Wheat situation

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Title:
Wheat situation
Uniform Title:
Wheat situation (Washington, D.C.)
Physical Description:
v. : ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture. -- Economics and Statistics Service
Publisher:
The Service
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Frequency:
quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wheat trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Wheat trade -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
Economics, Statistics, and Cooperatives Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WS-1 (Nov. 1936) - WS-254 (Nov. 1980)
Issuing Body:
Issued, 1936- by the Bureau of Agricultural Economics; <Oct.-Dec. 1953>-Feb. 1961 by the Agricultural Marketing Service; Apr. 1961-Nov. 1977 by the Economic Research Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; Feb. 1978- by the Economics, Statistics and Coopertives Servie, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; <Nov. 1980-> by the Economics and Statistics Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.
General Note:
Cover title.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000349017
oclc - 04015593
notis - ABY6688
lccn - 78643652 //r812
issn - 0364-2305
Classification:
lcc - HD9049.W3 U66a
ddc - 338.1/7/3110973
System ID:
AA00012162:00001

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Succeeded by:
Wheat outlook & situation


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Full Text











rS 98


Although wheat production is world-wide, production for export is concent-
rated in a few areas. Before the war Soviet Russia was the largest producer with China
second, and the United States third. With production in Soviet Russ ia reduced by the
war and good yield' obtained in the United States, the United States is now the largest
producer, Nortmally, consumption is so large that in Soviet R~ussia little wheat is ex-
ported, and in China imports are the rule. Canada, Argentina, the United States and
Australia are the important exporters, in the order mentioned. The United Kingdon
ordinarily inports about one-third of the world total imports. Other important import-
ers include Selgium, Gern~any, Cetherlands. Italy, Greece, Switzerland, and Eraz il and
China.


FOR RELEASE
FEB. 1, A. M.




SITU AT ON
BU REAU OF AG RI CULTURAL ECONOMY ICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE:

NOV. 9196 JAN. 1947


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W:S-8 F'


THiE: WHEAT S I TUA TION
Including ,Rye and Rice

Approved by the Ou~tloo~-k and Situation Board, January 24, 1947

SUMdARY

Wheat prices a~re still at high levels, though below the peaks reached in Nov-
embe r and DecC embe r. Th-e strength in prices results principally from the large
export demand. and th.e fact that transportation shortages have limited the market-.
ings of the ve~ry large suipples. Export and domestic demand proba!-ly will continue
to absorb all the wheant for which transportation can be provided.

It nown appear3 thit exports of wheat and flour will exceed the 267 million-
bushel goal a~noiunced in Augus-t. Exports totaled 158 million bushels in the last
half of 1946 and may; rEjch 325 million bushels for the entire marketing year. The
car situation recentlly has improved considerably. To further acceldrate the move-
ment of wheat, other grains, and flour into export positions, a Government organ-
ization similar to that-t which coordinated the export movement during the critical
shortage Iperiod in the- latter part of the 1945-46 marketing season was set up
Jannuary 1.

Domeistic wheait supplies in 1946-47 are now esti-zated at 1,256 million
bushels, consisiting of a carry-in of 100 million bushels of old wheat and a crop
of 1,156 million busheis. W!iheat disappearance in the United States is expected to
total nearly 790 million bushels, consisting of 525 million bushels for food, 180
for feed, and 87 for seed~. This would leave about 465 million bushel for export
during the mcarketing yEir or for carry-over July 1, 1947. If 325 million bushels
are exported, carry-ove~r would be about 140 million bushels.

A 1947 wrinter wh-ea.t rrop of about 947 million bushels was forecast in De-
cemnber; Ai winter cr~op of this size would be 8 percent above the previous record
of 874 million bushils in 1946. If an average spring wheat crop were produced,
the total crop may be about 1,170 million bushels. This would be above the 1946
record of 1,1563 million busrhels. Assuming domestic needs at 775 to 800 million
bushela, on thiF basis, about 380 million bushels would be left for export or
addition to ca rry-over.r

Wheat tocks in7 the~ United States on January 1, 1947 totaled 643 million
bushels which were~ smaller than on the same date in may of the preceding 6 years.
The redluced levesl f'ollowrin- a record crop is the result of' a small carry-over
July 1 and thle heavy~ exports and millings since that date.

World produc:tion, excluding Soviet Russia and China, for 1946 is now esti-
mated a.t 4.15 billion bushels. Thnis is the largest crop since 1939 and about
3 percent aboveI th3 1935-39 average. WIorld import demand for wheat and flour in
1946-47 has bee~n reduced somewhat by increased domestic production. This demand
continuesc extremelyl llarge, however, and, is expected to greatly exceed available
excportible- supplie.


iFor release Februar~y 1, A.MI.)







NOVSIBER 1946-JA'~TIrARY 1947 -1 (S1.;u LTor Conri~nupd..)

The rye-production estimated for 1946 hs- been reduic .d from~ 21.4 mi~lli~on
bushels to 18.7 million. (C~xcPt for 1934,I t'iS is thei sat-ill-:St crop since 1875.
With a carry-in July 1 of only 2.4 million bu~hels--thea snellest on rscord--rye
supp~lies for 1946-47 -re verly smRll. FTe r..e-r.ege of; r;,-ll sovin for ll purposes
last frll is estilst;d .t 5 perc- at lairzer thaln sown E yea~r r erlier-, s::u condition
on De~cember 1 was 9 points ibove: t!_r same date in- 19-15~. Cr. the~ barls .t' t;h~se
indice..tions a crop Considerasbly ab~o'l' inst of 12-16 is inl rros- ct.. ~nov.v.r, the
indicaitcd alcreage jI little oT~re thY: h:1f of th'i:. 1935-44S svarre;e, and.~ it is not
likely thait Froductionr vsi11 be large- enou,;. t~o fLljl;;' s*.JPply; tfe !`'sd .~ alcohol
d_ma-nd i?: ad~dition to food~ I.ndi se)~ n ds.


ever, it is expect-d thalt. The carrrly-ov~! r t th-e :ndi a ti! '-.rk'-t;:ng~ ason again
will bDe small withI exports rind sh1;ipmnt- low.:~ -end don-rric :'ooI conseci;ration at
thi- higheJst level --ince 1942, although still -omn:wha~t be~1lo _.vc;;r;, '1'h:- 1346-47
Asistic crop in genir.a-l ir beftte than the yior onF of a .ye iir earlia~r; but, in
spijt of~ heavy~, dermanrd for- ;-ce; fnom drfi,-;t: ;Irea, much! 71' tl.r: :.C~rasS~ d produ!ction
will be~ ni-:ded f'or locall conlumptioln an- th-; movn~em-nt of' ri? f'rom -lurplus to
deficit countries is; not- es.:pected to liYc:2d~ ?- p lr(: t of' tna; pr.-wnr vIo'lor:, 1-:ay-
'in*_ 0 larg- import requirement:!l for wt~._it and~~ Mrl.l r'~ on I :rc.1S




