels, was one of the smaller exporters. Ar-


gentina and Au-tralia each exported more than
100mrillion bushels. Western Europeancountries
v.ere the leading importers, taking about 3 5
million iushiels annual .


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223 million bushels annually and ranked next
to the United States. Exports from Australia
averaged about the same as prewar, but those
from Argentina were reduced to about half of the
prewar average.


During 1946-47 to 1948-49 the United States
exported an average of 463 million bushels of
wheat and Our -nine times as much as prewar-
and became the leading exporter. Canada in-
creased its exports from 182 million prewar to


THE


WS- I15


FOR RELEASE
FEB. 16, A. M.


SITUATION


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U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


The principal grains occupy one-half of the cropland of
the world and are among the most important crops grown. The
breadgrains wheat and rye occupy about 43 percent of the
acreage of principal grains; the coarse grains corn, oats,


S'OU AAI AD- O[







WORLD ..
PRINCIPAL GRAIN CROPS .... ..... /




20' 40' 60 0 I0" 120 140' 160' 180
NEG III OFFICE OF FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL RELATIONS


and barley nearly 39 percent, and rice about 18 percent
Rice occupies only about one-sixth of the world's principal-

grains areas, but is the leading food of about half the people
of the world.
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S... : .-, ...- ...- .. .
S- T..A T *S I T U A. I O .N : -.. ..
. ... .. .." Including Rye and Ric .* :

Approved by the Outlook and Situation Board, -February'.8, 1950
.. .. .. SUMMARY .

Wheat andtheat product exports to date are:running behind recent
Bpear, amounting to the equivalent of only 169 million bushels in July-
'eoembber compared- with 271 .million 'bushels for the same period a year
i a er. Eports,-for. the.'1949-50. year.are estimated 'at -about 375 million
4shels, This is down about 128 million from last years 503-million-bushel
ilt;l-time. record. While this would be the smallest in 5 years, it would still
.....ae compared, with prewar.- Total ..disappearance, .-etimated- at 1,065-mil-
bushel.-'-would- be the smallest since 1942-43 and would leave a-carry, -
iM' r.of about ;390.million bushels, -an increase of 83 million'from:a year. ..
tier, and.the highest since the. 619 million bushels on July 1, 1943. "

:::: Te an'program has been '.the biggest factor in the considerable
nce prieps have made since early in the season. Large quantities are
i the current price support programs, and in addition CCC has sizeable
es qf wheat (about. 150 million .:ushels onJanuary 1). These hold-
Stbtal-a d. least 475 million'bushels and may cause-wheat supplies in
ftree market-to become mote-lItmited in the April-June-quarter than a year
p r and thereby be a further price strengthening-factor. -It is to be
eted that a very large part of the carry-over on July 1, 1950 will again
owned by CCC.

i: In December a. winter.wheat acreage of 53 million acres and a crop of
!..... aii~. iOn bushels were-forecast by the Crop Reporting 'Board. Assuming a
action. in-,spring wheat acreage "bout the same as the 15 percent in winter
.e*t and yields at the..average .of the past 2 .years, a spring wheat produc-
l 't.. of about 250 million bushels would be obtained. In this- event, wheat
action for the year as a whole would total about 1,135 million bushels.
ha winter: wheat acreagetof .53 million acres, if *2O-millon. aered are
FSi e..ded to spring wheat ,the total, would be :73 million acre. **-Thiss about
A S ame as, or a little -bqlw' the probable:national wheat .alotmient .

.: Total..orld breaddradn-trade for-1949-50 .a nw: tecpected'to ,be reduced
: 0: percentnt. or m.ore beiwq-1948-49. Supplies of .wheat- ava-lable -a: e tapd
:J the principal surplus-producing ..areds are more than adequate-to meet-
.: t e cted demand, but significant increases in-.cdrry-over stokes are not
Sesp ected except in the United States. The reduced level of trade this
e. r refl o.oth an.improved ..ply'osition in nearly all of .the- important
:;A r.t g eloantries. '

4 CO :Cit n of fall-swn. grains was unusually favorable in most
o 6Nopsa ar at latest report.' Available information points to some
ftt A l.n ld U7e0:g sie increases repo red for 'a number of countries
.e#.Usnidt 4 tsed Jtn ,Gedmany, d 4 da Rumani and Italy appear to
: r: : .. .t .. et. .the l. important producing counties.



INI
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Moisture reserves- in wrne rrawre nro-nwes. or.inu ea
time were reported' at 72' p6r-e&t'r~4i1 qm a- d:
earlier. While reserves are W n 'd 6 percent of &
are nevertheless CbtaSide abl 141- -iaai and diat t..et
yield prospects for the 1950 prt scropt"', -r
Rye prices averaged.3 p ot b Idl& a year earlier in.
reflecting reduced delmid,'a s1iiplieb and lower'- 4w"e.
groans, especially corn. With asuflei of re, cin b -
the' yearoabo.itth`s as'a -b ar ie, t id.
P-ected to result in; a'-sanew*at larger ,Qari-y-v7or bri Julyt 1 9.
8 million bushels bf a yea r earlier. This Joerer,. is st% 'Ni,
Slow' 19 'l u ng or 193 '' -9 "" -..'...'.: ''1.9:
Ric& price i've". be. n above loan lev es. "ince'Ociob6.Wt ,...
ties gong ander the loai .aid' purchase ,agreement' program Y .n,.
of exports khvp supported rice prides.' Riq e' ex ts aree c
new high, .kb.eeding the record :of 1948-49, but 'because of record::
crop, ani increase in' yer-end stocks is probably." The natE16a riS b,
allotment Tor 1950 which .as announced .December 30, is ab6o{l.1 pef
below the actual' planted creage iri 1949" '
The19149-50 world ittceharvesi iMaet iedj at jc ee
the preedfrig year, and lightly aibov the tttar average, Inte-
'is at "high levlg, world exkprtable aiipalid' are estijatid attle`as:-
one-hail'df the'prewar average export "
S [ .' -THE DOMESTIC WHEAT SITUATION '

BACKGROUND.-, An abnormal world demand for bread grains
"*" 'mh e -it pOesible td move the excess over domestic needs
5 ~dfiawhedt ohops -produced 'ifi`1944-48, each in excess 6 '
S on billion 'bushels, 'and' to minimize the increase -in' the .
S e'of tecaflry-over on ultyl, 1949 (table 2) .
i 's. f ': .. '. 2)
..... : '. '... 1..In 1932'-41, the supply of wheat in continental:. :
...ited ttates averaged 982 millionn bushels donsieteA bf.
-"',- .: d- *of old. Aeat, *, production, 73-, m"im -: .: i.
S"" ddmstic s e, 9 Total disappearance averaged' 72f
Scosisting.of food,..475 feed, 122; seed, 81; and ,exportA:; .., :
"orieg..cOt.ties 9a shipierts tb U. S. Teritorie .'
X@* W.. 4 M -tovbtooksk -at -the end of thia,'O;."'d
inuc lar ^tan 'att he begliMnng.' peod werq r
a .:"', a rts frow thd UMnited States have 'eceeded -'.'.'"Ai
300-oOd. lri bushels only. in 1914-15, 12O3-21, ad each' :th ii
past 4 years beginning in 1945-46 when they averaged 'almost: "'
450 million bushels (tAble 1). -...Very mall United Sates,
ta. s. .il.9-3- tojet. i th drives toward, gra ..
e' *.. -many rbing. countries gtratl.ed 4:.
"~ ,t.. *fh' the 304s *nd' the air -4urtailed shipping in ti..e ,A
Sarly-4*'~ .. -the 35 year' since 1909,' .eavifig: out h --
yeears'of-'-e- imports, net exports averaged 169 mi"i.,onl-bfi.
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..::: :: h Wa prcs .A6 V kAir advancedd from an average -.of
.e.S.e per aite ei-. 1 fib record.of $2.81 inmid- .
: anuary 1948, a.t a record season average of t2.29.for the
7 .... 4' crop. .'t.18 o late 1944 the loan program, which
efleeted .ith g'ier t A -ri.. ticed amers pay, was the-
t.... .iportai. fatior'idomas iwheat prices. From 1942 :
thzuh. 1945 rea 'fSd.na exceptionally heavy and very
S large. qntitie 6f whe i6 iied for war industrial pur-
poseas, Beginning. ih early 195, export demand, including
: the various foreign: ad progr.as, became'the.most important
; pric factor. "
In 1947-48, United States wheat prices reflected the
unavailability of feed grains for export, the additional
: world demand resulting from short crops in importing countries,
and the continued rise in the general price level. With the
.:.:harest of the near-record crop in 1948 and favorable crops
:: n importing countries, the loan program again became an im-
: t'ant price factor. The price to growers for the 1948-49
.....0.1p averaged about 1 cent below the $2.00 loan level.
r0i.w Expected to Total about M Million
over about 390 Million BRishela
*.. p'tt.. .. .... *. ..
H Paw" 3 tic disappearance of'wheat during the first half of the current
g year was 545 million bushels, while exports to foreign countries
..bip.enta to Territories for the same period were 169 million and 2 mil-
IbUshes, :respectively. With the wheat year over half gone domestic
i ppearanee for the year ending June 30 looks as if it may be as follows:
ti* ai. military food, 491 million; seed, 81 million; -and feed, 115 mil-
P 0. d F 4 consumption will be about the same as a year earlier, seed re-
... ttp less and feed less. The quantity being fed this year is the
A k since about 1941, but is about as expected in view. of thi record
e/s an relatively low prices of feed grains.
:: ..kpqrtz ar. now expected to total about 375 million bushels. This
ip .e .dewn about 128 million from the 503 million bushels exported a year
N wouLd be the smallest since 1944-45. Shipments to Territories .of
't(.Odted States total 3. or. million bushels.
S -oi. appearance of wheat in 1949-50 would thus be about 1,065 mil-
:; helS ,t4e smallest since 1942-43. With the supply of 1,454 million
;'+:.51,(*.1 stocks of 307 million j/, production of 1,.46 million, and
pi. rt f..1 "llion)--carry-over next July would be about 390 mil-
a a Trk. iges~ -ary-over, was 631 million in 1942 and the prewar
932-41:) averagee was 235 million bushels.
:; k. f whit on Jan ry. 1, .1950 totaled 908 million bushels. This
as hOCbberDe~~uber _sappearanoe of about 251 million bushels,
tf Or he quarter since 1944, when it was about the same quantity.
|a. 0 ,rae-,&Ii o -the quarter was 338 million bushels in 1945, when
jp to l. .7 million. bushels. The.-October-December_,.
..3.'.'6 mIa on the basis'of a January revision in farm stocks.




JAN.-FEB. 1950 ..
disappearance this year was -distributd a.),oa aa follow.:
military food,129 million; seed, 30 Afli onjj feed, IW ..' u.ip.. .
ments, 75 million. :. ...i !.... '
.- -" '".'" '" *.'I ,.
Stocks of wheat on January 1 in the varioe, positions ti on44 O
for earlier years are shwn-in' table U6.0o Though considerably eqt'. ""1
on January 1, 1942 and 1943, current stocks are larger than:: on. M.'. '
January 1 of record. The off-fartiportion.of the total, at: 58 :..
bushels, is largest for the date except in 1942 and 1943, cOpB.i i.r.#.t. .
477 million bushels on January 1I 1949. This years stocks at intWez .iJs..
and elevators were exceeded on January 1, 1943, the only time irK 14 p .t` -,I
of record. Stocks at terminals and at merchant mills were exceeded wia.y on .
January 1, of 1942 and 1943. .
Wheat Prices Generally Below Loan: .
Supplies under Loan and Owned .. .. .
CCC important Price Factors *
Price of Hard Wheat at Kansas City rose above the loan the lat :,.
part of January, although prices .of Soft Red Winter at St. Louis.and" Sad. "-A
at Minneapolis continued slightly below the loan.' All prices were., ot e':t
early February. With some recovery, prices on February 7 were as ftoJlipp 'l
loan in parentheses: No.2 Hard Winter, ordinary protein,. at:-City $2.17i
(2.20); No.1 Dark Northern Spring, ordinary protein, at Minneapolis $2,1 ::-.
(2.22); No.2 Red Winter at St. Louis $2.22 (2.25); and No.2. Soft White a:
Portland $2.18-1/2 (2.16). -
.. .- '. ." .... ,...'.:*i .r ;. .:.
A pick-up in export sales accounted for the strength in the latter
part of January. For the marketing season as a whole, United States 'exn p
have been affected by the gbnerally-reduced demand of importing countrtiw', :|
Sales under the International Wheat Agreement, August I to January 33.",:&
taled about 54 million bushels against the United States export quota : o
168 million bushels for the year. The more recent weakness may ba tride:
apprehensions, related to .-the February break of the past two years-"'
The-loan program has been the biggest factor in-the, considerable .
advance prices have made since early in thb season. Wheat under' loan. .a4:;:
purchase agreements from the 1949 crops through December 31 totaled 3Z d&
lion bushels. 2/ Of this, 68-. were farm-stored loans, 229. were: warmhoU'Sf;a.:.
stored loans, and 16 under purchase agreements, In addition on Doemb.i.e !
1949, about 4-1/2 million bushels of 1948 wheat has been resealed ;in'as
The'total under price-support programs from the 1948 crop was .67iu. lir .
bushels. 'Price support availability was extended through January.tht:, l :
This enabled farmers to apply the proceeds of their 1949 crop price: A..itl'
and sales on 1950 income'taxes, since most farmers are on an am.nua ...l!. ..a
than an accrual income-tax basis.. : '.
CCC has sizeable inventories 'of wheat-(about 150 million bU h1 A
January 1) which.with the large quantity under-the current price uppi
. programs total at least 475 million bushels. These holdings: mO.. au :.
wheat supplies in normal, trade channels to become more limit 1 t. S 1 '
2/ Quantities placed under loan each.year since the program" tarted
together with quantities delivered,.. stocks owned by CCC ard aer *31... .
June 30, and loan rates, are shown in table 11. '

:. ,: ... .




