German popular stories

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Material Information

Title:
German popular stories translated from the Kinder und haus Marchen
Uniform Title:
Kinder- und Hausmärchen
Physical Description:
2 v. 22 leaves of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language:
English
German
Creator:
Grimm, Jacob, 1785-1863
Grimm, Wilhelm, 1786-1859
Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878
Taylor, Edgar, 1793-1839
Taylor, Richard
Baldwin, Charles, 1774-1865
Publisher:
Published by C. Baldwyn
Place of Publication:
London
Manufacturer:
Richard Taylor, Printer
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fairy tales -- 1823   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1823
Genre:
Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

General Note:
Title vignettes.
General Note:
Title-page and etchings by George Cruikshank; those in v. 1 in sepia ink.
General Note:
Volume II has imprint: London, James Robins & co; Dublin, Joseph Robins junr. & co., 1826.
General Note:
Translated by Edgar Taylor. Published later with titles: Gammer Grethel ... 1839, and Grimm' goblins ... 1876.
Statement of Responsibility:
collected by M.M. Grimm, from oral tradition.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 026796111
oclc - 03877257
System ID:
AA00011880:00001


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Full Text





























GERMAN POPULAR STORIES,










aL i.

























Now you must imagine me to., sit bya good fire,
amongst a company of good fellowes, over a well spiced
wassel bowl of Christmas ale, telling of these merrie tales
vi chi hlieraftir toll i', e."-Pref. to Hist. of" Tomn Thuunbe
the Little."-1621.






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Lriro OI L X al T -aditj o
C. "Foin Oial T~adi~tion.)


lihblijslwe by C.12a1dny;V.wm.1,M l *'tirflI.
1LNw(DNw ,












PREFACE.




THE Translators were first induced to compile
this little work by the eager relish with which a
few of the tales were received by the young friends
to whom they were narrated. In this feeling the
Translators, however, do not hesitate to avow
their own participation. Popular fictions and
traditions are somewhat gone out of fashion ; yet
most will own them to be associated with the
brightest recollections of their youth. They are,
like the Christmas Pantomimes, ostensibly brought
forth to tickle the palate of the young, but often
received with as keen an appetite by -those of
graver years. ,
There is, at least, a debt of gratitude due to
these ancient friends and comforters. To follow
the words of the author from whom the motto in
the title-page is selected, "They have been the
revivers of drowzy age at midnight; old and young
have with such tales chimed mattins till the cock
a2







PREFACE.


crew in the morning; batchelors and maides have
compassed the Christmas fire-block till the curfew
bell rang candle out; the old shepherd and the
young plow-boy after their daye's labor, have carold
out the same to make them merrye with; and who
but they have made long nights seem short, and
heavy toyles easie ?"
But the amusement of the hour was not the
translators' only object. The rich collection from
which the following tWles are selected, is very in-
teresting in a literary point of view, as affording
a new proof of the wide and early diffusion of these
gay creations of the imagination, apparently flow-
ing from some great and mysterious fountain head,
whence: Calmuck, Russian, Celt, Scandinavian,
and German, in their various ramifications, have"
imbibed their earliest lessons of moral instructions.
The popular tales of England have been too
much neglected. They are nearly discarded from
the libraries of childhood. Philosophy is made the
companion of the nursery: we have lisping che-
mists and leading-string mathematicians : this is:
the age of reason, not of imagination; and the
loveliest dreams of fairy innocence are consider-
ed as vain and frivolous. Much might be urged
against this rigid and philosophic (or rather unphi-
losophic) exclusion of works of fancy and fiction.







PREFACE.


Our imagination is surely as susceptible of im-
provement by exercise, as our judgement or our
memory; and so long as such fictions only are
presented to the young mind as do not interfere
with the important department of moral edu-
cation, a beneficial effect must be produced by the
pleasurable employment of a faculty in which so
much of our happiness in every period of life con-
sists.
It is, however, probably owing merely to acci-
dental causes that some countries have carefully
preserved their ancient stores of fiction, while here
they have been suffered to pass to oblivion or
corruption, notwithstanding the patriotic example
of a few such names as Hearne, Spelman, and Le
Neve, who did not disdain to turn towards them
the light of their carefully trimmed lamp, scanty
and ill-furnished as it often was. A very interest-
ing and ingenious article in the Quarterly Review,,
(No. XLI.) to which the Translators readily ac-
knowledge, their particular obligations, recently at-
tracted attention to the subject, and has shown
how ,wide a- field is open, interesting to the anti-
quarian as well as to. the reader who only seeks
amusement.
The collection from which the following Tales
are taken is one of great extent, obtained for the
aS







PREFACE.


most part from the mouths of German peasants
by the indefatigable exertions of John and William
Grimm, brothers in kindred and taste.-The re-
sult of their labours ought to be peculiarly interest-
ing to English readers, inasmuch as many of their
national tales are proved to be of the highest North-
ern antiquity, and common to the parallel classes
of society in countries whose populations have been
long and widely disjoined. Strange to say, "Jack,
commonly called the Giant-killer, and Thomas
Thumb," as the reviewer observes, "landed in
England from the very same hulls and war ships
which conveyed Hengist and Horsa, and Ebba the
Saxon." Who would have expected that Whit-
tington and his Cat, whose identity and London
citizenship appeared so certain;-Tom Thumb,,
Whose parentage Hearne had traced, and whose
monumental honours were the boast of Lincoln; -
or the Giant-destroyer of Tylney, whose bones
were supposed to moulder in his native village in
Norfolk, should be equally renowned among the
humblest inhabitants of Munster and Paderborn
A careful comparison would probably establish
many other coincidences. The sports and songs
of children, to which MM. Grimm have directed
considerable attention, often excite, surprise at
their striking resemblance to the usages of our







PREFACE. Vii

own country. We wish, with Leucadio Doblado,
speaking of Spanish popular sports," that anti-
quarians were a more jovial and volatile race, and
that some one would trace up these amusements
to their common source," if such a thing were
possible, or at any rate would point out their af-
finities. A remarkable- coincidence occurs in the
German song to the Lady-bird or Marien-wiirm-
chen." The second verse alone has been preserved
in England; but it is singular that the burthen of
the song should have been so long preserved in
countries whose inhabitants have been so com-
pletely separated. The whole song, which is to be
found in munderhorn, i. 235, may be thus trans-
lated :

Lady-bird! Lady-bird! pretty one! stay!
Come sit on my finger, so happy and gay;
With me shall no mischief betide thee;
No harm would I do thee, no foeman is near,
I only would gaze on thy beauties so dear,
Those beautiful winglets beside thee.

Lady-bird! Lady-bird i fly away home !
Thy house is a-fire, thy children will roam;
List! list! to their cry and bewailing :
The pitiless spider is weaving their doom, *
Then, Lady-bird! Lady-bird! fly away home!
Hark! hark to thy children's bewailing.








PREFACE.


Fly back again, back again, LJady-bird dear !
Thy neighbours will merrily welcome thee here;
With them shall no perils attend thee:
They'll guard thee so safely from danger or care,
They'll gaze on thy beautiful winglets so fair,
And comfort, and love, and befriend thee.

The valuable notes and dissertations added by
MM. Grimm to their work, have ,principally for
their object to establish the connexion between
many of these traditions and the ancient mytho-
logical fables of the Scandinavian and Teutonic
nations. In these popular stories," they are
sanguine enough to believe, "is concealed the
pure and primitive mythology of the Teutons,
which has been considered as lost for ever; and
they are convinced, that if such researches are con-
tinued in the different districts of Germany, the
traditions of this nature which are now neglected,
will change into treasures of incredible worth, and
assist in affording a new basis for the study of the
origin of.their ancient poetical fictions." On these
points their illustrations, though sometimes over-
strained, are often highly interesting and satisfac-
tory. Perhaps more attention might have been
directed to illustrate the singular .admixture of
Oriental incidents of fairy and romance, with the
ruder features of Northern fable; and particularly








PREFACE.


to inform us how far the well-known vehicles of
the lighter Southern fictions were current at an
early periodin Germany. It often seems difficult
to account for the currency, among the peasantry
on the shores of the Baltic and the forests of the
Hartz, of fictions which would seem to belong to
the Entertainments of the Arabians, yet involved
in legends referable to the highest Teutonic origin..
But it is curious to observe that this connexion
between the popular tales of remote and uncon-
nected regions, is equally remarkable in the rich-
est collection of. traditionary narrative which any
country can boast; we mean the ." Pentamerone,
over Trattenemiento de li Piccerille,' ('Fun for
the Little Ones,') published by Giov. Battista Ba-
sile, -very early in the 17th century, froni the old
stories current among the Neapolitans. It is sin-
gular that the German and the Neapolitan tales
(though the latter were till lately quite unknown
to foreigners, and never translated out of the
Italian tongues,) bear the strongest and most
minute resemblances. The French fairy tales, that
have become so popular, were chiefly taken from
" The Nights (Notti piacevoli) of Strapparola,"
published first in 1550; but in his collection such
fictions occupy no prominent and apparently only
an accidental station, the bulk of the tales being of








PREFACE.


what may be called the Classical Italian School.
The Pentamerone was drawn from original sources,
and probably compiled without any knowledge of
Strapparola, although the latter is precedent in
date. The two works have only four pieces in
common. Mr. Dunlop would add greatly to the
value of his excellent work on Fiction, if he would
include in his inquiries this most interesting branch
of popular entertainment, to which Sir Walter Scott
has already pointed in his notes to The Lady of
the Lake."
SAmong the most pleasing of the German tales
are those in -*which animals support tlhe lead-
ing characters. They are perhaps more vene-
rable in their origin than the heroic and fairy
tales. They are not orily amusing by their playful
and dramatic character, but instructive by the pu-
rity of their morality. None bear more strongly
the impress of a remote Eastern original, both in
their principles and their form of conveying in-
struction. Justice always prevails, active talent
is every where successful, the amiable and gene-
rous qualities are brought forward to excite the
sympathies of the reader, and in the end are con-
stantly rewarded by triumph over lawless power.
It will be observed as a peculiarity of the Ger-
man fables, that they introduce even inanimate








PREFACE.


objects among their actors, a circumstance some-
times; attended with considerable effect. Even
the sun,' the modri, and the winds, form part of
the dramatic person,
:The Translators can do little more than di-
rect the attention of the curious reader to the
source whence they have selected their. mate-
rials. The nature and immediate design: of the
present publication exclude the introduction of
some of those stories which would, in a literary
point of view, be most curious. With a view to
variety, they have wished rather to avoid, than
to; select those, the leading incidents of which are
already familiar to the English reader, and have
therefore often deprived themselves of the interest
which comparison would afford. There were also
many stories of great merit, and tending highly to
the elucidation of ancient mythology, customs, and
opinions, which the scrupulous fastidiousness of
modern taste, especially in works likely to attract
the attention of youth, warned them tp pass by.
If they should ever be encouraged to resume their
task, they might undertake it with different and
more serious objects. In those tales which they
have selected they had proposed to make no al-
teration whatever; but in a few instances they
have been compelled to depart in some degree







xii PREFAcr.

from their purpose. They have, however, endea-
voured to notice these variations in the notes, and
in most cases the alteration consists merely in the
curtailment of adventures or circumstances not af-
fecting the main plot or character of the story.
SA few brief notes are added; but the Translators
trust it will always be borne in mind, that their little
work makes no literary pretensions that its im-
mediate design precludes the subjects most at-
tractive asmatters of research and that professedly
critical dissertations would therefore be out of
place. Their object in what they have done in this
department, has been merely to direct attention to
a subject little noticed, and to point, however im-
perfectly, at a source of interesting and amusing
inquiry.





































I,











- 9C,.kht'











POPULAR STORIES.




HANS IN LUCK.

HANS had served his master seven years,
and at last said to him, Master, my time is
up, I should like to go home and see my mo-
ther; so give me my wages." And the mas-
ter said, You have been a faithful and good
servant, so your pay shall be handsome." Then'
he gave him a piece of siJver that was'as big
as his head.
Hans took out his pocket-handkerchief, put
the piece of silver into it, threw it over his
shoulder, and jogged off homewards. As he
went lazily on, dragging one foot after another,
a man came in sight, trotting along gaily on
a capital horse. "Ah!" said, Hans aloud,
" what a fine thingit is to ride o:n horsi'eacl







2 HANS IN LUCK.
there he sits as if he was at home in his chair;
he trips against no stones, spares his shoes,
and yet gets on he hardly knows how." The
horsemani heard this, and said. "Well, Hans,
why do you go on foot then?" "Ah! said he,
"I have thisloadto carry; tobe sureitis silver,
but it is so heavy that I can't hold up my head,
and it hurts my shoulder sadly." What do
you say to changing?" said the horseman; I
will give you my horse, and you shall give me
the silver." With all myheart," said Hans:
"" but I tell you one thing,-you'll have aweary
task to drag it along." The horseman got off,
took the silver, helped Hans up, gave him the
bridle into his hand and said, When you
want to go very fast, you must smack your
,lips loud, and cry 'Jip.'"
Hans was delighted as he sat on the horse,
and rode merrily dn. After a time he thought
lie -hluld like to go a little faster, so he smack-
ed his lips, and cried Jip." Away went the
horse full gallop; and before Hans knew what
he was about, he was thrown off, and lay in
a ditch bythe road side;, and.his horse would
have run off, ,if a shepherd who was; coming







I-ANS IN LUCK.


by, driving a cow, had not stopt it. Hans
soon came to himself, and got upon his legs,
again. He was sadly vexed, and said to the
shepherd, This riding is no joke when a man
gets onabetst like thi., that stumblesand flings
him off as if he would break his neck. How-
ever, I'm off now once for all: I like your
cow a great deal better; one can walk along
at one's leisure behind her, and have milk,
butter, and cheese, every day into the bargain.
What would I give to have such a cow!"
" Well," said the shepherd, "if youare sofond
of her, I will change my cow for your horse."
."Done!" said Hans merrily. The shepherd
jumped upon.the horse, and away he rode.
Hans drove off his cow quietly, and thought
his bargain a very lucky one. "If I have only
a piece of bread (and I certainly shall be able
to get that), I can, whenever Ilike, eatmybutter
and cheese with it; and when I am thirsty I can
milk my cow and drink the milk: what can I
wish for more?" When he came to an inn,
he halted, ate up all his bread, and gave away
his last penny for a glass of beer: then he
drove his cow towards his mother's village; and
33







HANS IN LUCK.


the heat grew greater as noon came on, till at
last hefound himself on a wide heath thatwould
take him more than an hour to cross, and he
began to be Wo hot and parched that his tongue
clave to the roof of his mouth. I can find
a cure for this," thought he; now will I
milk my cow and quench my thirst;" so
he tied her to the stump of a tree, and held
his leather cap to milk into; but not a drop
was to be had.
While he was trying his luck and managing
the matter very clumsily, the uneasy beast gave
him akick on the head that knocked him down,
and there he lay a long while senseless. Lucki-
ly a butcher, soon came by driving a pig in a
wheel-barrow." What is thematter withyou?"'
said the butcher as he helped him up. Hans
told him what had happened, and the butcher
gave him a flask, saying, There, drink and
refresh yourself; your cow will give you no
milk, she is an old beast good for nothing
'but the slaughter-house." "Alas, alas!" said
Halns, who would have thought it? If I kill
her, what will lIie bI good for? I hate cow-
beef, it is not tender enough for me. If it were







HANS IN LUCK. -5

a pig now, one could do something with it,
it would at any rate n'ake some sausages."
Well," said the butcher, to please you, I'll
change, and give you the pig for the cow."
"Heaven rewardyou for yourkindness!" said
Hans as he gave the butcher the cow, and
took the pig off the wheel-bari'ow, and drove it
off; holding it by the string that was tied to its
leg.
So on he jogged, and all seemed now to go
right with him; he had met with some mis-
fortunes, to be sure; but he was now well re-
paid for all. lThe next person he met was a
Ctiumtryimln carrying a fine white goose'under
his arm. The countryman stopped to ask what
was o'clock; and Hans told him all his luck,
and how he had made so many good bargains.
The countryman said he was going to take the
goose to a christening; "Feel," said he, "how
heavy it is, and yet it is only eight weeks old.
Whoever roasts and eats it many cutplenty of
fat offit, it has lived so well!" You're right,"
said Hans as he weighed it in his hand; but
my pig is no trifle." Meantime the country-
man began to look grave, and shook his head.







HANS IN LUCK.


" Hark ye," said he, "my good friend; your
pig may get you into a scrape; in the village
I just come from, the squire has had a pig sto-
len out of his stye. I was dreadfully afraid,
when I saw you, that you had got the squire's
pig; it will be a bad job if they catch you;
the least they'll do, will be to throw you into
the horse-pond."
Poor Hans was sadly frightened. Good
man," cried he, "prayget me outof this scrape;
you know this country better than I, take my
pig and give me the goose." I ought to have
something into the bargain," said the country-
man; however, I will not bear hard upon
you, as you are in trouble." Then he took the
string in his hand, and drove off the pig by a
side path; while Hanswent on the way home-
wards free from care. "After all," thought he,
SI have the best of the bargain: first there
will be a capital roast; then the fat will find me
in goose grease for six months; and then there
are all the beautiful white feathers; I will put
them into my pillow, and then I am sure I
shall sleep soundly without rocking. How
happy my mother will be!"







HANS IN LUCK.


As he. came to the last village, he saw a.
scissar-griindt-r, %with hiis wheel, working awiy,
and singing

O'er hill and o'er dale so happy I roam,
Work light and live well, all the world is my home;
Who so blythe, so merry as I?

Hans stood looking for a while, and at last
said, You must be well off, master grinder,.
you seem so happy at your work." Yes," said
the other, '- mine is a golden trade; a good
grinder never puts his hand in his pocket with-
out findingmoneyin it:-but where did you get
that beautiful goose?" I did not buy it, but
changed a pig for it." "And where did you get
the pig?" "Igave a cowforit." "And thecow?"
"I gave a horse for it." "And the horse?" "I
gave a piece of silver asbig asmyheiadfor that."
" And the silver?" "Oh! I worked hard for
that seven long years." You have thriven
well in the world hitherto," said the grinder;
"now if you could find money in your pocket
whenever you put your hand into it, your for-
tune would be made." Very true: but how
is that to be managed?" P You must turn







HANS IN LUCK.


grinder like me," said the other; "you only
want a grindstone; the rest will come of itself.
Here is one that is a-little the worse for wear:
I would not ask more than the value of your
goose for it;-will you buy?" How can you
ask such a question?" replied Hans; Ishould
be the happiest man in the world, if I could
have money whenever I put my hand in my
pocket; what could I want more ? there's the
goose!"" "Npw," said the grinder as he gave
him a common n rough stone that lay by his side,
" this is a most capital stone; do butmanage it
cleverly, and you can make an old nail cut
with it."
Hans took the stone and went off with a
light heart: his eyes sparkled for joy, and he
said to himself, "I must have been born in a
lucky hour; every thing that I want or wish
for comes to me of itself."
Meantime he began to be tired, for he had
been travelling ever since day-break; he was
hungry too, for he had given away his last
penny in his joy at getting the cow. At last
be could go no further, and the stone tired him
terribly; he dragged himself to the side of a














It
s~i







THE TRAVELLING MUSICIANS.


pond, that he might drink some water, and rest
a while; so he laid the stone carefully by his
side on the bank: but as he stooped down to
drink, he forgot it, pushed it a little, and down
it went plump into the pond. For a while he
watched it sinking in the deep clear water, then
sprangup forjoy, and again fell upon his knees,
and thanked Heaven with tears in his eyes for
its kindness in taking away his only plague, the
ugly heavy stone. How happy am I!" cried
he: "no mortal was eyer so lucky as I am."
Then up he got with a light and merry heart,
and walked on free from all:his troubles, till
he reached his mother's house.




THE TRAVELLING MUSICIANS,
OR THE WAITS OF BREMEN.

AN honest farmer had once an ass, that had
been a faithful servant to him a great many
years, but was now growing old and every day
more and more unfit fbr work. His master
therefore was tired of keeping him and began
B







10 THE TRAVELLING MUSICIANS,
to think of putting an end to him; but the ass,
who saw that some mischief was in the wind,
took himself slyly off, and began his journey
towards Bremen, "for there," thought he,
"i I may chance to be chosen town-musician."
After he had travelled a little way, he spied
a dog lying by the road-side and panting as
ifhe were very tired. "What makes you pant
so, my friend?" said the ass. "Alas !" said
the dog, "my master was going to knock me
on the 1head, because I am old and weak, and
can no longer make myself useful to him in
hunting; so I ran away: but what can I do
to earn,my livelihood?" "Hark ye!" said
the ass, "I am going to Bremen to turn musi-
cian: suppose you go with me, and try what
you can do in the same way?" The dog said he
,was willing, and they jogged on.together.
They had not gone far before they saw a cat
sitting in the middle of the road and making a
most rueful face. Pray, my good lady," said
the ass, what's the matter with you? you look
quite out of spirits !" Ah me! said the cat,
"how can one be in good spirits when one's
life is in danger ? Because I am beginning to







O'R THE WAITS OFBREMEN.


grow old, and had rather lie at my ease by the
fire than run about the house after the mice,
my mistress laid hold of me, and was going to
drown me; and though I have been lucky
enough to get away from her, I do not know
what I am to live upon." "Oh !" said the ass,
"by all means go with us to Bremen; you are
a good night singer, and may make your for-
tune as one of the waits." The cat was pleased
with the thought, and joined the party.
Soon afterwards, as they were passing by a
farm-yard, they saw a cock perched.upon a
gate, and screaming out with all his might
and main." Bravo i" said the ass; "upon my
word you make a famous noise; pray what is
all this about?" "Why," said the cock, "I
was just now saying that we should have fine
weather for our washing-day, and yet my mis-
tress and the cook don't thank me for mypains,
but threaten to cut off my head tomorrow,
and make broth of me for the guests that are
coming on Sunday!" Heaven forbid!" said
the ass; ( come with us, Master Chanticleer:
it will be better, at any rate, than staying here
to haveyourhead cut off! Besides, whoknows?







12 THE TRAVELLING MUSICIANS,
If we take care to sing in tune, we may get up
a concert of our own: so come along with
us." "With all my heart," said the cock:
so they all four went on jollily together.
They could not, however, reach the town
the, first day; so when night came on, they
went into a wood to sleep. The ass and the
dog laid themselves down under a great tree,
and the cat climbed up into thebranches; while
the cock, thinking that the higher he sat the
saferhe should be, flew upto the very top of the
tree, and then, according to his custom, before
he went to sleep, looked out on all sides of him
tosee that every thing was well. In going this,
he,saw afar off something bright, and shining;
and calling to his companions said, There
must be a house no great way off, for I see a
light." "If that be the case," said the ass,
"we had better change our quarters, for our
lodging is nqt the bestin the world!" "Besides,"
added the dog, I should not be the worse for
a bone or two,. or a bit of meat." So they
walked off together towards the spot where
:Chanticleer had: seen the light; and as they
drew near, it became larger and brighter, till







OR THE WAITS OF BREMEN.


they at last came close to a house in which a
gang of robbers lived.
The ass, being the tallest of the company,
marched up to the window and peeped in.
" Well, Donkey," said Chanticleer, "what do
you see?" "What do I see?" replied the ass,
"why I see a table spread with all kinds of
good things, and robbers sitting round it
making merry." "That would be a noble
lodging for us," said the cock. "Yes," said
the ass,. "if we could only get in:" so they
consulted together how they should contrive to
get the robbers out; and at last they hit upon
a plan. The ass placed himself upright on his
hind-legs, with his fore-feet resting against the
window; the dog got upon his back; the cat
scrambled up to the dog's shoulders, and the
cock flew up and sat upon the cat's head.
When all was ready, a signal was given, and
they began their music. The ass brayed, the
dog barked, the cat mewed, and the cock
screamed; and then they all broke through the
window at once, and came tumbling into the
room, amongst the broken glass, with a most







14b THE TRAVELLING MUSICIANS,
hideous clatter The robbers, who had been
not a little frightened by the opening concert,
had now no doubt that some frightful hobgob-
lin had broken in upon them, and scampered
away as fast as they could.
The coast once clear, our travellers soon sat
down, and dispatched what the robbers had
left, with as much eagerness as if they had not
expected to eat again for a month. As soon
as they had satisfied themselves, they put out
the lights, and each once more sought out a
resting-place to his own liking. The donkey
laid himself down upon a heap of straw in
the yard; the dog stretched himself upon a
mat behind the door; the cat rolled herself up
on the hearth before the warm ashes; and the
cock perched upon a beam on the top of the
house; and, as they were all rather tired with
their journey, they soon fell asleep.
But about midnight, when the robbers saw
from afar that the lights were out and that all
seemed quiet, they began to think that they
had been in too great a- hurry to run away;
and one of them, who was bolder than the rest,







OR THE WAITS OF BREMEN.


went to see what was going on. Finding every
thing still, he marched into the kitchen, and
groped about till he found a match in order to
light a candle; and then, espying the glittering
fiery eyes of the eat, he mistook them for live
coals, and held the match to them to light it.
Butthe cat, not understanding this joke, sprung
at his face, and spit, and scratched at him.
This frightened him dreadfully, and away he
ranto theback door; but there the dog jumped
up and bit him in the leg; and as he was
crossing over the yard the ass kicked him; and
the cock, who had been awakened by the noise,
crowed with all his might. At this the robber
ran back as fast as he could to his comrades,
and told the captain "how a horrid witch
had got into the house, and had spit at him and
scratched his face with her long bony fingers;
how a man with a knife in his hand had hidden
himself behind the door, and stabbed him in
the leg: how a black monster stood in the yard
and struck him with a club; and how the devil
sat upon the top of the house and cried out,
'Throw the rascal up here !'" After this the
robbers never dared to go back to the house:







THE GOLDEN BIRD.


but the musicians were so pleased with their
quarters, that they took up their abode there;
and there they are, I dare say, at this very day.




THE GOLDEN BIRD.

A CERTAIN king had a beautiful garden, and
in the garden stood a tree which bore golden
apples. These' apples were always counted,
and about the time when they began to grow
ripe it was found that every night one of them
was gone. The king became very angry at this,
and ordered the gardener to keep watch all
night under the tree: The gardener set his
eldest son to watch; but about twelve o'clock
he fell asleep, and in the morning another of
the apples was missing.. Then the second son
was ordered to watch; and at midnight he too
felf asleep, and in the morning another apple
was gone. Then the third son offered to keep
watch; but the gardener at first would not let
him, for fear some harm should come to him:
however, at last lie consented, and the young





















00 12sS^^^-; s S







.TE GOLDEN BIRD. 17
man laid ,himself under the tree to watch. As
the clock struck twelve he heard a rustling
noise in the air, and a bird came flying that
was of pure gold; and as it was snapping at
one of the apples with its beak, the gardener's
son jumped up and shot an arrow at it. But,
the arrow did thebird no harm; onlyit dropped
a golden feather from its tail, and then flew
. .'-. -The golden feather was brought to
the kinh in the morning, and all the council
v as called together. Every one agreed thatit
was worth more than all the wealth of the
kingdom: but the king said, One feather is
of no use to me, I must have the whole bird."
Then the gardener's eldest son set out and
thought to find thegoldenbird very easily; and
when he had gone but a little way, he cameto
a wood, and by the side of the wood he saw
a fox sitting; so he took his bow and made
ready to shoot at it. Then the fox said, "Do
not shoot me, for I will give you good coun-
sel; I know what your business is, and that
you want to find the golden bird. You will
reach a village in the evening; and when you
get there, you will see, two inns opposite to







THE GOLDEN BIRD.


each other, one of which is very pleasant and
beautiful to look at: go not in therebut rest
for the night in the other, though it may ap-
pear to you to be very poor and mean." But
the son thought to himself, What can such a
beast as this know about the matter?" Sohe
shot hisarrow at the fox; but he missed it, and
it set up its tail above its back and ran into
the wood. Then he went his way, -and in
the evening came to the village where the
two inns were; and in one of these were peo-
ple singing, and dancing, and feasting; but
the other looked very dirty, and poor. I
should be very silly," said he, if I went to
that shabby house, and left this charming
place;" so he went into the smart house, and
ate and drank at his ease, and forgot the bird,
and his country too.
Time passed on; and as the eldest son did
not come back, and no tidings were heard of
him, the second son set out, and the same
thing happened to him. He met the fox, who
gave him the same good advice: but when he
came to the two inns, his eldest brother was
standing at the window where the merry-







THE GOLDEN BIRD. 19
making was, and called to him to come in;
and he could not withstand the temptation,
but went in, and forgot the golden bird and
his country in the same manner.
Time passed on again, and the youngest son
too wished to set out into the wide world to
seek for the golden bird; but his father would
not listen to it for a long while, for he was very
fond of his son, and was afraid that some ill
luck might happen to him also, and prevent
his coming back. However, at last it was
agreed he should go, for he would not rest at
home; and as he came to the wood, he met the
fox, and heard the same good counsel. But
he was thankful to the fox, and did not attempt
his life as his brothers had done; so the fox
said, Sit upon my tail, and you will travel
faster." So he sat down, and the fox began to
run, and away they went over stock and stone
so quick that their hair whistled in the wind.
When they came to the village, the son fol-
lowed the fox's counsel, and without looking
about him went to the shabby inn, and rested
there all night at his ease. In the morning
came the fox again, and met him as h1 was







THE GOLDEN BIRD.


beginning his journey, and said, "Go straight
forward till you come to a castle, before which
lie a whole troop of soldiers fast asleep and
snoring: takenonotice of them, but go into the
castle andpass on and on tillyou cometoaroom,
where the golden bird sits in a wooden' cage;
close by it stands a beautiful golden-cage; but
do not try to take the bird out of the shabby
cage and put it into the handsome one, other-
wise you will repent it." Then the fox st r- 1 -
ed out his tail again, and the young man sat
himself down, and away they went over stock
and stone till their hair whistled in the wind.-
Before the castle gate all was as the fox had
said: so the son went in and found the chamber
where the golden bird-hung in a wooden cage,
and below stood thegolden cage; and the ihrl-
golden apples that had been lost were lying
close by it. Then thought he to himself;" It
will be a very droll thing to bring away such
a fine bird in this shabby cage;" so he opened
the door and took hold of it and put it into
the golden cage. But the bird set up such a
loud scream that all the soldiers awoke, and
they took him prisoner and carried him before






THE GOLDEN BIRD.

the king. The next morning the court sat to
judge him; and when all was heard, it sen-
tenced him to die, unless he should bring the
king the golden horse which could run as
swiftly as the wind; and if he did this, he was
to have the golden bird given him for his own.
So he set out once more on his journey,
sighing, and in great despair, when on a sud-
den his good friend the fox met him, and said,
'You see now what has happened on account
of your not listening to my counsel. I will
still, however, tell you how to find the golden
horse, if you will do as I bid you. You must
go straight on till you come to the castle where
the horse stands in his stall: by his side will
lie the groom fast asleep and snoring: take
away the horse quietly, but be sure to put the
old leather saddle upon him, and not the
golden one that is close by it." Then the son
sat down on the fox's tail, and away they-went
over stock and stone till their hair whistled in
the wind.
All went right, and the groom lay snoring
iith his hand upon the golden saddle. But
when the son looked at the horse, he thought







22 THE GOLDEN BIRD.
it a great pity to put the leather saddle upon it.
" I will give him the good one," said he; "I
am sure he deserves it." As he took up the
golden saddle, the groom aoke and cried out
so loud, that all the guards ran in and took
himn prisoner, and inthe morning he was again
brought before the court to be judged, and was
sentenced to die. But it was agreed, that, if
he could bring thither the beautiful princess,
he should live, and have the bird and the
horse given him for his own.
Then he went his way again very sorrowful;
but the old fox came and said, "Why did not
you listen to me ? If you had, you would have
carried away both the bird and the horse; yet
will Ionce more give you counsel. Go t ri igh t
on, and in the evening you will arrive at a
castle. At twelve o'clock at night the prin-
cess goes to the bathing-house: go up to her
and.give her a kiss, and she will let you lead
her away; but take care you do not suffer her
to go and take leave of her father and mo-
ther." Then the fox stretched out his tail,
and so away they went over stock and stone
till their hair whistled-again.