BAC iC-ROf f!!D. In th-i. 1?:2-41 period, the. L1:upplyr rana. dijtributlon
of .whea~~t inl ontinrental ilnit:-d ;tast;- a v .r--.l ;j r ;,ir ~s f'o~llow
tin million bLushel) otl.upl f:-2 n-itn o e
?ver old whal~t 23E~, productions! 73, snd impor't: for1 dol'es~tic
use- 9; tot--l dimpoetra~~r~nce: 721 co lining; c oi' food 4735, Red`L 122,
--see F1, -and~ I-ports and :'.ipm-n* s .3,

Wheat olrie:~s her- savan91ce.1 q.-l-ce:, 11 ing,~ 1'1*.-,. 11,3 WeighteC~d


14, nd15.'ipF to 194.5-44~ th:i loaln !progrs? w-.Ls tr. mojt iopnr-
tant factor In dom.=:tic w::F1it priPFes~ BE3innlng 1943li-44` th=: ixtra
d mand !;or whe~.;t resu~ltin- r'nor thl: warr bec91me tj. Infortc-nt
pricr factor.

Exports In 1946-475 Mayi Totl abDout 5=5 MIlllion Builj.:12;


Dlomestic whost dilPappearrance !ro..,th_ 1940t~-47 rluply oi 1,256 million
bushe.ls 1 (e~rry-in of' 100I: mr lion :indl a crop ot- 1,156; milion) is nor .7pc-cted to
total "brilt 79C million busihals, consi~tling of tooi f'ollouring,in rrillion ii)shels:
Foodl E25, fee;d 180I, snd _ld 87. M'illling grrades~ of' whea~t ar.: ;till not p nalitted
for the manufar-cture of' mixcd fee~ds (ex~cept in the~~ f'sr rest.), anr the1- us' of weat
in t'!e production of alcohol snd b-l:r is ailso proh:ibited. On1 tle b-asls of *..he
prospectiv. dome-tic dicspr;:arsnc, .about 4E5 million butshels woulGl be available
for exp1ort during th~c marker~ting7 :ir ol for Icai-rr-over Ju~ly: 1, t1947. It. now;
appear:. thaiit exportP will e~xioed the 207- mailionl-bushall 5oal of wh a't :1nd -lour
equtivalent, as Jnnounced Augus~t 2.?, and m.*.ly reel;ch 325 mil3ion. bus~h ls, or ev.:-n
more.

1/ Su nly 3nd distribution fiylures for recent yearc., tot-il and 1;- cl-e as a re
shown in tr.ble 2.




WS-98


S5


In the half year that ended in December, total exports of wheat and
flour amolunted -to about li$ million bushels.2/j (The approximate btreakdow~n into
-wheat and flour, and into civilian relief, UNREA, other exports by the Depart-
ment of Agriculture, and trade exports are shown in Ta~ble 8). If 325 million
bushels are exported, a carry-over of about 140 million bushels is exp-ected.
While this wo-uld be materially below the 215 million-bushel prewar average, it
would be considerably above the 100 million bushels on July 1, 1946. Because
of favorable prospects for the 1947 crop, the carry-over can be reduced, and
undoubtedly' every effort will be made to export at least 325 million bushels or
more. This will help meet the great need existing in many deficit countries.
Exports of 325 million bushels, except for the 387 million bushels in 19 5-46,
would be the largest since the 369 million bushels in 1920-21.

Exports hav~e been delayed by a shortage of cars to move the very large
quantities of grain, and by the maritime strikes. The car situation has recent-
ly shown considerable improvement. This improvement results from the special
efforts being taken to g~et additional facilities for the grain movement and by
the use of open-top cars, Considerable grain is now~ beinp: hauled lone distances
by truck.

Wheat Stocks on January 1 Are Smailles in 6 Years;
October-December E'arm Disappearance Record 1jiih

Wheat stocks on hand January 1, 1987 of 643 million bushels (table 6)
were smaller than on the same date in an~y of thle preceding 6 years. They were
not much more than half as large as on Jranuary 1, 1T43, but were much larger
than on this date in any of the 6 years 1?75-40, except in 19339 when they: were
slightly less. The present relatively lowr~ level of stocks following a record
crop is the result of a small carry-over July 1 and the heavy exports and mill-
ings since that ~a~te.

While 62 percent of the farm stocks are still in 5 States -- Niorth nakrota,
Kansas, Mlontana, Nebraska, and South Dakota, off-farm; stocks are more~ widely
dispersed. In order of size, largest off-farm stocks are in Kansas, Vashington,
NTew York, North Dakota, Texas, M~issouri, Oreg~on, O~klahome, M~iinnesota, and
Mlon~tana. These 10 States account for 72 percent of the total.

The total wheat disappearance July-December was 613 million bushels, of
which 307 million was in, the Octobeir-December quarter. For the samre quarter,
disappearance was 338: million bushels in 1945, but only 254-million~in 19411,
about 297 million in 1943, and 221 million in 1942. The distribution of the
half-year disappearance is estimated as follows, in million bushels: Food 275,
exports and shipments 160 feed. 114 and seed 64.

Stocks of wheat on farms Ja~nuary 1, 1347, estimated at 36F million
bushels, is sli-htly more than the 361 million a yea~r earlier, but otherwise
the lowest for the date since January 1, 1941. The January 1 farm stocks this
year wrere 11 percent below the 1942-45 average of 810 million, but 63 percent
above the 1937-41 average of c226 million bushels. The mrov-emeint from farms .of
186 .million bushels between October 1_ and December 31, .il the larvest of record
for that period -- exceeding the 157 million bushels for that 1uarter a year
earlier. The disappearance from farms for the half year that ended December 31,
was 69.4 percent of the July farm supply (stocks plus production). This is
slightly below the 60,9 percent a year earlier, moderately above the 1340-44

2/ Does not include exports of 3.2 million bushes of Carndian Wheat milled in
bond and exported as flour, or 2 billion bushels shipped to U.S. possessions.





6OYEMEER 1946-JACL.~r-.; IhY 1987


aveageof .8 percent~ inl a period of la~re cronsibut -somewhtvfr below the72.3
percent in 193?,,when July 1 "~farm~ stock's and production were only at about an
a~veragte prewer level.

Production in 1:94 Third Consecut-ive -3ecord*
Yields Heavy wi qCFt Lasi: t S)nc 1

The 19 '6 record production of 1,156 million bushels ofarn-ea~t (874 million
winter and 282 million spring) was 4 percent larger thanr the.previous record of
1,108 million bushels in 1.9L5. This is the third consecutive billion-bushel
wheat crop, ahd the third consecutive recoard-;breaking year.' Th~e only other
yvear in which production reached a billion bushels was 1915, when the large st
spr-ing whet crop was produced. The 67,200,000 acres of all wheat harvested
is 3 percent above the 65,120,000 acres harvested last year, -and is the largest
since 1938. The seeded acreage for 198l6 was increased to 71,;510,000 acres fr a1
the 69,130,000 acres seeded for the 1945 crop season.