"" .., ."";"';""" "- 7- -- "" '""
i1' AT' Z ui-qmcr.. tha a year earlier. In the five principal hard winter
': 4-st ate of the Southwest, very large quantities already have been placed
.t the' programp. The quantities added to those already used by mills
4is ga tly leave only relatively small supplies available to the trade. If
':ensercial supplies. prove to be too small to -maintain mill operations, prices
t..7ould need to advance above $2.35 $2.40 basis No.2 Hard Winter at Kansas
S::d.ty,. to cover the loan of $2.20 plus accrued -charges. In any event it is
.:'to be expe..ted that a very large part of the carry-over on July 1, 1950 will
t in be owned by CCC. 2/
,:%tPari. Price as the Basis the
1950 Lon Will be Qetermined on
". Basis- of Old. Formula

; Under the 1949-Agricultural Act, the support level for the 1950 crop
|:i.::8unchanged- at .90 percent of parity as determined by the old formula. The
te.'. .povidea that for basic commodities until 1954 the effective parity
i. .i ce' :.thbe.: higher of the old or the new parity. The old parity as calcu-
l edfor 4tnuary is $2.13 W/ and the new is $1.84 j/. As a result,
'i et'ir .d fparJty formula will apply, but the price to be used for support will
be determined by the level of the index of prices paid, interest and taxes
L .'ric mJune*
....'..". .. A From preliminary calculations based on information available now,
i: t: .ksa as if parity for the crops of 1951,. 1952 and 1953 will continue
1C ube based on the old formula for wheat. The minimum loan rates may be
li.e.uioed in. those years somewhat from the 90 percent level, the extent de-
AiS:d.g :pon.r, the-.relationship of actual supplies to normal supplies.
lantg Within Allotments; 1950
r.' ,1 i ey a t Equal 1949 Production
S'As of December 1, a winter wheat seeded acreage of 53 million, 15 per-
t --t less than 1949, was estimated by the Crop Reporting Board of BAE, On
:.. this acreage., a crop of 885 million bushels.was forecast on the basis of
Srpo rated condition of the crop oh December 1, 1949, of soil moisture con-
ttions' to that date, and, other factors affecting yield. Assuming a
r:.edutihonin spring wheat acreage about the same as that of winter wheat,
:a.an. stage of 19.2 million acres would be indicated. If 13 bushels per acre,
th:!. &tag'e'-of .the past two years, are obtained, this would result .in a pro-
4ctitn. od:'about 250 million bushels- of spring wheat. When added to the
d: te we wha.t. forecast, this would result in a total crop of about 1,135 mil-
lion bshels' With a carry-over of about 390 million bushels, supplies
Y;, /O6an.-.l,.1949-erop wheat mature April 30, 1950 or earlier on demand.
SIteau.m to the.. CCC under. purchase agreements must be filed within a 30-day
Period aing Apnril 30, 1950.
S/ 88.4,.O. per bushel (price 1909-1914) x 241 percent (January index
~to tms',; ..interest and taxes) = .$2.13.. Parity as determined under
S'ti. s 4 o Ula U, 1931-49, is shown in The Wheat Situation, issue of July

S fear calendar average price per bushel) 1 202 percent (10-year
r l'6s l ateageindex of prices received) = 73,8 cents, the adjusted base
.; pricec 1.' 8 x '249 percent (January index of prices paid, interest, taxes,
attd y~fli ntn) = f1.84. -


: : .... .:..... .




JAN.-FEB,. 17 -V
would total about. 1,525 million busbhld. ,cm.seatiaaihi
to again be close to 700 million busta .Th1 swuld
lion bushels available for export in 19505-51 .and .r 0eaflr** : ..
1951. If exports total 350 million bushels, this w.tid at r
of around 475 million bushelse,...
Winter wheat is reported to' e- entering well and in go ab n
generally, with damage to date .-etremly limited. Prospect aie ,'al
some concern 'among growers, however," in widespread portions of the IWu txr '
where the crop is susceptible to damage if February and March webat 4ilhdI
be unfavorable. In the Northeast, the mild weather and lack of-a.4obV : i
encouraged greening up and growth of fall-sown grains; light th$ l.aC ... .of
stands has resulted from "heaving". In the South, development is et'i 'ore|
advanced, making the crops susceptible to damage if a severe cold wav ..:
should occur. In Nebraska moderate snow cover has improved the ois4e., .,i
situation and protected wheat, but from Kansas to the Texas Psanihadeit ti
deep-rooted wheat has no snow cover, topsoils are. dry and susceptib13t.d '.:
blowing. In Oklahoma and Texas, some greening up has occurred, MusAl i Nt
by subsoil moisture, but surface moisture will be needed to ainritaain.i wbb
In the Pacific Northwest snow cover has protected wheat fromaievre tear -i
tures and damage appears to be limited. 'I",.:

The winter wheat acreage indicated in Decenber totaled. 53 .il i:,
acres. If about 20 million acres are seeded to spring-wheat the total W4u*21
be 73 million acres. This is about the same as, or a little below what.'.- 1..
expected national wheat allotment is expected to total. The national. aMLo I
ment, as originally announced on July 14, was 68.9. million acres. Subs.
quently, upward revisions were made possible by Public Law 272, eigned.'..
the President in August. While returns from all States are not in yet.'.'-,A
appears that the adjusted total will slightly exceed 73 million. acreai:::,

THE WORLD WHEAT SITUATION.. -
BACKGROUND.- On July 1, 1943, stocks of wheat in the four .
principal exporting countries--United States, Canada,
Australia and Argentina--were a record 1,737 million bu-
shels, almost four times the 1935-39 average of 458 million..
By July 1945, however, -they were down to 818 millid bu- ,.
shels, and by .July 1946 they were further-reduced to. 387.' .
millions. Greatly increased disappearance was caused by.."..'!::.:!
wartime depletion of food supplies in importing codntria '
and by poor crops in many areas. Stocks in these, foqr ":'
countries on July 1, 1946 were the smallest since 1938.:. .",':.:;:.
and were about 16 percent' less ihan the 1935;-39 average.. ::i
On July 1, 1948 these stocks had increased to. t6 mil .,:".
bushels, and on July 1, 1949 to 652 million bushels. While .
stocks of this size cannot be considered large, they are'. .
42 percent above the 1935-39 average of 458 million b4b~1l .,;'

6/ Stocks in Canada, Australia and Argentina at the beginning: ; Vheiil.
tive marketing year together with production, domestic disapramf:ancQ~
exports are shown in table 5. a .-'...l





WS-11 9 -

Condition of Fall-sown Winter
Wheat inT Eaope Favorable Some
Increase in Acreage Probable 7

Condition of fall-sown grains was unusually favorable in most
European areas, according to latest reports. Though actual estimates of
grain acreage seeded in Europe for harvest in 1950 have been received for
"o.nly a few countries, available information points to some net increase
in seedings, since increases reported for a number of countries, especially
the United Kingdom, Germany, Poland, Rumania, and Italy appear to outweigh
small declines in some of the less important producing countries. Winter
sowing constitute'the bulk of the breadgrain crop in these countries,
spring sowinga normally amounting to less than 10 percent of the total.

Winter wheat acreage in Canada, which constitutes only about 5 per-
...: cent'of the total for that country, was increased by 14 percent'over the
) previous year's seedings, bringing the acreage to 966 thousand acres.
t Conditions were much more favorable than for the 1949 crop, which was
Swn under very dry conditions throughout the fall.

In the Far East, official estimates are not available for India's
recentlyy seeded wheat acreage, the harvest of which occurs in March-May.
TTrade estimates indicate some increase over last year's area. Soil con-
ditions were reported excellent at the beginning of the seeding period.
Later reports, however, speak of an .urgent need for rain, to prevent
deterioration. In Japan, the acreage of wheat sown last-fall for har-
*vest in 1950 is expected to show a slight increase over 1948. Infor-
mation on winter grain prospects in China .is not available.

Moisture Reverve in Prairie
Provinces of Canada Much
Below Normal

Moisture reserves in the Prairie Provinces of Canada up to
November 20, were reported at 72 percent of normal compared with 64 per-
cent a year earlier. Saskatchewan had 73 percent of normal, Alberta
61 percent of normal, and Manitoba 96 percent of normal. (Acreage in
Saskatchewan is 63 percent of the total of the wheat acreage in the
Prairie Provinces, that in Alberta 27 percent and in Manitoba 10 per-
cent.) These reserves include moisture which fell on stubble land
between harvest and about the time the ground froze (August-November)
aild took account of rains which fell on summer-fallowed land during the
previous year. The percentages for the various districts were weighted
on the basis of acreage.

While reserves are above a year earlier, they are nevertheless
considerably below normal, and distinctly an unfavorable factor affect-
ing yield prospects-of the 1950 spring wheat crop.


7JThis afdf the first section on page 10 from World Food Situation,
February 1950, published by Office of Foreign Agricultural- relations, USDA.


'*-*'




JAN.-FEB. 1950 .0- .:..

World Total Trade In Breadgrains
is Down About 10 Percent ;..'.

Total world trade in breadgrains for 1949-50 is now eptet : to
be reduced 10 percent or more from the total 1948-49 exports of 2 6 al-
lion long tone (970 million -bushels of'wheat and flour, In tera.. oe6:t eat,
and 30 million bushels of rye), Supplies of wheat-available for expotrt '|
in the principal surplus-producing areas are adequate to meet the tarjscte&k
demand, but significant increases in stocks are not expected except In the
United States. Preliminary indications are that total exports 'of' tieat
.and rye during the first six months of the 1949-50 marketing.season .ill.
approach 410 million bushels, compared with 488 million during July- .
December 1948. The volume of world trade in breadgroins will probably
expand during January-June 1950, but the extent to which the total ill .
exceed that of the first half of the 1949-50 year will depend on crop
prospects in the spring of 1950 and on the ability of Importing countries
to overcome current trade difficulties.

The reduced level of trade thus far in 1949-50 (nearly all of.
which reduction. has occurred in total exports from the United States) re- j
fleets the improved supply position in nearly all of the important import.-
ing countries.. Two successive years (1948 and 1949) of relatively favorable :
production in Europe 8/- the world's principal deficit area--combined with
abnormally high breadgrain imports, have resulted in increased reserves ,
and a general relaxation of controls governing bread rations, flour ex-
traction rates, collections, .and utilization programs. Another result
in exporting countries' has been a return to more competitive conditions .V
in the international grain trade. Terms and conditions of trade are once
more assuming importance in place of the critical need which had charao-
terized the postwar period until early last year.

Wheat Prices in Canada Australia
and Argentina /

The handling and pricing of wheat continues under strict Govern-
ment control in Canada, Australia and Argentina, Controls are administer-
ed by Wheat Boards in Canada and Australia and by the Argentine Trade
Promotion Instutute in Argentina.

The Canadian Wheat Board makes producers a guaranteed initial pay-
ment and distributes back to the producer any profit remaining from opera-
tion of the 5-year pool, which ends with the current marketing season.
The initial payment to producers is $1.59. The agreed export price to
the United Kingdom is $1.82 per bushel, and to other International Wheat
Agreement countries $1.80. The price to all other countries (Class II)
declined from $2.09 at the beginning of December to about $1.95 at'the
end of the month and has remained at that level. The quantity of heat
available for export from the 1949 crop plus carry-over in Canada is es-
timated to total about 240 million bushels. Of this total, Canada, has a
quota of 203 million bushels under the International Wheat Agreement.
Prices in Canada are all based on No. 1 Northern, in store Fort William,
Port Arthur, or Vancouver.
8/ See The Wheat Situation issue of Sept.-Dec. 1949, tables 2 and 3, for
production of wheat and rye in European countries as well as other 0ounthrieB
1947-49 with comparisons. 9/ In terms of U. S. currency. .
..E i t'':Ei:






; In. Autralia, .naketing of wheat is under a postwar Wheat Stabili-
S': lo Plani, *ich guarantees prices to producers, based on cost of pro-
.duton. The guaranteed.. price applies on domestically used wheat and up
'to a maximumrof 100 million bushels of exports from any one season's crop.
'A .Stabilization Yund has been established which will be used to support
ta guaranteed price to producers if export prices go below that level.
W;'is fund ie built up by taxing wheat exports, the rate of tax being
0,.Qi percent .of the difference between the export price and the guaranteed
price to growers, but not to exceed 2s.2d. (24 cents per bushel at the
.present rate of exchange). The remainder of the profit from export sales,
H^.Ot ed to the advance of the guaranteed price, determines the final return
:,...to producer,

The present guaranteed price of 79 cents per bushel, bulk f.o.r.
w'iorte Is ellightly above the price guaranteed for last year's crop. Wheat
;tfor home. coroumption returns the grower only the guaranteed price. -Pre-
A~i nt export prices, however, are considerably above that level, and assure
i.g roers somewhat larger returns. Exports under the International Wheat
agreement are at the equivalent of $1.80 per bushel, while the latest quo-
a.i tition for export sales outside of the Agreement was $2.24 per bushel.

.., In Awgentina, the domestic -price for the 1949-50 wheat crop (har-
.i'iet beginnIng in December 1949) was announced December 1 as the equiva-
t'f. 1eto-f. $1.90 per bushel for No. 2 semi-hard wheat in bags, on tract at
2 /,j:'Bte. The.-ew rate which is only slightly above the price of $1.86 paid
Vain* 1948-49 wheat, compares with an official export price of $2.13 per
g::kiahel, quoted in early January.

:. r THE RYE SITUATION

BACEDROUND.- Reflecting an active foreign demand
d uriqg and for a time after World War I, rye acreage for
harvest expanded and for 10 years (1915-24) averaged
over 5 million acres. Production reached a peak of over
100 million bushels in 1922. Exports of rye averaged
nearly 34 million bushels a year during the 10 yards end-
ing jn 1927-2S. After that exports dropped sharply and in
onlypone year of the 30's did they total over 1 million bu-
sbelq.. From 1940-41 through 1948-49 exports averaged
.5.aillion bushels, reaching the high point of 7.2 million
S bushqla, in 1945-46. In each of the drought years of 1933
and 1934. imports totaled about 12 million bushels. From
19 4041.through 1948-49 imports averaged 4.3 million bu-
t: ,el, reaching a high of 8.3 million bushels in 1943-44.

R -Demand Below Year A.o.
|PrleB. own about 13 Percent
iye pplie for 1949-50 including July 1, 1949 carry-over of
,:',8..3 Min Duihpl1s production of 18.7 million, and imports which may
i.: n b. to about 10.0 million bushels, total 37.0 million bushels. This
.: :s about the same as the 36.6 million for 1948-49, but is considerably
:.belw. the 57,2 million average (1938-39 to 1947-48.) (See table 13.)
r. .* .. .. V...
L..^ .. : : .






Imports in July-Decebrer..tota b&vi i j4 i
3 million bushels may. enter- ;in-on. ti
ports for the year may exceed.tbs-9 g AiUii m-bushel1ib
and be the largest since 1934-35.. .

It is expected that food& ,, 949-50 wll'be. ab-uti .!
the 4.7 million bushels in 1948-49, which compares with a r:.ar;
of 6.7 million bushels. lye .for;,fQoo declined from 19434. to .3 ".
but has since remained at about ,the. game level. Feed- use in 19 9 .QS ,..i
ably will be about the same as the '7.0 million bushels estii atsU :fa '."
1948-49. With an expected increase in acreage of about 12 percent a-i:::
will be about 5.0 million bushels. The quantity used in the aproodugton of
alcohol and spirits in July-December was only 1.9 million bushels:cO paredd
with 3.7 million in the same period a year earlier. The .quantity..fot te..'
1949-50 year may not exceed 4.0 million bushels compared with. .7 miifpn
in 1948-49. On the basis of these disappearance figures, .the .carrya i::*W '
July 1, 1950 may be about 10 million bushels compared with 8.3 millq :~:
July 1, 1949. Rye supply and disappearance, annually and semi-annual ,,,
1934-35 to date are shown in tables .13 and 14. ...