. THE GOLDEN BIRD.


As they came to the castle, all was as the fox
had nsid, and at twelve o'clock the young man
met the princess going to the bath, and gave
her the kiss, and she agreed to run away with
him, but begged with many tears that he
would let her take leave of her father. At
first he refused, but she wept still more and
more, and fell at his feet, till at last he con-
sented; but the moment she came to her fa-
ther's house, the guards awoke and; he was
talked prisoner again.
Then he was brought before the king, and
the king aid You shall never havemydaugh-
ter, unless in eight days you dig away the hill
that stops the view from my window." Now
this hill was so big that the whole world could
not take it away: and when he had worked
for seven days, and had done very little, the
fox came and said, Lie down and go to sleep;
I will work for you." And in the morning he
awoke and the hill was gone; so he went mer-
rily to the king, and told him that now that it
was removed he must give him the princess.
SThen the king was obliged to keep his word,
and away went the young man and the prin-







THE GOLDEN BIRD.


cess; and the fox came and said to him, We
will have all three, the princess, the horse, and
the bird." Ah said the young man, that
would be a great thing, but how can you con-
trive it?"
"If you will only listen," said'the fox, it
can soon be done. When you come to the king,
and he asks for the beautiful princess, you must
say Here she is Then he will be veryjoy-
ful; and you will mount the golden horse that
they are to give.you, and put out your hand to
take leave of them; but shake hands with the
princess last. Then lift her quickly on to the
horse behind you; clap your spurs to his side,
and gallop away as fast as you ean."
All went right: then the fox said, "When
you come to the castle where the bird is, I
will stay with the princess at the door, and
you will ride in and speak to the king; and
when he sees that it is the right horse, he will
bring out the bird; but you must sit still, and
say that you want to look at it, to see whether
it is the true golden bird; and when you get
it into your hand, ride away."
This, too, happened as the fox -:a.id; they







THE GOLDEN BIRD.


carried off the bird, the princess mounted
again, and they rode on to a greatwood. Then
thefox came, and said, Pray kill me, and cut
off my head and my feet." But the young
.man refused to do it: so the fox said, I will
at any rate give you good counsel: beware of
two things; ransom n'o one from the gallows,
and sit down by the side of no river." Then
away he went. "Well," thought the young
man, "it is no hard matter to take that ad-
vice."
He rode on with the princess, till at last he
came to the village where he had left his two
brothers. And there he heard a great'noise
and uproar; and when he asked what was the
matter, the people said, Two men are going
to be hanged." As he came nearer, he saw
that the two men were his brothers, who had
turnedrobbers; sohesaid, "Cannot they in any
way be saved?" But the people said "No,"
unless he would bestow all his money upon the
rascals and buy their liberty. Then he did not
stay to think about the matter, but paid what
was asked, and his brothers were given up,
and went on with him towards their home.
c







THE GOLDEN BIRD.


And as they came to the wood where the
fox first met them, it was so cool and pleasant
that the two brothers said, "Let us sit down
by tlhe side of.the river, and rest a while, to eat
and drink." Very well," said he, and forgot.
the fox's counsel, and sat down on the side of
the river; and while he suspected nothing,
they came behind, and threw him down the
bank, and took the princess, the horse, and the
bird, and went home to the king their master,
and said, All this have we won by our exer-
tions." Then there was great rejoicing made;
but the horse would not eat, the bird would
not sing, and the princess wept.
The youngest son fell to the bottom of the
river's bed: luckily it was nearly dry, but his
bones were almost broken, and the bank was
so steep that he could find no way to get out.
Then the old fox came once more, and scolded
him for not following his advice; otherwise no
evil would have befallen him: Yet," said he,
f I cannot leave you here, so lay hold of my
tail and hold fast." Then he pulled him out
of the river, and said to him, as he got upon
the bank, Your brothers have set watch to







THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. 27
kill you, if they find you in the kingdom."
:So he dressed himself as a poor man, and came
secretly to the king's court, and, was scarcely
within the doors when the horse began to eat,
and the bird to sing, and the princess left off
weeping. He went straight to the king, and told
him all his brothers' roguery; and they were
seized and punished, and he had the princess
given to him again; and after the king's death
he was heir to his kingdom.
A long while after, he went to walk one day
in the wood, and the old fox met himi, and be-
sought him with tears in his eyes to :kh him,
and cut off his head and feet. And.at last he
did so, and in a moment the fox was changed
into a man, and turned out to be the brother
of the princess, who had been lost a great many
many years.


THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE.

THERE was once a fisherman who lived with
his wife in a ditch, close by.the sea-side., The
fisherman used to go out all daylong a-fishing;
c2







28 ,THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE.
and one day, as he snt on the shore with hi.. rod,
looking at the shining water and watching his
-line, all on a sudden his float was dragged
away deep under 'the sea: and in drawing it
up he pulled a great fifth out of the water.
The fish said to him, Pray let me live: I
am.not a real fish; I am an enchanted prince,
put me in :te water again, and let me go."
"'Oh!" said the man, youneednot make so
many words about the matter; I wish to have
nothing to do with a fish that can talk; so swim
.away as soon as you please." Then he put
him lIck into the water, and the fish darted
straight down to the bottom, and left a long
streak of blood behind him.
SWhen the fisherman went home to his wife
in the ditch, he told her how he had caught a
great fish, and how it had told him it was an
enchanted prince, and that on hearing it speak
he had let it go again. Did you not ask it
for any thing?" said the wife. No," ,aid the
man, "what should I ask for?" Ah!" said
the wife, ,I we live very retchledly here in this
Int1 stinkingg diicl: do go back, and tell the
fish e wa\\nt ia little cottage."








THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. 29

The fisherman tfid not much like the bu-
siness: however, he went to the sea, and when
he came there the water looked all yellow and
green. And he stood at the water's edge, and
said,
0 man of the sea
Come listen to me,
For Alice my wife,
The plague of my life,
Hath sent me to beg a boon of thee! "
Then the fish came swimming to him, and
said, Well, what does she want?" Ah!"
answered the fisherman,. my wife says that
when I had caught you, I ought to have asked
youfor somethingbefore I letyougo again; she
does not like living any longer in the ditch,
and wants a little cottage." "Go home, then,"
said the fish, she is in the cottage already."
So the man went home, and saw his wife stand-
ing at the door of a cottage. Come in, come
in," said she; "is not this much better than
the ditch?" And there was a parlour, and a
bed-chamber, and a kitchen; and behind the
cottage there was a little garden with all sorts
of flowers and fruits, and a court-yard full of







SO THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE.
ducks and chickens. A I!" said the fisher-
man, how happily we shall live! "We will
try to do so at least," said his wife.
Every thing went right for a week or two,
and then Dame Alice said, Husband, there is
not room enough in this cottage, the court-yard
and garden are a great deal too small; I should
like to have a large stone castle to live in; so
go to the fish again, and tell him to give us a
castle." "Wife," said the fisherman, "I don't
like to go to him again, for perhaps he will
be angry; we ought to be content with the
cottage." "Nonsense!" said the wife; "he
will do it very willingly; go along, and try."
The fisherman went; but his heart was very
heavy: and when he came to the sea, it looked
blue and gloomy, though it was quite calm,
and he went close to it, and said,
0 man of the sea !
Come listen to me,
For Alice my wife,
The plague of my life,
Hath sent me to beg a boon of thee "
Well, what does she want now?" said the
filh. Ah I said the man very sorrowfully,







THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIPE. 31
" my wife wants to live in a stone castle."
" Go home then," said the fish, she is stand-
ing at the door of it already." So away went
the fisherman, and found his wife staidingbe-
fore a great castle. See," said she, "is not
this grand?" With that they went into the
castle together, and found a great many ser-
vants there, and the rooms.all richly furnished
and full of golden chairs and tables; and be-
hind the castle was a garden, and a wood half
a mile long, full of sheep, and goats, and hares,
and deer; and in the court-yard were stables
and cow-houses. "Well!" said the man,
" now will we live contented and happy in
this beautiful castle for the rest of our lives."
" Perhaps we may," said the wife; "but let
us consider and sleep upon it before we make
up our minds:" so they went to bed.
The next morning, when Dame Alice awoke,
it was broad day-light, and she jogged the
fisherman with her elbow, and said, Get up,
husband, and bestir yourself, for we must be
king of all the land." Wife, wife," said the
man, why should we wish to be king? I
will not be king." '" Then I will," said Alice.








32 THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE.
" But, wife," answered ihe fit.ihrmnn, "how
can you be king? the fish cannot make you a
king." Husband," said she, "say no more
about it, but go and try; I willbeking!" So
tJie nmu went away, quite sorrowful to think
that his wife should want to be king. The
sea looked a dark grey colour, and was cover-
ed with foam as he.cried out,
0 man of the sea
Come listen to me,
For Alice my wife,
The plague of my life,
Hath sent me to beg a boon of thee! "
Well, what would she. have now?" said
the fish. "Alas!" said the man, my wife
wants to be ling." Go home," said the fish;
" she is king already."
Then the fisherman went home; and as he
came close to the palace, he saw a troop of
soldier,, and heard the sound of drums and
trumpets: and whenhe entered in, he saw his
wife sitting on a high throne of gold and dia-
mnonds, with a golden crown upon her.head;
and on each side of her stood six beautiful
miidLem, each a head taller than the other.








THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. S'

"Well, wife,'" said the fisherman, are you
king?" "Yes," said she, "I am king." And
when he had looked at her for a long time, he
said, "-Ah, wife! what a fine thing it is to be
king! now we shall never have any thing more
to wish for." "I don't knomw how that may be,"
said she; neverr is a long time. I am king, 'tis
true, but I begin to be tired of it, and I think
I. should like to be emperor." Alas, wife
why should you wish to be emperor?" said the
fisherman. "Husband,"' said she, "go to the
fish; I say I will be emperor." Ah, wife!"
replied the fisherman, the fish cannot make
an emperor, and I should not like to ask for-
Ssuch a thing." I am king," said Alice, and
youi are my slave, so go directly!" So the
fisherman was obliged to go; and he muttered
"as he went along, "This will come to no good,
it is too much- to ask, the. fish will be tired at
las, and then we shall repent of what we have-
done." He soon arrived at the sea, and the
water was quite black and muddy, and a-
,liughty whirlwind blew over it; but he went tot
the shore, and said,'
c 5.







84' THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE.
"Oman of the sea 1
Come listen to me,
For Alice my wife,
The plague ofmy life,
RHath sent me to beg a boon of thee l'"

What would she have now?" said the fish.
G Ah !" said the fisherman,. "she wants to be
emperor." Go home," said the fish; "she
is emperor already."
So he went home again; and as he came
near he saw his wife sitting on a very lofty
.throne nfade of solid gold, with a great crown
on her head full two yards high, and on each
side ofher stood her guards and attendants in a
row, each one smaller than the other, from the
tallest giant down to a little dwarf no bigger
than my finger. And before her stood princes,
and dukes, and earls: and the fisherman went
up to her and said, "Wife, areyou emperor?'
"Yes," said she, "I am emperor." "Ah!'"
said the man as he gazed upon her, "what a
fine thing it is to be emperor !" ". Husband,"
said she, why should we stay at being empe-
ror ? I will be pope next." 0 wife, wife !"







THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. 85
said he, how can you be pope ? there is but
one pope at a time in Christendom." Hus-
band," said she," I will be pope this very day."
" But," replied the husband, the fish cannot
make you pope." What nosennse !" said
she, "if he can make an emperor, he can make
a pope; go and try him." So the fisherman
went. But when he came to the shore the
wind was raging, and the sea was tossed up
anddownlike boiling water, and the shipswere
in the greatest distress and danced upon the
waves most fearfully; in the middle of the, sky
there was a little blue, but towards the south it
was all red as if a dreadful storm was rising.
At this the fisherman was terribly frightened
and trembled, so that his knees knockedtoge-
ther: but he went to the shore and said,.
0 man of the sea!'
Come listen to me,,
For Alice my wife,.
The plague of my life,
Hath sent me to beg a boon of thee !"'
What does she want now?" said the fish.;
"Ah !" said the fisherman,. "my wife wants to-








36 THE. FISHEIMAN AND HIIS WIFE.
be pope." "Go home," said the fish, she is
pope already."'
' Then the fisherman went home, and fund
his wife sitting on a throne that was two miles
Light i and she had three great crowns on her
head, and around stood all the pomp and power
of thie church; and on each side were two rows
:of burning lights, of all sizes, the greatest as
large as the highest and biggest tower in the
world, :aid the least no larger than asmallrush-
light. Wife," said the fisherman as he look-
ed at all this grandeur, "' are you pope?"
" YesI' said she, I am pope." Well, wife,"
replied he, it is a.grand thing to be pope;
and nw.yoqu.imust be content, for you can be
nothing greater." I. will consider of that,"
said the wife. Then they went to bed: but
Dame Alice could not sleep all night for think-
ing what she should be next. At last morn-
ing came, and the sun rose. "'Ha!" thought
she as she looked at it through the window,
"cannot I prevent the sun rising?" At this
she was very angry, and wakened'her hus-
band, and said, Husband, go to the fish







THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. 3T

and tell him I want to be lord of the sun and
moon." The fisherman was half asleep, but
the thought frightened him so. much, that he
started and fell out of bed. "Alas, wife!"
said he, "cannot you be content to be pope?"
"No," said she, "Iam very uneasy, and can-
not bear to see the sun and moon rise without
my leave.. Go to the fish directly."
Then the man went trembling for fear;
and ashe was going down to the shore a-dread-
ful storm arose; so that-the trees and the rocks
shook;-and the heavens became black, and the
lightning played, and the thunder rolled : and
you might have seen in the sea great:bLick
waves like mountains with a white crown of
foam upon them; and the fisherman said,

Oman of the sea !
Come listen to me,.
For Alice my wife;
The plague of my life,
Hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!"

What does she want now ?" said the fish.
" Al!" said he, "she wants to be lord of the







THE TOM-TIT AND THE BEAR..
sun and moon." Go home," said the fish,
"to your ditch again !" And there they live
to this very day.



THE TOM-TIT AND THE. BEAI.

ON: summer day, as the wolf and the bear
were walking together in a wood, they heard
a bird singing most delightfully. Bother,"
said the bear,, "what can that bird be that is;
singing so sweetly?" "0!" said.the wolf
"that is his majesty the king of the birds; we
must take care to show him all, possible re-
spect.' (Now I should tell you that this bird
was afteall no other than the tom-tit.) If
that is the case," said the bear, "I should like
to see the royal palace; so pray come along
and show it to me." "Gently, my friend," said
the wolf,, "we cannot see it just yet, we must
wait till the queen comes home."
Soon afterwards the queen came with food
im.herbeak, and sheand the king began to feed







THE TOM-TIT AND THE BEAR. 3W
their young ones. "Now for it !" said the,
bear; and was about tqo follow them, to see
what was to be seen. Stop a little, master
Bruin," said the.wolf we must wait now till
their majesties are goneagain." Sotheymarked
the hole where they had seen the nest, and
went away. But the bear, being very eager to
see the- royal palace, soon came back again,
and peeping into the nest, saw five or six young
birds lying at the bottom of it. "What non-
sense! said Bruin, "this is not a royalpalace;
. never saw such a filthy place in my life; and
you are no royal children, you little base-born
brats 1" As soon as the young tom-tits heard
this they were very angry, and screamed out
" We are not base-born, you stupid bear! our
father and mother are honest good sort of
people: and depend upon it you shall suffer
for your insolence I At this the wolf and the
hear grew frightened, and ran away to their
dens. But the young tom-tits kept crying and
screaming; and when their father and mother
camelhome and offered them food, they all said,
" We will not touch a bit; no, not the leg of
a fly, though we should die of hunger, till that








IO THE TOM-TIT AND THE BEAft.


rascal Bruin has been punished for calling us
base-born brats." Make yourselves easy,
my darlings," said the old king, "you may be
sure he shall meet withhis deserts."
So he went out aid stood before'the bear's
den, and cried'out with a. loud' voice, "'Bruin
the bear.! thou hast shamefully insulted our
lawful children: we therefore hereby declare
bloody and cruel war against thee and thine,
which shall never cease until thou hast been
punished as thou so richly deservest" Now
when the bear heard this, he called together
the ox, the ass, the stag, and all the beasts of
th'e earth, in order to consult about the means
of his defence. And the tom-tit also-enlisted
on his side all the birds of the air, both great
and small, and a very large army of hornets,,
gnats, bees, and flies,- and other insects.-
As the time approached when the war- was
to begin, the tom-tit sentout spies to see who
was the commander-ii-chief of the enemy's
i.orces; and the gnat, who was by far tihe cle-
verest spy of them all, flew backwards and for-
wards in the woodl where the enermys troops
were, and -at last hid himself under a leaf on a







THE TOM-TIT AND THE BEAR.


tree, close by which the orders of the day were
given out. And the bear, who was standing so
near the tree that the gnat could hear all he
said, called to the fox and said, Reynard, you
are the cleverest of all the beasts; therefore'
you shall be our general and lead us to battle:
but we must first agree upon some siginil,'by
which we may know what you want us to do."-
" Behold," said the fox, "I have a fine, long,
bushy tail, which is very like a plume of red.
feathers, and gives me a very warlike air:.now
remember, when you see me raise up my tail,
you may be sure that the battle is won, and
you have then nothing to do but to rush down
upon the enemy with all your force. On the
other hand, if I drop my tail, the day is lost,
and you must run away as fast as you can."
Now when the gnat had heard all this, she
flew back to the tom-tit, and told him every
thing that had passed.
At length the day came \\hen thebat.le was.
to be fought; and as soon as it was light, be-
hold! the army of beasts came rushing forward
with such a fearful sound that the earth shook.
And his majesty the tom-tit, with his troops,,







42 THE TOM-TIT AND THE BEAR.
came flying along in warlike array, flapping
and fluttering, and beating the air, so that it
was quite frightful to hear; and both armies set
themselves in order of battle upon the field.
Now the tom-tit gave orders to a troop of hor-
nets that at the first onset they should march
straight towards Captain Reynard, and fixing
themselves about his tail, should sting him with
all their might and main.. The hornets did as
theyweretold: and when Reynard felt the first
sting, he started aside and shook one of his-
legs, but still held up his tail with wonderful
bravery; at the second sting he was forced to
drop his. tail for a moment; but when the third
hornet had fixed itself, he" could bear it no.
longer, but clapped his tail between his legs
and scampered away as fast as he could. As
soon as the beasts saw this, they thought of
course all was lost, and scoured across the
country in the greatest dismay, leaving the
birds masters of the field.
Aknd now the king and queen flew back in
triumph totheirchildren, and said, "Now, chil-
dren, eat, drink, and be merry, tor the victory
is ours But the young birds said, No:







THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES. 43
not till Bruin has humbly begged our pardon
for calling us base-born." So the, king flew
back to the bear's den, and cried out, Thou
villain bear! come forthwith to my abode, and
humbly beseech my children to forgive thee
the insult thou hast offered them; for, if thou,
wilt not do this, every bone in thy wretched
body shall bebroken topieces." Then the bear
was forced to crawl out of his den very sulkily,
and do what the king bade him: and after that
the young birds sat down together, and ate
and drank 'and made merry till midnight.



THE
TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES.

THERE was a king who had twelve beautiful
daughters. They slept in twelve beds all in
one room; and when they went to bed, the
doors were shut and locked up; but every
morning their shoes were found to be quite
worn through, as if they had been danced in







44 TH-E TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES.
all: night; and yet nobody could find outhovw
it happened, or where they had been.
Then the king made it known to all the
land, that if any person could discover the se-
cret, and find out where it was that the'prin-
cesses danced in the night, he shouildhave the
one he liked best for his wife, and should be
king after his death; but whoever tried and did
not succeed, after three days and nights.
should be put to death.
; A king's son soon came. Hie was well en-
tertained, and in the evening was taken to the
chamber next to the one where the piincesses-
lay in their twelve.beds.. There he was to sit
and watch where they went to dance; and in
order that nothing might pass without his
hearing it, the door of his chamber was left
open. But the king's son soon fell asleep; and
when he awoke in the morning he found that
the princesses had all been dancing, for, the,
soles of their shoes were full of holes; :The
same thing happened .the second and third
night:: so the king ordered his head to be cut
aftl After him came several others; but they







'THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES. 4'5
had all the same luck, and all lost their lives
in the same manner.
Now it chanced that an old soldier, who
had been wounded in battle.and could fight no
longer, passed through the country where this
king reigned: and ashe was travelling through
a wood, he met an old woman, who .asked him
where he.was going. ".I hardly know where
I am going, or what I had better do," said the
soldier:; but I think I should like very well
to find out where it is that the princesses dance,
and then in time I might be a king." Well,"
said the old dame, that is no very hard task:
only take care not to drink any of the wine
which one of the princesses will bring to you
in the evening; and as soon as she leaves you
pretend to be fast asleep."
Then she gave him a cloak, and said,." As
soon as you put that on you will become invi-
sible, and you will then be able to follow the
princesses wherever they go." When the sol-
dier heard all this good counsel, he determined
to try his luck: so he went to the king, and
said he was willing to undertake the task.
He was as well received as the others had







46 THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES.
been, and the king ordered fine royal robes to
be.given him; and when the evening came, he
was led to the outer chamber. Just as he was
going to lie down, the eldest of the princesses
*brought him a cup of wine; but the soldier
threw it all away secretly, taking care not to
drink a drop. Then he laid himself down on
his bed, and in a little while began to snore
very loud as if he was fast asleep. When the
twelve princesses heard this theylaughedhear-
tily; and the eldest said, "This fellow too might
have done a wiser thing than lose his life in
this way! Then they rose up and opened
their drawers and boxes, and took out all their
"fine clothes, and dressed themselves atthe glass,
and skipped about as if they were eager to be-
gin dancing,. But the youngest said, "I don't
know how it is, while you are so happy I feel
very uneasy; I am sure some mischance will
befall us." "You.simpleton," said the eldest,
"you are always afraid; have you forgotten
how many kings' sons have already watched us
in vain? And as for this soldier, even if I had
not given him his sleeping draught, he would
have slept soundly enough."






THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES. 47
When they were all ready, they went and
looked at the soldier: but he snored on, and
did not stir hand or foot: so they.thought they
were quite safe; and the eldest went up to her
own bed and clapped her hands, and the bed
sank into the floor and a trap-door flew open.
The soldier saw them going down through the
:trap-door one after another, the eldest leading
the way; and thinking he had no time to lose,
he jumped up, put on the cloak which the old
yoman had given him, and followed them;
but in the middle of the stairs he trod on the
gown. of the youngest princess, and she cried
,out to her sisters, "All is not right; some one
took hold of my gown." You silly crea-
ture !" said the eldest, it is nothing but a
nail in the wall." Then down they all went,
and at the bottom they found themselves in a
most delightful grove of trees; and the leaves
were all of silver, and glittered and sparkled
beautifully. The soldier wished to take away
some token of the place; so he broke off a lit-
tle branch, and there came a loud noise from
the tree. Then theyoungest daughter said
again, I am sure all is not right-did not







A'8 THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES.
you hear that noise ? That never happened
before." But the eldest'said, "It is only the
princes, who are shouting for joy at our ap-
Iproach."
Then they came to another grove of trees,
~O here all the leaves were of gold; and after-
wards to a third, where the leaves were all
glittering diamonds. And the soldier broke a
branch from each; and every time there was a
loud noise, which made the youngest sister
iremble with fear; but the eldest still said,
it was only the princes, who were crying for
joy. So they went on till they came to a
:r'.:a-t lake; and at the side of the lake there
lay twelve little boats with twelve handsome
princes iri them, who seemed to be waiting
there for the princesses.
One of the princesses went into each nor.t,
and the soldier stepped into the same boat with
the youngest. As-they were rowing over the
lake, the prince who was in the boat with the
youngestt princes, and the soldier said, "I do
not know why it is, but though I am rowing
with all my might, we do no: get cn so fast as
usual, and' I am quite tired: the.boat seems.







THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES. 49
very heavy to-day." It is only the heat of
the weather," said the princess; I feel it very
warm too."
On the other side of the lake stood a fine il-
luminated castle, from which came the merry
music of horns and trumpets. There they all
landed, and went into the castle, and each
prince danced with his princess; and the sol-
dier, who was all the time invisible, danced
with them too; and when any of the princesses
had a cup of wine set by her, he drank it all
up, so that when she put the cup to her inouth
it was empty. At this, too, the youngest sister
was terribly frightened, but the eldest always
silenced her. They danced on till three o'clock
in the morning, and then all their shoes were
worn out, so that they were obliged to leave
off. The princes rowed them back again over
the lake; (but this time the soldier placed him-
self in the boat with the eldest princess;) and
on the opposite shore they took leave of each
other, the princesses promising to come again
the next night.
When they came to the stairs, the soldier
ran on before the princesses, and laid himself
D







50 THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES.
down; and as the twelve sisters slowly came
up very much tired, they heard him snoring in
his bed; so they said, "Now all is quite safe1."
then they undressed themselves, put away their
fine clothes, pulled off their shoes, and went to
bed. In the morning the soldier said nothing
about what had happened, but determined to
see more of this strange adventure, and went
again the second and third night; and every
thing happened just as before; the princesses
danced each time till their shoes were worn to
pieces, and then returned home. However,
on the third night the soldier carried away one
of the golden cups as a token of where he had
been.
As soon as the time came when he was to
declare the secret, he was taken before the
king with the three branches and the golden
cup; and the twelve princesses stood listening
behind the door to hear what he would say.
And when theking asked him Where do my
twelve daughters dance atnight?" he answered,
"With twelve princes in a castle under ground."
And then he told theking all that had happened,
and showed him the three branches and. the







ROSE-BUD.


golden cup which he had brought with him.
Then the king called for the princesses, and
asked them whether what the soldier said was
true: and when they saw that they were disco-
vered, and that it was of no use to deny what
had happened, they confessed it all. And the
king asked the soldier which of them he would
choose for his wife; and he answered;, "I ai2,
not very youLg, so I will have the eldest."-
And they were married that very day, and the
soldier was chosen to be the king's heir.





ROSE-BUD.

ONCE upon a tine there lived a king and
queen who had no children; and this they la-
mented very much. But one day as the queen
was walking by the side of the river, a little
fish lifted its head out of the water, and said,
"Your wish shall be fulfilled, and you shall
soon have a daughter." What the little fish
n2







ROSE-BUD.


had foretold o.on came to pass; and the queen
had a little girl that was so very beautiful that
the king could not cease looking on it for joy,
and determined to hold a great feast. So he in-
vited not only his relations, friends, and neigh-
bours, but also all the fairies, that they might
be kind and good to hislittle daughter. Now
there were thirteen fairies in his kingdom, and
he had only twelve golden dishes for them to
eat out of, so that he was obliged to leave one
of the fairies without an invitation. The rest
came, and after the feast was over they gave
all their best gifts to the little princess: one
gave her virtue, another beauty, another riches,
and so on, till she had all that was excellent
in the world. When eleven had done blessing
her, the thirteenth, who had not been invited,
and was very angry on that account, came in,
and determined to take her revenge. So she
cried out, The king's daughter shall in her
fifteenth year be wounded by, a spindle, and
fall down dead." Then the twelfth, who had
not yet given her gift, came forward and said,
that the bad wish must be fulfilled, but that.