Croy Prospects for !.a 1 Excellent

A 1947 winter wheat crop of about 94T million bushels is indicated on
the basis of estimated acreage and the relationships of..such factors as Decem~ber1
reported condition and weather throu -h N~ovember with seeded yields in past years.
Afny early season forecast is predicated on average conditions for the remainder
of the season. A combination of favrorable circumstances, accordingly, could
result in a winter wheat crop larger tha~n indicated, just as unfavorable condi-
tions could produce a smaller crop. /

A winter wheat crop of' 947 million bushels would be 8 peJrcent above the
previous record of 874 million bushels in 1986. If an average spring wheat, crop
of about 225 million oushels 4/ is obtained, the total crop would reach about

Ij Winter whrleat p~rod~uction: Comparison of forecasts in December
with final est~imhtrEs, 1?33-46, in million bushel~s

Year : DIecember: Final :Final esti-:: Year :Decemnber: Final ':Final esti-
of : of-previt revised :miatf abovPS+:: of :Of pielvi- : revised :mate absovei
ha~rvest : Ous.iry]97: estimate _: or bel.ow- _::;?arvest :ouEL;LayZ : estimate: or below-e

1933 :selow LhOo 378 o :: 19ko : 9 530 + 191
193L : 35 439 + 4 : : 1941 : 633 671 + 38
19?35 4 75 469 : : 1962 : 631 696 65
1936 : 530 521! 6 : : 1913 : 625 531 92:
1937 : over 600 689 o :: 19kh 527 759 + 232
1938 :630 685 +t 5Fi :: 1945 :762 818 + 56
19)39 : 485 566 + 81 :: 1946 : 751 874 123


k/ In the recent annosuncemient of final farm productions goals for 1947, whebat
was reduced about a million acres from the previously announced goal to allow
for a similar increase in flaxseed acrea.ge. Since winter wheat is already
planted, all of the adjustment in the goal acreare is made in the spring-wheat
Statt-s of North and South DakotaL, M~innesota, and Montana. The 1-947 crop flax-
seed wrill be supp:orted at S6.00 per~bushel, UJ. S. :;0, 1. Flaxseed, :in!:.eig.:1s
basis, an increase of $2.00 a bushel above the $4.00 support price announed
last September.





WS-98 7-

1,170 million bushels, which would exceed the 19E6 record of 1,156 million
,bu~shels. With domestic needs estimated at 775 million to 800 million bushels,
a crop of 1,170 million bushels would provide about 380 million bushels for
export or addition to carry-over.

The acreagte of winter wheat seeded for all sur-poses this fall is estimabMi
at 56.4 million acres, 8 percent above the 52 million acres seeded a year earlisI:
This year's acreage is about the same as that seeded in the fall of 1938, which
was second only to the record for the crop of 1937 when Zansas reached its pEea
of 17 million acres. The acreage seeded in 13 of the most important winter
wheat producing States excludingg the Pacific N-orthwest) exceeded the~ goal for
these same States by 7 percent.

Wheat Prices at Hieh Levels, but Belowr
P~eqks R~ecid in Late 1346

Wheat prices are still at highz levels, though belowr the peaks reached in
November and December. Z/ Tne strength in prices is iprimrari~ly the result of
the very large export demand and limitations on mark~tines arising from the
shortages of transportation facilities, both of which have kept terminal supplies
at lowr levels. It is expected that export and domestic demand will continue to
absorb all the wheat for which transportation can be Erovided, and as a result
prices are expected to be near current levels at lfest until prospects for the
newE crop are more definite.

The Commodity Credit Corporation purchased 1i+mil~lion bushels of w~heat
and wheat couivalent of flour in the July 1 D~ecembJer 31 p~-erid. This, com-
bined with stocks of 4O+million bushels, totaled 181 million bushels. Exports
by the Corporation in this period am!ounted to 127 million bushels, leav-ins the
equivalent of 54 million bushels on hand January 1. 6]. Wiith market prices well
above loan levels, only about 19 million bushels of wheat had been placed under
the loan program up to Decem'oer 31.

li/ The price of N'o. 2 Sard iWinter at K~ansas City for the week ended Novem~ber 23
and the price of No. 1. Dark N~orthern Spnrini at Minn~reapolis for the week ended
December 21 averaged the hirghest since Septezber 1920.
/ ;. st and flour stocks, purchases and exports by the Commodityr Credit Corpora-
tion for the half-year ended December !1, 1986, were as follows:

I rteme : Weat. : lcur M : To tal
: Mil~bu. : MilTbu. : i-u

Stocks, ;July 1 : 30.0 :10.2 :40.2
Purchased, July-3ec. :~ 11. 6. 140.4
Total : 1 3.5 : 71: 180.6
Exports, July-Dec. : 7. Q_ 26 ; 26.6
Stocks Dec. 31, t~ota.l :- 46 7.5 ; j 0
Stocks Dec. j1, detail:::
On hand : 23.3 : 3.0: 26
For deivery Jan.-': 3.2 :4.= 2 .7
Mar ..

3C Wheat equivalent.





KGrBER~s 1?46 JrlA_7UAR 1oL7


Ef~f etiveF Janxtr$ 1, theF I.C.C. -CranJtid a 10.-prcent increase in the
frpichlt rstes on Er~in -.nd _rain. pric.ucts, which~ -.1F1ersded th~e p~rvious in-
cressF of 3 pe~rcent as of~ Jul_;: 1, 14;J. It is cal-culatEd thart the n~ew freiight
rat; incri~ ase!. villad a cen't a- ou~chel! to the cost of movlne w'heat. from
Minn apF'li. to C:.:icS-o ard 1--1/4 c-ntF fr, := EanSa Cit:. to Ch.iCago.

C. S. Wheat: FricF S.upr.crt IEnder Enercency Pro~vision
TerminetF I wit'~ r 100 Cran)

5. result o~f the prorcl-amation t;; the Presid nt that hostilities were
ended~i on~ Dtcember 3.1, th; rh~Eft '.a~r-.E-T-reer~c:, Frice--Eupp;Ort p''-rog1 rmill be
termina.tci ,n rDc Eber 3 1 1 -ELS. Thc Ag~ricultlrdl Ad~i'ustment Lct of 1938, as
oIFfed-i b:.. the S*-Iabir--izationf Ac srrev'ed Cct'bEr 2, '1962, Drovided.prrice-supportf
los -o cooes in-t-~ fs:-r.ers at 0O cercent ofi the Juine parityZ. Loans were to be
Flff-ctiveF rll. r.heat srvl.stl. d liurin: t~he 2 ;:easrE be'lrinnine the first of Januar;y
followinl- tL; ...fficial rracl-nation t.ha-t ostiliti~e had cease-d (con~tin~ent on
produce t dsapro:in mrkeitir~LL -Setas L/). rIhe War--merLgencyl Progrm will
ha-.. ther ifeczt of sappo':rti.:- whet FriCEs into, the~ spring of 1?49 until pros-
pFctC f`or i-.; 1L'ra crop~ b~comE de~sir~:it price factor. Cusgtomrarily., the clos-
ine da~t- for 1-lacin- w~heart under loan has been 3acembe~r 31.