Rye stocks of 17.4 million bushels in all positions .on January l1,"i
1950,. are slightly larger than a year earlier, and much large, than in t.e
3 preceding years. Off-farm stocks, particularly stocks at. terminal.S^arp<11
a larger proportion of the total than usual. More than half of he currq ,i
rye stocks are located in Illinois and Minnesota .. ...

Rye prices in July-December averaged about 13 percent below a $a.0iAr-
earlier. Total supplies, including probable imports, are about the sse !
as a year earlier, but demand for alcohol use and for export are below a .4-
year earlier, Abundant supplies and lower prices of other grains also .'
are contributing to lower rye prices; corn prices in July-December averflag.i
about a fourth lower than a year earlier. (See tables 15 and-16.) .

Re Acreage Up 2 Percent; .
Condition Satisfactory

The acreage of rye sown for all purposes in the fall of 1949 w.". :
estimated at 3.7 million acres, an increase of 12 percent from the el3. atIr
lion acres seeded in the fall of 1948, but still 30 percent :below.the
1938-47 average. .These estimates include an allowance for:sapritag 3O:,. ','
rye, small quantities of-which are grown each.yaar : ...

The three major producing States of North Dakota, .South a et.a' afl
Nebraska show a relatively sharp i mcrease in 1949 fall aeedede; act ea:;,:
pared with a year earlier. The acreage seeded in'the.. important pz -0 Ful ,
Northern Plains States might have been larger had weather and .soj .s n
editions been more favorable during the regular fall seedaY.Iez9t&i
conditions in other States were generally vary favorable and. gter! tru
able to seed the full intended acreage. A-relatively larger rsei "at
the increased seeding last fall can be attributed to .the. e4Moe d6 sL.0
of wheat .. .
r. ,..




A :.... : A .... .




1 4 .. .2

-13-

Th .oamitton of rye on December 1 at 88 percent was 2 points above
hat reported a year earlier, and 7 points above the 10-year average.
'i:::Plants' generally entoret the dormant stage in a satisfactory condition.


STHM RICE SITUATION
BACEGOUNDi.- The rice acreage in the United States in
1945-49 averaged 1,687 thousand, which is 68 percent above
V.51 the 1935-39 average of 1,007 thousand. Production in the
i: ted States was increased when Oriental trade in rice
Swas out off by the war. This trade has not yet been re-
stored, and was only about 30 percent of prewar in 1949.
Considered from the standpoint of supply, the increase
I ..,..iA,United States acreage is not significant in relation
to the total world supply, since the United States pro-
6.. only about 1 percent of the total. However, from
the standpoint of trade, United States rice exports in
i,:i,' -1948 were 11 percent of the total compared with 1 percent
in 1934-38. This is the result of a 6-fold increase in
United States exports and a sharp drop in world trade.
.". ".

t!:lr:icoes Above Loan Levels:
-Quantities Under Govern-
PJ ?B' Programs and Being Exported

S ice prices to growers for the 1949 crop were below the loan. level
.:'1 t .-4p6iber and October but since that time have been above the loan
(.e3.Table 12). The price to farmers averaged $1.96 per bushel of
A h'r:.6 on January 15, compared with the loan of $1.78 per bushel of
rjJ.'6u,, h ri.e ($3.96 per cwt.). The season average price received by farmers
':;,*: the 1948 crop was $2.19 and the 1948 loan ,$1.84 per bushel ($4.08 per
.):. U. S. No. 1 Zenith at New Orleans for January 1950 was $8.15 per
$4ixtt called compared with $9.7 a year earlier, and U. S. No. 2 California
ge4arlat San Francisco for the same month $7.37 milled compared with $9.13
4" 'ear earlier. Prices in these markets for 1930-49 are shown in Tables
and 18 .

S This s .the second year in which growers have availed themselves
i 'the loan. and purchase agreement programs. Through December 31 farmers
i.i.l .la.ced. 1,i420,000 o~t. under loan (342,000 on farms and 1,178,000 in
1. mheiueS ) aid-180,000 cwt. under purchase agreements, or a total of
0i: 06Q0O owt. According to preliminary indications the quantity placed
i'a 6a 'teents in January, before the expiration of the privilege on
Jt.:: ay 31, Y.w& very large. Were it not for these programs, market
rio" wo wOd be very much lower than 'they are. Moreover, exports are at
:: : high lavelis, which also serves to reduce free supplies. .,




I .. .. .'..:" :, : :..: .

:-:":;, :'% ..I.: P. :. '".k...... .... .. .:.
:k .. A 3 : "" 9 .
S ,






Rice Supplies. at Record.' Hig : ... .i.i.' 0J
for Fourth Consecutive Year:. .
Increase in Carry-over Likely ." r '': '

United States supplies of rice, in 1949-50, in terms of m1i. .total ..
27.4 million 100-pound bags JO/, a new record high. .Old-crop l .t1..t %.t -b :
beginning of the year were only about 1 million bags, but the. alla .e-.'e
cord crop of 1949 totaled the .equivalent of 26.4 million bags, -Ctdi.l. .L''
food use from the 1949 crop may be about the same as the 8,.4 million biee "
in the preceding year. This would be 5.7 pounds per capital well-above the
4.8 pounds in 1947-48 but about equal to the 1935-39 average. Non-f6dd..useae..r
are expected to be about the same as those in 1948-49, as are shipments to
Territories that totaled 3.3 million bags in 1948. Exports are expected to.
be larger than in 1948-49 when they reached a near record high of 8.8. i.-1.
lion bags. Because of the exceptionally large crop in 1949, even ,though. ,. i
disappearance is at very high levels, the year-end carry-over- is expected to.;
be substantially larger than that at the beginning. Rice supply adn disir-i.j'
bution, 1934-49, is shown in table 19.

National Rice Acreage Allotments '".
About 14 Percent Below 1949 Acreage

The national rice acreage allotment was proclaimed on Decembe 30 .a.t
1,593,000 acres, which is 13.7 percent below the 1,845,000 acres planted i..-l.
1949. Compliance with individual producer allotments will be a condition; : :
for price support, which is mandatory at 90 percent of parity as of AtU tgi .,I
1950, parity level. At the time of announcing the acreage allotment, the.:: ;!i
Secretary of Agriculture announced that marketing quotas will not be re-: '
quired for 1950-crop rice. *

The total national allotment is distributed as follows: 557,874 Ae .ims
in Louisiana; 452,000 acres in Texas; 339,639 acres in Arkansas; 240.,72 ac
in California; and the remainder in Mississippi, Arizona, South Carol.iB,:
and Missouri. The 1949 planted acreage was 1,845,370 acres, of which-60,0P00:
was in louisiana, 531,000 in Texas, 405,000 in Arkansas, 298,000 in Calit..
fornia, and unofficial estimate of 6,370 in the other States.

World Rice Production Above Prewar;
Exportable Supplies-only About Half Prewar ;.

The 1949-50 (August-July) world rice harvest is estimated to be.
3 percent less than the preceding year, but slightly above the prew 6At: '
age (table 20). Expressed in terms of milled rice, world pr6ductio.n .ap r :
mates 116 million short tons compared with 119 million the year- 'efo a..:..
an average of 115 million tone before the war (1935-36/39-40). '-Mobat, ot .::.:..
decrease is in the deficit countries of Asia, particularly tina, ."but a:'::r::-`-:,:::..
over-all reduction also occurred in the surplus producing cotr :'e.$~a:.
Continent.

i/ Includes heads, second heads and screenings, and excludes brewers ria4~:.O
11/ Sections on rice world production and trade adapted from "Wor : 6F
Situation, February 1950, published by Office of Foreign Agricultural
Relations, USDA.


.. .W., .. .:.. ..
," ".4 ':..'.# :;..


l







t. 1 homghif or&l rice production is only slightly higher compared with
s,. exportable Supplies from the 1949-50 world crop for delivery in
ar.eetl ted at less than one-half of prewar average exports of
f lion tonue (table 20). The forecast of availabilities is 4,0 million
d slightly less than 1949 exports of around 4.1 million tons. This
Orop n -export, supplies is due primarily to a decline in the total pro-
otloan 'of Asia's surplus producing countries, whose exports represent
S60'percent of the world trade in rice. These supplies are between
10 percent less than last year and equal to a little more than one-
of prewar average shipments. On the other hand, export supplies in
0oe dnd North and South America may slightly exceed exports in 1949.

Approximately 93 percent of the world rice harvest is in Asia, and
3 .70 percent of total exports are shipped from the surplus countries
Aia. .The-per capital consumption of rice in Asia, the most important
iz:the diet of the majority of the population, remains below the pre-
anvel. While rice production in relation to prewar has increased
tly, population has increased much more. Accordingly. other foods
.'.had to replace rice to a considerable extent.

S t supplies in Rice Surplus Countries

From Asia's surplus rice region, Thailand, Burma, and French Indo- :
total export availabilities are estimated at 2.3 million short tons ..
w d with actual deliveries of about 2.5 million tons in 1949 and pre-
..ii.sQ... rte of 6.3 million tons. The acreage and production decline, in this
'-* 4't ch reversed the recovery trend toward the prewar crop level, was
ii iX" due to insurgent activities in Burma and French Indochina.

.. applies from Thailand's large crop just harvested, together with
Pl' i;Bit.'haond of more than 0.2 million tons, are expected to approximate
'41 flton tons compared with Axports of about 1.1 million tons in 1949.
i' Icbf :1n retarded planting of the crop, but late-season rainfall was
>t!tticafnt tor-prbduce relatively high yields per acre, and production is
bteid. to approach the near-record of last year.

.Although not-all of Burma's 1949 rice surplus was exported, deliveries -
6p-iahBtained at a relatively high level with the assistance of armed con-
i*'Vz., As a result, the 1.3 million short;tons exported in 1949 were only
7S1Itly below 1948, but less than one-half of prewar shipments. Exports.
i progressively smaller, however, toward the end of the year as the
wit of rough rice from the interior to the ports became more difficult.
sun. u lpplles in 1950, are estimated .at only 950 thousand short tons. A
in 1949.-50 acreage and production of around 20 percent was the
:" result of rebel activities.
S n:':' ...renah Indochina, internal warfarQ in 1949 prevented exportation
al'.. yand 1950 exports may not exceed the 60 thousand tons shipped that. 4
a.: Ck.of 700 thousand tons reportedly were blockaded in the interior,
rbvu4ns their hItpment. Exports in 1949 therefore were only 4 percent of
fhle 9rs r average of 1.6 million tons.





l ; ::'.. .::W::::,,,
*:<,* ',', .. .... ..






Korea is expected to ship mory than 100 thousmanfidth tD s
1950, and Formoeda" should have rice -for export.- In 'poest& .br
surplus from these areas has been shipped to China proper, ,.a -.
duction increased about 180 thousand tons in 1949-50 an&cr Aiflbe 1 A
gration from China will have increased 1950 requirements, use s-smi-ap
should be available for shipment to foreign countries. ..:'.. :..

Italy decreased rice acreage in 1949 because of the accuwmalatibn 1
of large carry-over stocks at planting time. Fairly good yields were ha
vested, however, and the crop exceeded that of the year before, Export
supplies therefore are estimated at around 150 thousand tons of milled.
rictu.

Export supplies from North America exceeded the preceding year's .
record. The United States and Mexico harvested the largest crops in his-
tory increasing the total supplies available for shipment .to foreign ...
countries to 650 thousand tons. Crop conditions were good in El Salvador, *.....;-.
and a relatively small surplus will probably be exported. .

Rice production statistics for most South American countries are
not yet available, since the harvest will not be completed until July.
Present indications are that the total production may show a moderate.
gain over the preceding year, and exportable supplies:may exceed slightly
the 1949 trade,

Prospects are that Brazil's crop may exceed the preceding year's .
harvest- and that the- domestic demand will again absorb all the supplies., ..':i
from the new crop. Brazilian rice consumption in recent years has in-
creased sharply and a production -gain in the last decade of about 800 theti a.j
and short tons of miled rice is now being utilized within the country. '
Exports dropped from 475 million pounds in 1948 to only approximately '
2 million pounds in 1949. Current advances in prices indicate that Stocks: :
at the beginning of the marketing season (June-May) may belight, and. that
export supplies during 1950 again may be negligible.

Current supplies in Educador of around 60 thousand tons for export .
are the largest in several years. British Guiana's crop may exceed that
of last year, and exports to the British West Indies may approximate those ..
of 1949. A reduced demand in Chile may result in the exportation of T*
around 5,000 tons, the same as in 1949. ',=

Imports Need in Rice Defioient Countries .. ..
Continue Large; Rice Supplements Used

The countries having the greatest neyd for rice imports are in
Asia--Japan, India, Ceylon, Malaya, China, Pakistan, and Indonesia. WIth,.
the exception of China, Pakistan, and possible Indonesia, the 1949450 pro-'
duction in these countries is equal to or above that of a year earlier. : i
Reduced. supplies of rice in Asia's exporting countries may result in a |
continued and/or expanded utilization of rice supplements, such s other
food grains, sweet and white potatoes, and manioc.

..4

7I









Wheat end wheat flour: United States imports and reports 1939-46

IMPOFTS 1/


-Ati
"lr .:'..l .
begicmI. h


For domestic use*


Full-duty
wheat
1,000
buensls


56
16'.
1,69'9
806
b/136,013.
26.235
1,136
21 i
2
1,317


Wheat
for
feed 2/
1,000
bushels


86
3,237
1,785
150
189

767

117
10


Flour V/

1.000
buenels


33.-
291
17.
100
:.7

7

6
190


A, EXPQFT5 _


Non-military exports Army Civilian Supply Prograa Total :
: Wheat I FloLur : Flour : wS; :Other
nas a wholly Total hat : wholly Total f" ;four :A
grain :from U. S.: :from U. S.: : flo / ud
: wheat : : grain : neat : : :
1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 13
S : busnel bushels busnels bushels bhel b l b ushels bushela


AA....................: 23,636 21,232* 4.4,868 0 0 0 44,868 9,407 W
., ................. : 1,810- 22,812* 33,622 0 0 0 33,622 6,935 '
S:....................: 12,632* 6/14,898 27,530 0 0 0 27,530 9,130 :,
!....................... 6,55* 19,9.8* 26,503 0 0 0 26,503 6,900 ;
..' .................... 11,942* 28,331* ,273 0 o o 0,273 10835
.....................: 19,010* 28,197* 47,207 ,358 40,233 94,591 141,798 9,398'
.....................: 6,135 79,876 306,011 6,878 35,489 82,367 388.378 2,688
...................... ... /154,01 8/165,088 319,102 47,167 31,883 79,050 398,152 6,552
.....................: 2/207,360 1/133,091 34o0,451 97,328 41,,.61 138,789 479,240 610 A4
;..................... 232,443 101,621 336,064 142,754 2,757 167,511 501,575* 2,745 -.



at* Intleates imports and exports from reports of the Department of Commerce, Figures for the Army Civilianm '
Srogrsam aze fro the National Military Establishments.