SROSE-BUD. 53
she could soften it, and lhat dti. king's daugh-
ter should not die, but fall asleep for a hun-
dred years.
SBut the king hoped to save his dear child
from the threatened evil, and ordered that all
the spindles in the kingdom should be bought
up and destroyed. All the fairies' gifts were
in the mean time fulfilled; for the princess was
so beautiful, and well-behaved, and amiable,
and wise, that every one who knew her loved
her. Now it happened that on the very day
she was fifteen years old the king and queen
were not at home, and she was left alone in
the palace. So she roved about by herself, and
looked at all the rooms and chambers, till at
last she came to an old tower, to which there
was a narrow staircase ending with a little
door. In the door there was a golden key, and
when she turned it the door sprang open, and
there sat an old lady spinning away very busily.
"Why, how now, good mother," said t he prin-
cess, what are you doing there?" Spin-
ning," said the old lady, and nodded her head.
"How prettily that little thing turns round!"
said the princess, and took the spindle and be-







ROSE-BUD.


gan to spin. But scarcely had she touched it,
-before the prophecy was fulfilled, and she fell
down lifeless on the ground.
However, she was not dead, but had only
fallen into a deep sleep; and the king and the
:queen, wh6 just then came home, and :ill their
court, fell asleep too; and the horses slept in
the stables, and the dogs ini the court, the pi-
geon's on the house-top, and the flies on the
walls.. Even the fire on the hearth left off
blazing, and went to sleep; and the meat.that
was roasting stood still; and the cook, who
was at that moment pulling the kitchen-boy
by the hair to give him a box on the ear for
something he had done amiss, let him go, and
both fell asleep; and so every thing stood. still,
and slept soundly..
A large hedge of thorns soon grew round
the palace, and every year it became higher
and tllcki-r, till at last the whole palace was
.surrounded and hid, so that not even the roof
or the chimneys could be seen. But there went
a -report through all the land of the beautiful
sleeping Rose-Bud (for so was the king's
daughter called); so that from time to time







ROSE-BUD.


several kings' sons came, and tried to break
through the thicket into the palace. This they
could never do; for the thorns and bushes laid
hold of them as it were with hands, and there
they stuck fast and died miserably.
- After many many years there came a king's
son into that land, and an old man told him
the story of the thicket of thorns, and how a
beautiful palace stood behind it, in which was
a wondrous princess,:called Rose-Bud, asleep
with all her court. He told too, how he had
heard from his grandfather that many many
princes had come, and had tried to break
through the thicket, but had stuck fast and
died. Then the young prince said, All this
shall not frighten me, I will go and see Rose-
Bud." The old man tried to dissuade him,
but he persisted in going.
Now that very day were the hundred years
completed; and as the prince came to the
thicket, he saw nothing but beautiful flowering
shrubs, through which he passed with ease,
and they closed after him as firm as ever.
Then he came at last to the palace, and there
in the court lay the dogs asleep, and the horses







ROSE-BUD.


in the stables, and on the roof sat the pigeons
fast asleep with their heads under their wings;
and when he came into the palace, the flies
slept on the walls, and the cook in the kitchen
was still holding up her hand as if she would
beat the boy, and the maid sat with a black
fowl in her hand ready to be plucked.
Then he went on still further, and all was
so still that he could hear every breath he
drew; till at last he came to the old tower
and opened the door of the little room in which
Rose-Bud was, and there she lay fast asleep;
and looked so beautiful that he could not take
his eyes off, and he stooped down and gave
her a kiss. But the moment he kissed her she
opened her eyes and awoke, and smiled upon
him. Then they went out together, and pre-.
sently the king and queen also awoke, and all
the court, and they gazed on each other with
great wonder. And the horses got up and
shook themselves, and the dogs jumped about
and bnrked; the pigeons took their heads from
tipder their wings, and looked about and flew
into the fil kd; the flies on the walls buzzed
away; the fire in the kitchen blazed up and







TOM THUMB.


cooked the dinner, and the ioast meat turned
round again; the cook gave the boy the box
on his ear so that he cried out, and the maid
went on plucking the fowl. And then was the
wedding of the prince and Rose-Bud cele-
brated, and they lived happily together all
their lives long.




TOM THUMB.

THERE was once a poor woodman sitting by
the fire in his cottage, and his wife sat by his
side spinning. "Howlonelyit is," said he, "for
you and me to sit here by ourselves, without
any children to play about and amuse us, while
other people seem so happy and merry with
their children!" What you say is very
true," said the wife, sighing and turning round
her wheel, how happy should I be if I had
but one child! and if it were ever so small,
nay, if it were no bigger than my thunb, I
should be very happy, and love it dearly."







TOM THUMB.


Now it came to pass that this good woman'a
wish was fulfilled just as she desired; for, some
time afterwards, she had a little boy who was
quite healthy and strong, but not much bigger
than my thumb. So they said, Well, we
cannot say we have not got what we wished
for, and, little as he is, we will love him dear-
ly;" and they called him Tom Thumb.
They gave him plenty of food, yet he never
grew bigger, but remained just the same size
as when he as born; still his eyes were sharp
and sparkling, and he soon showed himself to
be a clever little fellow, who always knew well
what he was about. One.day, -as the wood-
man was getting ready to go into the wood to
cut fuel, he said, I wish I had some one .to
bring the cart after me, for I want to make
haste." 0 father!" cried Tom, I will
take care of that; the cart shall be in the wood
by the time you want it." Then the wood-
man laughed, and said, How can' that be?
you cannot reach up to the horse's bridle."
" Never mind that, father," said Tom: if my
mother will only harness the horse, I will get







TOM THUMB. 9

into his ear and tell him which way to go."
" Well," said the father, "we will try for
once."
When the time came, the mother harnessed
the horse to the cart, and put Tom into his
ear; and as he sat there, the little man told
the beast how to go, crying out, Go on,"
and Stop," as he wanted: so the horse went
on just: as if the woodman had driven it him-
self into the wood. It happened that, as the
horse was going a little too fast, and Tom was
calling out Gently! gently!" two strangers
came up. What an odd thing that is!" said
one, there is a cart going along, and I hear
a carter talking to the horse, but can see no
one." "That is strange," said the other; "let
us follow the cart and see,where it goes." So
th1ey went on into the wood, till at last they
came to the place where the woodman was.
,Then Tom Thumb, seeing his father, cried
oat, See, father, here I am, with the cart, all
right and safe; now take me down." So his
afftlier took hold of the horse with one hand,
and with the other took his son out of the ear;
then he put him down upon a straw, where









he sat as merry as you please. The two
strangers were all this time looking on, and did
not know what to say for wonder. At last one
took the other aside and said, That little ur-
chin will make our fortune if we can get him
and carry him about from town to town as a
show: we must buy him." So they went to
the woodman' and asked him what he would
take for the little man: He will be better
off," said they, with us than with you." I
won't sell him at all," said the father; "my
own flesh and blood is dearer to me than all
the silver and gold in the world." But Tom,
1iiaring of the bargain they wanted to make,
crept up his father's coat to his shoulder, and
whispered in his ear, Take the money, fa,
other, and let them have me; I'll soon come
back to you."
So the woodman at last agreed to sell Tom-
to the strangers for a large piece of gold.
" Wielr do you like- to sit?" said one of them.
"Oh! put me on the rim of your hat, that will
be a nice gallery for me; I can walk about
there, and see the country as we go along."
So they did as he wished; and when Tom had


TOM THUIIiMB.







TOM THUMB.


taken leave of his father, they took him away
with them. They journeyed on till it began
to be dusky, and then the little man said, Let
me get down, I'm tired." So the man took
off his hat, and set him down on a clod of earth
in a ploughed field by the side of the road.
But Tom ran about amongst the furrows, and
at last slipt into an old mouse-hole. Good
night, masters," said he, "I'm off! mind and
look sharp after me the next time." They ran
directly to the place, and poked the ends of
their sticks into the mouse-hole, but all in vain;
Tom only crawled further and further in, and
at last it became quite dark, so that they were
Obliged to go their way without their prize, as
sulky as you please.
When Tom found they were gone, he came
out of his hiding-place. What dangerous
walking it is," said he, "in this ploughed field!
If I were to fall from one of these great clods,
I should certainly break my neck." At last,
by good luck, he found a large empty snail-
shell. This is lucky," said he, I can sleep
here very well," and in he crept. Just as he
was falling asleep he heard two men passing,







TOM THUMB.


and one said to the other, How shall we ma-
inage to steal that richparson's silver and gold?"
" I'll tell you," cried Tom. What noise was
that?" said the thief, frightened, am sure I
heard some one speak." They stood still list-
ening, and Tom said, "Take me with you, and
I'll soon show you how to get the parson's
money." But where are you?" said they.
" Look about on the ground," answered he,
"and listen where the sound comes from."
At last the thieves found him out, and lifted
him up in their hands. You little urchin !"
said they, what can you do for us? Why
I can get between the iron window-bars of the
parson's house, and throw you out whatever
you want." That's a good thought," said
the thieves, come along, we shall see what
you can do." .
When they came to the parson's house,
Tom slipt through the window-bars into.the
room, and then called out as loud as he could
bawl, Will you have all that is here?" At
this the thieves were frightened, and said,
'' Softly, softly! Speak low, that you may not
awaken any body." But Tom pretended not







TOM THUMB.


to understand them, and bawled out again,
" How much will you have? Shall I throw it
all out?" Now the.cook lay in the next room,
and hearing a noise she raised herself in her
bed and listened. Meantime the thieves were
frightened, and ran off to a little distance; but
,,at last they plucked up courage, and said,
"-The little urchin is only trying to make fools
of us." So they came back and whispered
softly to him, saying, Now let us have no
more of your jokes, but throw out some of the
money." Then Tom called out as loud as he
could, Very well: hold your hands, here it
comes." The cook heard this quite plain, so
she sprang out of bed and ran to open the door.
The thieves ran off as if a wolf was at their
tails;, and the maid, having groped about and
found nothing, went away for a light. By the
time she returned, Tom had slipt off into the
barn; and when the cook had looked about
*and seairched.every hole and corner, and found
nobody, she went to bed, thinking she must
have been dreaming with her eyes open. The
little man crawled about in the hay-loft, and at
last found a glorious place to finish his night's







(5 TOM THUMB.
rest in; so he laid himself down, meaning to
sleep tillday-light, and then find tlis \\a3y iioIne
to his father and mother., But, alas! how
cruelly was he disappointed! what crosses
and sorrows happen in this world! The cook
got up earlybefore day-break to feed the cows:
she went straight to the hay-loft, and carried
away a large bundle of haj:with the little man
in the middle of it fast asleep. He i;ll, hoiw-
ever, slept on, and did not awake till lie fiund
himself in the mouth of the cow, who had
taken him up with a mouthful of hay: Good
lack-a-day!" said he, how did I manage to
tumble into the mill?" But he soon found out
where he really was, and was obliged to laie
all his wits about him in order that he might
not get between the cow's teeth, and so be
crushed to death. At last down he ment into
her stomach. It is rather dark here," said
he; they forgot to build windows in this
room tolet the sun in: a candle would be no
bad thing."
Though he made the best of his bad luck,
he did not like his quarters at all; and the
worst of it was, that more and more hay wan;







TOM THUMB.


always coming down, and the space in which
he was, became smaller and smaller. At last
he cried out as loud as he could, "Don't bring
me any more hay! Don't bring me any more
hay!" The maid happened to be just then
milking the cow, and hearing some one speak
and seeing nobody, and yet being quite sure it
was the same voice that she had heard in the
night, she was so frightened that she fell off
her stooland overset the milk-pail. She ran
off as fast as she could to her master the par-
son, and said, Sir, sir, the-cow is talking'!"
But the iparson said, "Woman, thou art surely
imad !" However, he went with her into the
cow-house to see what was the matter.-
Scarcely had they set their foot on the thresh-
old, when Tom called out, "Don't bring me
any more hay!" Then the parson himself
was frightened; and thinking the cow was
surely bckwitcheld, ordered that she should be
killed directly. So the cow was killed, and
the stomach, in which Tom lay, was thrown
out upon a dunghill.
Tom soon set himself to work to get out,
which was not a very easy, task; but at last,







TOM THUMB.


just as he had made room to get his head out,
a new misfortune befell him: a hungry wolf
sprang out, and swallowed the whole stomach
with Tom in it at a single gulp, and ran away-
Tom, however, was not disheartened; and,
thinking the wolf would not dislike having
some chat with him as he was going along,
he called out, ,"My gord friend, I can show
you a famous treat." "Where's that?" said
the wolf. In such and such a house," said
Tom, describing his father's house, you
can crawl through the drain into the kitchen.
and there you will find cakes, ham, beef, and
every thing your heart cain desire." The wolf'
did not want to be asked twice; so that very
nighthe went tothe house and crawled th ro ugh
the drain into the kitchen, and ate and drank
there to his heart's content. As soon as he
was satisfied, he wanted to get away, but he
had eaten so much that he could not get out
the same way that he came in. This was just
what Tom had reckoned upon; and he now
began to set up a great shout, making all the
noise he could. Will you be quiet ?" said
the wolf: "you'll awaken every body in the







TOM THUMB.


house." "What's that to me?" said the
little man: "you have had your frolic, now
I've a.mind to be merry myself;" and he be-
gan again singing and .shoutiing as loud as he
could.
The woodman and his wife, being awakened
by thi- noise, peeped through a crack in the
door; but when they saw that the wolf was
there, 3oi may wtll i'uppoe that they were
terribly, frightenedd. and the woodman ran
for his axe, and gave his wife a scythe.-
"' Now do you :stay behind," said the wood-
man; "and when I lave knocked him on the
head, do you rip up his belly for him with
the scythe." Tom heard all this, and said,
SFather,' father! I am here, the wolf has
swallowed me:" and his father said, Heaven
be praised! we have found our dear' child
again;" and he told his wife not to use the
scythe, for feor she should hurt him. Then he
aimed a great blow, and struck the wolf on
the head, and killed him-on the spot; and
when hewva dead tlev cut open his body and
,.set Tommy free. "Ah !" said the father,
" what fears we-have had for you!" "Yes,








68 THE GRATEFUL BEASTS.
father," answered he, "I have travelled all
over the world, since we parted, in one way or
other; and now I am very glad to get fresh air
again." "'Why, where have you been?"
said his father. I have been in a mouse-
hole, in a snail-shell, down a cow's throat, and
in the wolf's belly; and yet here I am again
safe and sound:" Well," said they, "we
will not sell you again for all the riches in the
world." So they hugged and kissed their dear
little son, and gave him plenty tz eat and
drink, and fetched new clothes for him, for his
old ones were quite spoiled on his journey.




THE GRATEFUL BEASTS.

A CERTAIN nin, who had lost almost all his
money, resolved to set off with the little that
was left him, and travel into the wide world.
Then the first place he came to was a village,
where the young people were running about
crying and shouting. What is the matter?"







THE GRATEFUL BEASTS. 69
asked he. See here," answered they, "wa
have got a mouse that we make dance to please
us. Do look at him: what a droll sight it is .
how he jumps about!" But the man pitied
the poor little thing, and said, "Let the mouse
go, and I will give you money. So he gave
them some, and took the mouse and let it run;
and it soon jumped into a hole that was close
by, and was out of their reach.
Then he travelled on and came to another
village, and there the children had got an ass
that they made stand on its hind legs, and tum-
ble and cut capers, at which they laughed and
shouted, and gave the poor beast no rest. So
the good man gave them some of his money
to let the poor creature go away in peace.
At the next village he came to, the young
people had found a bear that had been taught
to dance, and they were plaguing the poor
thing sadly. Then he gave them too some
money to let the beast go, and the bear was.
very glad to get on his four feet, and seemed
quite at his ease and happy again.
But now he found that he had given away all.
the money bh had in the world, and had not a







70 THE GRATEFUL BEASTS.


shilling in his pocket. Then said he to himself,
"The king has heaps of gold in his treasury
-that he never uses; I cannot die of hunger, I
hope I shall be forgiven, if I borrow a little,
and when I get rich again I will repay it all."
So he managed to get into the treasury, and
took a very little money; but as he came out
the king's guards saw him, and said he was a
thief, and took, him to the judge, and he was
sentenced to be thrown into the water in a
box. The lid of the box was full of holes to
let in air, and a jug of water and a loaf of
bread were given him.
Whilst he was swimming along in the wa-
ter very sorrowfully, he heard something nib-
bling and biting at the lock; and all of a sud-
den it fell off, the lid flew open, and there stood
his old friend the little mouse, who had done
him this service. And then came the ass and
the bear, and pulled the box ashore; arid all
helped him because he had been kind io them.
But now they did not know what to do next;:
and began to consult together; when on a sud-
den a wave threw on the shore a beautiful white, :
stone that looked like an egg. Then the bear







THE GRATEFUL BEASTS.


said,' That's a lucky thing: this is the won-
derful stone, and whoever has it may have
every thing else that he wishes." So the man
went and picked up the stone, and wished for
a palace and a garden, and a stud of horses;
and his wish was fulfilled as soon as he had
made it. And there he lived in his castle and
garden, with fine stables and horses; and all
was so grand and beautiful, that he never could
wonder and gaze at it enough.
After some time, some merchants passed
by that way. See," said they, what a
princely palace! The last time we were here,
it was nothing but a desert waste." They
were very curious to know how all this had
happened, and went in and asked the master of
the palace how it had been so quickly raised.
I have done nothing myself," answered he,
"it is the wonderful stone that did all."-
What a strange stone that must be!" said
they: then he invited them in and showed it
to them. They asked him whether he would
sell it, and offered him all their goods for it;
and the goods seemed so fine and costly, that
he quite forgot that the stone would bring him







72 THE GRlATEFUL BEASTS.
in a moment a thousand better and richer
things, and he agreed to make the bargain.
Scarcely was the stone, however, out of his
hands before all his riches were gone, and he
found himself sitting in his box in the water,
with his jug of water and loaf of bread by his
side. The grateful beasts, the mouse, the ass,
and the bear, came directly to help him; but
the mouse found she could not nibble off the
lock this time, for it was a great deal stronger
than before. Then the bear said, We must
find the wonderful stone again, or all we can
do will be fruitless."
The merchants, meantime, had taken up
their abode in the palace; so away went the
three friends, and when they came near, the
bear said, "Mouse, go in and look through
the key-hole and see where the stone is kept:
you are small, nobody will see you." The
mouse did as she was told, but soon came
back and said, Bad news! I have looked in,
and the -toni hangs under the looking-glass
by a red silk string, and on each side of it sits
a great cat with fiery eyes to watch it."
Then the others took council together, and






THE GRATEFUL BEASTS. 7.

said, Go back ngaii, and wait till the mas-
ter of the palace is in bed asleep, then nip his
nose and pull his hair." Away went the
mouse, and did as they directed her; and the
niaster jumped up very angry, and rubbed his
nose, and cried, "Those: rascally cats are
good for nothing at all, they let the mice eat
my very nose and pull the hair off my head."
Then.he hunted them out of the room; and
so the mouse had the best of the game.
Next night as sooi as the master was asleep,.-
the mouse crept in again, and nibbled at the
red silken string to which the stone hung, till
down it dropped, and she rolled it along to the
door;'but when it got there, the poor little
mouse was quite tired, and said to the ass,
" Put in your foot, and lift it over the thresh-
old." This was soon done: and they took up
the stone, and set off for the water side. Then
the ass said, How shall we reach the box ?"
"That is. easily managed," answered the
bear: "I can swim very well, and do you, don-
key, put your fore feet over my shoulders ;-,
mind and hold fast, and take the stone in your
mouth: as for you, mouse, you can sit in my
ear." E







THE GRATEFUL BEASTS.


It was all settled thus, and away they swam.
After time, the bear began to brag and boast:
'" We are brave fellows, are not we, ass ?" said
he; "what do you think?" But the ass held
his tongue, and said not a word. Whli don't
you answer me?" said the bear, '" you must
be an ill-mannered brute not to speak when
you're spoken to." When the ass heard this,
he could hold no longer; so.he opened.his
mouth, and'dropped the wonderful stone. I
could not speak," said he; did not you know
I had the stone in my mouth? now 'tis lost,
and that's your fault." Do but hold your
tongue andbe quiet," said the bear; "and let
us think what's to be done."
Then a council was held: and at last they
called together all the frogs, their wives and
families, relations and friends, and said: "A
great enemy is coming to eat you all up; but
never mind, bring us up plenty of stones, and
we'll build a strorig wall to guard you." The
frogs hearing this were dreadfully frightened,
and set to work, bringing up all the stones they
could find. At last came a large fat f'o-og pull-
ing along the wonderful stone by the silken
string: and when the bear saw it, he jumped







JORINDA AND JORINDEL. 75
for joy, and said, "Now we have found what
we wanted." So he released the old frog from
his load, and told him to tell his friends they
might go about their business as soon as they
pleased.
Then the three friends swam off again for
the box ;and the lid flew open, and they found
that they were but just in time, for the bread
was all eaten, and the jug almost empty. But
as soon as the good man had the stone in his
hand, he wished himself safe and sound in his
palace again; and in a moment there he was,
with his garden and his stables and his horses;
and his three faithful friends dwelt with him,
and tlihe3 ll ~pent their time happily and mer-
rily as long as they lived.




JORINDA AND JORINDEL.

THERE was once an old castle that stood
in the middle of a large thick wood, and in
the castle lived an old fairy. All the day long
she. flew about in the form of an owl, or crept
E2







76 JORINDA AND JORINDEL.


about the country like a cat; but at night le
always became an old woman again. When
any youth came, within a hundred paces of ier
castle,. he-became quite fixed, and could not
move a step till she came and set him free:
but when any pretty maiden came within that
distance, she was changed into a bird; and the
fairy put her into a cage and hung her up in a
chamber in the castle. There were seven
'hundred of these cages hanging in the castle,
and all with beautiful birds in them.
Now there was once a maiden whose name
wa4 .Joiind a: she was prettier than all the'pretty
girlsthat evei- er see eeand and A shepherd who e
name was Jorindel was very fond of her, and
they were soon to be .arried. One day they
Sent to walk in the wood, that they might be
alone: and Jorindel said, We must take
care that we don't go too near to the castle."
It was a beautiful evening; the last rays of
the setting sun shone bright through the long
stems of the trees upon the green underwood
beneath, and the turtledoves sang plaintively
from the tall birches.
Jo'inda sat down to gaze upon the sun;





























SI --







JORINDA AND JORINDEL. 77
Jorindel sat by her side; and both felt sad,
they knew not why; but it seemed as.if they
were to be parted from one another for ever.
Theyhadwandered a long way; and when they
looked to see which way they should go home,
they found themselves at a loss to know what
path to take.
The sun was setting fast, and already half
of his circle had disappeared behind the hill:
Jorindelon a sudden looked behind him, and as
he saw through the bushes that they had, with-
out knowing it, sat down close under the old
walls of the 'castle, he shrank for fear, turned
pale, and trembled. .Jorinda was singing,
The ring-dove sang from 'the i- i low -pray,
Well-a-day! well-a-day!.
He mourn'd'for the fate
Of his lovely inate,
Well-a-day !-
The song ceased suddenly y. Jorindel turned
to see the reason, and beheld his Jorinda
changed into-a nightingale; so that her song
ended with a mournful jug, jug. An owl with
fiery eyes flew three times round them, and
three times screamed Tu whau Ti whu Tn








JORINDA AND JORINDEL.


whu! Jorindel could not move: he stood
fixed as a stone, and could neither weep, nor
speak, nor stir hand or foot. And now the
sun went quite down; the gloomy night came;
the owl flew into a bush; and a moment after
the old fairy came forth pale and meager, with
staring eyes, and a nose and chin that almost.
met one another.
She mumbled something to herself,. seized.
the nightingale, and went away with it in her
hand. Poor Jorindel saw the nightingale was
gone,-but what could he do? he could not
speak, he could not move from the spot where-
he stood. At last the fairy came back, and
sung with a hoarse voice,

Till the prisoner's fast,
And her doom is cast,
There stay Oh, stay !
When the charm is around her,
And the spell has bound her,
Hie away away !

On a sudden Jorindel found himself free.,
Then he fell on his knees before the fairy, and
prayed her to give him back his dear Jorinda:








JORINDA AND JORINDEL.


but she said he should never see her again,
and .went her way.
He prayed, he wept, he sorrowed, but all in
vain. Alas !" he said, "what will become
of me?"
He could not return to his own home, so
he went to a strange village, -and employed
himself in keeping sheep. Many a time did
he walk round and round as near to the hated
castle as he dared go. At last he dreamt one
night that he found a beautiful purple flower,
and in the middle of it lay a costly pearl;
and he dreamt that he plucked the flower, and
went with it in his hand into the castle, and
that every thing he touched with it was dis-
enchanted, and that there he found his dear
Jorinda again.
In the morning when he awoke, he began
to search over hill and dale for this pretty
flower; and eight long days he sought for it in
vain: but on the ninth day early in the morn-
-ing he found the beautiful purple flower; and
in the middle of it was a large dew drop as
big as a costly pearl.
Then he plucked the flower, and set out and







80 JORINDA AND JRORI~DEL.


travelled day and night till he came sgain to
the castle. He walked nearer than a hundred
paces to it, and yet he did not become fixed
as before, but found that he could go close up
to the door.
Jorindel was very glad to see this: he touch-
ed the door with the flower, and it sprang
open, so that he went in through the court,
and listened when he heard so many birds
singing. At last he came to the chamber where
the fairy sat, with the seven hundred birds
i iiiug b in the seven hundred cages. And when
she saw Jorindel she was very angry, and
screamed with rage; but she could not come
*within two yards of him; for the flower he
-held in his hand protected him. He looked
around at the birds, but alas! there were
many many nightingales, and how then should
he find his Jorinda? While he was thinking
what to do, he observed that the fairy had
taken down one of the cages, and was making
her escape through the door. He ran or flew
to her, touched the cage with the flower,-
and his Jorinda stood before him. She threw
her arms round his neck and looked as beau-



































