If p:*i;.' ortJune whn thei~ l"-E crop, 1 an ra~te is de~termined, should
be th= m= a th 81.8 S in mid-D~ecembe 1--86. thE avor; -e loan ra-te to
Cpro' r; for t!:. 1~~ C1l7 cr ht :r0 p~ercer.: r:juli be $1.,T.:J 'lil this: would be
consrliderably sbo--e the: avr-rr- e 1_:..-n ra-tf of $1.L8' for t?; 1266 cr::i i~t would be
con7;.-i~d rslbly i- low the ;Ici;;l pr~ic; fC2in re~ived byr --rowerc, the: average of




3=cKTE: 1.1.- La r-e -.vir crays ,nd restrlcted trade r~Esulted
i;n rh.- Is-r--et v:.rli a.;t supp~rlis -. record in th:e period
1918S'--8, .;ar Reti-.i: : ,. t0:1 b.~ i P. -r. E-.- resilnced rrld export s


h). iltit reducL d r:.. ort =, Tt:.cia incre- s- i, c! Jul;:. 1, 1.!'3,
stocks~ :n ther I:r nrrin~cital an:o7rtir.- cjour.- ries re:-ctled 1,7~0

1 Eg,, he.'.ll -.'sr, Cstoc.-:s ihad :n reduiced :ro S24 million busrhels,
and b July1 to to aout T/.Lilier.: ??Ie crased dicssy-


Juil;: 1 06wr h *aln Irce 19!~ E, and .5b':.u~t fifth less
th--r. thi 1 `'-2 -a-:rFI_e of L;S 2.Illion barbeils.z


1/ orml anor~c~en wa mde n Jl;1" t!.t th-ere will be rno w~helt market-

S/ Fa-rit: is- de-Ftermineld b';: I.lflF;,ir." trhe~ price of~ SZ.L cents per' bushel
iEV riF o~f 60I ~lor~t5 .s i. Jily; 1 0. to~ June~ 1 -18) .7 rthe inde~x of prices paid,





World. Freduction,~r E.xcllud.-Ine USSX and Ch-ina
'5 Frce~nt Abo.F P1;r wr

Fresent pro'sect s re that the 1946 world wheat production, excluding
the U.S.S.R. and China, will total about 4.15 billion bushels (Table 1). This
would be the largest crop~ since 1'339 ~and would be about 3 percent above the
1935-39 average,) and about 16 percent above the small 1945 production. recent
revisions include changes for the U. 'S., danada, Argentina, and Australia. s/

Compared w~ith 1'965, production in 1946 was estimated to be substant ially
greater in all areas, reflecting larger acreages as well.as more favorable
weather conditions! in m~ost countries. The most outstanding gain ,over last
year's crop waLs malde ini Europe where production totaled 1,360 million busbels,
330I million bushels above 1'965. This is a third larger than last years small
crop, but 16 percent be-lrow the 1'35-39 average. The: next largest gain ov~er
las-t year's harv"est wasB made in I'orth America. The bulk of the increase vaep inI
the Canadian crop which, at 421 million bushels, was about 32 percent larger
than in 1965. The n~ew record crop of 1,156 million bushels in the United States
was about k8 million bushels abovea the previous record in 1945.

The 1966 crop inr Afries, Estimated at about 135 million bushels, approadl-
es the prewar average and is about 55 percent above the small 1945 outturn. Thrre
crop in Soviet Ru~tSsi is estimated to slightly exceed last year's harvest, buit
is still consriderabl:, below~ the p:rewar level. Conditions in Asia were~ pen rally
favorable, except in India. Reduction in the Southern Hemisphere countries,
where the harvest took place In ilovember-January, are above the small ouitturns
of la~t y~ear, bit still below~ aver~age.

Scattered irinfrmatio~n on pr.ospets for the 1947 wheat crop include the
follokrinp: CropJ conditions in thle United Stateq point to another large crop.
In Europe, soil conditions for the winter crop are mostly satisfactory, bult
recent. report indicate that unusually cold weather may reduce the size of the
wrintor crop. In India, wlherF the harvest occurs in March, rains have r zlieved
dry conditiolns. Th? Australian government has announced that it plans to en-
courag~e seedine of as much wheat as possible in 1947, with the only restriction
beine that no license will be Branrted for seeding of land considered unsuitable
for wheat.

World EcuortstblF Suppsrli'Fe Etimat.Pd at About
15 -lilio Buhel: hort of Imagrt Reduirements

Even tho~ueh the wrorld im;:ort demand~ for wheat and flour in 1986~-67 is
reduced somewhat by, increased domestic production compared with 1945-46, th-e
demand co~ntinues extremely, lar-ge snd greatly in excess of available e:xportablee
supplies in Curpllus p~rodu-cinf countries. Even if 325 million bushels are ex-
ported by, the Urnited States, it, is estimated that the supply of wheat available
for export in all countries totsls only about 675 million bushel.s.


SEstimatesP and statments- by, countries in The Wnheat Situation, SepFt.-Ojct.
1986,1 -hes '3 snd 16.








;;
.:~;i


KO3VEMrBE 1946 JANrUARY 1987


- 10 -


I~Ec




.:iBI
:f'!":
~.
"''"
""':"
';1
;r


THiE RYE STITUATION~

Ey Suo~plies Very~ Short 1:Fc-sitatinc
Curtailment in Use


Ryve production for both 194~ and 1066 w~er-- rPvised downwaerd in December.
With the 198h5 crop now placed at on'ly, 24.0) million bushels, carry-over at 12:~
million and imports at 1.G million, supplies in 13945-L6 totaled 38.6 million
bush el s. It is estimated thrat distribultion was as follows (in million bushels):;
Food 6.7, feed 9.1, seed 4.3j, al~cohol 8.3, cPrports 7.2, and carryout 2.4,

The production estiacte for 1966 was re~vised from 21.4 million bushels to-
18.7 million bus~hels.11/tL~; ~ i is 56 percent less than t~he 1335-44 averagelzs di~
ePxcept for the 1934 crop, is the smallest since 1875. Cr.rry-in! was 2.4 millin
bushels, the smallest on record. The shortness of supplies creates a vegy 4~hit l
situation.

Brye Seedinrs E Percent Above Ye6r As

Zhe acr~age f a yp so'-n for all pumoross this fall is estimated at 9
million acri, 5 percent .larger than sowrn !net year. Condition on December9:
is reported at 92 T;ercent, 3 poin~te above? a yesrare Ci, n the basis of thes~
indications a crop considerably abo..e theF veryr arall one of 1?46 is in pro
How~rever, the indicated acr~eage is litt~le- ore th..r half of the 1935-44 avehi~
and it is not likely that production v.ill be larae eno~ugh to fully supply t3f';
feed and alcohol demand in addition to fooJd and seed needs.