IReab flour expressed in wheat equivalent. Exports of wheat products other than flour, not shown in the
iP.go passedd in thousand bushels wheat equivalent, beginning with 1941-&2, were as follows: 343; 1,475; 2,0771
k 7a6i 3.492; 6,666; and for 1948-4.9, 1,301.
Sas "unfit for human consumption" or imported for special feeding programs.
me flour imported in bond for reexport, which for 1939-40 was 214,000 bushels and in 1940-41 was

shet and wheat products used for livestock and poultry feed, imported duty-free by the Commodity Crew

afl from imported wheat, although in some years small quantities of United States wheat were added.
ps.00 ti 822,000 unreported exports to British Services. :
,s 11,358,000 unreported January-June 190,7 exports to Germany financed by the United Kingdom.
.OO* plusa 10,595,000 unreported January-June 1947 exports to Germany financed by the United Kingdom.
00fl sinus the included Amy Civilian Supply Program of 97,328, O0.
mF0i0 alnus the included Army Civilian Supply Program of 41l,61,000.
.." ;!E" .


Total wheat
and
flour
1,000
bushels


477
3,693
3,663
1,056
136,359
42,34.7
2,000
57
130
1,517


Wheat for
milling
in bond
and
export*
1,000
bushel


9,953
7,331
11,912
7,577
10,952
9,213
11,591
1,968
19
3,113


Total


1,000
bushels


10,430
11,024 :.:
155T7 ::
8,633.:
147, 31,1

13,591 :
2,025:.^

4,63Q:: .


I


.


.


.


....... o =................
.............. .........
.......... .... .......
.......... ...... ... ......
........... ..........
........o...=..,.....:
.........,.,,........ ... ":
..........,t.t.,.......:
......e|e.,......-..--:
.......at.t.......t..,:










Table 2 .- Wheat: Supply and disappearance, United States, 1927-49 1/
Year : upply : Disappearance
be- : Carry- : : Imports : Continental United States : Military : Exports :Ship- :
ginning: over :Proluction: : Total :Processed : : In- : : : procure- : : ments : Total
July : : dutr :faal : Feefood : dustrial Feed : ment / : : 6/ :
: 1000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,00-
: bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels

1927 : 109,456 875,059 188 984,703 502,745 89,864 --- 85,419 678,028 -- 191,227 2,692 871,94?
1928 : 112,756 914,373 91 1,027,220 508,479 83,663 -- 63,865 656,007 -- 141,220 3,172 800,39-
1929 : 226,821 824,183 53 1,051,057 504,292 83,418 --- 28,895 616,605 -- 140,354 2,983 759,94'
1930 : 291,115 886,522 354 1,177,991 489,575 81,132 --- 179,501 750,208 112,428 2.50 865,48.:
1931 : 312,505 941,540 7 1,254,052 482,830 80,071 190,240 753,141 122,897 2,757 878,79-
1932 : 375,257 756,307 10 1,131,574 492,368 83,760 142,807 718,935 31,866 3,023 753,82&
1933 : 377,750 552,215 153 930,118 448,396 78,051 44 102,357 628,848 25,598 2,779 657,22'
1934 : 272,893 526,052 15,569 814,514 459,089 82,686 51 113,485 655,311 10,531 2,783 668,62'
1935 145,889 628,227 34,617 808,733 472,563 87,479 57 101,105 661,204 4,207 2,889 668,3C>'C
1936 : 140,433 629,880 34,455 804,768 477,914 95,896 51 115,802 689,663 9,267 2,996 701,92'.
1937 : 83,167 873,914 634 957,715 474,644 93,060 39 133,484 701,227 100,060 3,321 804,60'
1938 : 153,107 919,913 271 1,073,291 481,418 74,225 103 157,997 713,743 106,645 2,888 823,2'6
1939 : 250,015 741,210 263 991,488 475,352 72,946 89 115,041 663,428 44,868 3,471 711,767

1940 279,721 814,646 3,523 1,097,890 478,506 74,351 101 122,746 675,704 33,619 3,834 "1315"
1941 : 384,733 941,970 3,664 1,330,367 471,084 62,490 1,614 116,348 651,536 16,133 27,859 4,064 .-,oQ,
1942 : 630,775 969,381 1,057 1,601,213 502,418 65,487 54,342 298,407 920,654 25,244 30,856 5,562 4'2,31tI
1943 618,897 843,813 136,360 1,599,070 491,600 77,351 107,527 497,846 1,174,324 62,759 42,339 3,093 1,28',;1'i
1944 : 316,555 1,060,111 42,347 1,419,013 477,668 80,373 82,295 296,369 936,705 150,146 48,777 4,205 1,13,833

1945 : 279,180 1,108,224 1,998 1,389,402 467,054 82,011 20,q71 304,333 874,36q 90,884 319,656 4,40i 1,289,314
1946 100,088 1,153,046 57 1,253,191 477,341 86,498 .4 181,713 7&5,596 92,452 327,185 4,1145 1,169,378
1947 : 83,813 1,367,186 130 1,451,129 484,631 90,746 608 187,721 763,706 116,436 340,775 4,221 1,255,138
1948 : 195,991 1,313,534 1,517 1,511,042 479,371 91,337 79 131,078 701,865 173,110 327,056 3,238 1,205,269
1949 !/: 305,773 1,146,463 1,452,236


J Includes flour and products in terms of wheat.
2' Prior to 1937 some new wheat included; beginning with 1937 only old crop wheat is shown In all stocks positions. The figure for July 1, 1937,
including the new wheat,is 102.8 million bushels, which is used as year-end carry-over in the 1936-37 marketing year.
I/ Imports include full-duty wheat, wheat imported for feed, and dutiable flour in terms of wheat. They exclude wheat imported for milling In bond
and export as flour, also flour free for export.
/ Includes procurement for both civilian relief feeding and for military food use; military takings for civilian feeding in occupied areas measured
at time of procurement,not at time of shipment overseas.
I/ Exports as here used, in addition to commercial exports, include U.S.D.A. flour procurement rather than deliveries for export. Beginning with
1941-42, deliveries for export (actual exportsincluding those for civilian feeding in occupied area) of wheat, flour,and other products,in million
bushelswere as follows: 27.9; 28.0; 42.4;. 144.0; 395.1; 401.6; 485.9; and for 1948-49, 502.9.
6/ Shipments are to Alaska, Hawall, Puerto Rico, and Virgin Islands.
Z/ Preliminary.


....................






19

Table 3 .- Wheat: Supply and d41sppoazn United States, January-June and July-December periodA, 1935-49 If

Supply : D1apapnearane
SContinental United States :Military: Ship- *
Period stock" :Product ,-: 8a', : Total :Processed: : In- : : procure-: sports ments I Total
:f: : g : or food : Seed :dustrial: Feed Total :ment : : 6/


: 1,000
busbpls


Jan.-J ne: 431,884
JU4y-D)o. 145,889

12L6
Jan.-Jo: 428,494
July.-Dec.: 140,433


Jan.-JUae: 370,997
July-Deo.: 83,167

1938
Ja. -June: 533,239
July-Dec.: 153,107
1.939
Jan.-June: 646,805
July-Dec.: 250,015
1940
Jan.-June: 606,014
July-Deo.: 279;721
19Ll
Jan.-June: 723,776
July-Dec.: 384,733
1942
Jan.-June: 999,919
July-Dec. 630,775
1943
Jan.-June: i,152,L1l
July-Dec.: 618,897

1944
Jan.-June: 817,599
July-Dec.: 316,555 1
1945
Jan.-June: 828,347
July-Dec.: 279,180 1


Jan.-June: 681,992
July-Dec.: 100,088 1
1947
Jan,-June; 642,277
July-Dec.: 63,813 1.


Jan.-June: 801,612
July-Dec.: 195,991 1


Jan.-June: 859,077
JUly-Dec.: 305,773 1


1,000 1,000 1,000 .
lishela bushels bushels


7,204 439,088
628,227 21,047 795,163


--- 13,570 442,064
629,880 26,292 796,605


--- 8,163 379,160
873,914 626 957,707


--- 8 533,247
919,913 61 1,073,081


--- 210 647,015
741,210 111 991,336


--- 152 606,166
814,646 368 1,094,735


--- 3,155 726,931
941,970 2,453 1,329,156


--- 1,211 1,001,130
969,381 167 1,600,323


--- 890 1,153,304
843,813 48,524 1,511,234


--- 87,836 905,435
,o60,111 37,619 1,414,285


--- 4,728 833,075
,108,224 1,915 1,389,319


--- 83 682,075
,153,046 27 1,253,161


--- 30 642,307
,367,186 46 1,451,045


--- 84 801,696
,313,534 33 1,509,558


1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000'
bushel buhels he buehele bushels bushels bushe bushels bushele bushels


221,848 27,211
238,644 58,297


233,919 29,182
251,362 67,824


226,552 28,072
247,434 65,183


227,210 27,877
252,788 53,597


228,630 20,628
249,714 50,419


225,638 22,527
243,870 54,392


234,636 ;9,9=0
244,388 L.,t-70


226,696 16,820
265,165 44,819


237,253 20,668
263,801 54,583


227,799 22,768
242,708 58,409


23.,90C 21,964
25.2,'-5 59,113


214,401 22,898
275,906 62,956


201,433 23,542
262,801 66,952


221,830 23,794
249,929 66,803


229,442 24,534


27 40,135 289,221
27 66,240 363,208


30 34,865 297,996
24 100,527 419,737


27 15,275 269,926
18 69,519 382,154


21 63,965 319,073
52 73,403 379,840


51 84,594 333,903
44 55,123 355,300


45 59,918 308,128
50 54,259 352,571


51 68,486 323,132
24 14,688 304,770


1,590 101,660 346,766
10,647 106,149 426,780


43,695 192,258 493,874
50,382 287,518 656,284


57,145 210,328 518,040
53,971 164,634 519,722


. ,7-. 131,735 416,983
1,@.' 164,413 495,587


1,563 139,920 378,782
--- 104,83 443,698


44 76,879 301,898
523 62,676 392,952


--- 2,458 1,520 293,199
--- 2,181 1,280 366,669


--- 2,026
--- 4,450


--- 4,817
-. 40,701


--- 59,359
--- 44,946


--- 61,699
--_ 28,27b


--- 16,598
-- 16,744


--- 16,876
7,140 15,778


8,993 12,081
9,272 9,307


15,972 21,549
17,347 18,512


45,412 23,827
41,878 22,768


108,268 26,009
61,832 147,798


29,052 1.I7..-:"
37,942 127,012


54,510 200,173
67,023 187,352


85 125,0-. 370,754 79,413 153,423
43 '1,r, 378,382 103,906 166,055


36 69,471 323,483 69,204 161,001


1,609
1,421


1,575
1,613


1,708
1,490


1,398
1,752


1,719
1,644


2,190
1,549


2,515
2,550


3,012
1,492


1,601
1,570


2,635
2,110


2,295
2,232


1,913
2,106


2,115
2,138


1,100


301,631
425,608


276,318
424,468


380,140
426,276


397,000
385,322


326,445
370,959


342,198
329,237


370,355
447,909


534,407
693,635


588,880
585,938


553,895
7aT,307


581,987
610,884


558,494
649.433


605,705
650,481


554,788


Footnotes are the Sam as for table 2


,146,463


1,484 860,561
--- 1,452,236





JAN.-FEB. 1950


- 20 -


Table 4.- Estimated saurr,1y and distribution of wheat, by classes,
continental United States, 1941-49 V/

Year beginning July
: 1941 : 1942 : 1943 : 1944 : 1945 : 1946 : 1947 :1948.2/ :1949 2/
:Mil. bu. Mil. bu. Mil. bu. Mil. bu. Mil. bu. Mil. bu. Mil. bU. Mil. bU. Mil. bu.


All wheat
Stocks, July 1 ..
Production ......
IrTr'Tp rts..........
Supply ........
Exports 3/ ......
Carry-over ......
Domestic disap-
pearance .....
Hard red winter
Stocks, JUly 1 ..
Production ......
Supply ........
Exports .........
Carry-over ......
Domestic disap-
pearance .....
Soft red winter
Stocks, July 1 ..
Production ......
Supply ........
Exports .........
Carry-over ......
DIomestic disap-
pearance .....
Hard red spring
Stocks, July 1 ..
Production ......
Imports .........
Supply ........
Sports .........
Carry-over ......
Domestic disap-
pearance .....
Durum
.tocks, July 1 ..
Production ......
Imports .........
Supply ........
Exports .........
Carry-over ......
Domestic disap-
pearance .....
White
Stocks, July 1 ..
Production ......
Supply ........

Carry-over ......
Domestic disap-
pearance .....