/ --










~~0




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title German popular stories
author German popular stories
publicationStmt
date 2014
distributor University of Florida Digital Collections
email ufdc@uflib.ufl.edu
idno http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00011880/00001
sourceDesc
biblFull
German popular stories
Grimm, Jacob, 1785-1863
Grimm, Wilhelm, 1786-1859
Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878
Taylor, Edgar, 1793-1839
Taylor, Richard
Baldwin, Charles, 1774-1865
extent 2 v. [22] leaves of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.
publisher Published by C. Baldwyn
pubPlace London
1823-26
type ALEPH 026796111
OCLC 03877257
notesStmt
note anchored true Title vignettes.
Title-page and etchings by George Cruikshank; those in v. 1 in sepia ink.
Volume II has imprint: London, James Robins & co; Dublin, Joseph Robins junr. & co., 1826.
Translated by Edgar Taylor. Published later with titles: Gammer Grethel ... 1839, and Grimm' goblins ... 1876.
collected by M.M. Grimm, from oral tradition.
encodingDesc
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taxonomy xml:id LCSH bibl Library of Congress Subject Headings
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language ident eng English
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item Fairy tales -- 1823
Bldn -- 1823
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div Front Cover
pb n 1 facs 00001.jpg
2 00001a.jpg
Half Title
3 00002.jpg
GERMAN POPULAR STORIES,
aL i.
4 00002a.jpg
Now you must imagine me to., sit bya good fire,
amongst a company of good fellowes, over a well spiced
wassel bowl of Christmas ale, telling of these merrie tales
vi chi hlieraftir toll i', e."-Pref. to Hist. of" Tomn Thuunbe
the Little."-1621.
Page
5 00002b.jpg
K-
-;,., ,'_ .... -...__j "-'-"'...
Lriro OI L X al T -aditj o
C. "Foin Oial T~adi~tion.)
lihblijslwe by C.12a1dny;V.wm.1,M l *'tirflI.
1LNw(DNw ,
Preface
6 00003.jpg
PREFACE.
THE Translators were first induced to compile
this little work by the eager relish with which a
few of the tales were received by the young friends
to whom they were narrated. In this feeling the
Translators, however, do not hesitate to avow
their own participation. Popular fictions and
traditions are somewhat gone out of fashion ; yet
most will own them to be associated with the
brightest recollections of their youth. They are,
like the Christmas Pantomimes, ostensibly brought
forth to tickle the palate of the young, but often
received with as keen an appetite by -those of
graver years. ,
There is, at least, a debt of gratitude due to
these ancient friends and comforters. To follow
the words of the author from whom the motto in
the title-page is selected, "They have been the
revivers of drowzy age at midnight; old and young
have with such tales chimed mattins till the cock
a2
7 00004.jpg
PREFACE.
crew in the morning; batchelors and maides have
compassed the Christmas fire-block till the curfew
bell rang candle out; the old shepherd and the
young plow-boy after their daye's labor, have carold
out the same to make them merrye with; and who
but they have made long nights seem short, and
heavy toyles easie ?"
But the amusement of the hour was not the
translators' only object. The rich collection from
which the following tWles are selected, is very in-
teresting in a literary point of view, as affording
a new proof of the wide and early diffusion of these
gay creations of the imagination, apparently flow-
ing from some great and mysterious fountain head,
whence: Calmuck, Russian, Celt, Scandinavian,
and German, in their various ramifications, have"
imbibed their earliest lessons of moral instructions.
The popular tales of England have been too
much neglected. They are nearly discarded from
the libraries of childhood. Philosophy is made the
companion of the nursery: we have lisping che-
mists and leading-string mathematicians : this is:
the age of reason, not of imagination; and the
loveliest dreams of fairy innocence are consider-
ed as vain and frivolous. Much might be urged
against this rigid and philosophic (or rather unphi-
losophic) exclusion of works of fancy and fiction.
8 00005.jpg
PREFACE.
Our imagination is surely as susceptible of im-
provement by exercise, as our judgement or our
memory; and so long as such fictions only are
presented to the young mind as do not interfere
with the important department of moral edu-
cation, a beneficial effect must be produced by the
pleasurable employment of a faculty in which so
much of our happiness in every period of life con-
sists.
It is, however, probably owing merely to acci-
dental causes that some countries have carefully
preserved their ancient stores of fiction, while here
they have been suffered to pass to oblivion or
corruption, notwithstanding the patriotic example
of a few such names as Hearne, Spelman, and Le
Neve, who did not disdain to turn towards them
the light of their carefully trimmed lamp, scanty
and ill-furnished as it often was. A very interest-
ing and ingenious article in the Quarterly Review,,
(No. XLI.) to which the Translators readily ac-
knowledge, their particular obligations, recently at-
tracted attention to the subject, and has shown
how ,wide a- field is open, interesting to the anti-
quarian as well as to. the reader who only seeks
amusement.
The collection from which the following Tales
are taken is one of great extent, obtained for the
aS
9 00006.jpg
PREFACE.
most part from the mouths of German peasants
by the indefatigable exertions of John and William
Grimm, brothers in kindred and taste.-The re-
sult of their labours ought to be peculiarly interest-
ing to English readers, inasmuch as many of their
national tales are proved to be of the highest North-
ern antiquity, and common to the parallel classes
of society in countries whose populations have been
long and widely disjoined. Strange to say, "Jack,
commonly called the Giant-killer, and Thomas
Thumb," as the reviewer observes, "landed in
England from the very same hulls and war ships
which conveyed Hengist and Horsa, and Ebba the
Saxon." Who would have expected that Whit-
tington and his Cat, whose identity and London
citizenship appeared so certain;-Tom Thumb,,
Whose parentage Hearne had traced, and whose
monumental honours were the boast of Lincoln; -
or the Giant-destroyer of Tylney, whose bones
were supposed to moulder in his native village in
Norfolk, should be equally renowned among the
humblest inhabitants of Munster and Paderborn
A careful comparison would probably establish
many other coincidences. The sports and songs
of children, to which MM. Grimm have directed
considerable attention, often excite, surprise at
their striking resemblance to the usages of our
10 00007.jpg
PREFACE. Vii
own country. We wish, with Leucadio Doblado,
speaking of Spanish popular sports," that anti-
quarians were a more jovial and volatile race, and
that some one would trace up these amusements
to their common source," if such a thing were
possible, or at any rate would point out their af-
finities. A remarkable- coincidence occurs in the
German song to the Lady-bird or Marien-wiirm-
chen." The second verse alone has been preserved
in England; but it is singular that the burthen of
the song should have been so long preserved in
countries whose inhabitants have been so com-
pletely separated. The whole song, which is to be
found in munderhorn, i. 235, may be thus trans-
lated :
Lady-bird! Lady-bird! pretty one! stay!
Come sit on my finger, so happy and gay;
With me shall no mischief betide thee;
No harm would I do thee, no foeman is near,
I only would gaze on thy beauties so dear,
Those beautiful winglets beside thee.
Lady-bird! Lady-bird i fly away home !
Thy house is a-fire, thy children will roam;
List! list! to their cry and bewailing :
The pitiless spider is weaving their doom, *
Then, Lady-bird! Lady-bird! fly away home!
Hark! hark to thy children's bewailing.
11 00008.jpg
PREFACE.
Fly back again, back again, LJady-bird dear !
Thy neighbours will merrily welcome thee here;
With them shall no perils attend thee:
They'll guard thee so safely from danger or care,
They'll gaze on thy beautiful winglets so fair,
And comfort, and love, and befriend thee.
The valuable notes and dissertations added by
MM. Grimm to their work, have ,principally for
their object to establish the connexion between
many of these traditions and the ancient mytho-
logical fables of the Scandinavian and Teutonic
nations. In these popular stories," they are
sanguine enough to believe, "is concealed the
pure and primitive mythology of the Teutons,
which has been considered as lost for ever; and
they are convinced, that if such researches are con-
tinued in the different districts of Germany, the
traditions of this nature which are now neglected,
will change into treasures of incredible worth, and
assist in affording a new basis for the study of the
origin of.their ancient poetical fictions." On these
points their illustrations, though sometimes over-
strained, are often highly interesting and satisfac-
tory. Perhaps more attention might have been
directed to illustrate the singular .admixture of
Oriental incidents of fairy and romance, with the
ruder features of Northern fable; and particularly
12 00009.jpg
PREFACE.
to inform us how far the well-known vehicles of
the lighter Southern fictions were current at an
early periodin Germany. It often seems difficult
to account for the currency, among the peasantry
on the shores of the Baltic and the forests of the
Hartz, of fictions which would seem to belong to
the Entertainments of the Arabians, yet involved
in legends referable to the highest Teutonic origin..
But it is curious to observe that this connexion
between the popular tales of remote and uncon-
nected regions, is equally remarkable in the rich-
est collection of. traditionary narrative which any
country can boast; we mean the ." Pentamerone,
over Trattenemiento de li Piccerille,' ('Fun for
the Little Ones,') published by Giov. Battista Ba-
sile, -very early in the 17th century, froni the old
stories current among the Neapolitans. It is sin-
gular that the German and the Neapolitan tales
(though the latter were till lately quite unknown
to foreigners, and never translated out of the
Italian tongues,) bear the strongest and most
minute resemblances. The French fairy tales, that
have become so popular, were chiefly taken from
" The Nights (Notti piacevoli) of Strapparola,"
published first in 1550; but in his collection such
fictions occupy no prominent and apparently only
an accidental station, the bulk of the tales being of
13 00010.jpg
PREFACE.
what may be called the Classical Italian School.
The Pentamerone was drawn from original sources,
and probably compiled without any knowledge of
Strapparola, although the latter is precedent in
date. The two works have only four pieces in
common. Mr. Dunlop would add greatly to the
value of his excellent work on Fiction, if he would
include in his inquiries this most interesting branch
of popular entertainment, to which Sir Walter Scott
has already pointed in his notes to The Lady of
the Lake."
SAmong the most pleasing of the German tales
are those in -*which animals support tlhe lead-
ing characters. They are perhaps more vene-
rable in their origin than the heroic and fairy
tales. They are not orily amusing by their playful
and dramatic character, but instructive by the pu-
rity of their morality. None bear more strongly
the impress of a remote Eastern original, both in
their principles and their form of conveying in-
struction. Justice always prevails, active talent
is every where successful, the amiable and gene-
rous qualities are brought forward to excite the
sympathies of the reader, and in the end are con-
stantly rewarded by triumph over lawless power.
It will be observed as a peculiarity of the Ger-
man fables, that they introduce even inanimate
14 00011.jpg
PREFACE.
objects among their actors, a circumstance some-
times; attended with considerable effect. Even
the sun,' the modri, and the winds, form part of
the dramatic person,
:The Translators can do little more than di-
rect the attention of the curious reader to the
source whence they have selected their. mate-
rials. The nature and immediate design: of the
present publication exclude the introduction of
some of those stories which would, in a literary
point of view, be most curious. With a view to
variety, they have wished rather to avoid, than
to; select those, the leading incidents of which are
already familiar to the English reader, and have
therefore often deprived themselves of the interest
which comparison would afford. There were also
many stories of great merit, and tending highly to
the elucidation of ancient mythology, customs, and
opinions, which the scrupulous fastidiousness of
modern taste, especially in works likely to attract
the attention of youth, warned them tp pass by.
If they should ever be encouraged to resume their
task, they might undertake it with different and
more serious objects. In those tales which they
have selected they had proposed to make no al-
teration whatever; but in a few instances they
have been compelled to depart in some degree
15 00012.jpg
xii PREFAcr.
from their purpose. They have, however, endea-
voured to notice these variations in the notes, and
in most cases the alteration consists merely in the
curtailment of adventures or circumstances not af-
fecting the main plot or character of the story.
SA few brief notes are added; but the Translators
trust it will always be borne in mind, that their little
work makes no literary pretensions that its im-
mediate design precludes the subjects most at-
tractive asmatters of research and that professedly
critical dissertations would therefore be out of
place. Their object in what they have done in this
department, has been merely to direct attention to
a subject little noticed, and to point, however im-
perfectly, at a source of interesting and amusing
inquiry.
Frontispiece
16 00013.jpg
I,
- 9C,.kht'
Section
head Hans in Luck
17 00014.jpg
POPULAR STORIES.
HANS IN LUCK.
HANS had served his master seven years,
and at last said to him, Master, my time is
up, I should like to go home and see my mo-
ther; so give me my wages." And the mas-
ter said, You have been a faithful and good
servant, so your pay shall be handsome." Then'
he gave him a piece of siJver that was'as big
as his head.
Hans took out his pocket-handkerchief, put
the piece of silver into it, threw it over his
shoulder, and jogged off homewards. As he
went lazily on, dragging one foot after another,
a man came in sight, trotting along gaily on
a capital horse. "Ah!" said, Hans aloud,
" what a fine thingit is to ride o:n horsi'eacl
18 00015.jpg
2 HANS IN LUCK.
there he sits as if he was at home in his chair;
he trips against no stones, spares his shoes,
and yet gets on he hardly knows how." The
horsemani heard this, and said. "Well, Hans,
why do you go on foot then?" "Ah! said he,
"I have thisloadto carry; tobe sureitis silver,
but it is so heavy that I can't hold up my head,
and it hurts my shoulder sadly." What do
you say to changing?" said the horseman; I
will give you my horse, and you shall give me
the silver." With all myheart," said Hans:
"" but I tell you one thing,-you'll have aweary
task to drag it along." The horseman got off,
took the silver, helped Hans up, gave him the
bridle into his hand and said, When you
want to go very fast, you must smack your
,lips loud, and cry 'Jip.'"
Hans was delighted as he sat on the horse,
and rode merrily dn. After a time he thought
lie -hluld like to go a little faster, so he smack-
ed his lips, and cried Jip." Away went the
horse full gallop; and before Hans knew what
he was about, he was thrown off, and lay in
a ditch bythe road side;, and.his horse would
have run off, ,if a shepherd who was; coming
19 00016.jpg
I-ANS IN LUCK.
by, driving a cow, had not stopt it. Hans
soon came to himself, and got upon his legs,
again. He was sadly vexed, and said to the
shepherd, This riding is no joke when a man
gets onabetst like thi., that stumblesand flings
him off as if he would break his neck. How-
ever, I'm off now once for all: I like your
cow a great deal better; one can walk along
at one's leisure behind her, and have milk,
butter, and cheese, every day into the bargain.
What would I give to have such a cow!"
" Well," said the shepherd, "if youare sofond
of her, I will change my cow for your horse."
."Done!" said Hans merrily. The shepherd
jumped upon.the horse, and away he rode.
Hans drove off his cow quietly, and thought
his bargain a very lucky one. "If I have only
a piece of bread (and I certainly shall be able
to get that), I can, whenever Ilike, eatmybutter
and cheese with it; and when I am thirsty I can
milk my cow and drink the milk: what can I
wish for more?" When he came to an inn,
he halted, ate up all his bread, and gave away
his last penny for a glass of beer: then he
drove his cow towards his mother's village; and
33
20 00017.jpg
HANS IN LUCK.
the heat grew greater as noon came on, till at
last hefound himself on a wide heath thatwould
take him more than an hour to cross, and he
began to be Wo hot and parched that his tongue
clave to the roof of his mouth. I can find
a cure for this," thought he; now will I
milk my cow and quench my thirst;" so
he tied her to the stump of a tree, and held
his leather cap to milk into; but not a drop
was to be had.
While he was trying his luck and managing
the matter very clumsily, the uneasy beast gave
him akick on the head that knocked him down,
and there he lay a long while senseless. Lucki-
ly a butcher, soon came by driving a pig in a
wheel-barrow." What is thematter withyou?"'
said the butcher as he helped him up. Hans
told him what had happened, and the butcher
gave him a flask, saying, There, drink and
refresh yourself; your cow will give you no
milk, she is an old beast good for nothing
'but the slaughter-house." "Alas, alas!" said
Halns, who would have thought it? If I kill
her, what will lIie bI good for? I hate cow-
beef, it is not tender enough for me. If it were
21 00022.jpg
HANS IN LUCK. -5
a pig now, one could do something with it,
it would at any rate n'ake some sausages."
Well," said the butcher, to please you, I'll
change, and give you the pig for the cow."
"Heaven rewardyou for yourkindness!" said
Hans as he gave the butcher the cow, and
took the pig off the wheel-bari'ow, and drove it
off; holding it by the string that was tied to its
leg.
So on he jogged, and all seemed now to go
right with him; he had met with some mis-
fortunes, to be sure; but he was now well re-
paid for all. lThe next person he met was a
Ctiumtryimln carrying a fine white goose'under
his arm. The countryman stopped to ask what
was o'clock; and Hans told him all his luck,
and how he had made so many good bargains.
The countryman said he was going to take the
goose to a christening; "Feel," said he, "how
heavy it is, and yet it is only eight weeks old.
Whoever roasts and eats it many cutplenty of
fat offit, it has lived so well!" You're right,"
said Hans as he weighed it in his hand; but
my pig is no trifle." Meantime the country-
man began to look grave, and shook his head.
22 00023.jpg
HANS IN LUCK.
" Hark ye," said he, "my good friend; your
pig may get you into a scrape; in the village
I just come from, the squire has had a pig sto-
len out of his stye. I was dreadfully afraid,
when I saw you, that you had got the squire's
pig; it will be a bad job if they catch you;
the least they'll do, will be to throw you into
the horse-pond."
Poor Hans was sadly frightened. Good
man," cried he, "prayget me outof this scrape;
you know this country better than I, take my
pig and give me the goose." I ought to have
something into the bargain," said the country-
man; however, I will not bear hard upon
you, as you are in trouble." Then he took the
string in his hand, and drove off the pig by a
side path; while Hanswent on the way home-
wards free from care. "After all," thought he,
SI have the best of the bargain: first there
will be a capital roast; then the fat will find me
in goose grease for six months; and then there
are all the beautiful white feathers; I will put
them into my pillow, and then I am sure I
shall sleep soundly without rocking. How
happy my mother will be!"
23 00024.jpg
HANS IN LUCK.
As he. came to the last village, he saw a.
scissar-griindt-r, %with hiis wheel, working awiy,
and singing
O'er hill and o'er dale so happy I roam,
Work light and live well, all the world is my home;
Who so blythe, so merry as I?
Hans stood looking for a while, and at last
said, You must be well off, master grinder,.
you seem so happy at your work." Yes," said
the other, '- mine is a golden trade; a good
grinder never puts his hand in his pocket with-
out findingmoneyin it:-but where did you get
that beautiful goose?" I did not buy it, but
changed a pig for it." "And where did you get
the pig?" "Igave a cowforit." "And thecow?"
"I gave a horse for it." "And the horse?" "I
gave a piece of silver asbig asmyheiadfor that."
" And the silver?" "Oh! I worked hard for
that seven long years." You have thriven
well in the world hitherto," said the grinder;
"now if you could find money in your pocket
whenever you put your hand into it, your for-
tune would be made." Very true: but how
is that to be managed?" P You must turn
24 00027.jpg
HANS IN LUCK.
grinder like me," said the other; "you only
want a grindstone; the rest will come of itself.
Here is one that is a-little the worse for wear:
I would not ask more than the value of your
goose for it;-will you buy?" How can you
ask such a question?" replied Hans; Ishould
be the happiest man in the world, if I could
have money whenever I put my hand in my
pocket; what could I want more ? there's the
goose!"" "Npw," said the grinder as he gave
him a common n rough stone that lay by his side,
" this is a most capital stone; do butmanage it
cleverly, and you can make an old nail cut
with it."
Hans took the stone and went off with a
light heart: his eyes sparkled for joy, and he
said to himself, "I must have been born in a
lucky hour; every thing that I want or wish
for comes to me of itself."
Meantime he began to be tired, for he had
been travelling ever since day-break; he was
hungry too, for he had given away his last
penny in his joy at getting the cow. At last
be could go no further, and the stone tired him
terribly; he dragged himself to the side of a
25 00027a.jpg
It
s~i
The Travelling Musicians
26 00028.jpg
THE TRAVELLING MUSICIANS.
pond, that he might drink some water, and rest
a while; so he laid the stone carefully by his
side on the bank: but as he stooped down to
drink, he forgot it, pushed it a little, and down
it went plump into the pond. For a while he
watched it sinking in the deep clear water, then
sprangup forjoy, and again fell upon his knees,
and thanked Heaven with tears in his eyes for
its kindness in taking away his only plague, the
ugly heavy stone. How happy am I!" cried
he: "no mortal was eyer so lucky as I am."
Then up he got with a light and merry heart,
and walked on free from all:his troubles, till
he reached his mother's house.
THE TRAVELLING MUSICIANS,
OR THE WAITS OF BREMEN.
AN honest farmer had once an ass, that had
been a faithful servant to him a great many
years, but was now growing old and every day
more and more unfit fbr work. His master
therefore was tired of keeping him and began
B
27 00028a.jpg
10 THE TRAVELLING MUSICIANS,
to think of putting an end to him; but the ass,
who saw that some mischief was in the wind,
took himself slyly off, and began his journey
towards Bremen, "for there," thought he,
"i I may chance to be chosen town-musician."
After he had travelled a little way, he spied
a dog lying by the road-side and panting as
ifhe were very tired. "What makes you pant
so, my friend?" said the ass. "Alas !" said
the dog, "my master was going to knock me
on the 1head, because I am old and weak, and
can no longer make myself useful to him in
hunting; so I ran away: but what can I do
to earn,my livelihood?" "Hark ye!" said
the ass, "I am going to Bremen to turn musi-
cian: suppose you go with me, and try what
you can do in the same way?" The dog said he
,was willing, and they jogged on.together.
They had not gone far before they saw a cat
sitting in the middle of the road and making a
most rueful face. Pray, my good lady," said
the ass, what's the matter with you? you look
quite out of spirits !" Ah me! said the cat,
"how can one be in good spirits when one's
life is in danger ? Because I am beginning to
28 00030.jpg
O'R THE WAITS OFBREMEN.
grow old, and had rather lie at my ease by the
fire than run about the house after the mice,
my mistress laid hold of me, and was going to
drown me; and though I have been lucky
enough to get away from her, I do not know
what I am to live upon." "Oh !" said the ass,
"by all means go with us to Bremen; you are
a good night singer, and may make your for-
tune as one of the waits." The cat was pleased
with the thought, and joined the party.
Soon afterwards, as they were passing by a
farm-yard, they saw a cock perched.upon a
gate, and screaming out with all his might
and main." Bravo i" said the ass; "upon my
word you make a famous noise; pray what is
all this about?" "Why," said the cock, "I
was just now saying that we should have fine
weather for our washing-day, and yet my mis-
tress and the cook don't thank me for mypains,
but threaten to cut off my head tomorrow,
and make broth of me for the guests that are
coming on Sunday!" Heaven forbid!" said
the ass; ( come with us, Master Chanticleer:
it will be better, at any rate, than staying here
to haveyourhead cut off! Besides, whoknows?
29 00031.jpg
12 THE TRAVELLING MUSICIANS,
If we take care to sing in tune, we may get up
a concert of our own: so come along with
us." "With all my heart," said the cock:
so they all four went on jollily together.
They could not, however, reach the town
the, first day; so when night came on, they
went into a wood to sleep. The ass and the
dog laid themselves down under a great tree,
and the cat climbed up into thebranches; while
the cock, thinking that the higher he sat the
saferhe should be, flew upto the very top of the
tree, and then, according to his custom, before
he went to sleep, looked out on all sides of him
tosee that every thing was well. In going this,
he,saw afar off something bright, and shining;
and calling to his companions said, There
must be a house no great way off, for I see a
light." "If that be the case," said the ass,
"we had better change our quarters, for our
lodging is nqt the bestin the world!" "Besides,"
added the dog, I should not be the worse for
a bone or two,. or a bit of meat." So they
walked off together towards the spot where
:Chanticleer had: seen the light; and as they
drew near, it became larger and brighter, till
30 00032.jpg
OR THE WAITS OF BREMEN.
they at last came close to a house in which a
gang of robbers lived.
The ass, being the tallest of the company,
marched up to the window and peeped in.
" Well, Donkey," said Chanticleer, "what do
you see?" "What do I see?" replied the ass,
"why I see a table spread with all kinds of
good things, and robbers sitting round it
making merry." "That would be a noble
lodging for us," said the cock. "Yes," said
the ass,. "if we could only get in:" so they
consulted together how they should contrive to
get the robbers out; and at last they hit upon
a plan. The ass placed himself upright on his
hind-legs, with his fore-feet resting against the
window; the dog got upon his back; the cat
scrambled up to the dog's shoulders, and the
cock flew up and sat upon the cat's head.
When all was ready, a signal was given, and
they began their music. The ass brayed, the
dog barked, the cat mewed, and the cock
screamed; and then they all broke through the
window at once, and came tumbling into the
room, amongst the broken glass, with a most
31 00033.jpg
14b THE TRAVELLING MUSICIANS,
hideous clatter The robbers, who had been
not a little frightened by the opening concert,
had now no doubt that some frightful hobgob-
lin had broken in upon them, and scampered
away as fast as they could.
The coast once clear, our travellers soon sat
down, and dispatched what the robbers had
left, with as much eagerness as if they had not
expected to eat again for a month. As soon
as they had satisfied themselves, they put out
the lights, and each once more sought out a
resting-place to his own liking. The donkey
laid himself down upon a heap of straw in
the yard; the dog stretched himself upon a
mat behind the door; the cat rolled herself up
on the hearth before the warm ashes; and the
cock perched upon a beam on the top of the
house; and, as they were all rather tired with
their journey, they soon fell asleep.
But about midnight, when the robbers saw
from afar that the lights were out and that all
seemed quiet, they began to think that they
had been in too great a- hurry to run away;
and one of them, who was bolder than the rest,
32 00034.jpg
OR THE WAITS OF BREMEN.
went to see what was going on. Finding every
thing still, he marched into the kitchen, and
groped about till he found a match in order to
light a candle; and then, espying the glittering
fiery eyes of the eat, he mistook them for live
coals, and held the match to them to light it.
Butthe cat, not understanding this joke, sprung
at his face, and spit, and scratched at him.
This frightened him dreadfully, and away he
ranto theback door; but there the dog jumped
up and bit him in the leg; and as he was
crossing over the yard the ass kicked him; and
the cock, who had been awakened by the noise,
crowed with all his might. At this the robber
ran back as fast as he could to his comrades,
and told the captain "how a horrid witch
had got into the house, and had spit at him and
scratched his face with her long bony fingers;
how a man with a knife in his hand had hidden
himself behind the door, and stabbed him in
the leg: how a black monster stood in the yard
and struck him with a club; and how the devil
sat upon the top of the house and cried out,
'Throw the rascal up here !'" After this the
robbers never dared to go back to the house:
The Golden Bird
33 00035.jpg
THE GOLDEN BIRD.
but the musicians were so pleased with their
quarters, that they took up their abode there;
and there they are, I dare say, at this very day.
THE GOLDEN BIRD.
A CERTAIN king had a beautiful garden, and
in the garden stood a tree which bore golden
apples. These' apples were always counted,
and about the time when they began to grow
ripe it was found that every night one of them
was gone. The king became very angry at this,
and ordered the gardener to keep watch all
night under the tree: The gardener set his
eldest son to watch; but about twelve o'clock
he fell asleep, and in the morning another of
the apples was missing.. Then the second son
was ordered to watch; and at midnight he too
felf asleep, and in the morning another apple
was gone. Then the third son offered to keep
watch; but the gardener at first would not let
him, for fear some harm should come to him:
however, at last lie consented, and the young
34 00036.jpg
00 12sS^^^-; s S
35 00038.jpg
.TE GOLDEN BIRD. 17
man laid ,himself under the tree to watch. As
the clock struck twelve he heard a rustling
noise in the air, and a bird came flying that
was of pure gold; and as it was snapping at
one of the apples with its beak, the gardener's
son jumped up and shot an arrow at it. But,
the arrow did thebird no harm; onlyit dropped
a golden feather from its tail, and then flew
. .'-. -The golden feather was brought to
the kinh in the morning, and all the council
v as called together. Every one agreed thatit
was worth more than all the wealth of the
kingdom: but the king said, One feather is
of no use to me, I must have the whole bird."
Then the gardener's eldest son set out and
thought to find thegoldenbird very easily; and
when he had gone but a little way, he cameto
a wood, and by the side of the wood he saw
a fox sitting; so he took his bow and made
ready to shoot at it. Then the fox said, "Do
not shoot me, for I will give you good coun-
sel; I know what your business is, and that
you want to find the golden bird. You will
reach a village in the evening; and when you
get there, you will see, two inns opposite to
36 00039.jpg
THE GOLDEN BIRD.
each other, one of which is very pleasant and
beautiful to look at: go not in therebut rest
for the night in the other, though it may ap-
pear to you to be very poor and mean." But
the son thought to himself, What can such a
beast as this know about the matter?" Sohe
shot hisarrow at the fox; but he missed it, and
it set up its tail above its back and ran into
the wood. Then he went his way, -and in
the evening came to the village where the
two inns were; and in one of these were peo-
ple singing, and dancing, and feasting; but
the other looked very dirty, and poor. I
should be very silly," said he, if I went to
that shabby house, and left this charming
place;" so he went into the smart house, and
ate and drank at his ease, and forgot the bird,
and his country too.
Time passed on; and as the eldest son did
not come back, and no tidings were heard of
him, the second son set out, and the same
thing happened to him. He met the fox, who
gave him the same good advice: but when he
came to the two inns, his eldest brother was
standing at the window where the merry-
37 00040.jpg
THE GOLDEN BIRD. 19
making was, and called to him to come in;
and he could not withstand the temptation,
but went in, and forgot the golden bird and
his country in the same manner.
Time passed on again, and the youngest son
too wished to set out into the wide world to
seek for the golden bird; but his father would
not listen to it for a long while, for he was very
fond of his son, and was afraid that some ill
luck might happen to him also, and prevent
his coming back. However, at last it was
agreed he should go, for he would not rest at
home; and as he came to the wood, he met the
fox, and heard the same good counsel. But
he was thankful to the fox, and did not attempt
his life as his brothers had done; so the fox
said, Sit upon my tail, and you will travel