TH:~E RCE SITUATP.ION


E~port Demand Continues Lar~ee EM$t
SuDpliFs For U. 5_ Use Increased

The U. S. rice cro~p of 71.5 million b~ushels in 1-766 was an all-tine 2~~jhi
record. When oriental trade in rice wass cut off by th war, production in,::(e';~
U., S. was increased so thart produicticn in the pas~t 5 years hEs averaged })..pec.~t
cent above the 197.5-3?, provIer, ave-:r:n=. WhileP thris is a: lar!TF increase for
the United States, it is not very significant ir. relation to th total world
Fupply rscir~ U. 5, production is Cen?:; i Orc nt Of the world total:rS

With beoinninve-ye .r socks el-tivalent to -Inly 1.6 m-illion bushels, ri
198-87_L supplipe total 73,.1 mil'io~n bls~r.Fels. Civilian food use for the year
may~ amount to abiut l4,6 milllion. bu~ebel, rwhich would be the larvest since 19 2,
but be~cyl the 1???5-39 averaE Of 26.0 m~illiorn bushels. Rice for seed, feed, and
the urse of brok~n~ rice by brewe~rs is epv~ectd to oe .5 million, exports and-
sh~ipments 35.1 million and 3ilit:;ry. 2.0~ million, in the basis of. this di~stribu--
tion, only a nom~inal1 Ca;rry-over woul'1d rPemain at thF pnd of the mrarklet~in season,"
Cn December j0 the Depa~rtmenat 3f irriculture announced thant there will be no 1;
rice mark:eting auJtas and no acreate gllotmentse durinPe the 19hy-h8 rice produc-
tion zan marketin= year. Arcrrease, yield, and production dalta are shown in
Table g su~Pply: and distribution in Table 11 end prices in Tiable 10.

World Eice Croo Ug 10 FErcPnt:
Still 8 PErcent Eelow FPreWar

A preliminaryI forecast by the Office of Forei-n Arricultural Relations,
places world rice Production for 1966-lc7 10/ at 6.'3 billion bushels compared
10/ The I.orthern !ipmisphere harvests in 1?66 are combined with, the 1347 prloduo r
tiojn of the Southern Hemisphere countries.11/ '.lost of the revision in Deceanbe'~r;l'"
w~as due to adjustment of estimate to the 194~5 Census level. ';




- 1 -


with 6.7 billion in 1:'Lc-46 (upj .11:ucat 10 pe~cent) '-nd 7.4 billion t!- 1 lf-!39,
prewa~ri aver1'9. (1Cyc~r by:~ b 1t. 7 errcnnt).

TheF Asiat~ic Cro3p in ran-r-.1 it better than in 1':rrG- $6 ~'. S r6915 f F~trFa
hea~vy' deminands ithiin prod~ucinel- countriF -, howeG:Iver, movemIents of rice frcom s~ur-
plus to deficit countries 12 not *-:7'ct'd to exceed 215 percent of the greei~r
vol.ume. lice stocks at thel ou~tyr-t of C!!: season are generallyy ex~trremely lorw.

Supplea'- which wou~lld bcrin-l the~ volume:~ o~f rice entering~ interactive ~n-l
't'reae to prevrar levole muct rr0.34 LEgaly-1: from the export producing arE.s ofi
B` urm~a, Siam, and Indnchi:na. h'ith~ thi relhabilitation of producing iand zarket~ine
facili~itie in thcse _ri or, bati I roduction rnd supply conditions are beinr
imprved.Ho''ver, it if now1 e.-rcrt-d that. the- ptrecwar volume of produi'c'tlon will
not be reached vithin, thb n tt 2 or 7 :.arZ. Rice' ship~ments from thie 1Jestern
Hemisphere to th~e Easterp. E i;Glr.rr FI, I':.:'ich reverses the historically dir-atiar.
are likely~ to continued at 1.r~ at P.couji b th next year, When this me'.FL7nt end,
Eurorp may agrin bF ,-n :.Ulet for Americ n rice until production in the F.-r East
becomer rufficient to ,:rovida ?ore theIr. th; muinimum impoort demands of Aliatir


In consideration of crospEct: th-,t er-;.rt, demand for U. S. rice !:juld
continur larceF ;n 1967-46, ries crl-anesE r~ce amended. for 1,947 are on~l:. eli-!itl y
below those seeded in. 186~.~ _'he 1`C3recowd;! 10oal is 1,5210,000! acr~e co p~red
-Eith -1-,-S',O ace ed~ed ii. 1 kG.~1

Table 1.- Whehat producfionr in. z3Erli:d countsriFs, average 113 -3 -.0



Countr:- 105-9 96 742 14 94 1 1


No~rthe rl 4Hem i SpherE
United Statre ............: 790 aby
Canada ... ................: 12 15
Mexico ...................: 1 16
Total countries .... 0 178
Continental uroT3.- e (25) ....: 1, a ,--0
U. ad ire(2 .........: 70 22
rForth Africe (6) ....... ...: 111 1 h
Asia (5) 2/ ................: El 22
Tot-l It coun'lri-rle .....:_ 27 2 _
Total I'- counrtrics ...... ~ j~3,0 2

So~uthern Hjemighere
Arepentlina ................: ,1 2 ?
Australia ......... 170 67
Union of Sou'hl Afric-s ....: 1I 181
Total countries ......: 41_. ; 1 Il
Trrtal L- cou~r.trice .. .. i i _


97L 841 1,072
557 284 41.7
18 1! 14
1 5~1.91438 1_ 3
1 170 1,36 5 1~,327 .
115 15 138
110 10o s6
rlg EL; Mg
S8 2 202 2 gig
1,442 3,340- 3,553


i ,15t
L01
1L


8e







115
18~
7CL
7 ,c1,


18


103




1 r~lE


235 250 150 160
156 110o 2 1
20 18 11. r
411 278 214 ?'LE
_1 153 Ll 3 IEL1 3 ,7, 3115


Estimtltai vrl;~d total, c:cl.
U. .S.E. -nd China .......*


4,C411 970 120I 3,980


L,010 :.3,r570 4,150


indications onl.
2/ IncludFs India, Turkey~, S:.riR, Le5banon, snd Fslestine.




-13


Ta~ble 5. Eszti-lat;d suppl ;ndl distrlbu~tion of wheapt,
by~ classes, contline.ntr al Unit~cd Statesa, a-s .r-age 1937-41, annual
1342-46
irr bu~gi~lning JTuly
:ny.~~~ 1974:1 2 :L 1P
: Mi. o. Ml, b. Ml. u. Ml. u. il. bul Mil. bu.