385
942
4
1,331
31
631


631
969
1
1,601
346
619


619
844
136
1,599
43
316


316
1,060
42
1,418
145
279


279
1,108
2
1,389
391
100


100
1,153
0
1,253
8402
81,


84
1,367
0
1,451
483
196


196
1,314
1
1,511
504
307


307
1,16,
1

(376)
(3I9)


: 669 948 1,240 994 898 767 772 700 (687)

160 291 317 113 109 37 28 110 368
: 396 486 364 468 521 580 739 638 546
556 777 681 581 630 617 767 748 714
: 20 21 20 104 236 273 337 351
: 291 317 113 109 37 28 110 168
-:
245 439 548 368 357 316 320 229

40 54 29 18 19 11 8 16 18
204 149 125 204 213 196 237 258 260
244 203 154 222 232 207 245 274 278
: 2 1 1 10 65 32 45 40
: 54 29 18 19 11 8 16 18
-:
: 188 173 135 193 156 167 184 216

136 206 205 150 112 39 31 48 78
202 206 227 236 221 215 220 226 173
: 4 1 135 39 2 0 0 1 ---
342 413 567 425 335 254 251 275 251
: 2 2 6 24 53 40 49 60
206 20 150 112 39 31 48 78
-:
134 206 411 'I 243 183 154 137

25 34 27 14 8 5 9 10 1'
41 42 34 30 33 36 45 46 39
0: 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 ---
66 76 62 47 41 41 54 56 57
: 0 1 2 1 1 10 3
: 34 27 14 8 5 9 10 18


32

24
99
123
7
46

70


48 47 37 35 31


46
86
132


41


21
122
l-3


31


82 99 107


34 35


12
146
18 -


25
128
,a


50
25


107 70 80 83


y 1929-1940 in the Wheat Situation, September 1943, page 12.
S'Lt '.-ct to revision.
/ Includes flour made from U. S. wheat also includes shipments


to U. S. Territories.


ii


,


13-,








Table 5 .- Wheat: Supply and


disappearance, Canada, Australia,
1930-39, annual 1940-49


and Argentina, averages 1920-29 and


Canada
Year
beginning Supply : Disappearance
August : e : : :
Carry-over 1/ : Production : Total Domestic : Net exports

Million Million Million Million Million
bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels

Average
1920-29 : 2/ 65.5 385.4 450.9 103.2 270.9
130- : 132.7 330.5 463.2 112.4 199.7
1940 300.5 540.2 840.7 136.5 224.1
1941 : '80.1 314.8 794.9 149.1 221.9
19.2 : 4?.9 556.7 980.6 183.3 202.7
1943 594.6 284.5 879.1 174.6 348.0
1944 : 36.,. 416.6 773.1 .1l.' 333.2
1945 258.1 318.5 576.6 167.1 335.9
1946 73.6 413.7 487.3 161.4 239.8
1947 36.1 341.8 427.9 150.7 199.5
1Q49, 77.7 393.3 471.0 144.1 228.2
1949 3/ 98.7 367.4 466.1

Year
beginning Australia
December 1 :

Average
1920-29 : 7.7 135.4 143.1 44.6 89.9
1939-39 16.9 177.8 194.7 54.5 116.9
1940 : 77.5 82.2 159.7 59.6 58.1
1904 42.0 166.7 208.7 59.6 44.6
I'42 : 104.5 155.7 260.2 68.9 37.3
1943 : 154.0 109.7 263.7 94.6 91.2
1944 77.9 52.9 130.8 100.3 19.0
194- : 11.5 142.4 153.9 76.6 57.1
2146 : 20.2 117.3 137.5 67.9 56.1
1947 : 13.5 220.1 233.6 77.2 (130.0)
1948 26.4 189.7 216.1 78.6 (120.0)
1949 3/ 17.5 207.0 22r.5

Year
beginning Argentina
January 1 4/:

Average
1921-30 16.2 219.7 235.9 76.3 142.h
1931-40 24.3 232.8 257.1 98.8 134.8
1941 : 7.7 299.5 307.2 100.6 90.0
1942 116.6 2'3:.3 354.9 117.1 83.0
1943 : 154.8 235.2 390.0 120.6 76.1
1944 : 193.3 249.9 443.2 166.5 96.7
19Ls : 180.0 150.1 330.1 154.6 95.5
1946 : 80.0 143.5 223.5 136.5 53.0
1947 : 34.0 206.3 240.3 133.0 82.3
lq40 : 25.0 245.0 270.0 141.1 78.9
1949 3/ : 50.0 191.1 241.1 66.3
1950 1 : 210.0

Data from Office of Foreign Agricultural Relations.
1/ From previous crops.
2/ Six-year average; stocks prior to 1924 reported as of epre.:er 1.
3/ preliminary. Estimated stocks for 1949, all on July 1 bases, are as follows, in million bushels:
Canada 130, Argentina 120, Australia 95.
4/ When combined, figures for Argentina are usually used with those of the previous year for Northern
Hemispriere countries. For example, the January 1950 Argentine production is combined with the 1949
production of the United States and Canada.







Table 6 .- Wheat, No. 2 Bard Winter: Weigbted average price per bushel of reported cash
sales, Kansas City, by months, 1900-1949


LeA lrar: Jul1 AJg. Sept.. Oct. :I ov. *:Dec. : Jan. : Feb. : Mar. : Apr. :May June :Average
~ an Cents Cent. Cents


: Cents genis


Cents Conse


eata on a en .


19oo : 68.8 65.6 b
1901 63.0 66.6
1902 : 70.0 65.9
1903 69.6 73.1
1904 : 87.0 93.5
1905 83.8 79.8
1906 71.3 67.8
1907 87.2 86.0
1908 96.7 94.6
1909 :114 102
1910 104 100
1911 : 87 93
1912 92 89
1913 : 82 83
1914 : 78 91
1915 136 126
1916 : 14 141
1917 268 261
1918 220 216
1919 225 218
1920 : 267.7 245.3
1921 : 118.1 114.8
1922 : 112.7 104.3
1923 95.8 100.6
1924 120.5 119.0
1925 153.9 163.9
1926 : 136.5 131.0
1927 135.6 135.3
1928 : 120.4 105.9
1929 125.3 122.6
1930 : 80.0 80.6
1931 : 3.8 42.7
1932 4: 4.9 47.7
1933 98.0 89.7
1934 : 93.2 106.6
1935 : 99.2 104.1
1936 111.0 122.0
1937 : 122.5 111.8
1938 : 70.0 65.5
1939 : 66.7 64.6
1940 70.7 69.3
1941 98.3 106.6
1942 : 107.9 111.2
193 : 140.1 1--.9.8
19144 152.1 150.8
1945 : 158.3 159.8
1946 197.8 193.8
1947 q/228.8 231.8
1948 219.3 215.0
1949 : 200.h 206.0


66.7
65.7
66.6
7?. 4
102.9
78.1
66.7
93.2
98.0
102
99
95
88
87
104
107
157
212
216
224
243.9
121.6
104.5
109.1
119.5
157.5
132.0
130.6
107.5
124.4
77.6
43.1
48.0
87.1
107.5
111.1
122.1
109.5
65.7
85.9
75.8
11h,.1
120.3
145.8
153.0
162.1
196.0
264.6
220.4
21-.2


67.5 66.7
66.3 69.0
67.5 66.8
72.6 72.4
106.3 105.5
80.3 81.6
69.2 68.8
99.9 94.7
99.2 101.5
106 10h4
95. 91
104 100
88 83
84 83
102 108
107 103
167 185
212 212
216 215
230 246
207.2 175.7
110.0 108.6
113.3 117.4
111.9 108.8
136.9 143.1
158.2 162.8
138.6 136.9
128.2 130.6
109.8 112.4
121.7 118.7
74.4 69.0
47.5 58.6
45.2 42.6
83.0 84.1
102.2 101.8
119.0 112.6
122.0 121.9
106.0 94.2
61.7 63.3
82.7 85.8
81.6 84.5
112.2 11 .4
120.5. 123.1
15.2.3 1,6. L

168.3 168.9
203.9 21C..h
295.3 299.9
222.6 228.2
218.8 220.2


65.8
75.3
66.9
71.0
104.7
80.9
69.8
97.0
103.4
110
93
100
84
84
113
112
172
212
2234
263
169.4
139.2
117.4
108.7
161.6
171.6
137.7
131.8
111.2
120.7
70.6
52.4
41.8
80.4
104.2
110.8
1)4.2
96.5
66.9
98.3
33.0
120.1

162.8
162.0
169.2
207.?
301.1
228.7
222.1


67.9
79.1
66.9
74.8
106.6
81.0
70.14
99.7
106.0
111
95.
105
87
85
134
120
189
212
231
282
172.0
112.9
114.5
112.9
181.5
178.1
137.2
132.7
114.5
118.9
69.5
52.6
43.6
84.4
100.9
112.6
138.0
102.7
70.9
101.2
84.7
125.6
136.8
1641.8
163.6
169.2
209. C
:03.22
225.0


68.5
74.8
67.7
87.0
109.0
77.9
72.3

109.6
111
90
103
86
86
154
120
182
212
226
242
162.0
128.9
115.1
110.9
181.2
171.0
135.4
132.6
118.3
112.5
69.3
53.8
43.7
85.0
99.6
110.0
136.5
99.6
69.2
99. h
77.8
123.1
137.0
163.0
165.8
169.1
226.1
250. e
214.6


68.5
72.1
68.6
86.5
103.7
76.4
70.7
98.1
115.3
110
88
105
86
88
149
105
197
212
239
249
155.0
133.7
115.6
108.7
170.9
160.5
132.8
138.2
115.8
102.3
70.2
51.2
48.1
82.0
96.8
105.9
138.6
91.5
68.7
102.1
85.1
121.0
139.9
165.2
166. 3
172.0
269. h
245. h
224.1


69.6
71.9
67.6
89.1
99.9
79.3
72.6
96.5
129.8
108
88
109
88
87
154'
112
243
212
262
275
133.0
134.9
120.4
104.3
150.9
159.1
130.7
152.4
110.5
101.4
73.0
53.2
60.4
77.7
104.6
102.0
140.0
84.6
69.6
105.7
87.2
114.6
1-8. 4
164.0
165.7
172.1
267.6

226.0


70.0
73.5
69.2
91.8
100.8
79.9
90.4
100.2
138.3
107
90
111
87
90
150
110
301
212
260
293
147.0
133.6
116.2
106.3
152.9
154.8
142.1
160.0
100.6
99.1
73.1
53.6
70.0
85.7
98.8
94.9
1;2.0
79.7
75.7
94.7
90.4'
114.9
138.1
163.2
166.7

269.3
240.2
222.1


66.8 67.4
70.5 67.6
73.3 67.6
88.7 76.9
99.7 97.4
77.9 80.1
80.8 72.41
97.2 93.'4
135.8 99.4
108 107
88 98
109 97
88 88
85 81
121 105
100 119
274 171
--- /252
217 219
276 242
138.1 183.1
117.0 119.6
10k.2 112.6
10.1 104.9
160.2 135.4
152.9 162.7
114.1 135.3
147.5 135.1
105.0 112.1
88.7 119.6
68.2 75.5
45.6 46.9
75.9 50.9
89.1 88.5
87.7 98.1
96.0 105.]
120.8 121.14
76.7 110.8
70.9 69.5
76.3 74.1
97.? 81.9
110.9 112.0
137.0 126.3
155.6 114.8
168.2 155.6
186.11/160.2
237.3 208.e
229.4 252.1
195.1 216.8


Compiled as followed: January 1699 December 1900, Kansas City Daily Price Current.
January-December 1901, Kansas C:ty Star.
January 1902 Kansas City Grain Market Feview. (Prior to November 1920 called Kansas City Daily Price Current).
Average of daily prices weighted by carlot sales.

I] Average for 11 months.
2/ Beginning July 1947, sales of Dark Hard and Bard Winter wheat combined--reported as Bard Winter.


vv-- ......................





11 -23 -
Table 7.- Wheat: Weighted average cash price, specified markets
Sand dates 1948-49, 1949-50

:All classes: No. 2 : No. 1 : No.1 : No. 2 : No. 1
Sand grades :Dark Hard : Dark : Herd Red : Soft
Month : six : and Hard : N. Spring !Amber DUrUm: Winter : Wheat
:and markets : Winter :Minneapolis:Minneapolis: St. Louis : Portland
date :: :Kansas City:-1 : : I1
:19 48-:1949-:198-: 199-:1948-:1949-:1948-:1949-:1948-:1949- 1948-:1949-
S49 : 50: 49: 50 : 49 : 50 49 : 50: 49 : 50: 49 : 50
S Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol. Dol Dl. Dol. Dol. Dol.
Month
Nov. .*: 2.37 2.27 2.28 2.20 2.17 2.40 2.46 2.30 2.36 2.16 2.23 2.21
Dec. : 2.31 2.27 2.29 2.22 2.40 2.38 2.38 2.30 2.44 2.20 2.24 2.20
Jan. : 2.27 2.26 2.25 2.22 2.35 2.37 2.35 2.29 2.29 2.22 2.21 2.19
Week
ended :
,:Dec. 3 : 2.35 2.27 2.33 2.25 2.45 2.38 2.44 2.30 2.45 --- 2.25 2.22
10 : 2.35 2.28 2.32 2.23 2.44 2.37 2.42 2.31 2.47 --- 2.25 2.21
17 : 2.29 2.27 2.27 2.22 2.36 2.38 2.36 2.30 2.38 --- 2.24 2.21
24 : 2.26 2.26 2.27 2.21 2.37 2.37 2.36 2.29 --- --- 2.24 2.19
31 : 2.29 2.26 2.27 2.21 2.38 2.36 2.34 2.28 2.28 2.20 2.23 2.18
Jan: 7 : 2.31 2.29 2.27 2.23 2.36 2.40 2.36 2.28 2.29 2.24 2.22 2.19
14 : 2.30 2.26 2.27 2.21 2.35 2.36 2.40 2.29 --- 2.20 2.22 2.18
21 : 2.27 2.24 2.24 2.21 2.35 2.34. 2.32 2.28 2.32 2.21 2.22 2.19
28 : 2.25 2.26 2.23 2.24 2.32 2.37 2.32 2.32 2.24 --- 2.18 2.20

1/ Average of daily cash quotations.

Table 8.- Wheat: Average closing prices of May wheat futures,
specified markets and dates, 1948-49, 1949-50
: Chicago : Kansas City : Minneapolis
Period : 1948-49 :1949-50 1948-49 199-50 : 1948-49 : 1949-50

.: Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars
iMonth
Nov. : 2.35 2.12 2.24 2.08 2.29 2.15
Dea. : 2.39 2.14 2.26 2.10 2.29 2.18
Jan. : 2.24 2.11 2.12 2.07 2.17 2.15
Week ended -
Dec. 3 : 2.31 2.14 2.21 2.10 2.26 2.19
10 : 2.30 2.15 2.20 2.10 2.25 2.19
17 : 2.27 2.15 2.16 2.11 2.21 2.20
24 : 2.27 2.13 2.17 2.09 2.21 2.17
31 : 2.28 2.11 2.17 2.08 2.22 2.17
.Jan. 7 : 2.26 2.12 2.15 2.08 2.19 2.15
14 : 2.26 2.11 2.13 2.06 2.18 2.14
21 : 2.24 2.10 2.12 2.06 2.17 2.14
28 : 2.20 2.11 2.08 2.07 2.13 2.15


_.__:




JiN. FEB. 1950 -.2 -.
Table 9.- Wheat: Prices per bushel in three exporting countries, Friday weare
mid-month, Oct., 1949-Jan.,1950, Weekly Dec., 1949-Jan., 1950
..-1


HARD WHEAT : HARD WHEAT :


. SOFT WEAT


Date
: (Friday)


Friday mid-month
October 14
November 11
December 16
January 13


:United States: Canada :
: No. 1 Dark : No. 2 :United States : United
Northern : Manitoba: No. 1 : States
: Spring : at : Dark Winter : No. 1
: 13 percent : Fort : Galveston : Portland
protein at : William : j :
: Duluth I/ : 2/ :__
Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars


2.32
2,30
2.30
2.27


2/2.13
2.12
1.99
1.92


2.345
2.335
2.40
2.38


2.175
2.205
2.205
2.18


Australia
V 3/


Dollars-

--- i
---
4-


Weekly A
December 2 : 2.33 2.05 2.39 2.215 _/
9 : 2.29 2.00 2.40 2.205 --
23 : 2.32 1.93 --- 2.185 -_.
30 : '2.30 1.94 --- 2.185 ---
January 6 : 2.31 1.93 .2.395 2.19 2.24
20 : 2.32 1.91 2.39 2.19 ---
27 : 2.32 1.93 2.41 2.21 ---
i/ F.O.B. spot to arrive. 2- Fort William quotation is in store. 3/ Sales to
non-contract countries. 4/ Quarterly report from Australia delayed. Odd sale to'
Japan in late November reported at $2.28 c.i.f. 2/ Converted to U. S. Currency
beginning September 23.
Table 10.- Wheat: Stocks in the United States on Jan. 1, average 1937-41, and
annual 1945-50 I/


Stocks
position


:Average 1945 1946 1947 : 1948

:1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
:bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels


Farm ........... :272,690 384,638 3
Interior mills,
elevators .anc :
warehouses 2/ .:'154,035 160,432 1
Terminals ...... :159,344 152,043. 1
Merchant mills &:
mill p.evators :115,881 114,387
Commodity Credit:
Corp.wheat,3/ : --- 16,847
Total :701.950 828.347 6


61,031


.08,776
.02,131


365,794 428,666


119,044
56,256


116,827
141,889


:1949 1950
1,000 1,000
bushels bushels

391,379 327,230

203,933 236,284
166,348 219,038 -


95,276 96,779 111,130 103,113 -117,749


1
i8


4,778 ,o404 3,100 3.701 7,805
1.992 642.277 801.612 868.474 908.106:


Terminal stocks (Commercial) are reported by the Production and Marketing Adminis-
tration. Stocks owned by the Commodity Credit Corporation not included by position
are reported by CCC. Stocks in other positions are estimated by the Crop Reportin
Board. 2/ Jan. I stocks for earlier years as well as for other quarters are shop
in The Wheat Situation, issue of December 1948-February 1949, page 16. 2/ Include'
all off-farm storage not other wise designated. 3/ Wheat owned by CCC and ator
in bins or other storage owned or controlled by CCC; also CCC-owned grain in tr
sit and in Canadian elevators. Other wheat owned by CCC, as well as wheat out- *|
standing under loan is included in other stocks positions. .