faster." So he sat down, and the fox began to
run, and away they went over stock and stone
so quick that their hair whistled in the wind.
When they came to the village, the son fol-
lowed the fox's counsel, and without looking
about him went to the shabby inn, and rested
there all night at his ease. In the morning
came the fox again, and met him as h1 was
38 00041.jpg
THE GOLDEN BIRD.
beginning his journey, and said, "Go straight
forward till you come to a castle, before which
lie a whole troop of soldiers fast asleep and
snoring: takenonotice of them, but go into the
castle andpass on and on tillyou cometoaroom,
where the golden bird sits in a wooden' cage;
close by it stands a beautiful golden-cage; but
do not try to take the bird out of the shabby
cage and put it into the handsome one, other-
wise you will repent it." Then the fox st r- 1 -
ed out his tail again, and the young man sat
himself down, and away they went over stock
and stone till their hair whistled in the wind.-
Before the castle gate all was as the fox had
said: so the son went in and found the chamber
where the golden bird-hung in a wooden cage,
and below stood thegolden cage; and the ihrl-
golden apples that had been lost were lying
close by it. Then thought he to himself;" It
will be a very droll thing to bring away such
a fine bird in this shabby cage;" so he opened
the door and took hold of it and put it into
the golden cage. But the bird set up such a
loud scream that all the soldiers awoke, and
they took him prisoner and carried him before
39 00042.jpg
THE GOLDEN BIRD.
the king. The next morning the court sat to
judge him; and when all was heard, it sen-
tenced him to die, unless he should bring the
king the golden horse which could run as
swiftly as the wind; and if he did this, he was
to have the golden bird given him for his own.
So he set out once more on his journey,
sighing, and in great despair, when on a sud-
den his good friend the fox met him, and said,
'You see now what has happened on account
of your not listening to my counsel. I will
still, however, tell you how to find the golden
horse, if you will do as I bid you. You must
go straight on till you come to the castle where
the horse stands in his stall: by his side will
lie the groom fast asleep and snoring: take
away the horse quietly, but be sure to put the
old leather saddle upon him, and not the
golden one that is close by it." Then the son
sat down on the fox's tail, and away they-went
over stock and stone till their hair whistled in
the wind.
All went right, and the groom lay snoring
iith his hand upon the golden saddle. But
when the son looked at the horse, he thought
40 00043.jpg
22 THE GOLDEN BIRD.
it a great pity to put the leather saddle upon it.
" I will give him the good one," said he; "I
am sure he deserves it." As he took up the
golden saddle, the groom aoke and cried out
so loud, that all the guards ran in and took
himn prisoner, and inthe morning he was again
brought before the court to be judged, and was
sentenced to die. But it was agreed, that, if
he could bring thither the beautiful princess,
he should live, and have the bird and the
horse given him for his own.
Then he went his way again very sorrowful;
but the old fox came and said, "Why did not
you listen to me ? If you had, you would have
carried away both the bird and the horse; yet
will Ionce more give you counsel. Go t ri igh t
on, and in the evening you will arrive at a
castle. At twelve o'clock at night the prin-
cess goes to the bathing-house: go up to her
and.give her a kiss, and she will let you lead
her away; but take care you do not suffer her
to go and take leave of her father and mo-
ther." Then the fox stretched out his tail,
and so away they went over stock and stone
till their hair whistled-again.
41 00044.jpg
. THE GOLDEN BIRD.
As they came to the castle, all was as the fox
had nsid, and at twelve o'clock the young man
met the princess going to the bath, and gave
her the kiss, and she agreed to run away with
him, but begged with many tears that he
would let her take leave of her father. At
first he refused, but she wept still more and
more, and fell at his feet, till at last he con-
sented; but the moment she came to her fa-
ther's house, the guards awoke and; he was
talked prisoner again.
Then he was brought before the king, and
the king aid You shall never havemydaugh-
ter, unless in eight days you dig away the hill
that stops the view from my window." Now
this hill was so big that the whole world could
not take it away: and when he had worked
for seven days, and had done very little, the
fox came and said, Lie down and go to sleep;
I will work for you." And in the morning he
awoke and the hill was gone; so he went mer-
rily to the king, and told him that now that it
was removed he must give him the princess.
SThen the king was obliged to keep his word,
and away went the young man and the prin-
42 00045.jpg
THE GOLDEN BIRD.
cess; and the fox came and said to him, We
will have all three, the princess, the horse, and
the bird." Ah said the young man, that
would be a great thing, but how can you con-
trive it?"
"If you will only listen," said'the fox, it
can soon be done. When you come to the king,
and he asks for the beautiful princess, you must
say Here she is Then he will be veryjoy-
ful; and you will mount the golden horse that
they are to give.you, and put out your hand to
take leave of them; but shake hands with the
princess last. Then lift her quickly on to the
horse behind you; clap your spurs to his side,
and gallop away as fast as you ean."
All went right: then the fox said, "When
you come to the castle where the bird is, I
will stay with the princess at the door, and
you will ride in and speak to the king; and
when he sees that it is the right horse, he will
bring out the bird; but you must sit still, and
say that you want to look at it, to see whether
it is the true golden bird; and when you get
it into your hand, ride away."
This, too, happened as the fox -:a.id; they
43 00046.jpg
THE GOLDEN BIRD.
carried off the bird, the princess mounted
again, and they rode on to a greatwood. Then
thefox came, and said, Pray kill me, and cut
off my head and my feet." But the young
.man refused to do it: so the fox said, I will
at any rate give you good counsel: beware of
two things; ransom n'o one from the gallows,
and sit down by the side of no river." Then
away he went. "Well," thought the young
man, "it is no hard matter to take that ad-
vice."
He rode on with the princess, till at last he
came to the village where he had left his two
brothers. And there he heard a great'noise
and uproar; and when he asked what was the
matter, the people said, Two men are going
to be hanged." As he came nearer, he saw
that the two men were his brothers, who had
turnedrobbers; sohesaid, "Cannot they in any
way be saved?" But the people said "No,"
unless he would bestow all his money upon the
rascals and buy their liberty. Then he did not
stay to think about the matter, but paid what
was asked, and his brothers were given up,
and went on with him towards their home.
c
44 00047.jpg
THE GOLDEN BIRD.
And as they came to the wood where the
fox first met them, it was so cool and pleasant
that the two brothers said, "Let us sit down
by tlhe side of.the river, and rest a while, to eat
and drink." Very well," said he, and forgot.
the fox's counsel, and sat down on the side of
the river; and while he suspected nothing,
they came behind, and threw him down the
bank, and took the princess, the horse, and the
bird, and went home to the king their master,
and said, All this have we won by our exer-
tions." Then there was great rejoicing made;
but the horse would not eat, the bird would
not sing, and the princess wept.
The youngest son fell to the bottom of the
river's bed: luckily it was nearly dry, but his
bones were almost broken, and the bank was
so steep that he could find no way to get out.
Then the old fox came once more, and scolded
him for not following his advice; otherwise no
evil would have befallen him: Yet," said he,
f I cannot leave you here, so lay hold of my
tail and hold fast." Then he pulled him out
of the river, and said to him, as he got upon
the bank, Your brothers have set watch to
The Fisherman and His Wife
45 00048.jpg
THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. 27
kill you, if they find you in the kingdom."
:So he dressed himself as a poor man, and came
secretly to the king's court, and, was scarcely
within the doors when the horse began to eat,
and the bird to sing, and the princess left off
weeping. He went straight to the king, and told
him all his brothers' roguery; and they were
seized and punished, and he had the princess
given to him again; and after the king's death
he was heir to his kingdom.
A long while after, he went to walk one day
in the wood, and the old fox met himi, and be-
sought him with tears in his eyes to :kh him,
and cut off his head and feet. And.at last he
did so, and in a moment the fox was changed
into a man, and turned out to be the brother
of the princess, who had been lost a great many
many years.
THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE.
THERE was once a fisherman who lived with
his wife in a ditch, close by.the sea-side., The
fisherman used to go out all daylong a-fishing;
c2
46 00049.jpg
28 ,THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE.
and one day, as he snt on the shore with hi.. rod,
looking at the shining water and watching his
-line, all on a sudden his float was dragged
away deep under 'the sea: and in drawing it
up he pulled a great fifth out of the water.
The fish said to him, Pray let me live: I
am.not a real fish; I am an enchanted prince,
put me in :te water again, and let me go."
"'Oh!" said the man, youneednot make so
many words about the matter; I wish to have
nothing to do with a fish that can talk; so swim
.away as soon as you please." Then he put
him lIck into the water, and the fish darted
straight down to the bottom, and left a long
streak of blood behind him.
SWhen the fisherman went home to his wife
in the ditch, he told her how he had caught a
great fish, and how it had told him it was an
enchanted prince, and that on hearing it speak
he had let it go again. Did you not ask it
for any thing?" said the wife. No," ,aid the
man, "what should I ask for?" Ah!" said
the wife, ,I we live very retchledly here in this
Int1 stinkingg diicl: do go back, and tell the
fish e wa\\nt ia little cottage."
47 00050.jpg
THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. 29
The fisherman tfid not much like the bu-
siness: however, he went to the sea, and when
he came there the water looked all yellow and
green. And he stood at the water's edge, and
said,
0 man of the sea
Come listen to me,
For Alice my wife,
The plague of my life,
Hath sent me to beg a boon of thee! "
Then the fish came swimming to him, and
said, Well, what does she want?" Ah!"
answered the fisherman,. my wife says that
when I had caught you, I ought to have asked
youfor somethingbefore I letyougo again; she
does not like living any longer in the ditch,
and wants a little cottage." "Go home, then,"
said the fish, she is in the cottage already."
So the man went home, and saw his wife stand-
ing at the door of a cottage. Come in, come
in," said she; "is not this much better than
the ditch?" And there was a parlour, and a
bed-chamber, and a kitchen; and behind the
cottage there was a little garden with all sorts
of flowers and fruits, and a court-yard full of
48 00051.jpg
SO THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE.
ducks and chickens. A I!" said the fisher-
man, how happily we shall live! "We will
try to do so at least," said his wife.
Every thing went right for a week or two,
and then Dame Alice said, Husband, there is
not room enough in this cottage, the court-yard
and garden are a great deal too small; I should
like to have a large stone castle to live in; so
go to the fish again, and tell him to give us a
castle." "Wife," said the fisherman, "I don't
like to go to him again, for perhaps he will
be angry; we ought to be content with the
cottage." "Nonsense!" said the wife; "he
will do it very willingly; go along, and try."
The fisherman went; but his heart was very
heavy: and when he came to the sea, it looked
blue and gloomy, though it was quite calm,
and he went close to it, and said,
0 man of the sea !
Come listen to me,
For Alice my wife,
The plague of my life,
Hath sent me to beg a boon of thee "
Well, what does she want now?" said the
filh. Ah I said the man very sorrowfully,
49 00052.jpg
THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIPE. 31
" my wife wants to live in a stone castle."
" Go home then," said the fish, she is stand-
ing at the door of it already." So away went
the fisherman, and found his wife staidingbe-
fore a great castle. See," said she, "is not
this grand?" With that they went into the
castle together, and found a great many ser-
vants there, and the rooms.all richly furnished
and full of golden chairs and tables; and be-
hind the castle was a garden, and a wood half
a mile long, full of sheep, and goats, and hares,
and deer; and in the court-yard were stables
and cow-houses. "Well!" said the man,
" now will we live contented and happy in
this beautiful castle for the rest of our lives."
" Perhaps we may," said the wife; "but let
us consider and sleep upon it before we make
up our minds:" so they went to bed.
The next morning, when Dame Alice awoke,
it was broad day-light, and she jogged the
fisherman with her elbow, and said, Get up,
husband, and bestir yourself, for we must be
king of all the land." Wife, wife," said the
man, why should we wish to be king? I
will not be king." '" Then I will," said Alice.
50 00053.jpg
32 THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE.
" But, wife," answered ihe fit.ihrmnn, "how
can you be king? the fish cannot make you a
king." Husband," said she, "say no more
about it, but go and try; I willbeking!" So
tJie nmu went away, quite sorrowful to think
that his wife should want to be king. The
sea looked a dark grey colour, and was cover-
ed with foam as he.cried out,
0 man of the sea
Come listen to me,
For Alice my wife,
The plague of my life,
Hath sent me to beg a boon of thee! "
Well, what would she. have now?" said
the fish. "Alas!" said the man, my wife
wants to be ling." Go home," said the fish;
" she is king already."
Then the fisherman went home; and as he
came close to the palace, he saw a troop of
soldier,, and heard the sound of drums and
trumpets: and whenhe entered in, he saw his
wife sitting on a high throne of gold and dia-
mnonds, with a golden crown upon her.head;
and on each side of her stood six beautiful
miidLem, each a head taller than the other.
51 00054.jpg
THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. S'
"Well, wife,'" said the fisherman, are you
king?" "Yes," said she, "I am king." And
when he had looked at her for a long time, he
said, "-Ah, wife! what a fine thing it is to be
king! now we shall never have any thing more
to wish for." "I don't knomw how that may be,"
said she; neverr is a long time. I am king, 'tis
true, but I begin to be tired of it, and I think
I. should like to be emperor." Alas, wife
why should you wish to be emperor?" said the
fisherman. "Husband,"' said she, "go to the
fish; I say I will be emperor." Ah, wife!"
replied the fisherman, the fish cannot make
an emperor, and I should not like to ask for-
Ssuch a thing." I am king," said Alice, and
youi are my slave, so go directly!" So the
fisherman was obliged to go; and he muttered
"as he went along, "This will come to no good,
it is too much- to ask, the. fish will be tired at
las, and then we shall repent of what we have-
done." He soon arrived at the sea, and the
water was quite black and muddy, and a-
,liughty whirlwind blew over it; but he went tot
the shore, and said,'
c 5.
52 00055.jpg
84' THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE.
"Oman of the sea 1
Come listen to me,
For Alice my wife,
The plague ofmy life,
RHath sent me to beg a boon of thee l'"
What would she have now?" said the fish.
G Ah !" said the fisherman,. "she wants to be
emperor." Go home," said the fish; "she
is emperor already."
So he went home again; and as he came
near he saw his wife sitting on a very lofty
.throne nfade of solid gold, with a great crown
on her head full two yards high, and on each
side ofher stood her guards and attendants in a
row, each one smaller than the other, from the
tallest giant down to a little dwarf no bigger
than my finger. And before her stood princes,
and dukes, and earls: and the fisherman went
up to her and said, "Wife, areyou emperor?'
"Yes," said she, "I am emperor." "Ah!'"
said the man as he gazed upon her, "what a
fine thing it is to be emperor !" ". Husband,"
said she, why should we stay at being empe-
ror ? I will be pope next." 0 wife, wife !"
53 00056.jpg
THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. 85
said he, how can you be pope ? there is but
one pope at a time in Christendom." Hus-
band," said she," I will be pope this very day."
" But," replied the husband, the fish cannot
make you pope." What nosennse !" said
she, "if he can make an emperor, he can make
a pope; go and try him." So the fisherman
went. But when he came to the shore the
wind was raging, and the sea was tossed up
anddownlike boiling water, and the shipswere
in the greatest distress and danced upon the
waves most fearfully; in the middle of the, sky
there was a little blue, but towards the south it
was all red as if a dreadful storm was rising.
At this the fisherman was terribly frightened
and trembled, so that his knees knockedtoge-
ther: but he went to the shore and said,.
0 man of the sea!'
Come listen to me,,
For Alice my wife,.
The plague of my life,
Hath sent me to beg a boon of thee !"'
What does she want now?" said the fish.;
"Ah !" said the fisherman,. "my wife wants to-
54 00057.jpg
36 THE. FISHEIMAN AND HIIS WIFE.
be pope." "Go home," said the fish, she is
pope already."'
' Then the fisherman went home, and fund
his wife sitting on a throne that was two miles
Light i and she had three great crowns on her
head, and around stood all the pomp and power
of thie church; and on each side were two rows
:of burning lights, of all sizes, the greatest as
large as the highest and biggest tower in the
world, :aid the least no larger than asmallrush-
light. Wife," said the fisherman as he look-
ed at all this grandeur, "' are you pope?"
" YesI' said she, I am pope." Well, wife,"
replied he, it is a.grand thing to be pope;
and nw.yoqu.imust be content, for you can be
nothing greater." I. will consider of that,"
said the wife. Then they went to bed: but
Dame Alice could not sleep all night for think-
ing what she should be next. At last morn-
ing came, and the sun rose. "'Ha!" thought
she as she looked at it through the window,
"cannot I prevent the sun rising?" At this
she was very angry, and wakened'her hus-
band, and said, Husband, go to the fish
55 00058.jpg
THE FISHERMAN AND HIS WIFE. 3T
and tell him I want to be lord of the sun and
moon." The fisherman was half asleep, but
the thought frightened him so. much, that he
started and fell out of bed. "Alas, wife!"
said he, "cannot you be content to be pope?"
"No," said she, "Iam very uneasy, and can-
not bear to see the sun and moon rise without
my leave.. Go to the fish directly."
Then the man went trembling for fear;
and ashe was going down to the shore a-dread-
ful storm arose; so that-the trees and the rocks
shook;-and the heavens became black, and the
lightning played, and the thunder rolled : and
you might have seen in the sea great:bLick
waves like mountains with a white crown of
foam upon them; and the fisherman said,
Oman of the sea !
Come listen to me,.
For Alice my wife;
The plague of my life,
Hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!"
What does she want now ?" said the fish.
" Al!" said he, "she wants to be lord of the
The Tom-Tit and the Bear
56 00059.jpg
THE TOM-TIT AND THE BEAR..
sun and moon." Go home," said the fish,
"to your ditch again !" And there they live
to this very day.
THE TOM-TIT AND THE. BEAI.
ON: summer day, as the wolf and the bear
were walking together in a wood, they heard
a bird singing most delightfully. Bother,"
said the bear,, "what can that bird be that is;
singing so sweetly?" "0!" said.the wolf
"that is his majesty the king of the birds; we
must take care to show him all, possible re-
spect.' (Now I should tell you that this bird
was afteall no other than the tom-tit.) If
that is the case," said the bear, "I should like
to see the royal palace; so pray come along
and show it to me." "Gently, my friend," said
the wolf,, "we cannot see it just yet, we must
wait till the queen comes home."
Soon afterwards the queen came with food
im.herbeak, and sheand the king began to feed
57 00060.jpg
THE TOM-TIT AND THE BEAR. 3W
their young ones. "Now for it !" said the,
bear; and was about tqo follow them, to see
what was to be seen. Stop a little, master
Bruin," said the.wolf we must wait now till
their majesties are goneagain." Sotheymarked
the hole where they had seen the nest, and
went away. But the bear, being very eager to
see the- royal palace, soon came back again,
and peeping into the nest, saw five or six young
birds lying at the bottom of it. "What non-
sense! said Bruin, "this is not a royalpalace;
. never saw such a filthy place in my life; and
you are no royal children, you little base-born
brats 1" As soon as the young tom-tits heard
this they were very angry, and screamed out
" We are not base-born, you stupid bear! our
father and mother are honest good sort of
people: and depend upon it you shall suffer
for your insolence I At this the wolf and the
hear grew frightened, and ran away to their
dens. But the young tom-tits kept crying and
screaming; and when their father and mother
camelhome and offered them food, they all said,
" We will not touch a bit; no, not the leg of
a fly, though we should die of hunger, till that
58 00061.jpg
IO THE TOM-TIT AND THE BEAft.
rascal Bruin has been punished for calling us
base-born brats." Make yourselves easy,
my darlings," said the old king, "you may be
sure he shall meet withhis deserts."
So he went out aid stood before'the bear's
den, and cried'out with a. loud' voice, "'Bruin
the bear.! thou hast shamefully insulted our
lawful children: we therefore hereby declare
bloody and cruel war against thee and thine,
which shall never cease until thou hast been
punished as thou so richly deservest" Now
when the bear heard this, he called together
the ox, the ass, the stag, and all the beasts of
th'e earth, in order to consult about the means
of his defence. And the tom-tit also-enlisted
on his side all the birds of the air, both great
and small, and a very large army of hornets,,
gnats, bees, and flies,- and other insects.-
As the time approached when the war- was
to begin, the tom-tit sentout spies to see who
was the commander-ii-chief of the enemy's
i.orces; and the gnat, who was by far tihe cle-
verest spy of them all, flew backwards and for-
wards in the woodl where the enermys troops
were, and -at last hid himself under a leaf on a
59 00062.jpg
THE TOM-TIT AND THE BEAR.
tree, close by which the orders of the day were
given out. And the bear, who was standing so
near the tree that the gnat could hear all he
said, called to the fox and said, Reynard, you
are the cleverest of all the beasts; therefore'
you shall be our general and lead us to battle:
but we must first agree upon some siginil,'by
which we may know what you want us to do."-
" Behold," said the fox, "I have a fine, long,
bushy tail, which is very like a plume of red.
feathers, and gives me a very warlike air:.now
remember, when you see me raise up my tail,
you may be sure that the battle is won, and
you have then nothing to do but to rush down
upon the enemy with all your force. On the
other hand, if I drop my tail, the day is lost,
and you must run away as fast as you can."
Now when the gnat had heard all this, she
flew back to the tom-tit, and told him every
thing that had passed.
At length the day came \\hen thebat.le was.
to be fought; and as soon as it was light, be-
hold! the army of beasts came rushing forward
with such a fearful sound that the earth shook.
And his majesty the tom-tit, with his troops,,
60 00063.jpg
42 THE TOM-TIT AND THE BEAR.
came flying along in warlike array, flapping
and fluttering, and beating the air, so that it
was quite frightful to hear; and both armies set
themselves in order of battle upon the field.
Now the tom-tit gave orders to a troop of hor-
nets that at the first onset they should march
straight towards Captain Reynard, and fixing
themselves about his tail, should sting him with
all their might and main.. The hornets did as
theyweretold: and when Reynard felt the first
sting, he started aside and shook one of his-
legs, but still held up his tail with wonderful
bravery; at the second sting he was forced to
drop his. tail for a moment; but when the third
hornet had fixed itself, he" could bear it no.
longer, but clapped his tail between his legs
and scampered away as fast as he could. As
soon as the beasts saw this, they thought of
course all was lost, and scoured across the
country in the greatest dismay, leaving the
birds masters of the field.
Aknd now the king and queen flew back in
triumph totheirchildren, and said, "Now, chil-
dren, eat, drink, and be merry, tor the victory
is ours But the young birds said, No:
The Twelve Dancing princesses
61 00064.jpg
THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES. 43
not till Bruin has humbly begged our pardon
for calling us base-born." So the, king flew
back to the bear's den, and cried out, Thou
villain bear! come forthwith to my abode, and
humbly beseech my children to forgive thee
the insult thou hast offered them; for, if thou,
wilt not do this, every bone in thy wretched
body shall bebroken topieces." Then the bear
was forced to crawl out of his den very sulkily,
and do what the king bade him: and after that
the young birds sat down together, and ate
and drank 'and made merry till midnight.
THE
TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES.
THERE was a king who had twelve beautiful
daughters. They slept in twelve beds all in
one room; and when they went to bed, the
doors were shut and locked up; but every
morning their shoes were found to be quite
worn through, as if they had been danced in
62 00065.jpg
44 TH-E TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES.
all: night; and yet nobody could find outhovw
it happened, or where they had been.
Then the king made it known to all the
land, that if any person could discover the se-
cret, and find out where it was that the'prin-
cesses danced in the night, he shouildhave the
one he liked best for his wife, and should be
king after his death; but whoever tried and did
not succeed, after three days and nights.
should be put to death.
; A king's son soon came. Hie was well en-
tertained, and in the evening was taken to the
chamber next to the one where the piincesses-
lay in their twelve.beds.. There he was to sit
and watch where they went to dance; and in
order that nothing might pass without his
hearing it, the door of his chamber was left
open. But the king's son soon fell asleep; and
when he awoke in the morning he found that
the princesses had all been dancing, for, the,
soles of their shoes were full of holes; :The
same thing happened .the second and third
night:: so the king ordered his head to be cut
aftl After him came several others; but they
63 00066.jpg
'THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES. 4'5
had all the same luck, and all lost their lives
in the same manner.
Now it chanced that an old soldier, who
had been wounded in battle.and could fight no
longer, passed through the country where this
king reigned: and ashe was travelling through
a wood, he met an old woman, who .asked him
where he.was going. ".I hardly know where
I am going, or what I had better do," said the
soldier:; but I think I should like very well
to find out where it is that the princesses dance,
and then in time I might be a king." Well,"
said the old dame, that is no very hard task:
only take care not to drink any of the wine
which one of the princesses will bring to you
in the evening; and as soon as she leaves you
pretend to be fast asleep."
Then she gave him a cloak, and said,." As
soon as you put that on you will become invi-
sible, and you will then be able to follow the
princesses wherever they go." When the sol-
dier heard all this good counsel, he determined
to try his luck: so he went to the king, and
said he was willing to undertake the task.
He was as well received as the others had
64 00067.jpg
46 THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES.
been, and the king ordered fine royal robes to
be.given him; and when the evening came, he
was led to the outer chamber. Just as he was
going to lie down, the eldest of the princesses
*brought him a cup of wine; but the soldier
threw it all away secretly, taking care not to
drink a drop. Then he laid himself down on
his bed, and in a little while began to snore
very loud as if he was fast asleep. When the
twelve princesses heard this theylaughedhear-
tily; and the eldest said, "This fellow too might
have done a wiser thing than lose his life in
this way! Then they rose up and opened
their drawers and boxes, and took out all their
"fine clothes, and dressed themselves atthe glass,
and skipped about as if they were eager to be-
gin dancing,. But the youngest said, "I don't
know how it is, while you are so happy I feel
very uneasy; I am sure some mischance will
befall us." "You.simpleton," said the eldest,
"you are always afraid; have you forgotten
how many kings' sons have already watched us
in vain? And as for this soldier, even if I had
not given him his sleeping draught, he would
have slept soundly enough."
65 00068.jpg
THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES. 47
When they were all ready, they went and
looked at the soldier: but he snored on, and
did not stir hand or foot: so they.thought they
were quite safe; and the eldest went up to her
own bed and clapped her hands, and the bed
sank into the floor and a trap-door flew open.
The soldier saw them going down through the
:trap-door one after another, the eldest leading
the way; and thinking he had no time to lose,
he jumped up, put on the cloak which the old
yoman had given him, and followed them;
but in the middle of the stairs he trod on the
gown. of the youngest princess, and she cried
,out to her sisters, "All is not right; some one
took hold of my gown." You silly crea-
ture !" said the eldest, it is nothing but a
nail in the wall." Then down they all went,
and at the bottom they found themselves in a
most delightful grove of trees; and the leaves
were all of silver, and glittered and sparkled
beautifully. The soldier wished to take away
some token of the place; so he broke off a lit-
tle branch, and there came a loud noise from
the tree. Then theyoungest daughter said
again, I am sure all is not right-did not
66 00069.jpg
A'8 THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES.
you hear that noise ? That never happened
before." But the eldest'said, "It is only the
princes, who are shouting for joy at our ap-
Iproach."
Then they came to another grove of trees,
~O here all the leaves were of gold; and after-
wards to a third, where the leaves were all
glittering diamonds. And the soldier broke a
branch from each; and every time there was a
loud noise, which made the youngest sister
iremble with fear; but the eldest still said,
it was only the princes, who were crying for
joy. So they went on till they came to a
:r'.:a-t lake; and at the side of the lake there
lay twelve little boats with twelve handsome
princes iri them, who seemed to be waiting
there for the princesses.
One of the princesses went into each nor.t,
and the soldier stepped into the same boat with
the youngest. As-they were rowing over the
lake, the prince who was in the boat with the
youngestt princes, and the soldier said, "I do
not know why it is, but though I am rowing
with all my might, we do no: get cn so fast as
usual, and' I am quite tired: the.boat seems.
67 00070.jpg
THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES. 49
very heavy to-day." It is only the heat of
the weather," said the princess; I feel it very
warm too."
On the other side of the lake stood a fine il-
luminated castle, from which came the merry
music of horns and trumpets. There they all
landed, and went into the castle, and each
prince danced with his princess; and the sol-
dier, who was all the time invisible, danced
with them too; and when any of the princesses
had a cup of wine set by her, he drank it all
up, so that when she put the cup to her inouth
it was empty. At this, too, the youngest sister
was terribly frightened, but the eldest always
silenced her. They danced on till three o'clock
in the morning, and then all their shoes were
worn out, so that they were obliged to leave
off. The princes rowed them back again over
the lake; (but this time the soldier placed him-
self in the boat with the eldest princess;) and
on the opposite shore they took leave of each
other, the princesses promising to come again
the next night.
When they came to the stairs, the soldier
ran on before the princesses, and laid himself
D
68 00071.jpg
50 THE TWELVE DANCING PRINCESSES.
down; and as the twelve sisters slowly came
up very much tired, they heard him snoring in
his bed; so they said, "Now all is quite safe1."
then they undressed themselves, put away their
fine clothes, pulled off their shoes, and went to
bed. In the morning the soldier said nothing
about what had happened, but determined to
see more of this strange adventure, and went
again the second and third night; and every
thing happened just as before; the princesses
danced each time till their shoes were worn to
pieces, and then returned home. However,
on the third night the soldier carried away one
of the golden cups as a token of where he had
been.
As soon as the time came when he was to
declare the secret, he was taken before the
king with the three branches and the golden
cup; and the twelve princesses stood listening