All wheat :
StocksI July 1 ...: 250; 632 621728 1f00
Pr~odli~t~ion .......: 9E5P 974 ~ S41 1,072i 1,108 1,156 i
Import ......... U 1 1 ~~~~ 1 256
'p 'y ......... .,d~ ,31 125
Expor~tr ? I........; 'r5 r4 6 153 391
C~arry--ov~r .......:~ 3401;_ _t2 Z17 281_ 100C
Domestjc disrap- :
pea'rance.......: rj84 9.5 121099 900 -

Stocks, Jiuly 1l ...: 1Q 29 .1?11 111 37:
Production .......: 364 47 357 4C. 0I 521 582
Suppl, .......... ;0rr+ t23 1
C;x!orts .....,.....: .~t '-1 04-~i 112i 233
ca~rry-over;r .......: 317 5
Domestic di~sa- :
p: rjlnch.......: 2- 43 -- 2, -
Sof't r:d winter :
Stock~, J~uly 1 ...: 5. cEUr 1- 2 11


Exports...........:- -12i:6 ;R
C-arry-ov v .......: Z "i
D'omEStic dies6p- :
pea-rance~ ......: 20a5 19 44 1 154
Hard red aswine
PtoCkS, July 1 ...: ee S 2150 113
Production .......: 148 "i15 231 24 21 21?4
In orts ..........: 3 5 3 ~ 2" i
pply; ~.........: P7 I 5 3
Expor~t s ..........: 2 ~ 14 ~ 2 1 53

iEons~~tlc disap-.:
pen ance ....... : le?7 21509 96 2lc
Durulm:
Stock5, JTui! 1 ...: 15 55 23 15 9 5
Production t.......: B.15 e7 3S 33 36
Import ..........: 1 1
Supp : .........: "rd 271
Exports ..........: 1 1 2 1
Carry".~-overl .......: 2 _. __5 5
Domestic disap- :
pearance........: 29 51 50 40 36
White
Stocks, July1 1 ...: 16 411 us 20 2
Pr voi~tion .... :'13i2

Expror 3.1 -----5 5--- --36
CarSry-ove-r .......: 24 Zc 2 2, 8
Domestic disap- :
penanac e....... : 6t; 71 86 00 104 ; Llf
t' Sl eact to reviion. 2j.- Includces flour madFe fromr U.3. whea~rt,also included:., l;ti~
-- 871me-nts. -


!!0VrEMBrERF 1E946 Ti;JPt.~iA 194? ~




-11


Table1J i.-Weat Wii h-.average cash price; s:?ecified markets and dat rs,
1945 and 1946
:All7i) cla im E. To. 1 : No. 2 Hard: IRE. 2 : Soi:
MoI~nth :and Fra as :Hlrd ;in-ter:Dk'i.NT. Spring:Am~ber Du~run: Red Wiinter: Whi t
:n ;:i: I:1 .cr _t;: !i.: rie lit r:1-linnea?olis :M~innean;olis: St. ~Louis : Portl!! I
date '1*51661 161 : 19$46 1395 :~E 13 92c3 5 : .194b.1L :lob

*CenltZ C-n~ts IC-nts II I Cents Cents Cents Cants Cents Cents Cents P- nt
Ilonth: :


Ocet. :60

Dec. :7.

O~ct. ', : -. .



H~ov. *1-2




Dec. i 11b
14 :111
'11 11
1S : 7 0 7


.1 .0
.I112:. C


216.~4
225.0
232.4

210.5

215;.0
;116.5
216.5
221.0
217.6
228.2
22g.1
2219.2
229.3
234,0
235.2


158.1
162.8
163.9


i '1.7 .


.~~9
l.l
;.2


172.5
173.1
173.1


220.3
233.1
226.5


175.0
175.0
175.0


222.9
2216.2
2o9.0

219.0
222.0
2215.2
225-9
223.3
228.5
220.8
27-6;.6
225.0
226.7
230.4 -
231.7
225.6


1


1f
1
li r
1


154.8 14 .,
156.6 184.2
159.1 11: -T
161)0. 185.3
161.2 15;.0
162.1 17.E.1
163.0 188.;
163.5 10j1.4
163.4 10':1.7
163.8g 13o.2.
164.0 100.5,
164.0 18.;:5
164.o 199~.:


6 1-73.2 21
E.I _._.4 172.LL 21
?.j I:.8 172.9 22
_8!. 172.6 2?
~:.~: -~.7 171.9 2"
~-. r.7 172.8 23
9._ :1 .4 173.1 23
.11.5 172.4 23
0.111.6 1711.8 2'

3.1 1 .`3 172.7 23
:.1 :11.1 172.0 23
;.: .~7 1-72.6 2'
O mutations.


8.0 175.0
6.8 ---
2.8 175.o
5.9 ---
3.8 175.0
!i.8 175.0
0.6 ---
6.2 ----
2.2 175.0
6.4 ---
4.0 175.0
7.0 ---
3.4 1-75.0


177.9
178.7
17s.3
1_78.2


of asit


Pr'ice~s -EUl b 10lle in three exportinS countries, Friday nearest


;.i.:'me~~lnth~, ':ct.-Decln r- -1. l46, weekly Octobe-r 1946-Janua~ryi 1967.
: P r." 'l.owt: Hard. heatt : Soft Wheat
: United tTates Canada :United Stcates:United StateS:BAashamiZ
Date :iro. 1 R.SI.11. 3 .:No. 3 Canadian:No. 1 D.H.W.r :
(Pria:-) :13 ,.et. ro;:i n :110.. Sp~g. at : Galvesto n :2 No. 1 : 1
: s Dueth :Fort Plillia~n : / :PortlaInd :
1' 2/ 1/
Prida:-, .il1: ;rcat h : Crnt s Coints Cents Conts -:- t -
Oct.. 11 :1.. 209.0O 216.5 185.0 -
iro-. I 60222.0 221.*0 189.5--
Dic. 1 : -" r2 .. 27.0 225 Ir~


13 :

iTI -. i :



Dec. :


Jan3. :


11 ..G
11 ..0
2 .0
2.22.0
.
.0
2 .
1 .0
.
017.0
21(.0
-:16.0


212.0
212.0
210.0

2220 .
227.0
220.0

222.0
221.0


213.5
210.0
217.0
217.0
21;.5
22'. 0

219.0
221.0


222.0


183.0
185.0
185.0
187.5
188.o
193.0
190.0
190.0
188.0
189.0
189,0
189.0


1 7.-



---' 1

---.


IT : 1 223 .0 223.0 188.5 210?.
1/~~~~~~~ F~.a:a r oarv. 2' Fort Williamn luotation is in store. No. 1 HE4-;:,
Ilar'r Horltheriln S:rn:~1j-, 13 1:.-rc: proteinn, (Dul~uth) -plus 1/2. cent_ (fo~r in-store basis'5
I~s aswned- ~ t~o to faiirly; chei) ::~~.~ le ith Jo.. 3 Canadian iUn!thernl~t Sp~ring wheat' (For~t






00 E BR 1 1/ -.ia 'af Y 19-


i- 1 -


Tabi ::-t: --ir e .' :: n r c f :1- w .- t f t r


P' r~io : hie c. _


: .n D l ti


I'iinn::.poli3


: E 1 1: 1 1945. 1946 1 1 : 1 4
c: C nt3 a :n :C..t o tent s


?nth::

Dt.