I
I










Table 11 .-Wheat: Loan rates, quantity plegped and 1selvered to Cosmodity relitit ,'"rporailon, and sLo'ys
ownie by (7' ani loans outs.anaing June 3)7, 'JniteJ States, 1939-1.9

:Y-A a :Loan rate : S: to.-ks and loan. June 1'
Year A a : :ho. 2 Iard:No. 1 Dark: ;; :ft : :,______________
gnnng :per.-enage: ationa] : Winter : Northern : No.2 Red :. hite : :[,i ver." 3to-ks : Unler loar,
.Jul r aerae e : at : Spring a at : White : Fle-pge. : .0o ownel : .urrrt rop
raV : rity : r : Kansas Minneap- : Lt. LouIs3: at "l : t.y : I ovjp : o .:.ner Total
: price 1/ : : Ciy : oils : : or : : :': :. : yea
U11liorn Millor. Million Vi Llion Mil1or. Million
Per.,ar L Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars Cvllars tusnels busne s ousnelda tustels bushels tusnels

1938 : .59 .72 .81 ."3 .6?7 ',.-' I'.' t,. 21.5 X.i. 2'.Q
1939 ". .61 ." .8" .8 16".7 ".' 1.6 1- -.3 11.9
191.' .61. .77 .R .81 ."1 9'9.5 .'." 169.2 31.3 ?.1. 2:7.9
1u1 '. .98 1.1,1 1.15 1.15 3'6.3 J 2.8 319.7 9-. 4.9 .19.)
3IO2 : As 1.1. 1.27 1.32 1.? : .21 .'"'.l "1.' 259.8 133.3 5.1 398.1
1043 : q' 1.23 1.37 1.42 .1.: 1. 1 ". *'.3 99.1 14.. 2.5 117.1
19LL 1.35 1.I5r 1.53 1.. 1.6 1. '. 1. .2 123.9
19L; i.38 1.'5? 1.55 1.58 1. .. 21.0 2.5 l.'J 32.5
1 .o : ," .L. 1.6r. 1.06 ..-l ., .. 19.c .7 19.3
IL' 1.43 &.-'2 2."1. 2. 1. -- ;..9 .8 3.L 37.1
1Q.0 2..:, 2.23 2.2;5 ..a .. 1.' 238.2 32.2 c.., 2' i..
1 l. Q, 1.95 2.2r- 2.22: ', .I

_T' The ns.ti.nal avqraye loan rate ar. the farm% aq a per. enrp re a e pc ri .F e .rn aT, r .r.o *.'ninrrin; of the marketing year.
1 Inclu-les .-.pen caretr. purchases heinning 191.3, ar.i a-'or-tirlcy ra, 1 r,. 'I me new :rp w-.a'..
1/ In.:10ies !' I... million bushel or 101.4 :roF uaneat c'nt unle- market.r. -eri3en.:.
T. In.-lues i... million busnels of pur-hase agreem-er.' w.east Jliverej .








Table 12.-tire, rough: Average prire per r..~;rel reeivel try farmers, Inlted states, IQ3'-i.q9 1


iYer A- rust .September: October :Novemner C-erter: Jarinry fet.rarv: Mar-h April : May : June : July : Average
eAUF. rs : 15 : 15 : 15 : t 1 : iL, l 15 1_ : 1 : 1' : 1,

ents Cant a Ct.s Cents .ants ent *en' s ents enr. enr.s enta Cents 'ents

1921 :2 :i 0.1 1P5.) 1 -.t 1''.' i,'t.1 1) .2 101.3 99.Q
103-' .?' 85.1 81.1 78.7 76.' 76.1 '..' "7.1 ".7 7:6. 75.6 72.1. 78.1.
1 31 ;'. 1I 1.0- 19.8 55.8 '6. *.i.. '1.' -.,: .1 :..4 1.4.5 1.1.9 1.8.,
1932 : ..1 1.1.1 37.8 37.2 3".' 3.. 1.6 .. 1 L..1 ;8.5 59., L.1.8
193' '..L 74?.1 "'8.1 79.' 76.2 '8.; 9.L. 9.' )1.3 '7.' 76.5 71,.7 "'7.
1031. : '.1 '6.2 79.1. 80.. "'6.2 831.6 8 8).L 2. 83:.2 86.. sR.6 78.9
193I w.' t4..8 69.8 71.9 &'.9 8).1 81.9 81 .8 82. 81..6 i.)3 86.2 73.0
196 <7.i 91.9 80.0 78.9 "6.3 81..6 91.3 91.8 92.' 88.2 83.2 8:." 81.1.
10:'" ".2 6L.7 72.3 74.6 66.7 6-.3 6b.5 61.2 55.8 56.'. 60.3 62.8 65.8
1938 : .1.1 6)0.1 6L... 65.q 66.i 'J.6 6A." '-.6 61'. 1 2.i. 61.' 6..1. 6L..'
1939 '8.9 86.3 73.6 74..8 '1.8 73.'. 6o.6 I .. i..6 71.1 71.' "5.. 7?.8
10I.: : .6 62.1 6a.1 75.7 '1.1 9W.. 48.11b.'.i I L... i. 11.6 ILl.:. 81.2
1901. 1...* 89.1 95.9 123.2 1.7.' li '.4. Ib1.L 1-t1.3) 10.' 178.6 172.2 1').6 110.)
19L2 I'r.)' 156.3 139.6 14L.1 16.7.5 1 '." 178. l' -.. 1 iL.' 12."' 182.3 1a. 163.3
103 : 1 13 17 188 188 7 18 188 i 1 Ill 1" 1t. 173 178
19]t : '' 1'9 17" 18.' 183 181 il81 Hi 18. i8'' 181 181 17'
10z. : It5 1b8 178 182 1" 17i6 1"3 18 18. 18. 131 183 179
19.6 : ."L 18 L. 22 23- 231 j3i ;36 2136 i' 232; 2 ;-2 '
191.' : 1 23c, 251 2 8' 28 3'1 3q. ." ",f. 1 2 9
191.9 : i.' 211. 21 23- 21.1 2.7 232 2; .3 .229 21" 21. 219
lL,9 : ', I'"' 173 186 191.

I monday pries are the result of weighting monLrtlv .tatL price. y produtLion. S.. S. marKeting-year prices are .ne result of
TIll weirtLin .ItaLe monthly prices by monthly sales to otrai.n 3Ste marketing-year averages, ar- 'i weighting the State markelng-year
averaqs3 bh total sales for each 5tate.
2' Monthly figures prior to 1923 are not available. Annual "alenmar year averages for 191) to 1922 are respectively as follows: '9.1., 66.3,
78,., 80.3, 9q.1, 89.3, 83.q, 98.7, 192.0., 180.0, 21.5.5, 112.1, 98.,', Q8.5, 112.), 13'.", 1.8.,', 1U3.0, Q9.8, and 91.1.
2, Prel minary.








Table 13 .- Bye: Supply and disappearance, United States, 1934-69


Supply: Disappearance
Year r : : :Domestic Erprts :
beginning ovr Produc- Imports Total :Food 2 Feed / Seed Total
July : i/ ; tlon e r : Totrl t
Million Million Million Million Million Million Million Million Million Million Million
*"chels buphe bu'rshels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels

193 : 14.9 16.3 11.2 42.4 8.0 4.8 8.6 10.2 31.6 / 31.6
1935 10.8 56.9 2.3 70.0 6.9 21.9 8.7 12.8 50.3 2/ 50.3
1936 : 19.7 24.2 3.9 47.8 7.0 13.8 10.0 11.6 42.4 0.2 42.6
1937 5 8.2 48.9 / 54.1 5.9 18.0 9.1 6. 39.0 6.6 45.6
S193 far and te 6.0na 6. 6,8 19.8 9.7 5 41.8 0.8 42.6
i--= : 21.9 38.6 i. 60.5 7.0 20.2 7.4 5.6 40.2 0.7 40.9
6o19.6 39.7 60.7 7.1 19.9 8.1 6.7 41.8 0.2 42.0
9Calculte 18.7 3.9 8.8 7.4 7.8 19.4 8.3 date ..3 2.3
1942 29.1 52.9 1.5 83.5 8.3 27.2 6.8 2.1 44.4 0.5 44.9
1"L3 : 47.1 28.7 8.3 84.1 8.7 33.7 5.8 4,5 52.7 0.4 53.1
1944 : 31.0 22.5 4.1 57.6 7.8 18.8 5.4 10.3 42.3 3.1 45.4
1945 : 12.2 24.0 2.0 38.2 6.7 9.1 4.5 8.3 28.6 7.2 35.8
1946 : 2.4 18.9 1.6 22.9 4.5 6.4 4.9 4.2 20.0 0.6 20.6
1947 2.3 26.0 28.3 4.6 6.1 5.0 6.6 22.3 2.7 25.0
194F 3.3 26.4 68 36.5 4.7 6.9 4.5 6.7 22.8 5.4 28.2
199 / : 8.3 18.7 i/70 34.

/ 1934-42, farm and terminal stocks only. Beginning In 1943, the figures also include interior mill and elevator
stocks.
TCaleulted from trade sources, 1934-45; from Bureau of the Census, 1945 to date.
'I Residual item.
Includes flour.
Less than 50,000 bushels.
7Z Preliminary.
7/ imports for July-December only.









Table 14 .,Rye: Supply and disappearance, United States, January-June and July-December periods, 1943-49

Supply : Disappearance
period Stocks Produc- Domestic Exports
Period S i on : Imports: Total Food / Feed A/ Seed :Alcohol, Total: E Total
: : : : : rt oa :*
1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
bushels bushels buphels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels bushels


July-Dec. : 47,114 28,680 765 76,559 4,549 20,937 5,293 3,429 34,208 243 34,451
1944
Jan.-June : 42,108 --- 7,549 49,657 4,185 12,770 460 1,081 18,496 176 18,672
July-Dec. 30,985 22,525 3,299 56,809 3,685 13,394 4,994 8,753 30,826 393 31,219
1945
Jan.-June 25,590 --- 850 26,440 4,092 5,386 435 1,610 11,523 2,751 14,274
July-Dec. : 12,166 23,952 1,869 37,987 3,413 6,863 4,098 6,513 20,887 3,785 24,672
1946
Jan.-June 13,315 --- 127 13,442 3,242 2,340 356 1,803 7,741 3,324 11,065
July-Dec. 2,377 18,879 865 22,121 2,476 5,023 4,506 1,407 13,412 205 13,617
1947
Jan.-June 8,504 --- 776 9,280 2,021 1,326 391 2,828 6,566 368 6,934
July-Dec. : 2,346 25,975 41 28,362 2,360 3,476 4,670 1,981 12,487 1,441 13,928
1948
Jan.-June : 14,434 --- 0 14,434 2,196 2,659 406 4,608 9,869 1,212 11,081
'. -i.. : 3,353 26,449 2,04o 31,842 2,414 4,002 4,184 3,700 14,300 259 I4,5:9
Jar..-..ie : 17,283 --- 4,754 22,037 2,296 2,886 364 3,015 8,561 5,172 13,733
July-Dec.j: 8,304 18,697 7,035 34,036 2,456 4,690 1,862 2,050

1 Includes stocks in interior mill and elevators, in addition to stocks on farms and in terminals.
/ Calculated from trade sources, 1943-45; from Bureau of the Census, 1945 to date.
3J Pesidual item.
Includes flour.
/ Includes estimates for December.









Table 15.- Ryet Average price per buahl received by farmers, and parity price, United States, 1908-49 1/

bear July August :September: October : November: December: January : February: March April May June Average
n 15 : 15 : 15 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15 : 15
July
Cents Cents Cent Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents .ants

Fri.'e raceive.I by farmers
19n08 TT^. *i.e 1,L 7i.9 13.& **15 T. ? 74.1. 'L.2 "'.' 8 9i.. '.
199 : "'., "., "2.6 -3.2 '2.7 '1.1 ".a. "2.;7 ']"1. ~'.. '..' "i .