behind the door to hear what he would say.
And when theking asked him Where do my
twelve daughters dance atnight?" he answered,
"With twelve princes in a castle under ground."
And then he told theking all that had happened,
and showed him the three branches and. the
Rose-Bud
69 00072.jpg
ROSE-BUD.
golden cup which he had brought with him.
Then the king called for the princesses, and
asked them whether what the soldier said was
true: and when they saw that they were disco-
vered, and that it was of no use to deny what
had happened, they confessed it all. And the
king asked the soldier which of them he would
choose for his wife; and he answered;, "I ai2,
not very youLg, so I will have the eldest."-
And they were married that very day, and the
soldier was chosen to be the king's heir.
ROSE-BUD.
ONCE upon a tine there lived a king and
queen who had no children; and this they la-
mented very much. But one day as the queen
was walking by the side of the river, a little
fish lifted its head out of the water, and said,
"Your wish shall be fulfilled, and you shall
soon have a daughter." What the little fish
n2
70 00073.jpg
ROSE-BUD.
had foretold o.on came to pass; and the queen
had a little girl that was so very beautiful that
the king could not cease looking on it for joy,
and determined to hold a great feast. So he in-
vited not only his relations, friends, and neigh-
bours, but also all the fairies, that they might
be kind and good to hislittle daughter. Now
there were thirteen fairies in his kingdom, and
he had only twelve golden dishes for them to
eat out of, so that he was obliged to leave one
of the fairies without an invitation. The rest
came, and after the feast was over they gave
all their best gifts to the little princess: one
gave her virtue, another beauty, another riches,
and so on, till she had all that was excellent
in the world. When eleven had done blessing
her, the thirteenth, who had not been invited,
and was very angry on that account, came in,
and determined to take her revenge. So she
cried out, The king's daughter shall in her
fifteenth year be wounded by, a spindle, and
fall down dead." Then the twelfth, who had
not yet given her gift, came forward and said,
that the bad wish must be fulfilled, but that.
71 00074.jpg
SROSE-BUD. 53
she could soften it, and lhat dti. king's daugh-
ter should not die, but fall asleep for a hun-
dred years.
SBut the king hoped to save his dear child
from the threatened evil, and ordered that all
the spindles in the kingdom should be bought
up and destroyed. All the fairies' gifts were
in the mean time fulfilled; for the princess was
so beautiful, and well-behaved, and amiable,
and wise, that every one who knew her loved
her. Now it happened that on the very day
she was fifteen years old the king and queen
were not at home, and she was left alone in
the palace. So she roved about by herself, and
looked at all the rooms and chambers, till at
last she came to an old tower, to which there
was a narrow staircase ending with a little
door. In the door there was a golden key, and
when she turned it the door sprang open, and
there sat an old lady spinning away very busily.
"Why, how now, good mother," said t he prin-
cess, what are you doing there?" Spin-
ning," said the old lady, and nodded her head.
"How prettily that little thing turns round!"
said the princess, and took the spindle and be-
72 00075.jpg
ROSE-BUD.
gan to spin. But scarcely had she touched it,
-before the prophecy was fulfilled, and she fell
down lifeless on the ground.
However, she was not dead, but had only
fallen into a deep sleep; and the king and the
:queen, wh6 just then came home, and :ill their
court, fell asleep too; and the horses slept in
the stables, and the dogs ini the court, the pi-
geon's on the house-top, and the flies on the
walls.. Even the fire on the hearth left off
blazing, and went to sleep; and the meat.that
was roasting stood still; and the cook, who
was at that moment pulling the kitchen-boy
by the hair to give him a box on the ear for
something he had done amiss, let him go, and
both fell asleep; and so every thing stood. still,
and slept soundly..
A large hedge of thorns soon grew round
the palace, and every year it became higher
and tllcki-r, till at last the whole palace was
.surrounded and hid, so that not even the roof
or the chimneys could be seen. But there went
a -report through all the land of the beautiful
sleeping Rose-Bud (for so was the king's
daughter called); so that from time to time
73 00076.jpg
ROSE-BUD.
several kings' sons came, and tried to break
through the thicket into the palace. This they
could never do; for the thorns and bushes laid
hold of them as it were with hands, and there
they stuck fast and died miserably.
- After many many years there came a king's
son into that land, and an old man told him
the story of the thicket of thorns, and how a
beautiful palace stood behind it, in which was
a wondrous princess,:called Rose-Bud, asleep
with all her court. He told too, how he had
heard from his grandfather that many many
princes had come, and had tried to break
through the thicket, but had stuck fast and
died. Then the young prince said, All this
shall not frighten me, I will go and see Rose-
Bud." The old man tried to dissuade him,
but he persisted in going.
Now that very day were the hundred years
completed; and as the prince came to the
thicket, he saw nothing but beautiful flowering
shrubs, through which he passed with ease,
and they closed after him as firm as ever.
Then he came at last to the palace, and there
in the court lay the dogs asleep, and the horses
74 00077.jpg
ROSE-BUD.
in the stables, and on the roof sat the pigeons
fast asleep with their heads under their wings;
and when he came into the palace, the flies
slept on the walls, and the cook in the kitchen
was still holding up her hand as if she would
beat the boy, and the maid sat with a black
fowl in her hand ready to be plucked.
Then he went on still further, and all was
so still that he could hear every breath he
drew; till at last he came to the old tower
and opened the door of the little room in which
Rose-Bud was, and there she lay fast asleep;
and looked so beautiful that he could not take
his eyes off, and he stooped down and gave
her a kiss. But the moment he kissed her she
opened her eyes and awoke, and smiled upon
him. Then they went out together, and pre-.
sently the king and queen also awoke, and all
the court, and they gazed on each other with
great wonder. And the horses got up and
shook themselves, and the dogs jumped about
and bnrked; the pigeons took their heads from
tipder their wings, and looked about and flew
into the fil kd; the flies on the walls buzzed
away; the fire in the kitchen blazed up and
Tom Thumb
75 00078.jpg
TOM THUMB.
cooked the dinner, and the ioast meat turned
round again; the cook gave the boy the box
on his ear so that he cried out, and the maid
went on plucking the fowl. And then was the
wedding of the prince and Rose-Bud cele-
brated, and they lived happily together all
their lives long.
TOM THUMB.
THERE was once a poor woodman sitting by
the fire in his cottage, and his wife sat by his
side spinning. "Howlonelyit is," said he, "for
you and me to sit here by ourselves, without
any children to play about and amuse us, while
other people seem so happy and merry with
their children!" What you say is very
true," said the wife, sighing and turning round
her wheel, how happy should I be if I had
but one child! and if it were ever so small,
nay, if it were no bigger than my thunb, I
should be very happy, and love it dearly."
76 00079.jpg
TOM THUMB.
Now it came to pass that this good woman'a
wish was fulfilled just as she desired; for, some
time afterwards, she had a little boy who was
quite healthy and strong, but not much bigger
than my thumb. So they said, Well, we
cannot say we have not got what we wished
for, and, little as he is, we will love him dear-
ly;" and they called him Tom Thumb.
They gave him plenty of food, yet he never
grew bigger, but remained just the same size
as when he as born; still his eyes were sharp
and sparkling, and he soon showed himself to
be a clever little fellow, who always knew well
what he was about. One.day, -as the wood-
man was getting ready to go into the wood to
cut fuel, he said, I wish I had some one .to
bring the cart after me, for I want to make
haste." 0 father!" cried Tom, I will
take care of that; the cart shall be in the wood
by the time you want it." Then the wood-
man laughed, and said, How can' that be?
you cannot reach up to the horse's bridle."
" Never mind that, father," said Tom: if my
mother will only harness the horse, I will get
77 00080.jpg
TOM THUMB. 9
into his ear and tell him which way to go."
" Well," said the father, "we will try for
once."
When the time came, the mother harnessed
the horse to the cart, and put Tom into his
ear; and as he sat there, the little man told
the beast how to go, crying out, Go on,"
and Stop," as he wanted: so the horse went
on just: as if the woodman had driven it him-
self into the wood. It happened that, as the
horse was going a little too fast, and Tom was
calling out Gently! gently!" two strangers
came up. What an odd thing that is!" said
one, there is a cart going along, and I hear
a carter talking to the horse, but can see no
one." "That is strange," said the other; "let
us follow the cart and see,where it goes." So
th1ey went on into the wood, till at last they
came to the place where the woodman was.
,Then Tom Thumb, seeing his father, cried
oat, See, father, here I am, with the cart, all
right and safe; now take me down." So his
afftlier took hold of the horse with one hand,
and with the other took his son out of the ear;
then he put him down upon a straw, where
78 00081.jpg
he sat as merry as you please. The two
strangers were all this time looking on, and did
not know what to say for wonder. At last one
took the other aside and said, That little ur-
chin will make our fortune if we can get him
and carry him about from town to town as a
show: we must buy him." So they went to
the woodman' and asked him what he would
take for the little man: He will be better
off," said they, with us than with you." I
won't sell him at all," said the father; "my
own flesh and blood is dearer to me than all
the silver and gold in the world." But Tom,
1iiaring of the bargain they wanted to make,
crept up his father's coat to his shoulder, and
whispered in his ear, Take the money, fa,
other, and let them have me; I'll soon come
back to you."
So the woodman at last agreed to sell Tom-
to the strangers for a large piece of gold.
" Wielr do you like- to sit?" said one of them.
"Oh! put me on the rim of your hat, that will
be a nice gallery for me; I can walk about
there, and see the country as we go along."
So they did as he wished; and when Tom had
TOM THUIIiMB.
79 00082.jpg
TOM THUMB.
taken leave of his father, they took him away
with them. They journeyed on till it began
to be dusky, and then the little man said, Let
me get down, I'm tired." So the man took
off his hat, and set him down on a clod of earth
in a ploughed field by the side of the road.
But Tom ran about amongst the furrows, and
at last slipt into an old mouse-hole. Good
night, masters," said he, "I'm off! mind and
look sharp after me the next time." They ran
directly to the place, and poked the ends of
their sticks into the mouse-hole, but all in vain;
Tom only crawled further and further in, and
at last it became quite dark, so that they were
Obliged to go their way without their prize, as
sulky as you please.
When Tom found they were gone, he came
out of his hiding-place. What dangerous
walking it is," said he, "in this ploughed field!
If I were to fall from one of these great clods,
I should certainly break my neck." At last,
by good luck, he found a large empty snail-
shell. This is lucky," said he, I can sleep
here very well," and in he crept. Just as he
was falling asleep he heard two men passing,
80 00083.jpg
TOM THUMB.
and one said to the other, How shall we ma-
inage to steal that richparson's silver and gold?"
" I'll tell you," cried Tom. What noise was
that?" said the thief, frightened, am sure I
heard some one speak." They stood still list-
ening, and Tom said, "Take me with you, and
I'll soon show you how to get the parson's
money." But where are you?" said they.
" Look about on the ground," answered he,
"and listen where the sound comes from."
At last the thieves found him out, and lifted
him up in their hands. You little urchin !"
said they, what can you do for us? Why
I can get between the iron window-bars of the
parson's house, and throw you out whatever
you want." That's a good thought," said
the thieves, come along, we shall see what
you can do." .
When they came to the parson's house,
Tom slipt through the window-bars into.the
room, and then called out as loud as he could
bawl, Will you have all that is here?" At
this the thieves were frightened, and said,
'' Softly, softly! Speak low, that you may not
awaken any body." But Tom pretended not
81 00084.jpg
TOM THUMB.
to understand them, and bawled out again,
" How much will you have? Shall I throw it
all out?" Now the.cook lay in the next room,
and hearing a noise she raised herself in her
bed and listened. Meantime the thieves were
frightened, and ran off to a little distance; but
,,at last they plucked up courage, and said,
"-The little urchin is only trying to make fools
of us." So they came back and whispered
softly to him, saying, Now let us have no
more of your jokes, but throw out some of the
money." Then Tom called out as loud as he
could, Very well: hold your hands, here it
comes." The cook heard this quite plain, so
she sprang out of bed and ran to open the door.
The thieves ran off as if a wolf was at their
tails;, and the maid, having groped about and
found nothing, went away for a light. By the
time she returned, Tom had slipt off into the
barn; and when the cook had looked about
*and seairched.every hole and corner, and found
nobody, she went to bed, thinking she must
have been dreaming with her eyes open. The
little man crawled about in the hay-loft, and at
last found a glorious place to finish his night's
82 00085.jpg
(5 TOM THUMB.
rest in; so he laid himself down, meaning to
sleep tillday-light, and then find tlis \\a3y iioIne
to his father and mother., But, alas! how
cruelly was he disappointed! what crosses
and sorrows happen in this world! The cook
got up earlybefore day-break to feed the cows:
she went straight to the hay-loft, and carried
away a large bundle of haj:with the little man
in the middle of it fast asleep. He i;ll, hoiw-
ever, slept on, and did not awake till lie fiund
himself in the mouth of the cow, who had
taken him up with a mouthful of hay: Good
lack-a-day!" said he, how did I manage to
tumble into the mill?" But he soon found out
where he really was, and was obliged to laie
all his wits about him in order that he might
not get between the cow's teeth, and so be
crushed to death. At last down he ment into
her stomach. It is rather dark here," said
he; they forgot to build windows in this
room tolet the sun in: a candle would be no
bad thing."
Though he made the best of his bad luck,
he did not like his quarters at all; and the
worst of it was, that more and more hay wan;
83 00086.jpg
TOM THUMB.
always coming down, and the space in which
he was, became smaller and smaller. At last
he cried out as loud as he could, "Don't bring
me any more hay! Don't bring me any more
hay!" The maid happened to be just then
milking the cow, and hearing some one speak
and seeing nobody, and yet being quite sure it
was the same voice that she had heard in the
night, she was so frightened that she fell off
her stooland overset the milk-pail. She ran
off as fast as she could to her master the par-
son, and said, Sir, sir, the-cow is talking'!"
But the iparson said, "Woman, thou art surely
imad !" However, he went with her into the
cow-house to see what was the matter.-
Scarcely had they set their foot on the thresh-
old, when Tom called out, "Don't bring me
any more hay!" Then the parson himself
was frightened; and thinking the cow was
surely bckwitcheld, ordered that she should be
killed directly. So the cow was killed, and
the stomach, in which Tom lay, was thrown
out upon a dunghill.
Tom soon set himself to work to get out,
which was not a very easy, task; but at last,
84 00087.jpg
TOM THUMB.
just as he had made room to get his head out,
a new misfortune befell him: a hungry wolf
sprang out, and swallowed the whole stomach
with Tom in it at a single gulp, and ran away-
Tom, however, was not disheartened; and,
thinking the wolf would not dislike having
some chat with him as he was going along,
he called out, ,"My gord friend, I can show
you a famous treat." "Where's that?" said
the wolf. In such and such a house," said
Tom, describing his father's house, you
can crawl through the drain into the kitchen.
and there you will find cakes, ham, beef, and
every thing your heart cain desire." The wolf'
did not want to be asked twice; so that very
nighthe went tothe house and crawled th ro ugh
the drain into the kitchen, and ate and drank
there to his heart's content. As soon as he
was satisfied, he wanted to get away, but he
had eaten so much that he could not get out
the same way that he came in. This was just
what Tom had reckoned upon; and he now
began to set up a great shout, making all the
noise he could. Will you be quiet ?" said
the wolf: "you'll awaken every body in the
85 00088.jpg
TOM THUMB.
house." "What's that to me?" said the
little man: "you have had your frolic, now
I've a.mind to be merry myself;" and he be-
gan again singing and .shoutiing as loud as he
could.
The woodman and his wife, being awakened
by thi- noise, peeped through a crack in the
door; but when they saw that the wolf was
there, 3oi may wtll i'uppoe that they were
terribly, frightenedd. and the woodman ran
for his axe, and gave his wife a scythe.-
"' Now do you :stay behind," said the wood-
man; "and when I lave knocked him on the
head, do you rip up his belly for him with
the scythe." Tom heard all this, and said,
SFather,' father! I am here, the wolf has
swallowed me:" and his father said, Heaven
be praised! we have found our dear' child
again;" and he told his wife not to use the
scythe, for feor she should hurt him. Then he
aimed a great blow, and struck the wolf on
the head, and killed him-on the spot; and
when hewva dead tlev cut open his body and
,.set Tommy free. "Ah !" said the father,
" what fears we-have had for you!" "Yes,
The Grateful Beasts
86 00089.jpg
68 THE GRATEFUL BEASTS.
father," answered he, "I have travelled all
over the world, since we parted, in one way or
other; and now I am very glad to get fresh air
again." "'Why, where have you been?"
said his father. I have been in a mouse-
hole, in a snail-shell, down a cow's throat, and
in the wolf's belly; and yet here I am again
safe and sound:" Well," said they, "we
will not sell you again for all the riches in the
world." So they hugged and kissed their dear
little son, and gave him plenty tz eat and
drink, and fetched new clothes for him, for his
old ones were quite spoiled on his journey.
THE GRATEFUL BEASTS.
A CERTAIN nin, who had lost almost all his
money, resolved to set off with the little that
was left him, and travel into the wide world.
Then the first place he came to was a village,
where the young people were running about
crying and shouting. What is the matter?"
87 00090.jpg
THE GRATEFUL BEASTS. 69
asked he. See here," answered they, "wa
have got a mouse that we make dance to please
us. Do look at him: what a droll sight it is .
how he jumps about!" But the man pitied
the poor little thing, and said, "Let the mouse
go, and I will give you money. So he gave
them some, and took the mouse and let it run;
and it soon jumped into a hole that was close
by, and was out of their reach.
Then he travelled on and came to another
village, and there the children had got an ass
that they made stand on its hind legs, and tum-
ble and cut capers, at which they laughed and
shouted, and gave the poor beast no rest. So
the good man gave them some of his money
to let the poor creature go away in peace.
At the next village he came to, the young
people had found a bear that had been taught
to dance, and they were plaguing the poor
thing sadly. Then he gave them too some
money to let the beast go, and the bear was.
very glad to get on his four feet, and seemed
quite at his ease and happy again.
But now he found that he had given away all.
the money bh had in the world, and had not a
88 00091.jpg
70 THE GRATEFUL BEASTS.
shilling in his pocket. Then said he to himself,
"The king has heaps of gold in his treasury
-that he never uses; I cannot die of hunger, I
hope I shall be forgiven, if I borrow a little,
and when I get rich again I will repay it all."
So he managed to get into the treasury, and
took a very little money; but as he came out
the king's guards saw him, and said he was a
thief, and took, him to the judge, and he was
sentenced to be thrown into the water in a
box. The lid of the box was full of holes to
let in air, and a jug of water and a loaf of
bread were given him.
Whilst he was swimming along in the wa-
ter very sorrowfully, he heard something nib-
bling and biting at the lock; and all of a sud-
den it fell off, the lid flew open, and there stood
his old friend the little mouse, who had done
him this service. And then came the ass and
the bear, and pulled the box ashore; arid all
helped him because he had been kind io them.
But now they did not know what to do next;:
and began to consult together; when on a sud-
den a wave threw on the shore a beautiful white, :
stone that looked like an egg. Then the bear
89 00092.jpg
THE GRATEFUL BEASTS.
said,' That's a lucky thing: this is the won-
derful stone, and whoever has it may have
every thing else that he wishes." So the man
went and picked up the stone, and wished for
a palace and a garden, and a stud of horses;
and his wish was fulfilled as soon as he had
made it. And there he lived in his castle and
garden, with fine stables and horses; and all
was so grand and beautiful, that he never could
wonder and gaze at it enough.
After some time, some merchants passed
by that way. See," said they, what a
princely palace! The last time we were here,
it was nothing but a desert waste." They
were very curious to know how all this had
happened, and went in and asked the master of
the palace how it had been so quickly raised.
I have done nothing myself," answered he,
"it is the wonderful stone that did all."-
What a strange stone that must be!" said
they: then he invited them in and showed it
to them. They asked him whether he would
sell it, and offered him all their goods for it;
and the goods seemed so fine and costly, that
he quite forgot that the stone would bring him
90 00093.jpg
72 THE GRlATEFUL BEASTS.
in a moment a thousand better and richer
things, and he agreed to make the bargain.
Scarcely was the stone, however, out of his
hands before all his riches were gone, and he
found himself sitting in his box in the water,
with his jug of water and loaf of bread by his
side. The grateful beasts, the mouse, the ass,
and the bear, came directly to help him; but
the mouse found she could not nibble off the
lock this time, for it was a great deal stronger
than before. Then the bear said, We must
find the wonderful stone again, or all we can
do will be fruitless."
The merchants, meantime, had taken up
their abode in the palace; so away went the
three friends, and when they came near, the
bear said, "Mouse, go in and look through
the key-hole and see where the stone is kept:
you are small, nobody will see you." The
mouse did as she was told, but soon came
back and said, Bad news! I have looked in,
and the -toni hangs under the looking-glass
by a red silk string, and on each side of it sits
a great cat with fiery eyes to watch it."
Then the others took council together, and
91 00094.jpg
THE GRATEFUL BEASTS. 7.
said, Go back ngaii, and wait till the mas-
ter of the palace is in bed asleep, then nip his
nose and pull his hair." Away went the
mouse, and did as they directed her; and the
niaster jumped up very angry, and rubbed his
nose, and cried, "Those: rascally cats are
good for nothing at all, they let the mice eat
my very nose and pull the hair off my head."
Then.he hunted them out of the room; and
so the mouse had the best of the game.
Next night as sooi as the master was asleep,.-
the mouse crept in again, and nibbled at the
red silken string to which the stone hung, till
down it dropped, and she rolled it along to the
door;'but when it got there, the poor little
mouse was quite tired, and said to the ass,
" Put in your foot, and lift it over the thresh-
old." This was soon done: and they took up
the stone, and set off for the water side. Then
the ass said, How shall we reach the box ?"
"That is. easily managed," answered the
bear: "I can swim very well, and do you, don-
key, put your fore feet over my shoulders ;-,
mind and hold fast, and take the stone in your
mouth: as for you, mouse, you can sit in my
ear." E
92 00095.jpg
THE GRATEFUL BEASTS.
It was all settled thus, and away they swam.
After time, the bear began to brag and boast:
'" We are brave fellows, are not we, ass ?" said
he; "what do you think?" But the ass held
his tongue, and said not a word. Whli don't
you answer me?" said the bear, '" you must
be an ill-mannered brute not to speak when
you're spoken to." When the ass heard this,
he could hold no longer; so.he opened.his
mouth, and'dropped the wonderful stone. I
could not speak," said he; did not you know
I had the stone in my mouth? now 'tis lost,
and that's your fault." Do but hold your
tongue andbe quiet," said the bear; "and let
us think what's to be done."
Then a council was held: and at last they
called together all the frogs, their wives and
families, relations and friends, and said: "A
great enemy is coming to eat you all up; but
never mind, bring us up plenty of stones, and
we'll build a strorig wall to guard you." The
frogs hearing this were dreadfully frightened,
and set to work, bringing up all the stones they
could find. At last came a large fat f'o-og pull-
ing along the wonderful stone by the silken
string: and when the bear saw it, he jumped
Jorinda and Jorindel
93 00096.jpg
JORINDA AND JORINDEL. 75
for joy, and said, "Now we have found what
we wanted." So he released the old frog from
his load, and told him to tell his friends they
might go about their business as soon as they
pleased.
Then the three friends swam off again for
the box ;and the lid flew open, and they found
that they were but just in time, for the bread
was all eaten, and the jug almost empty. But
as soon as the good man had the stone in his
hand, he wished himself safe and sound in his
palace again; and in a moment there he was,
with his garden and his stables and his horses;
and his three faithful friends dwelt with him,
and tlihe3 ll ~pent their time happily and mer-
rily as long as they lived.
JORINDA AND JORINDEL.
THERE was once an old castle that stood
in the middle of a large thick wood, and in
the castle lived an old fairy. All the day long
she. flew about in the form of an owl, or crept
E2
94 00099.jpg
76 JORINDA AND JORINDEL.
about the country like a cat; but at night le
always became an old woman again. When
any youth came, within a hundred paces of ier
castle,. he-became quite fixed, and could not
move a step till she came and set him free:
but when any pretty maiden came within that
distance, she was changed into a bird; and the
fairy put her into a cage and hung her up in a
chamber in the castle. There were seven
'hundred of these cages hanging in the castle,
and all with beautiful birds in them.
Now there was once a maiden whose name
wa4 .Joiind a: she was prettier than all the'pretty
girlsthat evei- er see eeand and A shepherd who e
name was Jorindel was very fond of her, and
they were soon to be .arried. One day they
Sent to walk in the wood, that they might be
alone: and Jorindel said, We must take
care that we don't go too near to the castle."
It was a beautiful evening; the last rays of
the setting sun shone bright through the long
stems of the trees upon the green underwood
beneath, and the turtledoves sang plaintively
from the tall birches.
Jo'inda sat down to gaze upon the sun;
95 00099a.jpg
SI --
96 00100.jpg
JORINDA AND JORINDEL. 77
Jorindel sat by her side; and both felt sad,
they knew not why; but it seemed as.if they
were to be parted from one another for ever.
Theyhadwandered a long way; and when they
looked to see which way they should go home,
they found themselves at a loss to know what
path to take.
The sun was setting fast, and already half
of his circle had disappeared behind the hill:
Jorindelon a sudden looked behind him, and as
he saw through the bushes that they had, with-
out knowing it, sat down close under the old
walls of the 'castle, he shrank for fear, turned
pale, and trembled. .Jorinda was singing,
The ring-dove sang from 'the i- i low -pray,
Well-a-day! well-a-day!.
He mourn'd'for the fate
Of his lovely inate,
Well-a-day !-
The song ceased suddenly y. Jorindel turned
to see the reason, and beheld his Jorinda
changed into-a nightingale; so that her song
ended with a mournful jug, jug. An owl with
fiery eyes flew three times round them, and
three times screamed Tu whau Ti whu Tn
97 00101.jpg
JORINDA AND JORINDEL.
whu! Jorindel could not move: he stood
fixed as a stone, and could neither weep, nor
speak, nor stir hand or foot. And now the
sun went quite down; the gloomy night came;
the owl flew into a bush; and a moment after
the old fairy came forth pale and meager, with
staring eyes, and a nose and chin that almost.
met one another.
She mumbled something to herself,. seized.
the nightingale, and went away with it in her
hand. Poor Jorindel saw the nightingale was
gone,-but what could he do? he could not
speak, he could not move from the spot where-
he stood. At last the fairy came back, and
sung with a hoarse voice,
Till the prisoner's fast,
And her doom is cast,
There stay Oh, stay !
When the charm is around her,
And the spell has bound her,
Hie away away !
On a sudden Jorindel found himself free.,
Then he fell on his knees before the fairy, and
prayed her to give him back his dear Jorinda:
98 00102.jpg
JORINDA AND JORINDEL.
but she said he should never see her again,
and .went her way.
He prayed, he wept, he sorrowed, but all in
vain. Alas !" he said, "what will become
of me?"
He could not return to his own home, so
he went to a strange village, -and employed
himself in keeping sheep. Many a time did
he walk round and round as near to the hated
castle as he dared go. At last he dreamt one
night that he found a beautiful purple flower,
and in the middle of it lay a costly pearl;
and he dreamt that he plucked the flower, and
went with it in his hand into the castle, and
that every thing he touched with it was dis-
enchanted, and that there he found his dear
Jorinda again.
In the morning when he awoke, he began
to search over hill and dale for this pretty
flower; and eight long days he sought for it in
vain: but on the ninth day early in the morn-
-ing he found the beautiful purple flower; and
in the middle of it was a large dew drop as
big as a costly pearl.
Then he plucked the flower, and set out and
99 00105.jpg
80 JORINDA AND JRORI~DEL.
travelled day and night till he came sgain to
the castle. He walked nearer than a hundred
paces to it, and yet he did not become fixed
as before, but found that he could go close up
to the door.
Jorindel was very glad to see this: he touch-
ed the door with the flower, and it sprang
open, so that he went in through the court,
and listened when he heard so many birds
singing. At last he came to the chamber where
the fairy sat, with the seven hundred birds
i iiiug b in the seven hundred cages. And when
she saw Jorindel she was very angry, and
screamed with rage; but she could not come
*within two yards of him; for the flower he
-held in his hand protected him. He looked
around at the birds, but alas! there were
many many nightingales, and how then should
he find his Jorinda? While he was thinking
what to do, he observed that the fairy had
taken down one of the cages, and was making
her escape through the door. He ran or flew
to her, touched the cage with the flower,-
and his Jorinda stood before him. She threw
her arms round his neck and looked as beau-
100 00105a.jpg
/ --
~~0
The Waggish Musician
101 00106.jpg
THE WAGGISH MUSICIAN.. 81
tiful as ever, as beautiti' as when they walked.
together in the wood.
Then he touched all the other birds with the
flower, so that they resumed their old forms;
and tdok his dear Jorinda home, whereithey
lived happily together many years.
THE WAGGISH MUSICIAN.
ONE day a waggish musician, who played
delightlidly on the fiddle, went rambling in a
forest in a merry mood. Then he said to him
sei "Time goes rather heavily on, I must
find a companion." So he took up his fiddle,
arid fiddled away till the wood resounded with
his music.
Presently up came a wolf. "Dear me! there's
a wolf coming to see me," said the musician.
But the wolf came up to him, and said, How
very prettily you play! I wish you would teach
me." '" That is easily done," said the musician,
"if you will only do what I bid you."- "Yes,"
102 00107.jpg
82 THE WAGGISH MUSICIAN.
replied the wolf, I shall be a very apt scho-
lar." So they went on a little way together,
and came at last to an old oak tree that was
hollow within, and had a large crack in the
middle of the trunk. Look there," said the
musician, "if you wish to learn to fiddle, put
your fore feet into that crack." The wolf did
as he was bid: but the musician picked up a
large stone and wedged both his fore-feet fast
into the crack, so as to make him a prisoner.
Now be so good as to wait there till I come
back," said he, and jogged on.
S-After a while, he said again to himself,
F' Time'goes very heavily, I must find another
companion." So he took his fiddle, and fiddled
away again in the wood. Presently up came
a fox that was wandering close by. "Ah!
there is a fox," said he. The fox came up and
said, You delightful musician, how prettily