LI c.



p~t.

11

?: t .1

i'


1..




J


1


: ir 5,




i 1. .



: 1~-. ..

: 1 .






: 1 :~.5
: .
: 1 .


18 .7







1.. .. ,







I 0 .

t ,


1? i..
i 1


1:E3.8



S1' 3..8

1 i. i



lit. I
, .F..
16..7

1 ..

1 .


1.95. 7
185.7




131.'7




15.r 1. r


:I ..




1 -. F




1T ,.5


181.1






161. S






1 I .2
1 Y.7






113.5
1T 2.5


186.1
191.5
191.2





181.0


191.5


1942.2
191.9


190.9

188.4
1?3.6
192.4
188.1


19J1.7


19~ ~ .8 1 ] E .12 E 19rl.6


.: C 1 -1 -c.1:-- nn -- 1


**~~~ 1' 9': -15 9 194:1946 : 1947


":bu I~i bu~ShjlS F1 ushel Z bushelic bushels bushels bunhels


L) 1_L

tor~~~~ ,I -0, *.lc C. :.... 1~~- 1,7S 512E 1'.46. 10,.3 108e,776118,999
:cme I..:-1 1- .............< lb ,3~ 1 ,E .E. 2 ,15 1,i,' 15 1 0 ,1 1 5 ,


.:1.~: t.r:-.............. < 1 ,lI.-i 2 5,0 II5F 112 1.5 111.9 L 5,276I 97,0J 69






45O 1171.4~0






15 -

Table 7.-iPrcentage monthly ~sales oz' ;.:~ ;t by urners,
United StaEt~es, aivFer w-e 193 3_-., a .ualFt 19 E-hi


Pearcent,2c o otal -lesclri ni
:~~ ~ :
: An -,:Sept.: Oct. :H~ov. D-c. :Jrin. : Feb.:~Mar. :A r.:May:Jan~i
:: : : :: .
2-:-Pr-Fr- Per- Ter- =?br P r- 'er- P:r- -
cent cent cent ce~t, ceint cetcn cnt; cent 0--.; :.n`t


beginning. :J~ur. :July
Ju~ne ::

. :cent cnent
Whes t
Avara-go
1934-S3 :60 13
19j3h.... ,:-1, 5.6
1935------: 2.5 19.2
1936......: 5.B 5h
1937-----*: 51.1 i'0.
1938......: 5.4 69
1939......: 7.6 30
1940~......: 5.6?".0
1961......: J.,n -1.9
1962.. ...; .3 10.5
1983..... 3.3 69
1364....... 7.1: .1
i94S......: F.7 ~-.6
PePrcrntagees for 1'.23-15


6.9
S5.2
9.7
6.0
7.8

6.1
7.4
~ 7.4

7.9
8.6


iC.3

3.8

4.1
L.1
5.2
".2

7.2


2.9

3.1
3.8
3.6

6.2
7.5
10.1
6.4
4.1


4-.9
3.5
2.5
3.4
3.9


3.3
6.1
8.1
7.9
4.9
3.2


2.6
2.7
3.9



4.0
9,2
5.i5
4.9
1.7


c. i


:.3

L.1

c.7
C.0


1711


17~.?-
ly.L -
13.0
10.8


10.5
s.4
17.7
G.7
10.4
11.6
a.0

11,8

9.1


5.3
4.4




9.2
3.1
6.1
6.6
8.3
2.5
3.6


5.3
2.9
j.4
'3.e
3.3
,. 7 .
7. 9

5.1,

5.9
5,6
2.o


.n

.n
.I
1.7

1.1




1.;


;in The WiheaLt Situa~tion, Decomioor 91?11, 13ae 18,


Ta-tle S.- stimLated errorts of w~hc-at ani7 "l~our, U~nited Stae,?-l
er en~ded ;Tune 1946 9nd half year ended Deccemo r 1?'56


i ar ended
Itl Jhr:ne 146 :

.: il.n Tu. l


~a~l~f .year ezded December 19366

Whoo~t Flour* Cot-P1


Miitryciiia rlif : 80.6 32.3 15. .7'
U.11. B.R.A. : 85.8 13.5 11.1 ?.7
Dot, of Acric:ultu.re other:
than Military relief
an U IE.h,.: 1:7.1 r71.? O ~ 1.3
Trade ex-ports s3,7 '3.9 27.h ..-
Total : ~/387.2_ 100,3 _Ti 5-7.2 1
ne r~ldes U~. S., Ur. K. nInd Frech Zonets of G-erma~ny, U~. S. Zone in~ Ita~l~l.-, and
U. S. 24crifc Arlla. rDoes ?ot. include luse by~ milit.:ry f'orces.
2/J Does not include 5.T0 million bushrels of sh~ip3e~t~s to U., S. po~cssessis nor 1 .7
million t-u~ichl? of Cainadiantr - r/ 17oes not include ?Sout 2.10 million bu~shels. of sh~~iipnent to U. S. possessirong r.nrl
3.2 million ~lbushls of rirnndizn r:heat milled in 'rond. for expiort. *Wh~eat equivalent.





NOV T"SER~- 1940- -0 1!'7


- 10


Tsble 9 -.Rioc, re :.: Arcri.,e seedd,i yiold, aInd produrtton in
Southern ':t.:';. ...1 'C ~:ifrnia ?.ndj tnt:1 ozlcagro R!d production
ini theC ;lited ';itates 1910-40i


..le -e P.r:8Ce c~ production
: : Der :.cre :
:Sothen .. :E1t: :Ct.r Cilif/;-outher :Calif. :United,
: cct:,rcf .:a e : t 3 Sae :S tates :
: 1,000 1,000L 1, 000 1,000 1,000 1,000
r: re-s 1a :-

42/4,911
51,648
39,274
41,663
33,238 i
32,6'45
33,4 036.

44,497 .
43;834
39,5 4
44, 92'9
44, 613 '.
41;619 :

39.040;':
39.452
rl9,82Q
53,422
52,508
54,062
54,433 'r
51,323G54
64~,843
68.161
68,150
71,520


3/2; ,11
45.,686
31,384
33,963
271,567
1/20,278
,2.3,230 U


1/.15,;' IL
7,,15



9 D,79 O

;-',052


1.,131
-:5,0 ;



5 ~,233
5 ~,171
j4,:22


1919



1:j23
1r;24
19"5


192S
1929
19130
1931


1933
1935
1936
1937
1939
1940
1941
1942
19:3
1944 ~
1945 ~
1946


9:!0
1,157
855
P1;


?50
867


765
t056



'701
7_7
93 ~

951

9'72
1,11.0
1,2'3
1,276
1,24-8

1,331


16





12.5

140



106




1-1 '


1,0;1
'1,2'9
990




!.513 G

1,016





374



1,11'