1910 : 74.5 74.2 73.4 72.2 71.6 72.4 73.2 72.5 3).4- 75.6 76.8 77.4 '*.'
1911 76.2 76.2 78.3 81.4 83.2 83.0 83.6 84.2 34..' 84.8 85.4 84.8 8 .'.
1912 : 80.8 74.4 70.4 69.4 67.6 65.0 66.& 66.0 63.0 62.6 63.2 63.6 0 .1
1913 62.0 61.8 63.9 64.0 63.3 63.0 62.1 61.8 62.4 63.0 63.6 63.8 'i.4
1914 : 62.0 68.2 ".2 79.6 83.3 88.4 95.4 103.0 102.9 101.2 100.0 95.9 13.2
1915 : 91.4 87.2 ?3.6 83.7 84.6 84.4 86.8 87.0 84.6 83.6 83.8 83.6 83.t
1916 : 83.4 91.6 101.9 109.7 118.7 120.3 121.0 124.8 130.8 1.49.8 173.6 180.0 112.5
1917 177.6 170.0 165.8 169.3 167.4 168.2 172.6 187.9 218.0 228.1 204.4 178.8 1-3.'.
1918 : 166.9 161.6 156.6 153.3 152.1 151.2 145.6 136.3 139.0 150.6 149.6 141.2 it..7
1919 : 144.2 144.0 137.0 132.8 131.5 142.8 153.4 149.8 150.6 169.6 183.5 186.4 1.L.9'

1920 : 178.8 168.8 165.6 152.2 134.4 125.8 128.1 128.8 122.4 112.0 108.8 108.0 11.t.
1921 : 101.0 94.0 89.2 81.6 72.2 69.6 70.0 77.0 83.8 85.9 87.8 82.8 P'.4.
1922 : 74.0 66.9 63.2 65.2 68.2 70.7 71.7 71.0 70.1 70.8 69.2 62.2 '2.?
1923 56.3 55.3 57.2 58.8 62.1 63.9 63.5 64.5' 62.8 60.4 60.1 61.6 1'.
192 : 68.8 70.8 80.1 105.7 108.6 112.7 126.2 132.2 125.1 100.9 103.6 101.8 9L.'
1925 : 92.3 92.8 *'1.1 74.1 73.4 86.8 88.2 82.5 73.4 73.8 72.5 76.0 ".
1926 : 80.7 86.1 I1.0 82.4 83.0 82.4 83.6 88.4 86.4 85.2 90.1 94.9 4.2.5
1927 91.2 80.6 81.4 81.0 84.0 87.8 88.0 89.5 96.0 99.8 111.5 106.8 8?2..
1928 : 99.2 83.6 81.8 87.1 86.3 87.2 87.9 91.5 91.4 86.0 79.1 75.7 9l.'
1929 : 85.3 91.8 89.2 89.9 85.5 88.4 85.7 78.3 68.4 68.7 63.8 60.7 ....

1930 4: 3.6 53.0 53.1 47.6 41.6 41.1 37.4 34.9 34.3 32.8 33.0 31.4 43.3
1931 : 33.0 32.5 33.2 33.6 41.4 36.8 36.8 36.3 37.7 36.6 33.4 28.8 33.9
1932 : 22.0 23.3 23.6 22.3 22.1 21.1 22.7 21.9 22.8 30.1 38.9 43.5 26.9
1933 : 78.2 58.8 61.4 52.7 55.4 51.9 53.6 54.2 53.1 52.8 51.9 58.2 62.3
193 : 61.8 73.9 79.1 75.0 71.9 74.4 73.1 69.3 66.5 66.0 62.0 53.7 72.0
1935 : 36.0 35.5 36.5 42.1 40.4 40.0 41.4 44.4 42.9 40.8 40.6 43.8 38.3
1936 : 61.1 75.1 79.5 80.4 "].' 90.0 97.9 98.9 95.8 99.9 96.0 85.3 80.8
1937 : 81.0 70.6 68.1 63.8 .' 59.2 64.1 63.4 58.7 52.2 49.8 46.0 67.2
1938 41.4 32.4 32.0 32.9 32.1 32.3 34.7 33.9 32.9 33.0 36.4 39.1 32.2
1939 : 34.3 34.2 44.0 45.1 44.6 52.3 56.7 55.7 55.6 57.1 52.4 40.3 42.6

19C.) 18.3 36.8 -)J.; C.5 L2.'4 1l.. ,-.'r 1.- O .i L1.4 .A.i .1.I -".q


194q *1 1 9.. 1**2. I 1." I .- 1 9.. 1 1'0. 11 *.8 *L2. *:1. 1..' ,
19 14. : 122.* 1 l i i. 1 .1 11. I .'. J1 g 14 L 136
146 : 1 -' 16,: 191 1 20 2i :18 3 '1 ZA.4 Z..4 L .'. 103
IL' : 21 211 248 A. .i. ,.. :. :P1' l;1 1' 22'
191.8 1: 1 L.6 119 11.' i.1 1" .. ;'L 118 118 Ll. 1 I 1. '
1909 120 1' 127 L: 2 i:,

*rit. price

1922 !: 1 i 12 1: 1 .: 1
12 "124 1' 1 11 1 1 .
1925 122 12 11 2l 121 21 : :; l l. 1 12- 12
1926 '12; 101 121 1i. 12'1 120 .i 1 i I-
192" 1 1.20 L2') 1"* 11i 1; 1 1i t. L 1722
1928q 1: 121 il; i11 1 ) 1; :. 1 .' 1 :.i1 : 1
1920 12;-: 12:. I 1420 12" Do Li 1 1 .1 1' l" i 1 1
j ai .) 115 11. 114. 112 111 l -l C,3 I "' l :.. 1 ,. !
1931 l 7' 1':0. 18.6 89 .0 'o.s, '9 .* *,. .. i1.. a'" "..' 88.'s
1032 88.e 88.6 8V.8 8".1 8h.L 8."' 8:'.l .'.1 ... 1:.1 L .1 .
I 31 8i.7 88.6 91.1. 91.L 91.1. 01.i. -. '.7 i.. I... '2.
1934L 92.2 4-..) 9;.l 95.0 4.* 0 .. 5 3).t, .". 4... q ._ *,... t...
1035l 91.6 92.9 92.2 02.2 91.4. 91.I. '. :'.-' L.'. a. N0.. 80.1
10b6 91.4 9q3.b 93.6 93.6 93.6 QL.. Q5..)' QC. 0t.' 9".9 9-." q7.a
10"'" 9'.2 06.5 95.* 94.3 93). 9.1 '... 992.9 ..2 .2.2 Q...2 91.1
1038 90.7 90. 89.3 8. 38.3 8.3 "0?..' 8,3. 3988. 8.t 88.6 88.i 88.t,
1911 : 88.6. 87.8 9'J.0 9." 00. 9( Y'.:, ,',. g .0 ':.,0 9";., 9:j.' 91..0
1.' '. I .1' 9).0 90.) '.0.1. W .- 9-..) 9.' 9''.' C'.' 01.4 92.
191.1 91..3 96.. 98". 110 101 12 13)) 1:; L.: 1 1'd8 i)8
10L2 : 1.1 108 109 O "o U.1 L12 112 13 U114. 1 111b 11"
19. : 117 11' 1-17 118 11o 12". 120 121 121 121 l 1.2
1941. 122 122 122 12. L;2 122 123 123 121. 12. 124. 121.
141.5 : 2.. 12. 125 L25 L25 126 127 128 120 13:' 132 135
19L6 1.2 1.45 1.3 1i.I8 1 12 15? 15 1c.9 1i,' 165 .bL 166
19L' : lt 168 171 1"2 171. 176 181 170 179 1'q 18) 181
19L8 : 181 181 180 1'9 17) 1"7 l 19 176 1"7 1" 176 176
199 4 1'6 1" 1'"L 173 1"' 173

1/ ". S. montnl. prt:es are the result or weighting monthly S'.ate prices by production. U. .. marKt infL-Rear pri-es re 0ne result of
il wei ght irng tat ae monthly prices by monthly sales to obtain State marketing-year averages, arn 2', weighting the State marketing-year
averages bj otal a sales for each State.
.2' Prelimlnary.
13 Cosputation or parity prices: Average price in base period (August 1909 to July 1914) I monthly index of prices paid by farmers, intereal
and taxes.
jI,' Monthly figures prior to 1923 are not available. Annual calendar year averages for 1910 to 1922 are respectively as follows: 69.1, 72.0,
72.0, 73.1, 73.4, 7'.0, 90.0, 107.0, 125.0, 143.0, 145.0, 119.0, 118.0.






28


Table 16.- Pye, No 2: Weighten average price per Ltuhel of reported aanD sales, Minnepolle, b3y months, 1930-49

fear : : : : : : : :
teorrlr.n : lulj : Aug. : Sept. Oct P; ow. : Dec. : Jan. ; Feb. : MIr. : Apr. : a : June : Average

Cent Certe Cents rents Cents Ceant Cents Centa Cents CentB CoLe Cent. Cents

t' : e 6 1 '. 49.1 42 7 13.6 38.3 37.4 3.,.7 3..2 36.h 36.6 51.3
3-37 ? 1 38.3 LO.. -:1.3 v5.3 b.0o 1-6.0 '7... LI. 6 38.7 32.4 `1.8
,: 31 13 8 3'. 1 31.6 50.6 30.7 32 5 32.2 34.1 L3 3 32.h 62.1 Lo0.6
". 3., 72.3 71.3 62.3 6&.3 ,9.0 63.7 61.1 "o.2 -7.2 59.8 68.7 68..
73 7 59.3 86.7 75.7 76 0 8o.. 76.2 68.7 61.? 61.5. 5b.3 k6.3 81 0
L. I L .o LC =.1 a 4 .6 41 C' 53.5 56.9 42.1 4'9.7 51.7 58.2 50.2
7 6 7- 0 d?.. '6 7 8' 1 ?1.6 109.9 113.2 110.6 109.0 112.1. 108.9 99. 97.2
lf7 : ? 77 3 '77. 7'.C0 68.- 6-.8 75..9 7'.1 66.7 61 0 .8.0 55.', 73.8
1iL L& Lo.. 0 o.a. .1 4 40.2 42.- 1' 1 ..2 13.1 L3.1 .0.9 50.0 1.3.9
1' ..3.1 Li.; =2.7 =2.1 '1.0 66.9 7) 3 c.6.5 66.' 69.5 58.8 L1..9 1.9
I': .1 o '.1 2 .3.6 L7.i '0.? .0 2.6 "-.2 2.'. ,6.5 56.1 s6 6 50.8
11.1 51 1.7 c7 60 ,) i 61 7. O,.3 7..1 75. 71.8 69.3 60.3 6 .1
.C: 3. .1i ,. .' 70 7 .-7 ; 1 3. 80. 087.2 9?..1 73.
1 1l.:,l ? i1 ll l,' iL 1 1':* L ..-' 12- *. 123.' 127 1 119." 1.12.1 10B.1
I'' 113 C' 11 I 1..'? i iIll LI 1 li .A i2S 1 12'.' 127.2 133.9 139.2 155.3 12f .2
1.= 1? 1'. ? 11 f 3 193 I I'V L' 3 ?3:.o' 26 6- 286.1 -'- 171.6
1i. ?,, 3, ? -3 3 ?3 67 6 ,') -S: .7 31C.l0 3 3' 1 .8 310 2 30?.9 25..2
S'. ? i .c ? 1 7 ?" ?m2 I" ?%770 (7 3 2 1 ? c,.2 253 0 ?4.1 2 -L.? 26'.7
r"'-:i 1 I1.' i 73 1 i.7 it ;.-: 'Ai: Ic. if..2 1V6.1 136.2 13' 6 1,7.5
i:.L 161 L i9. 1 6.: ILi A 1L1 3 iL, 7


:' i'Tlie: frtm PI iJr.neap: 11.3 Le 1Ly M.ripr Pee: r.: Avere.ae :f dtlL r!ies v 1m.e1 c.-y car-1c-r. ealea



iTi. 17.- Pict. miLlid. blue FPeae ta3 Zer lr., n. B1c. 1 'ErTra Far,:I- A'ersge rr-,.lesale price per round,
nc:rrp New "Tleaasn. '. mcTnftra iz-;'.-'

vear : ; : : : :
e,_rlntnaW : A.u. ; Sept : OcX. Icv : Dec. I Jan : Feb. : Mr. Apr. : Manj : June : July Average

Blents Cente 'lere C.nMs '7eta C.r-" C.eats '.-er Carta a r, te Cnert. ,oeoce Cenca
Blue Pose :
- : 1 ,,:, 70) .Le ., 3 73 c 3.67 3.,3 3.50 3.o0 3 72
S i : ." : .7 ?.:Q? ?.7 .2.L 3 2. 2.16 2.79
2 : ; .i .0 l. .iu 3C,0 2. X, 3.'9 ?.38
1 3. 3 3 'C L...3 .0,3 L. 0u .00. 3.92
1 : 7 ? 7 3. 3. ?.7 3 L 1 .)1 3.85
1 ^-1, L ?i L, __ X L I.7P' L i:.1 L. 1 *77 7.*.. L .LL, L "5 I4 -7 ", L.39
r 1,1 Lm7r 1$ L v-ti i L .7F, 6 A:.0.
i1'T 5 I ,." i ., 7 .7 :. 8 2.S7 3. -'08
n *. ?. ; -' i *2 3 2 2.?? 3.5- 2.3 p ?.o ?.91
i ?.c 1 : 8 3 3.1n -3 '" -'3 3.ie 3.?3 3. 3. 0
l 3.: : 3.2 .71 3 7 L.22 h 74h L'.il 78 L.c2 3.?3
i-1 i' ,:. ? .Tr_ f.4 7.':"; 7.-0 7.60 7.15 7.15) ,.16
.:c i: : t. .:, 6., 6.m. 6.c, 6.60 6 53
S c c' .r '. 6 '.:o' -: 6.' c..cou ..c) .60 .60 c 60 6.6) 6.60
1-'' r.o .., C 6 c 6. e '. c.60 C.t. 6 10 6 6) 6..6' c.60 6.60
I '. :..to c .. .6'" c..~ 6 60 o.6) ', i. ) 6.60o L. 6 ) 13...: 7.17
*.L 6.0.~.- 7. i Ii' ci.- -' tv "'.'u -vy *.'X. 9.30 3."-7- i% 25 8.:1i
1L1; 1-, L ',L 1, L ir 12.6F 13.'" 1 12.9-' 13 8' 15 &5 Jc.5',: 13.-0

7L"7 : .7 U ..'.1 u.. 1".1i L:.'. '.6'" 1 .LL Li L'.- 13.1.' 1:...).' 16.25 12.95
1,-L : .7-. :. A .1 1r'. -' 9.73 -. .0 '.?:' 10 8.b O .70 9.25.
1i 49 .- .?5 7 ,- ; 7 "' .10.

DAe froum ProadcCLi-,n nInd Mari'. In.r Ad.Iier rat ilon.
I 1-C0-Lc, Blue Frae.