you play! I must and will learn to play as
you do." That you may soon do," said the
musician, if you do as I tell you." That
I will," said the fox. So .they travelled on
together till they came to a narrow footpath
-with high bushes on each side. Then the
103 00108.jpg
THE WAGGISH MUSICIAN.
musician bent a stout hazel stem down to the
ground from one side of the path, and set his
foot on the top, and held it fast; and bent an-
other from the other side, and said to the fox,
" Now, pretty fox, if you want to fiddle, give
me hold of your left paw." So the fox gave
him his paw; and he tied it fast to the top of
one of the hazel stems. Now give me your
right," said he; and the fox did as he was
told: then the musician tied that paw to the
other hazel; and took off his foot, and away
up flew the bushes, and the fox too, and hung
sprawling and swinging in the air. Now
be so kind as to stay there till I come back,"
said the musician, and jogged on.
But he soon said to himself, Time begins
to hang heavy, I must find a companion.",' So
he took up his fiddle, and fiddled away di-
vinely. Then up came a hare running along.
A- Ah! there is a hare," said the musician.
And the hare said to him, You fine fiddler,
how beautifully you play! will.you teach me? "
" Yes," said the musician," I will soon'do
tlint, if you will follow my orders." ') Yes,"
said the hare, "I shall make a good scholar.',
104 00109.jpg
84 THE WAGdISH MUSICIAN.
Then they went on together very well for a
long while, till they came to an open space in
the wood. The musician tied a string round
the hare's neck, and fastened the other end
to the tree. Now," said he, "pretty hare,
quick, jump about, run round the tree twenty
times." So the silly hare did as she was bid:
and \when she had run twenty times round the
tree, she had twisted the string twenty times
round the trunk, and was fast prisoner; and
she might pull and pull away as long as she
pleased, and only pulled the string faster about
her neck. "Now wait there till I come back,"
said the musician.
But the wolf had pulled and bitten and
scratched at the stone a long while, till at last
he had got his feet out and was at liberty.
Then he said in a great passion, I will run
after that rascally musician and tear him in
pieces." As the fox saw him run by, he said,
" Ah, brother wolf, pray let me down, the
musician has played tricks with me." So the
wolf set to work at the bottom of the hazel
stem, and bit it in two; and away went both
together to find the musician: and as they
105 00110.jpg
THE WAGGISH MUSICIAN.
came to the hare, she cried out too for help.
So they went and set her free,. and all followed
the enemy together.
: [Meantime the musician had been fiddling
away, and found another companion; for a
poor woodcutter had been pleased with the
music, and could not help following him with
his axe under his arm. The musician was
pleased to get a man for his companion, and
behaved very civilly to him, and,played him
no tricks, but stopped and played his prettiest
tunes till his heart overflowed for joy. While
the woodcutter was standing listening, hesaw
the wolf, the fox, and the hare coming, and
knew by their faces that they were in a great
rage, and coming to do some mischief. So he
stood before the musician with his great axe,
as much as to say, No one shall hurt him as
long as I have this axe. And when the beasts
saw this, they were so frightened that they
ran back into the wood. Then the musician
played the woodcutter one of his best tunes
for his pains, and went on with his journey.
The Queen Bee
106 00111.jpg
THE QUEEN BEE.
Two king's sons once upon a time went out
into the world to seek their fortunes; but they
soon fell into a wasteful foolish way of liv-
ing, so that they could not return home again.
Then their young brother, who was a little
insignificant dwarf, went out to seek for his
brothers: but when he had found them they
only laughed at him; to think that he, who
was so young and simple, should try to travel
through the world, when they, who were so
much wiser, had been unable to get on.
However, they all set out on their journey to-
gether, and came at last to an ant-hill. The
two elder brothers would have pulled it down
in order to see how the poor ants in their fright
O'.,ild run about and carry off their e,.L.
But the little dwarf said, ".Let the poor things
enjoy themselves, I wll not suffer you to trou,
ble them."
So on they went, and came to a lake where
many many ducks were swimming about.
The two brothers wanted to catch two, and
107 00112.jpg
THE QUEEN BEE. $7
roast them. But the dwarf said, Let the
poor things enjoy themselves, you shall not kill
them." Next they came to a bees' nest in a
hollow tree, and there was so much honey that
it ran down the trunk; and the two brothers
wanted to light a fire under the tree and kill
the bees, so as to get their honey. But the
dwarf held them back, and said, Let the
pretty insects enjoy themselves, I cannot let
you burn them."
At length the three brothers came to a cas-
tle: and as they passed by the stables they saw
fine horses standing there, but all were of mat-
ble, and no man was to be seen. Then they
went through all the rooms, till they came to
a door on which were three locks: but in the
middle of the door there was a wicket, so that
they could look into the next room. There
they saw a little grey old man sitting at a table;
and they called to him once or twice, but he
did-not hear: however, they called a third
time, and then he rose a*id came out to them.
He said nothing, but took hold of them and
led them to a beautiful table covered with all
sorts of good things: and when they had eaten
108 00113.jpg
81 THE QUEEN BrF.
and drunk, he showed each of them to a bed-
chamber.
The next morning he came to the eldest and
took him to a marble table, where were three
tablets, containing an account of the means
by which the castle might be disenchanted.
The first tablet said--" In the wood, under
the moss, lie the thousand pearls belonging to
the king's daughter; they must all be Ibundl
and if one be missing by set of sun, he who
seeks them will be turned into marble."
The eldest brother set out, and 'oightt fordthe
pearls the whole day; but the evening came,
and he had not found the first hundred: so he
was turned into stone as the tablet had foretold.
The next day the second brother undertook
the task; but he succeeded no better than the
first; for he could only find the second hun-
dred of the pearls; and therefore he too was
turned into stone.
At last came the little dwarfs turn: and hi
looked in the moss; but it was so hard to find
the pearls, and the job was so tiresonm !-so
he sat down upon a stone and cried. And as he
sat there, the king of the ants (whoselife he had
109 00114.jpg
THE QUEEN BEE. 89
..lvwd) came to help him, with five thousand
ants; and it was not long before they had found
all the pearls and laid them in a heap.
The second tablet said--" The key of the
princess's bedchamber must be fished -up out
of the lake." And as the dwarf came to the
brink of it, he saw the two ducks whose lives
he had saved swimming about; and they dived
down and soon brought up the B-hy from the
bottom,
The third task was the hardest. It was to
choose out the youngest and the best of the
king's three daughters. Now they were all
beautiful, and all exactly alike: bit .he was
told that the eldest had eaten:a piece of sui.g'r,
the next some sweet syrup, and the youngest
a spoonful of honey; so he was to guies which
it was that had eaten the honey.
Then-came the queen of the bees, who had
been saved by the little dwarf from the fire,
and she tried the lips of all three; but at last
she sat upon the lips of the one that had eaten
the honey: and so the dwarf knew which was
the youngest. Thus the spell was broken, and
all who had been i iiuled into stones awoke,
The Dog and the Sparrow
110 00115.jpg
90 THE DOG AND THE SPARROW. .
and took their proper forms. Aid the dwart
married the youngest and the best of the prin-
cesses, and was king after her father's death;
but his two brothers married the other two
sisters.
THE DOG AND THE SPARROW.
A SHEPHERD'S dog had. a master who took
no care of him, but often let him suffer the
greatest hunger. At.last he could bear it no
longer'; so he took to his heels, and off he ran
in a very sad and sorrowful mood. On the
road he met a sparrow, that said to him,
Why are you so sad, my friend ?" Be-
cause," said the dog, I am very very hungry,
and have nothing to eat." If that be all,"
answered the sparrow, come vith me into
the next town, and I will soon find you plenty
of food." So on they went together into the
town: and as they passed by a butcher's shop,
'the sparrow.said to the dog, Stand there a
little while, till I peck you down a piece of
111 00116.jpg
THE DOG AND. THE SPARROW.
meat." So the sparrow perched upon the
shelf: and having first looked carefully about
her to see if any one was watching her, she
precked and scratched at a steak that lay upon
the edge of the shelf, till at last down it fell.
Then the dog snapped it up, and scrambled
away with it into a corner, where he soon ate
it all up. Well," said the sparrow, "you shall
have some more if you will; so come with me
to the next shop, and I will peck you down
another steak." When the dog had eaten this
too, the sparrow said to him, Well, my good
friend, have you had enough now?" "I have
had plenty of meat," answered he, but I
should like to have a piece of bread to eat
after it." Come with me then,' said the
sparrow, "and you shall soon have that too."
So she took him to a baker's shop, and pecked
at two rolls that lay in the window, till they
fell down: and as the dog still wished for
more, she took him to another shop and pecked
down some more for him. When that was
eaten, the sparrow asked him whether he had
had enough now. Yes," said he; "and
now let us take a walk a little way out of the
112 00117.jpg
90 THE DOG AND THE SPARROW.
town." So they both went out upon the high
road: but as the weather waswarm, they had
riot gone far before the dog said, I am very
much tired,-I should like to take a ap.'
" Very well," answered the sparrow, "-do t"o,
and in the mean time I will perch upon that
bush." So the dog stretched himself Iout 'ol
the road, and fell fhst asleep. Whilst he slept,
there came by a carter with a cart drawn by
three horses, and loaded with two casks of
wine. The sparrow, seeing ihat 'the carter didi
not turn'odut of the way, but would go on in
the track in which the dog lay, so as to drive
over him, called out, Stop stop!. Mr.
Carter, or it shall be the worse for you." hit
the carter, grumbling to himself '" You mirak
it the worse tlr me, indeed! whi t can you do? "
cracked his whip, anid drove his cart over ih~ .
poor dog, so tlat the wheels crushed him to
death. ",There," cried the sparrow, "'thoui
cruel villain, "thot hast killed my friend the
dog. Now mind what I say. This deed of
hiine shall cost dhee all thou art worthh" "Do
your orst, and welcome," said fhe brute,
' whatiarmnba~ryoiu do me?" andpassed On.
113 00118.jpg
THE DOG AND THE SPARROW., V5
But the sparrow.crept under the tilt of the cart,
anid pecked at the bung of one of the casks till
she loosened it; and then all the wine ran out,
without the carter seeing it. At last he looked
rou id, and saw that the cart was dripping, and
the cask quite empty. "What an unlucky
wretch I am!" cried he. "Not wretch enough
yet! ".said the sparrow, as she alighted upon.
the head of one of the horses, and pecked at:
him till he reared up and kicked. When the
carter saw this, he drew out his.hatchet and
aimed ablow at the sparrow, meaning to kill
her; but hle flew away, and the blow fell upon
the poor horse's head with such force, that he
fcll do'in dead. Unhluky \wretch that I am!"
cried he. "Not wretch enough yet!" said the
sparrow. And as the carter went on with tha
other two horses, she again crept under the tilt
of the cart, and pecked out the bung of the
-cuc Id cask, so that all the wine ran. out.
5Wh'lv the carter saw this, he again cried out,
" Miera ble wretch that I am! But the p- -
row answered, Not wretch enough yet!"
and perched on the head of the second horse,
and pecked at him too. The carter ran up
114 00119.jpg
S THE DOG AND THE SPARROW.
and struck at her again with his hatchet; but
away she flew, and the blow fell upon the se-
cond horse and killed him on the spot. "Uin-
lucky wretch that I am!" said he. Not
wretch enough yet!" said the sparrow; and
perching upon the third horse, she began to
peck him too. The carrier was mad with fury;
and without looking about him, or caring what
he was about, struck again at the sparrow;
but killed his third horse as he had done the
other two. "Alas! miserable wretch that I
am!" cried he. Not wretch enough yet!"
answered the sparrow as she flew away; now
wIl I plague and punish thee at thy own house."
The carter was forced at last to leave his cart
behind him, and to go home overflowing with
rage and vexation. Alas !" said he to his
wife, what ill luck has befallen me!-my
wine is all spilt, and my horses all three dead."
" Alas! husband," replied she, and a wicked
bird has come into the house, and has brought
with her all the birds in the world, I am sure,
and they have fallen upon our corn in the loft,
and are eating it up at such a rate!" Away ran
the husband up stairs, and saw thousands of
115 00120.jpg
THE DOG AND THE SPARROW.
birds sitting upon the floor eating up his corn,
with the sparrow in. the midst of them. Un-
lucky wretch that I am!" cried the carter;
for.he saw: that the corn was almost all gone.
" Not wretch enough yet!" said the sparrow;
Sthy cruelty shall cost thee thy life yet!" and
away she flew.
The carter seeing that he had thus lost all
that he had, went down into his kitchen; and
was still not sorry for, what he had done, but
sat himself angrily and. sulkily in the chimney
corner. But the sparrow sat on the outside
of the window, and cried, "Carter thy cruelty
shall cost thee thy life!" With that he jumped
up in a rage, seized his hatchet, and threw it
at the sparrow; but it missed her, and only
broke the window. The sparrow now hopped
in, perched upon the window-seat, and cried,
" Carter! it shall cost thee thy life!" Then
he became mad and blind with rage, and struck
the window seat with such force that he cleft
it in two: and as the sparrow flew from place
to place, the carter and his wife were so. fh-
ri ous, that they broke all their furniture, glasses,
chairs, benches, the table, and at last the wall*,
Frederick and Catherine
116 00121.jpg
96 FREDERICK AND CATHERINE.
without touching the bird at all. In the end,
however, they caught her: and the wife said
" Shall I kill her at once?" No," cried he,
" that is letting her off too easily: she shall
die a much more cruel death; ILwill eat her.'
.-ut the sparrow began to flutter about, and
stretched out her neck and cried,. Carter! it
shall cost thee thy life yet!" With that he
could wait no longer: so he gave his wife the
hatchet, and cried, Wife, strike at the bird
and kill her in my hand." And the wife struck;
but she missed her aim, and hit her husband
on the head so that he fell down dead, and the
sparrow flew quietly home to her nest.
FREDERICK AND CATHERINE.
THERE was once a man called Frederick:
he had a wife whose name was Catherine, and
ihlev Ilad not long been married. One day
Frederick said, Kate I am going to work
in the fielils; when I come back I shall be
117 00122.jpg
FREDERICK AND CATHERINE. 07
lnu;gry, so let me have something nice cooked,
and a good draught of ale." Very well," said
she, "it shall all be ieadN." When dinner-
time drew nigh, Catherine took a nice steals
which was all the meat she had, and put it on
the fire to fry. The steak soon began to look
brown, and to crackle in the pan; and Cathe-
rine stood by with a fork and turned it: then
she said to herself, "The steak is almost ready,
I may as well go to the cellar for the ale." So
she left the pan on the fire, and took a large jug
and went into the cellar and tapped the ale
cask. The beer ran into the jug, and Catherine
stood looking on. At last it popped into her
head, The dog is not shut up-he may be
running away with the steak; that's well
thought of." So up she ran from the-cellar;
and sure enough the rascally cur had got the
steak in his mouth, and was making off with
it.
Away ran Catherine, and away ran the dog
across' the field: but he. ran faster than she,
and stuck close to the steak. "It's all gone,
and 'what. can't be cured must be endured,'"
said Catherine. So she turned round; and as
r
118 00123.jpg
98 FREDERICK AND CATHERINE.
she had run a good.way and was tired, she
walked home leisurely to cool herself.
Now all this time the ale was running too,
for Catherine had not turned the cock; and
when the jug was full the liquor ran upon the
floor till the cask was empty. When she got
to the cellar stairs she saw what had happened.
" My stars said she, what shall I do to
keep Frederick from seeing all this slopping
about?" So she thought a while; and at last
remembered that there was a sack of fine
meal bought at the last fair, and that if she
sprinkled this over the floor it would suck
up the ale nicely. What a lucky thing,"
said she, that we kept that meal! we have
now a good use for it." So away' she went
for it: but she managed to set it down just
upon the great jug full of beer, and upset it;
and thus all the ale that had been saved was
set swimming on the floor also. Ah! well,"
said she, when one goes, another may as
well follow." Then she strewed the meal all
about the cellar, and was quite pleased with
her cleverness, and said, How very neat and
clean it looks !"
119 00124.jpg
FREDERICK ANIS CATHERINE.
At noon Frederick came home. Now,
wife," cried he, what have you for dinner?"
" O Frederick !" answered she, I was cook-
ing you a steak; but while I went down to
draw the ale, the dog ran away with it; and:
while I ran after him, the ale all ran out; and
when I went to dry up the ale with the sack
of meal that we got at the fair, I upset the jug:
but the cellar is now quite dry, and looks so
clean!" Kate, Kate," said he, "how cculd
you do all this ? Why did you leave the steak
to fry, and the ale to run, and then spoil all the
meal?" Why, Frederick," said she," I did
not know that I was doing wrong, you should
have told me before."
The husband thought to himself, If my wife
manages matters thus, I must look sharp my-
self. Now he had a good deal of gold in the
house: so he said to Catherine, What pretty
yellow buttons these are! I shall put them in-
to a box and bury them in the garden; but
take care that you never go near or meddle
with them." "No, Frederick," said she, "that
I never will." As soon as he was gone, there
came by sqoe pedlars with eartheni'aie
F2
120 00125.jpg
100 FREDERICK AND CATHERINE.
plates and dishes, and they asked her whether
she would buy. Oh dear me, I should like
to buy very much, but I have no money: if
you bad any use for yellow buttons, I might
deal with you." .' Yellow buttons!" said
they: let us have a look at them." Go
into the garden and dig where I tell you, and
you will find the yellow buttons: I dare not
go myself." So the rogues went: and when
they found what these yellow buttons. were,
they took them all away, and left her plenty
of plates and dishes. Then she set them all
about the house for a show: and when. Fre-
derick came back, he cried out, Kate, what
have you been doing?" See," said she, I
have bought all these with your yellow but-
tons: but I did not touch them myself; the
pedlars went themselves and dug them up."
SWife, wife," said Frederick, what a pretty
piece of work you have made! those yellow
buttons were all my money: How came you
to do such a thing ?" '% Why," answered-she,
"I did noto know there was any harm in it;
yoau -.ould have told me."
SCatherine stood musing for a while, and at
121 00126.jpg
FREDERICK AND C T1 I R I N ..
last said to her husband, I-1 rk y e, Frederick,
we will soon get the gold back: let us run after
the thieves." Well, we will try," answered
he; "but take some butter and cheese with
you, that we may have something to eat by'
the way." Very well," said she; and they
set out: and as Frederick walked the fastest,
he left his wife some way behind. It does
not matter," thought she: when we turn
back, I shall be so much nearer home than
he."
Presently she came to the top of a hill; down
the side of which there was a ioad so narrow
that the cart-wheels always chafed the trees
on each side as they pas ed. Ah, see now,i"
said she, "how they have bruised and wound-
ed those poor trees; they will never get well."
So she took pity on them, and made use of the
butter to grease them all, so that the wheels
might not hurt them so much. While she was
doing this kind office, one of her cheeess fell
out of the basket, and rolled down the iH.
Catherine looked, but could not see whert it
was gone; so she said "Well, I suppose the
other will go the same way and find you; he
122 00127.jpg
102 FREDERICK AND CATHERINE.
has younger legs than I have." Then she
rolled the other cheese after it; and away it
went, nobody knows where, down the hill.
But she said she supposed they knew the road,
and would follow her, and she could not stay
there all day waiting for them.
At last she overtook Frederick, who desired
her to give him something to eat. Then she
gave him the dry bread. Where are the
butter, and cheese?" said he. Oh!" an-
swered she, I used the butter to grease those
poor trees that the wheels chafed so: and one
of the cheeses ran away, so I sent the other
after it to find it, and I suppose they are both
on the road together somewhere." "' What a
goose you are to do such silly things!" said
the husband. How can you say so?" said
she; I am sure you never told me not."
SThey ate the dry bread together; and Fre-.
derick said, "Kate, I hope you locked the
door safe when you came away?" No," an-
swered she, you did not tell me." Then go
home, and do it now before we go any further,"
said Frederick, and bring with you some-
thing to eat."
123 00128.jpg
FREDERICK AND CATHERINE. 103
Catherine did as he told her, and thought
to herself by the way, Frederick wants some-
thing to eat; but I don't think he is very fond
of butter and cheese: I'll bring him a bag of
fine nuts, and the vinegar, for I have often
seen him take some."
When she reached home, she bolted the
back door, but the front door she took off the
hinges, and said, "Frederick told me to lock
the door, but surely it can no where be so safe
as if I take it with me." So she took her time
by the way: and when she overtook her hus-
band she cried out, There, Frederick, there
is the door itself, now you may watch it as
carefully as you please." Alas! alas!" said
he, what a clever wife I have I sent you to
make the house fast, and you take the door
away, so that every body may go in and out
as they please:-however, as you have brought
the door, you shall carry it about with you for
your pains." Very well," answered she,
" I'll carry the door; but I'll not carry the
nuts and vinegar bottle also,-that would be
too much of a load; so, if you please, I'll fasten
them to the door."
124 00129.jpg
104 FREDERICK AND CATHERINE.
Frederick of course made no objection to
that plan, and theyset off into the wood to ldbk
for the thieves; but they could not find them:
and when it grew dark, they climbed up into
a tree to spend the night there. Scarcely were
they up, than who should come by but the
-very rogues they were looking for. They were
in truth great rascals, and belonged to that
class of people who find things before they are
lost: they were tired; so they sat down and
made a fire under the very tree where Frede-
rick and Catherine were. Frederick slipped-
down on the other side, and picked up some
stones. 'Then he climbed up again, and tried
to hit the thieves on the head with them: but
they only said, It must be near morning, for
the wind shakes the fir-apples down."
SCatherine, who had the door on tber shoul-
der, began to be very tired; but she thought
it was the nuts upon it that were so heavy: so-
she said softly, "Frederick, I mustlet the nuts
go." ,' No," answered he, "not now, they
will discover us." I can't help that, they must
go." "Well then,: make haste and throw
them down, if ypu will." Then away rattled
125 00130.jpg
FREDERICK AiD :CATHERINE. 105
the nuts down among the'boughs; and one of
the thieves cried, Bless me, it is hailing."
A little while after, Catherine.thought the
door was still very heavy: so she whispered to
Frederick, I must throw the vinegar down."
" Pray-don't," answered he," it will disco-
ver us." I can't help that," said she, go it
must.". So she poured all the vinegar down;
and- the thieves said, "What a heavy dew
there-is!"
At last it popped into Catheriie's head that
it was the.door itself that was so heavy all the
time: so she whispered Frederick, I must
throw the door down soon." But he begged
and prayed her not to do so, for he was sure
it would betray them. "Here goes, however,"
said she: and down-went the door with such
a clatter upon the thieves that they cried out
" Murder!" and not knowing what was com-
ing, ran away. as fast as they could, and left
all the gold. So Catherine was right at last;.
and when sheand Frederick came down, there
they found all their money safe and sound.
The Three Children of Fortune
126 00131.jpg
THE
THREE CHILDREN OF FORTUNE.
ONcE upon a time a father sent for his three
sons, and gave to the eldest a cock, to the se-
cond a scythe, and to the third a cat. I am
now old," said he, my end is approaching,
and I would fain provide for you before I die.
Money I have none, and what I now give you
seems of but little worth; yet it rests with
yourselves alone to turn my gifts to good ac-
count. Only seek out for a land where what
you have is as yet unknown, and your fortune
is made."
After the death of the father,. the eldest set
out with his cock: but wherever he went, in
every town he saw from afar off a cock sitting
upon the church-steeple, and turning round
with the wind. In the villages he always heard
plenty of them crowing, and his bird was
therefore nothing new; so there did not seem
much chance of his making his fortune. At
length it happened that he came to an island
127 00132.jpg
THE THREE CHILDREN OF FORTUNE. 107
where the people who lived there had never
heard'of a cock, and knew not even how to
reckon the time. They knew, indeed, if it
were morning or evening; but at night, if they
lay awake, they had no means of knowing how
time went. Behold," said he to them, what
a noble animal this is how like a knight he
is! he carries a bright red crest upon his head,
and spurs upon his heels; he crows three
times every night, at stated hours, and at the
third time the sun is about to rise. But this
is not all; sometimes he screams in broad day-
light, and then you must take warning, for
the weather is surely about to change." This
pleased the natives mightily; they kept awake
one whole night, and heard, to their greatjoy,
how gloriously the cock called thehour, at two,
four, and six o'clock. Then they asked him
whether the bird was to be sold, and how much
he would sell it for. About as much gold
as an ass can carry," said he. A very fair
price for such an animal," cried they with one
voice; and agreed to give him what he asked.
When he returned home with his wealth,
his brothers wondered greatly: and the second
128 00133.jpg
108 THE THREE CHILDREN OF FORTUNE.
said, I will now set forth likewise, and see if
I can turn my scythe to as good an account."
There did not seem, however, much likelihood
of this; for go where he would, he was met by
peasants who had as good a scythe on their
shoulders as he had. But at last, as good luck
would have it, he came to an island where the
people had never heard of a scythe: there, as
soon as the corn was ripe, they went into the
fields and pulled it up; but this was very hard
work, and a great deal of it was lost. The
man then set to work with his scythe; and
mowed down their whole crop so quickly, that
the people stood staring open-mouthed with
wonder. They were'willing to give him what
he asked for such a marvellous thing: but he
only took a horse ladeB with as much gold as
it could carry.
Now the third brother had a great longing
to go and see what he could make of his cat.
So he set out: and at first it happened to him
as it had to the others, solong as he kept upon
the main land, he met with no success; there
were plenty of cats every where, indeed too
many, so that theyoung ones were for the most
129 00134.jpg
THE THREE CHILDREN OF FORTUNE. 109
part, as soon as they came into the world,
drowned in the water. At last he passed over
to an island, where, as it chanced most luckily
for him, nobody had ever seen a cat; and
they were overrun with mice to such a degree,
that the little wretches danced upon the tables
and chairs, whether the master of the house
were at home or not. The people complained
loudly of this grievance; the king himselfknew
not how to rid himself of them in his palace;
in every corner mice were squeaking, and idey
gnawed every thing that their teeth could lay
hold of. Here was a fine field for Puss-she
soon began her chase, and had cleared two
rooms in the twinkling of an eye; when the
people besought their king to buy the won-
derful animal, for the good of the public, at
any price. The king willingly gave what was
asked,-a mule laden with gold and jewels;
and thus the third brother returned home
with a richer prize than either of the others.
Meantime the cat feasted away upon the
mice in the royal palace, and devoured so
many that they were no longer in any great
numbers. At length, quite, pent and tired
130 00135.jpg
110 THE THREE CHILDREN OF FORTUNE.
with her work, she became extremely thirsty;
so she stood still, drew up her head, and cried
" Miau, Miau!" The king gathered together
all his subjects when they heard this strange
cry, and many ran shrieking in a great fright
out of the palace. But the king held a council
below as to what was best to be done; and it
was at length fixed to send a herald to the cat,
to warn her to leave the castle forthwith, or
that force wouldbeused to remove her. "For,"
said the counsellors, "we would far more will-
ingly put up with the mice (since we are used
to that evil), than get rid of them at the risk
of our lives." A page accordingly went, and
asked the cat whether she were willing to
quit the castle?" But Puss, whose thirst be-
came every moment more and more pressing,
answered nothing but Miau Miau!" which
the page interpreted to mean No! No!"
and therefore carried this answer to the king.
," Well," said the counsellors, "then we must
try, what force will do.", So the guns were
planted, and thepalace was fired upon from
all sides. When the fire reached the room
where-the cat was, she sprang out of the win-
King Grisly-beard
131 00136.jpg
KING GRISLY-BEARD, 111
dow and ran away; but the besiegers did not
see her, and went on firing until the whole
palace was burnt to the ground.
KING GRISLY-BEARD.
A GREAT king had a daughter who was very
beautiful, but so proud and haughty and con-
ceited, that none of the princes who came to
ask her in marriage were good enough for her,
and she only made sport of them.
Once upon a time the king held a great
feast, and invited all her suitors; and they sat
in a row according to their rank, kings and
princes and dukes and earls. Then the prin-
cess came in and passed by them all, but she
had something spiteful to say to every one.
The first was too fat: "He's as round as a tub,"
said she. The next was too tall: What a
maypole!" said she. The next was too short:
'" What a dumpling!" said she. The fourth
was too pale, and she called him "Wallface."
132 00136a.jpg
112U KING GRI-SLY-B1EARD.
The fifth was too red, so she called him
" Cockcomb." The sixth was not straight
enough, so she said he was like a green stick
that had been laid to dry over a baker's oven.
And thus she had some joke to crack upon
every one: but she laughed more than all at
a good king who was there. Look at him,"
said she, his beard is like an old mop, he
shall be called Grisly-beard." So the king
got the nick-name of Grisly-beard.
But the old'king was very angry when he
saw how his daughter behaved, and how she
ill-treated all his guests; and he vowed that,,
willing or unwilling,, she should marry the first
beggar, that came to the door.
Two days after there came by a travelling
musician, who began to sing under the win-
dow, and beg alms: and when the king heard
him, he said, Let him come in." So they
brought in a dirty-looking fellow;: and when
he had sung.before:theIking and the.princessi
he begged a boon. Then the king said, You
have sung so-well, that I will give you- my
daughter for your wife." The princess beg-
ged and prayed; but the king said, "I have
133 00138.jpg
KING GRISLY-BEARDV
sworn to give you to the first beggar, and I
will keep my word." So words and tears were
of no avail; the parson was sent for, and she
was married to the musician. When this was
over, the king said, Now get ready to go;
you must not stay here; you must travel on
with your husband."
Then the beggar departed, and took her
with him; and they soon came to a great wood.
"Pray," said she, "whose is this wood?"
"It belongs to king Grisly-beard," answered
he; "hadst thou taken him, all had been
thine." "Ah unlucky wretch that I ai !"
sighed she, "would that I had married king
Grisly-beard !" Next they caie -to some fine
meadows. Whose are these beautiful green
meadows ?" said she. They belong to king
Grisly-beard; hadst thou taken him, they had
all been thine." Ah unlucky wretch that
I am !" said she, "would that I had married
king Grisly-beard!"
Then they came to a great city. Whose
is this noble city ?'' said she. "It belongs to
king Grisly-beard; hadst thou taken him, it
had all been thine." Ah miserable wretch
134 00139.jpg
S114 KING GRISLY-BEARD.
that I am !" sighed she, why did I not mary
king Grisly-beard?" That is no business of
mine," said the musician; "why should you
wish for another husband? am not I. good
enough for you?"
At last they came to a small cottage. "What
a paltry place!" said she; "to whom does that
little dirty hole belong?" The musician an-