1,.?, rj




1.,5~7


37.2

37.8

5.3 C' C

:f.5




4.3


-11.5 1
'3.7
Z4, :.
iIS.0


51.0

.51.5
47.5
Er6.C
53. eL
56J.0
61'.9
I0.2
06.1 c




61.0
7.-1 :.
tY.,0


9,300
8,262
",290
7,700
5s671
41,365
4:, 00
7,986
8,960
8,171
5,719
7,271
8,25;0
7,800
2,912
3,256
7,400
9,584
9,108
8,375
9,000
9,440
8,415
12, 627
14,560
13,1000

16,728


1 Includess -r~i-.:-fte.H in ct:. I 1:- r:,~ inl (..;51: Lane neblr Sc follor-s: 222 in

2/ La~r E: st: p!rocu: 1: :. :o t;. Pr el 1i ir:. r:. .
Footnotejs orn tablE IIa 1. ;
Da-ta "rom- Produ~ -1 o -In..in -tc a', .S.D.A Ilnd from Deparlts
ment of ~cog;mrce~ i!, .eI n fpblt.-. cnrts Unmilled
ric covered n 1 > .:::of 111 ~c(Mate,'! gFear.ni hieads and

ser Icnin 8, C 0 li~i n ir ) Cc.Lr I-r. :i n -1f'e* lj100 ~cou ~nd3sofrough rice

milled ric" uron'i ..il jfrol so r:in plue 'ice 1 2. 6 on LI r":e c1us imports
adjusted for r-111 .'. -:. tr~e ieb cros Includes seed, fled. 1I
and u~se t: b:-ol: so'~ :. 01. So e-ille~r~ 1': bra 1'rs rice C' lancing item;
results fronl err.:~3. 1: .! incneso; 1 02dfeecs
ma~rketlin: ;ew. 5 110 un. P includee holdiniesb the -;
Denartmeni t Of :.,~-riTij 1:: :~~r; h;i' Of miills, in C our l13nd p~ckrets,as follows: 0i in
1942, 1,152 in 10-15Z, 1,;l26 1r_4, 37 in 1?945, r:nd in! 1940. Figures for 1915r
46 and 194-4 sr .=lni


-:f







.5-9.9


-17 -


Table 10. Rice rough: Louisiana and California
prices receivred.by farnners, by months, 19337-46

Louisiana price per barrel of 162 pounds

ni -q:Aug. :Sept.:i Oct.:, Nov.: Dec. : Jan.: Feb. : Ma~r.: Apr.: T"ay :J-une : July

S: D ol. Dol Dl. Dol.. Dol. D ol. Dol. Dlol. Dol. Dol. Dol. D~ol.


1 ..


: 2.342 2.70 2.81 2.88B 2.70 2.81 2.84


2.88 2.92 2.81 2.77 2.70


1 4 : 2.84
1 PS- : 2,66
.- : 3.28
1.77 : 2.74
1 t : 2.30
1.19" : 2.09
1 o : 2.84
I 1 : 3.82
J1 1: :-6,76
: : 5.83
S'1 i. : 5.94
1 15 : 5.94
1 46 : 6.30


2.81
1.98
3.56
2.34
2.16
3.20
2.30
3.13
5.78
5.80
5.80
5.98
7.09


2.99
2.34
3.13
2.E88
2.34
2,74
2.52
3.,6

6.21

6.41


S.06
2.52
3.02
2.99
2.48
2.81
2.F88

5.58
6S.91
;.52
i;c4


2.81
2.R66
2.95
2.45
2.34
2.66
2.99
.5.36
.6.12


cE.E6
S.r06


2.77
2.99
3.31
2.,59
2,g8
2.70
3.46

6.-8

6.48


2.95
3.06
3,49
2.98
2.48
2.4?8
,'.82


7.06
t?.-18
6.48


;5.06
2.Y99
3.53
2.27
2.34
2.34
3.78
6.41
G.05.
6.84
6.C6
7.i2


3.10
3.02
3.60
2,.05
2 ..30
.4
4.50
6;. 5,
6.73
6.88 i
6.48
'7.02


3.20
5.42

2.30
2.70
4.50
C8.55
6.62
6.48
6.48
7.20


3.20

2.27
2.~33
2.70
%.36
6.19
6.62
6.26
6.48
7.20


3.17
3.24
3.00

2.7
2.834

S.12
6.48
6.30
6.48
?.2O


'7. 81 .9


Corll o~r!:; Tice ner 1;00 ,ounds 1/I
I' or begin-:
nig:Aug.- :Sept.: O~ct.: iro~v,: De~c.: Ja~n.: Feb.: Mar.:~ Apr.: M-ay :June_ : July

:Dol Dol Do. 11Cl al. ol. Col. D Jol. ol--n-:3-' Co.:2 ol.


1.79
1.t7

1..5E
1.4C
1.2
1.27
1.4
T.-0
00f7
93,
-. 71
.3.89


1.80.





1,58



:.51
3.69

3.E71


2.00 )
F1.1
1.35




1.20

3.58


1.75
1.89
2.CO3
1.51
1.31
1.13
1.33
1.87
3.67
3.80
3.144
3.56
3.78


19~33
1304 -

1975






1;
1; rn 2


:1.72

i1,18

:1.F1
:1.33
:1.27


:3.f7

: 3.60
:.-4 i
:3.ES i
:7,.i8


2.00


1.22

1.3 ,.~i

3,.14

3. 4-
2.06


1.72
1.74
1.20


1,24
1.27




3 ':I

3..51
2.67 i

4.44


1.75
1.65




1.5 .~
1.58
1,2 F

1.4 3


].77.
1.05
1,16


1.20

1.,71

3 CO
3 1
3 67
3,3

4.73


1,80-
1.F0
1.3
1.533





1,71

3.b1


1.7i.
1,.67
2.00
1.56


1.9





3. 6


1.74 ;
1.91
2.00
1.51
1.29
1.13
1.24
1.73
3.67
3.91
3.44
S.56
5.73


1 :' nr to Januaryr~ 1935F, pri-ce of" Csl iforn~ia paddy,ro,~ f. ~. wcareh)ouseF, fro m Pacific

E-1.:els be~gin~in ng wthr January 19416 subject to revision, the price on Deccember
1j~ p. rs 'erevsed fromr $2.67 to ".42










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CO) rF b C r) PA C r-1 r-- 0 0' 0
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r -l ,-1r- 1 .s o .t ;t r r.
- rr- r.t -r- s0 o a C

C L *LC L 0 *L b -'D E 0 *..


LO '.




f LrE
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,-- LD 00 r LO.f LO Ln CU
L\ 1_ f ,-r .L1t') r-4 -( IL

.-' j ,,- f-1 I 00 0 r-1


L .O 1.. Ll LnD LD~ LD


C C (1~ ri -' -0 0-- O


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9-~c? r-.-C r -,(-C'TCT


\IIIIIIIII~IIIIIIIIIIMIN Iilll
3 1262 08862 6378


NOViESrEr~ 194?6-J^ UARY~2:k 1947


- 18 -


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