Iabti 18,- IlIe, mi Lle, Calif-nolta earl. U.,. S. ei ? (Fancyj: Avsara price per i0Cr pounds, double eas.:-kd, San Flracisco
docrB, b.y ere, 136-'' 1i

Year : : : : :
te1nwnin,L .:Cct. r -fu : Dec. : Jan : Fec. : Mr. : Apr. My : Jue : July : Aug. : Sept. : Average
- c o.er : : r -.
Dollar Dcl l iare Dollars Dc liars Dollare Dollar Dollars Do lIars c-lare Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars

1 ." : 3 0 3..6 r .- 3.-- 3.6. 3.72 6.71 3.79 3.82 3.87 3.71. 3.69 3.70
971 3. 3.'. .0L ?w. C3 2.66 ;.39 2.32' .28 ?.22 2.21 2.2"2 2.63
1, ~? : .., '. -.1,:V. 2.23 ?.2 2.33 2?..* .-'O 3.ho 3.36 3.31 2.63
1 61. 3 79 3. ? .76 31.78 3.78 7.79 3.78 3 78 3.78 3.78 3.78 3.77
,^ 3 7 13.7 7 3 7 78 3 71 3.78 3.91 4.10 1..10 4.10 1.10 ".13 3.93
1L.. L hL ,) I I .' L L L.=.3. l.0 -a .50 '.?.L .70 4. 70 L.70 b.'8 '..5
1)0 6 L.4 .. .= 3.3L h .i, h..I 4 5.l .1 115 .15 4.1. 'A.15 '.02
i 3.1- 5 '-- 3. C 3 ?5. 3.'- 3.'. 3.5 3. 3. 3.75 3.65 i.15 3.37
..-, 2.9: 5 2. 2.95 3.i0 lO 3.1' 3 10 3.10 3.50 3.-0
1 3 ', 3. 3 0. y,0 3. 0 -.e 3 30 3.3) 3.60 3.60 3.60 3.57 3.70
1,os : 3.', ".- 3.0 t 3.0 3.80o L.21 3 .3 .3z. 4.35 4.35 3.92
11 .. 4 0- .67 70 6..,l 6.S8 6.86 6.95 .'. 7.oc ;.,xr 6.6, 6.26 6.3k
lx? : 6.2 c 1 r..6 6.3A 0o. 3 6.38 6.". 6.5,0 6.=.0 6.50 6.-o 6.50 6.40
l.,,3 B .,': c.b. c.-0 .0 6.=:, ...o 6. 6.. ," -.,'0 C.50 6.=,,) 6.L6 6.50
. 6. '6 '.6 6. hi 6.t 6..6 6..,6 6.V1 6.16 6.1 L 6.1 6 6.46 6.'6
C1L?- i ..* Cc '.6 C 6.16 6.1.6 6.Le. 6.Ii 6.16 6. 46 12."' 6.47 7.35 7.05
6. 7.',-L '.3? 6.70 1..70 9 ;0 8.70 8 70 8.70 8.770 11.81 12.50 10.32 9.23
1?417 : V'3 1':C- 10.' 11.01 1.1 60 U.6p 11..60 12 33 12.63 12.62 11.95 11.23 11.51
1-L- 7.8. 6.13 9 13 9.13 9.25 9.06 8.7? 6.33 1.22 7.97 7.95 7.78 8.48
131. 7 1'0 7.3' 7.37

1 Prior to May 18, 1942,: allff.rnla-Japan.
DaTo friom Prod-',to!o and sNr'.tiL Adlai latrstion.




7 : ....


-29-

Table 19.-BRoe, milled beessle: Supply and distribution, United States, 1931-.19


Bunts,


-DiBtribution


Year beginning
.... August





19341
. 12935
1936
1937
S1938
1939
9240
I. 2

1944
F' 191
'. 19k4

1967

1919


Carry-
over
?i


Million
bag 5/

1.74b
.53 :
.82.
1.69
1.50 .
2.32
2.70
1.69
.19
1.19
1.97
.77
.85
.35
..23
1.07


Fpr on : Import Total :
production


Million
bags

11.25
11.55 .
13.78
15,19
15.23
15.30
15.41
li .62
18.90
19.248
20.1'.
20.1.1
21.89
22.90
25.03
26.37


Million Million
bags bags


.33
.16
.25
..11
.12
.13
.08
.09
.09
.01

.02


13.32
12.214
114.87
16.99
16.85
17.75
18.19
16. 40
19.18
20.98
22.12
21.23
22.74'
23.2,
25.26
27.44


continental U.
Clyllian :eed and
f0, : feed

Ul,'.n 4ll11ion
kage bag


7.13
6.65,
7.63
7.61.
7.31
7.75
7.69
7.00
7.35
6.96
6.33
S.h1.
8.23
6.93
8.36


b. lesappearance
Broken rice :
use. by : Total
brewers h/ :
Million Million
bags bags


.03

.05
.37
.35
.54.
.51
.68
.61.
1.31
1.52
1.62
1.12.
2.03
1.71


7.93
7.54
8.97
9.10
8.59
9.25
9.30
8.92
9.27
9.57
9.13
8.12
10.78
10.1,0
11.51


b ut ri'.ut.ron (C 'nt:r:ue.: :cvilan
ExportE 71 : Shipments 7,' :r: : per
Y* ea.beginning : : : : llit.ary:Balancirn: .Carry- cper
Mugust I/ .:Commercial:J'ELA not : Total : rc :t'iDA not : Totel :piL-cure-: item : over : o-
-8/ : li tary : *l r/ :a:m r : mn t 10 ': I al' : e 1,0 .t c o n
.' J..i ay*: : : : : : : :
:sumpt ion
Million MIllior Million Million .Ullion iUllion Million Million Million
bags b.R5 bags ba^r ba.Le byge r.age bfags baL Poersa

1934 1.21 0 1.21 3.1k 0. 3.1 --- .51 .53 5.6
19 : .79 0 .79 2.95 0 2.9 ..12 .8 5.2
1936 *: .9 0 .91 3.00 0 3.00 ---. 3.. .30 1.69 5.9
1937 a 3.05 0 3.05 3.39 0 3.39 --- -.05 1.50 5.9
1938 3.33 0 3.33 3.02 0 3.02 --- -.41 2.32 5.6
1939 3.10 0 3.10 3.16 0 3.16 --- -,46. 2.70 5.9
1910 : 3.95 --- 3.95 3.31 --- 3.31 -.06 1.69 5.8
1941 : 4.57 .03 U'.60 2.16 .65 a.81 .20. -.32 .19 5.3
1942 2.77 1.61 24.38 .39 2.52 2.91 .82 ..31 1 9 5.6
193 : 3.37 1.66 5.03 --- 3.13 3.13 .80 +:&8 1.97 5.1
1944 : I.32 .76 5.08 --- 2.56 2.56 4.04. ,81 .77 4.9
IS5 : 4.18 2.92 7.10 2.1.9 .67 3.16 1.92 -.22 .85 4.0
1946 4.51 3.85 8.36 1.84. .01 1.85 .70 +.70' .35 5.8
1927 6.28 2.53 8.81 3.35 --- 3.35 .4 1. *.02. .23 4.8
1948 6/ : 8.08 :.69 8.77 3.32 --- 3.32 .19 +.10 1.07 5.7

iza from U. S. D. A. Production and Marketing Administration, Department of Commerce, Dsparment of 4Ational
Defense, as well as from the Bureau of Agri culturalEconomice.

; .** O .illad rice Is converted on the basis of pounds of milled rice (heaad, secfnt h9eds, and screenings, excluding
brewers's produced annually from 100 pounds of rough rice, converted separately f.-r the Southern States and for
California. For the 5 yeaw ended July 1949, 100 pounds of rough rice produced.an average of 66.13 pounds of such
milled rioe, or a 45-pound bushel produced about 29.8 pounds.

'. Includes California on an October 1 year.
"f Stocks on farm, in country warehouses, and in mills, and in addition includes U. S. D. A. holdings outside
at miles in million bags as follows: 1.06 in 1943, 1.79 in 191'; 0.25 in 1915, 0.37 in 1916, 0.16 in 1947, *. in
1948 and 1949.
S / Civilian food disappearance of commercially milled rice produced from dametic grain plu rice used on fers
Vhare grown and by custom milli' for local consumption, adjusted for military procurement and use of broken rice by
.brwers. Thus, consumption data represent the year rice enters trade channels rather than the time of actual human
consumption. In som year large stocks are held by wholesalers and retailres, while In other years such stocks
ae small.
Rice used by brewers other than brewer' rice as such, which la not Included in this table.
S Bag equal 100 pounds.
SPreliminary.
Beginning with 1941, exports and hipmpunt are an a July year. Complete figures are available for such a year,
whereas they are not for an August year. Insofar as the figures for the month of July are not much different from
Sne year to another, the use of the July year Is justifiable.
SIncludes exports of rough rice In terms of milled equivalents.
x/ cxludes ehipm nts by military for civilian relief feeding.
' /Procured for both civilian relief feeding and for military food use; military takings for civilian feeding in
: coped areas measured at tim of procurement, not at tim of shipment overseas.
"I/2a1ancing item results from drying loss, waste, and errors in data and conversions.
K "





riA.-F.iLi. IIU *iu ,"
Table 20.- RICE (in terms of milled): World production and trade 1935a36 to t'
1939-40, estimated production and export applies, 1949-50 I/

: Estimated : Apparent :
: production : domestic : International trade
Oontinent and : disappearance:.
country :1935-36 :194950 : : Prewar average Export
: to : / : 1936-1940 : Net : Net :suppli1
: 3o 40 : : :imports :exports :1950 W
: 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000
:sh. tons:sh. tons: sh. tons :eh. tons:sh. tons:ah, to
Western Hemisphere: : : : "
North America: : : : : : '
United States..........: 729: 1,304: 622 : : 107: 60$I
Mexico ......... ......: 59: 107: 50 : : 9.
Estimated total......: 924: 1,659: 1,140 : 332 : 116:
South America: : : : : : :
Brazil.................: 971: 3/ : 929 : 42: A
dritish Guiana ......... 52: / : 35 : : 17:
Ecuador..... ...........: 50: 3/: 37 : 13:
Others................: 235: : 328 : 01 : :_
Estimated total......: 1,308: 2,629 1329 : 101 : 80: 13
Total Western Hemisphere : 2,232: 4,288: 2,469 : '33 .196:.
Asia: : : : :: .
French Indo-Chlru..... .: 5,039: 4,253: 3,429 : : 1,610;
Thailand...............: 3,356: 3,937: 1,896 : 1,460: 1,301
Burma..................: 5,489: 3,214: 2,221 : : 3,268: 95.
China..................: 38,630: 34,335: 39,041 : 411 : : -..
Japan.................: 9,385: 9,432: 11,331 : 1,946 : : -
Korea..................: 3,083:4/ 2,386: 2,022 : i 1,061: 4/ i
Taiwan.................: 1,350: 1,296: 641 : : 709: 31
Philippines............: 1,652: 1,953: 1,717 : 65 : :
Malayan Union..........: 427: 3/ : 1,206 : 779 : -
Indonesia..............: 6,960: 3/ : 7,172 212 : --
India..................: 22,043: 24,964: ( : ( : -
Pakistan...............: 8,542: 9,214: (32,137 : 1 2 .: .
Others.................: 4,116: 13,041: 5,179 : 1i095 32: 3
Estimated total......: 110,072: 107,850: 107,992 :t6,060 8,140: 2.j
Europe: : : : : : :
Italy.................: 550: 484: 382 : : 68: .
Estimated total......: 777: 805: 2,053 : 1,46 170:
Africa: : : : : .
Egypt .................. 522: 977: 390 : : 132:
Estimated total......: 1,730: 2,684: 1,998 : 455: 156:F.
Estimated world total....: 115,070: 115,974: 114.770 8,00 : 8.700:
-/ For countries of Asia and Africa, rough rice is converted to terms of milled &
70 percent, for other countries at 65 percent.
?/ Preliminary.
Unavailable. .i
South Korea only. F
Comnpiled in the Office of Foreign Agricultural Relations.




. 'Ta ble i 2L-Ri6., roughs Acreage seeded, yield, mnd production, Southern States,
California, and total United States, 1919-49


1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1926
1926
1927
1928
1929

1930
1931
1932
1935
1954
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939

1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948


SAcereage


I


928
1,137
, 856
913
768
748
750
867
867
840
765

866
840
764
690
704
717
843
967
951
925


972
1,110
1,278
1,280
1,257
1,268
1,331
1,453
1.554


1949 2/ : 1,541

I/ Includes production in oi
75 in 1927, and 400 in 1928.
_/ Preliminary.


i Cali-
a forgia


Year Souther
S States

1,000
3 eo


Average yield peraore
| o


United a Southern
States a States
i


1,090
1,263
1,490
1,517
1,503
1,507
1,586
1,703
1,802
1,839


46.3
38.7
40.7
39.4
42.8
42.8
41.2
41.6
45.0
43.9


Cali-
fornia


' .w~-'
"S
'4-,

24


Production


United
States


Southern a Call-
States a fbrnia
I


United
States


1,000 1,000 1,000
Bushels Bushels bushels bushels bushels


l.VUU
acres

155
162
135
140
106
90
10;
149
160
132
95

110
125
110
108
108
100
138
149
125
120


other States, in thousand bushels, as follows:


l.UUU
aores

1,083
1,299
990
1.053
874
838
853
1,016
1,027
972
860

966
965
874
798
812
817
981
1,116
1,076
1,045


Bushels

36.2
38.2
37.4
37.2
35.9
37.8
37.6
39.3
41.0
42.5
44.2

44.0
43.3
44.3
44.5
43.7
44.7
48.0
45.8
46.4
48.7


60.0
51.0
54.0
55.0
53.5
48.5
46.6
53.6
56.0
61.9
60.2

66.1
66.0
70.9
64.0
76.4
74.0
68.0
61.5
67.0
75.0

80.0
55.0
56.0
61.4
61.0
58.2
66.1
71.4
61.2
72.0


39.6
39.8
39.7
39.6
38.0
39.0
38.7
41.4
43.3
45.1
46.0

46.5
46.2
47.6
47.2
48.1
48.3
50.8
47.9
48.8
51.7

49.9
40.6
43.4
42.9
45.8
45.2
45.5
46.0
47.2
48.5


1/33,611
43,386
31,984
33,963
27,567
1/28,278
/28,236
4,039
35,537
E35,663
33,815

37,658
36,363
33,819
30,739
30,791
32,052
40,436
44,314
44,131
45,062


222 in 1919, 50 in 1924, 300 in 1925, 610 in 1926,


7


44,993
42,908
52,000
50,471
53,830
54,235
54,632
60,403
69,873
67,679


I I i, ,


9,300
8,262
7,290
7,700
5,671
4,365
4,800
7,986
8,960
8,171
5,719

7,271
8,250
7,800
6,912
8,256
7,400
9,384
9,108
8,375
9,000

9,440
8,415
12,627
14,560
15,000
13,915
17,584
17,856
15,183
21,462


42,911
51,648
39,274
41,663
33,258
32,645
33,036
42,025
44,497
45,834
39,534

44,929
44,613
41,619
37,651
39,047
39,452
49,820
53,422
52,506
54,062

54,433
51,323
64,627
65,031
68,830
68,150
72,216
78,259
85,056
89,141







. A


w wjinr


kM JSili"""i,


** .. ,* iIui. ERSiT v OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08862 6261

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