swered, That is your and my house, where
we are to live." Where are your servants?"'
cried she. "What do we want with servants?"
said he, "you must do for yourself whatever
is to be done. Now make the fire, and put on
water and cook my supper, for I am very'tired."
But the princess knew nothing of making fires
and cooking, and the beggar was forced to help
her. When they had eaten a very scanty meal
they went to bed; but the musician called her
up very early in the morning to clean the house.
Thus they lived for two days: and when they
had eaten up all there was in the cottage, the
man said, "Wife, we can't go on thus, spending
money and earning nothing. You must learn
to weave baskets." Then he went out and cut
willows andbrought them home, and she began
135 00140.jpg
KING GRISLY-BEARD.
to weave; but it made her fingers very sore.
" Lsee this work won't do," said he, "try and
spin; perhaps you will do that better." So she
sat down and tried to spin; but the threads cut
hertenderfingerstillthe bloodran. Seenow,"
said the musician, "you are good for nothing,
you can do no work;-what a bargain I have
got! However, I'll try and set up a trade in
pots and pans, and you shall stand inthemarket
and sell them." "Alas! sighed she, when
I stand in the market-and any of my father's
court pass by and see me there, how they will
laugh at me!"
But the beggar did not care for that; and
said she must work, if she did not wish to die
of hutiger. At first the trade went well; for
many people, seeing such a beautiful woman,
went to buy her wares, arid paid their money
without thinking of taking away the goods.
They lived on this as long as it lasted, and then
her husband bought a fresh lot of ware, and she
sat herself down with it in the corner of the
market; but a drunken soldier soon came by,
and rode his horse against her stall and broke
all her goods into a thousand pieces. Then
136 00141.jpg
KING GRISLY-BEARD.
she began to weep, and knew not what to do.
"Ah what will become of me !" said she;
" whit will my husband say ?" So she ranhome
and told him all. "Who would have thought
you would have been so silly," said he, "as
to put an earthenware stalling the corner ofthe
market, where every body passes ?-But let
us have no more crying; I see you are not fit,
for this sort of work: so I have been to the
king's palace, and asked if th6y did not want a
kitchen-maid, and they have promised to take
you, and there you will have plenty to eat."
Thus the princess became a 'kitchen-nmaid,
and helped the cook to do all the dirtiest
work: she was allowed to carryhome some of
the meat that was left, and on this she and
her husband lived.
She hadnotbeen there long, before sheheard
that the king's eldestson was passingby; going
to be married; and she went to -one of the
windows and looked out. Every thing was
ready, and all the pomp and splendour of the
court was there. Then she thought with, ant
aching heart on her own sad fate, atid bitterly
grieved for the pride and folly which had
137 00142.jpg
KING GRISLY-BEARD. 117
brought her so low. And the servants gave
her some of the rich meats, which she put into
her basket to take home.
All on a sudden, as she was going out, in
came the king's son ingolden clothes; and when
he saw a beautiful woman at the door, he took
her by the hand, and said she should be his
partner in tle duice: but she trembled forfear,
for she saw that it was king Grisly-beard, who
was making sport of her. However, he kept
fast hold and led her in; and the cover of the
basket came off, so that the meats in it fell
all about. Then everybody laughed and jeered
at her; and she was so abashed that she wished
h-Irselfa thousand feet.deep in the earth. She
sprang to the door to run away; but on the
steps king Grisly-beard overtook and brought
her back, and said, Fear me not! I am the
musician who has. lived with you in the hut:
I brought you there because I loved you. I am
also the soldier who.overset your stall. I.have
done all this.only to cure you of pride, and to
punishyou for the ill-treatment you : tet orn;,
onJle. Nowall is over; you have l]e-,u t wis-
The Adventures of Chanticleer and Partlet
138 00143.jpg
118 CHANTICLEER AND PARTLET.
dom, your faults are gone, and it is time to
celebrate our marriage feast "
Then the chamberlains came and brought
her the most beautiful robes: and her father
and his whole court were there already, and
congratulated her on her marriage. Joy was in
every face. The feast was grand, and all were
merry; and I wish you and I had been of the
party.
THE ADVENTURES
OF
CHANTICLEER AND PARTLET.
1. Hiw they went to the Mountains to eat Nuts.
"THE nuts are quite ripe now," said Chanti-
cleer to his wife Partlet, suppose we go to-
gether .to the-mountains, and eat as.many
as we can, before the squirrel takes them all
away." "With all my heart," said Partlet,
" let us go and make a holiday of it together."
139 00144.jpg
CHANTICLEER AND PARTLET.
So they went to-the mountains; and as it
was a lovely day they stayed there till the even-
ing. Now, whether it was that they had eaten
so many nuts that they could not walk, oi
whether they were lazy and would not, I do
not know: however, they took it into their
heads that it did not become them to go home
on foot. So Chanticleer began to build a little
carriage ofnut-shells: and when it was finished,
Partlet jumped into it and sat down, and bid
Chanticleer harness himself to it and draw her
home. "That's a good joke !" said Chanti-
cleer; "no, that will never do; I had rather by
half walk home; I'll sit on the box and be
coachman, if you like, but I'll not draw."
While this was passing, a duck came quacking
up, and cried out, "You thieving vagabonds,
what business have you in my grounds? I'll
give it you well for your insolence!" and upon
that she fell.upon Chanticleer most lustily. But
Chanticleer was no coward, and returned the
duck's blows with his sharp spurs so fiercely,
that she soon began to cry out for mercy; which
was only granted her upon condition that she
would draw the carriage home for them. This
140 00145.jpg
120 CHANTICLEER AND PARTLET.
she agreed to do; and Chanticleer got upon the
box, and drove, crying, "Now, duck, get on
as fast as you can." And. away they went at a
pretty good pace.
After they had travelled along a little way,
they met a needlelandia pin walking together
along the road: and the needle cried out,
SStop stop !" and said it was so dark that
they could hardly find their way, and such
dirty walking they could not get on at all: he
told them that he and his friend, the pin, had
been at a public house a few miles off, and
had sat drinking till they had forgotten how
late it was; he begged therefore that the tra-
vellers would be so kind asto give them a lift
in their carriage. Chanticleer, observing that
they were but thin fellows, and not likely to
take up much room, told them they might ride,
but made them promise not to dirty the wheels
of the carriage in getting in, nor to tread on
Partlet's toes.
Late at night they arrived at an inn; and as
it was bad travelling in the dark, and the duck
seemed much tired, and waddledabout a good
deal- from one side to the other, they made up
141 00146.jpg
CHANTICLEER AND PARTLET.
their minds to fix their quarters there; but
the landlord at first was unwilling, and said
his house was full, thinking they might not,
be very respectable company: however, they
spoke civilly to him, and gave him the egg
which Partlet had laid by the way, and said
they would give him the duck, who was in
the habit of laying one every day: so at last
he let them come in, and they bespoke a
handsome supper, and spent the evening very
jollily.
Early in the morning, before it was quite
light, and when no body was stirring in the inn,
Chanticleer awakened his wife, and, fetching
the egg, they pecked a hole in it, ate it up, and
threw the shells into the fire-place. They then
went to thepin and needle, who were fast asleep,
and, seizing them by their heads, stuck one
into the landlord's easy chair, and the other
into his handkerchief: having done this, they
crept away as softly as possible. However,
the duck, who slept in the open air in the
yard, heard them coming, and jumping into
the brook which ran close by the inn, soon
swam out of their reach.
CG
142 00147.jpg
122 CHANTICLEER AND PARTLET.
An hour or two afterwards the landlord
got up, and took his handkerchief to wipe his
face, but the pin ran into him and pricked
him: then he walked into the kitchen to light
his pipe at the fire, but when he stirred it up
the egg-shells flew into his eyes, and almost
blinded him. "Bless me!" said he, all the
world seems to have a design against my head
this morning:" and so saying, he threw him-
self sulkily into his easy chair; but, oh dear !
the needle ran into him; and this time the
pain was not in his head. He now flew into
a very great passion, and, suspecting the com-
pany who had come in the night before, went
to look after them, but they were all off; so he
swore that he never again would take in such
a troop of vagabonds, who ate a great deal,
paid no reckoning, and gave him nothing for
his trouble but their apish tricks.
2. Hoze Chanticleer and Partlet went to visit-
Mr. Korbis.
Another day, Chanticleer and Partlet wished
to ride out together;: so Chanticleer built a
143 00148.jpg
CHANTICLEER AND PARTLET. 123
handsome carriage with four red wheels, and
harnessed six mice to it; and then:he.and
Partlet got into the carriage, and: away they
drove. Soon afterwards a cat met them; an4
said, Where are you going?" And Chan-
ticleer replied,
All on our way
A visit to pay
To Mr. Korbes, the fox, to-day."
Then the cat said, Take me with you."
Chanticleer said, With all my heart: get up
behind, and be sure you do not fall off."
Take care of this handsome coach of mine,
Nor dirty my pretty red wheels so. fine !
Now, mice, be ready,
And, wheels, run steady!
For we are going a visit to pay
To Mr. Korbes, the fox, to-day."
Soon after came up a mill-stone, an egg, a
Sduck, and a pin; and Chanticleer gave them
all leave to get into the carriage and go with
them.
144 00149.jpg
124 CHANTICLEER AND PARTLET.
When they arrived at Mr. Korbes's house,
he was not at home; so the mice drew the
carriage into the coach-house, Chanticleer and
Partlet flew upon a beam, the cat sat down in
the fire-place, the duck got into the washing
cistern, the pin stuck himself into the bed pil-
low, the mill-stone laid himself over the house
door, and the egg rolled herself up in the
towel.
When Mr. Korbes came home, he went to
the fire-place to rnake a fire; but the cat threw
.all the ashes in his eyes: so he ran to the
kitchen to wash himself; but there the duck
splashed all the water in his face; and when
he tried to wipe himself, the egg broke to
pieces in the towel all over his face and eyes.
Then he was very angry, and went without his
-supper to bed.; but when he laid his head on
the pillow, the pin ran into his cheek: at this he
became quite furious, and, jumping up, would
have run out of the house: but when he came
:to the door, the mill-stone fell down on his
head, and killed him on the spot.
145 00150.jpg
CHANTICLEER AND PARTLET.
3. How Partlet died and was buried, and how
Chanticleer died of grief
Another day Chanticleer and Partlet agreed
to go again to the mountains to eat nuts; and
it was settled that all the nuts which they found
should be shared equally between them. Now
Partlet found a very large nut; but she said
nothing aboutitto Chanticleer, and kept it all
to herself: however, it was so big that she
could not swallow it, and it stuck in her
throat. Then she was in a great fright, and
cried out to Chanticleer, Pray run as fast as
you can, and fetch me some water, or I shall
be choked." Chanticleer ran as fast as he
could to the river, and said, River, give me
some water, for Partlet lies on the mountain,
and will be choked by a great nut." The
river said, Run first to the bride, and ask
her for a silken cord to draw up the water."
Chanticleer ran to the bride, and said, Bride,
you must give me a silken cord, for then the
river will give me water, and the water I will
carry to Partlet, who.lies on the mountain, and
146 00151.jpg
126 CHANTICLEER AND PARTLET.
will be choked by a great nut." But the bride
said, Rnn first, and bring me my garland
that is hanging on a willow in the garden."
Then Chanticleer ran to the garden, and took
the garland from the bough where it hung, and
brought it to the bride; and then the bride
gave him the silken cord, and he took the
silken cord to the river, and the river gave him
water, and he carried the water to Partlet;
but in the mean time she was choked by the
great nut, and lay quite dead, and never moved
any more.
Then Chanticleer was very sorry, and cried
bitteily: :and all the beasts came and wept
with him over poor Partlet. And six mice
biilt: a little hearse to carry her to lhei grave';
and when it was ready they harnessed them-
selves before it, and Chanticleerdrove them.
On' the way they met the fox.' Where: are
you going, Chanticleer?" said he. To bury
my Partlet," said thepther. May I go with
you?" !.aid the fox. ," Yes; but you must
get up behind, or my horses will not be able
to draw you." Then the fox got up behind;
.and presently the wolf, the bear, the goat, and
147 00152.jpg
CHANTICLEER AND PARTLET. 127
all the beasts of the wood, came and climbed
upon the hearse.
So on they went till they came to a rapid
stream. How shall we get over?" said
Chanticleer. Then said a straw, I will lay
myself across, and you may pass over upon
me." But as the mice were going over, the
straw slipped-away and fell into the water,
and the six mice all fell in and were drowned.
What was to be done? Then a large log of
wood came and said, I am big enough; I
will lay myself across the stream, and you shall
pass over upon me." So he laid himself down;
but they managed so clumsily, that the log of
wood fell in: and was. carried away by the
stream. Then a. stone, who saw what had
happened, came up and kindly offered to help
poor Chanticleer by laying himself across the
stream; and this time he got safely to the
other side with the hearse, and managed to
get Partlet out of it; but the fox and the
other mourners, who.were sitting behind, were
too heavy, and fell back into the water and
were all carried away by the stream,. and
drowned .
Snow-drop
148 00153.jpg
SNOW-DROP.
SThus .Chanticleer was left alone with his
dead Partlet; and having dug a grave for her,
he laid her in it, and made a little hillock over
her. Then he sat down by the grave, and
wept and mourned, till at last he died too:
and so all were dead.
SNOW-DROP.
IT was in'the middle .of winter, when the
broad flakes of snow were falling around, that
a certain queen sat working at a window, the
frame of which was made of fine black ebony;
and as she was looking out upon the snow, she
pricked her finger, and three drops of blood
fell upon it. Then she gazed thoughtfully upon
the red drops which sprinkled the white snow,
and said, Would that mylittle daughter may
be as white as that snow, as red as the blood,
and as black as the ebony window-frame!"
And so the little girl grew up:, her skin was as
white as snow, her cheeks as rosy as the blood,
149 00154.jpg
SNOW-DROP.
and her hair as black as ebony; and she was
called Snow-drop.
But this queen died; and the king soon mar-
ried another wife, who was very beautiful, but
so proud that she could not bear to think that
any one could surpass her. She had a magi-
cal looking-glass, to which she used to go and
gaze upon herself in it, and say,
Tell me, glass, tell me true !
Of all the ladies in the land,
Who is'the fairest? tell me who? "
And the glass answered,
Thou, queen, art fairest in the land.'"
But Snow-drop grew more and more beau-
tiful; and when she was seven years old, she
was as bright as the day, and fairer than the
queen herself. Then. the glass one day an-
swered the queen, when she went to consult it
as usual,
Thou, queen, may'st fair and beauteous be; ,
But Snow-drop is lovelier far than thee .".
When she heard this, she turned pale ith
rage and envy; and called to one of-her ser-
vants and said, Take Snow-drop away into
G5
150 00155.jpg
130 sNOW-DROr.
the wide wood, that I may never see her more."
Then the servant led her away; but his heart
melted when she begged him to spare her life,
and he said, I will not hurt thee, thou pretty.
child." So he left her by herself; and though
he thought it most,likely that the wild beasts
would tear her in pieces, he felt as if a great
weight were taken off his heart when he had
made up his mind not to kill her, but leave
her to her fate.
Then poor Snow-drop wandered along
through the wood in great fear; and the wild
beasts roared about her, but none did her any
harm. In the evening she came to a little cot-
tage, and went in there to rest herself, for her
little feet would carry her no further. Every
thing was spruce and neat in the cottage: onr
the table was spread a white cloth, and there
were seven little plates with seven little loaves,
and seven little glasses with wine in them; and-
knives and forks laid in order; and by the wall
stood seven little beds. Then, as shevwas very
hungry, she picked a little piece off each loaf,
and drank a very little wine out of each glass;
and after that she thought she would lie down
151 00156.jpg
SNOW-DROP. 131
and rest. So she tried all the little beds; and
one was too long, and another was too short,
till at last the seventh suited her; and there
she laid herself down, and went to sleep. '-
Presently in came the masters of the cottage,
Who were seven little dwarfs that lived among
the mountains, and dug and searched about
for gold. They lighted up their seven lamps,
and saw directly that all was not right. The
first said, Who has been sittingon nly stool ?"
The second, Who has been eating off my
plate?" The third, Who has been picking
my bread?" The fourth,'' Who has. been
meddling with my spoon?" The fifth, Who
has been handling my fork?" The .sixth,
Who was been cutting with my knife? "
The seventh, "W Who has beeh drinking l\y
wine?" Then the first looked round aid said,
Who has been lying on my bed?" And the
-rest came running to him, and every one cried
out that somebody had been upon his bed..
But the seventh saw Snow-drop, and called
Small his brethren to come and see her; and they
cried out with: wonder and astonishment, and
152 00157.jpg
131. SNOW-DROP.
brought their lamps to look at her, and said,
"Good heavens what a lovely child she is!"
And they were delighted to see her, and took
care not to wake her; and the seventh dwarf
slept an hour with each of the other dwarfs in
turn, till the night was gone.
In the morning, Snow-drop told them all
her story; and they pitied her, and said if she
would keep all things in order, and cook and
wash, and knit and spin for them, she might
stay where she was, and they would take good
care of her. Then they went out all day long
to their work, seeking for gold and silver in
the mountains; and Snow-drop remained .at
home: and they warned:her, and said, The
queen will soon find out where you are, so
take care and let no one in."
But the queen, now that she thought Snow-
drop was dead, believed that she was certainly
the handsonmet lady in the land; and she went
to her glass and said,
"Tell me, gnlss, tell me true!
Of all the ladies in the land,
Who is fairest? tell me who? "
153 00158.jpg
sNow-nDOPP. 133
And the glass answered,
"Thou, queen, art the fairest in all this land;.
But over the hills, in the greenwood shade,
Where the seven dwarfs their dwelling have inade,
There Sno;-drop is hiding her head, and she
Is lovelier far, O queen than thee."
Then the queen was very much alarmed;
for she knew that the glass always spoke the
truth, and was sure that the servant had be-
trayed her. And she could not bear to think
that any one lived who was more beautiful
than she was; so she disguised herself as an
old pedlar, and went her way over the hills to
the place where the dwarfs dwelt. Then she
knocked at the door, and cried Fine wares
to sell! Snow-drop looked out at the win-
dow, and said, Good day, good woman;
what have you to sell?" "Good wares, fine
wares," said she; laces and bobbins of all
colours." I will let the old lady in; she
seems to be a very good sort of body," thought
Snow-drop; so she ran down, and unbolted
the door. "Bless me!" said the old woman,
" how badly your stays are laced.! Let me
lace them up with one of my nice new laces."
154 00159.jpg
134 SNOW-DROP.
Snow-drop did not dream of any mischief;
so she stood up before the old woman; but
she set to work so nimbly, and pulled the lace
so tight, that Snow-drop lost her. breath, and
fell down as if she were dead. There's an
end of all thy beauty," said the spiteful queen,
and went away home.
In the evening the seven dwarfs returned;
and I need not say how grieved they were to
see their faithful Snow-drop stretched upon the
ground motionless, as if she were quite dead.
However, they lifted her up, and when they
found what was the matter, they cut the lace;
and in a little time she began to breathe, and soon
came to life again. Then they said, The old
woman was the queen herself; take care another
time, and let no one in when we are away."'
When the queen got home, she went straight
to her glass, and spoke to it as usual; but to
her great surprise it still said,
"Thou, queen, art the fairest in all this land;
But over tile hill, in the greenwood -hrde,
Where the seven dwarfs their dwelling have made,
There Sno%\ -drop is hiding her head; and she
Is lovelier far, 0 queen thai thee."
155 00160.jpg
SNOW-DROP. 185
Then the blood ran cold in her heart with
spite and malice to see that Snow-drop still
lived; and she dressed herself up again in a
disguise, but very different from the one she
wore before, and took with her a poisoned
comb. When she reached the dwarfs' cottage,
she knocked at the door, and cried Fine
wares to sell !" But Snow-drop said, I dare
not let any one in." Then the queen said,
" Only look at my beautiful combs;" and gave
her the poisoned one. And it looked so pretty
that she took it up and put it into her hair to
try it; but the moment it touched her head
the poison was so powerful that she fell down
senseless. There you may lie," said the
queen, and went her way. But bygood luck
the dwarfs returned very early, that evening
and when they saw Snow-drop lying on the
ground, they thought what had happened, and
soon found the poisoned comb. And when
they took it away, she recovered, and told them
all that had passed; and they warned her once
more not to open the door to any one.
Meantime the queen went home to her glass,
and trembled with age when she received ex-
156 00161.jpg
SNOW-DROP.
actly the same answer as before; and she said,
," Snow-drop shall die, if it costs me my life."
So she went secretly into a chamber, and pre-
pared a poisoned apple: the outside looked
very rosy and tempting, but whoever tasted it
was sure to die. Then she dressed herself up
as a peasant's wife, and travelled over the hills
to the dwarfs' cottage, and knocked at the door;
but Snow-drop put her head out of the win-
dow and said, I dare not let any one in, for
the dwarfs have told me not." Do as you
please," said the old woman, "but at any rate
take this pretty apple; I will make you a pre-
sent of it." No," said Snow-drop, "'I dare
not take it." You silly girl! answered the
other, "what are you afraid of? do you think
it is poisoned ? Come do you eat one part,
and I will eat the other." Now the apple was
so prepared that oie side was good, though the
other side.was poisoned. Then Snow-drop was
very much tempted to taste, for the apple looked
exceedingly nice; and when she saw the old
woman eat, she'could refrain no longer. But
she had scarcely put the piece into her mouth,
when she fell down, dead upon the ground.
157 00162.jpg
SNOW-DROP.
" This time nothing will save thee," said the
queen; and she went home to her glass, and
at-last it said
"Thou, queen,,art the fairest of all the fair."
And then her envious heart was glad, and as
happy as such a heart could be.
When evening came, and the dwarfs re-
turned home, they found Snow-drop lying on
the ground: no breath passed her lips, and
they were afraid that she was quite dead.
They lifted her up, and combed her hair, and
washed her face with wine and water; but all
was in vain, for the little girl seemed quite dead.
So they laid her down upon a bier, and all
seven watched and bewailed her three whole
days; and then they proposed to bury her;
but her cheeks were still rosy, and her face
looked just as it did while she was alive; so
they said, "We will never bury her in the cold
ground." And they made a coffin ofglass, so
that they might still look at her, and wrote her
name upon it, in goldenletters, and that she was
a king's daughter. And the coffin was placed
upon the hill, and one of the dwarfs always sat
158 00163.jpg
138 SNOW-DROP,
by it and watched. And the birds of the air
came too, and bemoaned Snow-drop: first of
all came an owl, and then a raven, but at last
came a dove.
And thus Snow-drop lay for a long long
time, and still only looked as though she were
asleep; for she was even now as white as snow,
and as red as blood, and as black as ebony.
At last a prince came and called at the dwarfs'
house; and he saw Snow-drop, and read what
,as written in golden letters. Then he offered
the dwarfs money, and earnestly prayed them to
let him take her away; but they said, We will
not part with her for all the gold in the orld."
At last however they had pity on him, and gave
him the coffin: but the moment he lifted it up
tocarryithome with him, the piece of applefell
from between her lips, and Snow-drbp awoke,
and said "Where am I?" And the prince an-
swered, "Thou art safe with me." Then he told
her all that had happened, and said,." I loveyou
better than all the world: come with me to my
father's palace, and you shall be my wife."
And Snow-drop consented, and went home
with the prince; and every thing was pre-
159 00164.jpg
SNOW-DROP.
pared with great pomp and splendour for their
wedding.
To the feast was invited, among the rest,
Snow-drop's old enemy the queen; and as
she was dressing herself in fine rich clothes,
she looked in the glass, and said,
"Tell me, glass, tell me true!
Of all the ladies in the land,
Who is fairest? tell me who?"'
And the glass answered,
"Thou, lady, art loveliest here, I ween.;
But lovelier far is the new-made queen."
When she heard this, she started with rage;
but her envy and curiosity were so great,, that
she could not help setting out to see the bride.
And when she arrived, and saw that it was no
other than Snow-drop, who, as she thought,
had been dead a long while, she choked with
passion, and fell ill and died; but Snow-drop
and the prince lived and reigned happily over
that land many many years.
The Elves and the Shoemaker
160 00165.jpg
THE
ELVES AND THE SHOEMAKER.
THERE was once a shoemaker who worked
very hard and was very honest; but still he
could not earn enough to live upon, and at last
all he had in the world was gone, except just
leather enough to make one pair of shoes.
Thenhe cut them all readyto makeup thenext
day, meaning to get up early in the morning to
work. His conscience was clear and his heart
light amidst all his troubles; so he went peace-
ably tobed, left all his cares to heaven, and fell
asleep. In the morning, after he had said his
prayers. he set hiiiiiseldown to his work, when,
to his great wonder, there stood the shoes, all
ready made, upon the table. The good man
knew not what to say or think of this strange
event. He looked at the workmanship; there
was not one false stitch in the whole job; and
all was so neat and true, that it was a complete
masterpiece.
That same day a customer came in, and the
shoes pleased him so well that he willingly paid
161 00166.jpg
wi
WIl1I
"4.
,'-Jr :- '
162 00168.jpg
, THE ELVES AND THE SHOEMAKER. 141
a price higher than usual for them; and the
poor shoemaker with themoneybought leather
enough to make two pair more. In the even-
ing he cut out the work, and went to bed early
that he might get up and begin betimes next
day: but he was saved all the trouble, for when
he got up in the morning the work was finished
ready to his hand. Presently in came buyers,
who paid him handsomely for his goods, so that
he bought leather enough for four pair more.
He cut out the work again over -night, and
found it finished in the morning as before; and
so it went on for some time: what was got
ready in the evening was always done by day-
break, and the good man soon became thriving
and prosperous again.
One evening about Christmas time, as he
and his wife were sitting over the fire chatting
together, he said to her, "I should like to sit
up and watch to-night, that we may see who
it.is that comes and does my work for me."
The wife liked the thought; so they left a light
burning, and hid themselves in the corner of
the room behind a curtain that was hung up
there, and watched what should happen.
163 00169.jpg
142 THE ELVES AND THE SHOEMAKER.
As soon as it was midnight, there came two
little naked dwarfs; and they sat themselves
upon the shoemaker's bench, took up all the
work that was cut out, and began to ply with
their little fingers, stitching and rapping and
tapping away at such a rate, that the shoemaker
was all amazement, and could not take his eyes
off for a moment. And on they went till thejob
was quite finished, and the shoes stood ready
for use upon the table. This was long before
day-break; and then they bustled away as
quick as lightning.
The next day the wife said to the shoemaker,
"These little wights have made us rich, and we
ought to he thankful to them, and do them a
good office in return. I am quite vexed to see
them run about as they do; they have.nothing
upontheir backs to keep off the cold. I'll tell
you what, I will make each of them a shirt,
and a coat and waistcoat, and a pair ofpanta-
loons into the bargain; do you make each of
them a little pair of shoes." ..
The thought pleased the good shoemaker
.very much; and one evening, when all the
things were ready, they laid them on thetable
The Turnip
164 00170.jpg
THE TURNIP.
instead of the work that they used to cut out,
and then went and hid themselves to watch
what the little elves would do. About midnight
they came in, and weregoing to sit down to their
work as usual; but when they saw the clothes
lyingfor them, they laughed and were greatly
delighted. Then they dressed themselves in the
twinkling of an eye, and danced and capered
and sprang about as merry as could be, till at
last they danced out at the door over thegreen;
and the shoemaker saw them no more: but
every thing went well with him from that time
forward, as long as he lived.
THE TURNIP.
THERE were two brothels who were both
soldiers; the one was rich and the other poor.
The poor man thought he would try to.better
himself; so, pulling offhis red coat, he became
a gardener, and dug his ground well, and
sowed turnips.
SWhen the seed came up, there was one
165 00171.jpg
1~- THE TURNIP.
plant bigger than all the rest; and it kept get-
ting larger and larger, and seemed as ifit would
never cease growing; so that it might have been
called the prince of turnips, for there never was
such a one seen before, and never will again.
At last it was so big that it filled a cart, and
two oxen could hardly draw it; and the gar-
dener knew not what in the world to do with
it, nor whether it would be a blessing or a curse
to him. One day he said to himself, What
shall I do with it? if I sell it, it will bring no
more than another; and for eating, the little
turnips are better than this; the best thing
perhaps is to carry it and give it to the king
as a mark of respect."
Thenhe yoked his oxen, and drew the turnip
to the Court, and gave it to the king. "What
a wonderful thing!" said the king; "I have
seen many strange things, but such a monster
as this I never saw. Where did you get the
seed? or is it only your good luck? If so, you
are a true child of fortune." "Ah, no !" an-
swered the gardener, "I amnochildof fortune;
Iam apoor soldier who never could get enough
to live upon; so I laid aside my red coat, and
166 00172.jpg
THE TURNIP. 145
set to work, tilling the ground. I have a bro-
ther, who is rich, and your majesty knows him
well, and all the world knows hinr; but be-
cause I am poor, every body forgets me."
The king then took pity on him, and said,
SYou shall be poor no longer. I will give you
so much that you shall be even richer than
your brother." Then he gave him gold and
lands and flocks; and made him so rich that
his brother's fortune could not at all be com-
pared with his.
:When the brother heard of all this, and how
a turnip had made the gardener so rich, he
envied him sorely, and bethought himself how
he could contrive to get the same good fortune
for himself. However, he determined to ma-
nage more cleverly than his brother, and got
together a rich present of gold and fine horses
for the king; and thought he must have a much
larger gift in return: for if his brother had re-
ceived so much for only a turnip, what must
his present be worth?
The king took the gift very graciously, and
said he knew not what to give in return more
valuable and wonderful than the great turnip;
H
167 00173.jpg
THE TURNIP.
so the soldier was forced to put it into a cart,
and drag it home with him. When he reached
home, he knew not upon whom to- vent his
rage and spite; -and at length wicked thoughts
came into his head, and- he resolved to kill his
brother.
So he-hired some villains to murder him;
and having- shown, thm where -to lie in am-
bush, he went to his brother, and said, Dear
brother; I have found a hidden treasure; let
us go and dig it up, and share it between us."
The other had no suspicions of his roguery:
so they went -out together, and as: they were
tria\elling along, the murderers rushed out,
upon him, bound him, and were going to hang
hin on a tree;
But whilst they were getting all ready, they
heard te trampling of a horse at a distance,
which so frightened them' that they pushed
their prisoner neck and shoulders together into
a sack, and swung him up by a cord to the
tree, where they left him dangling, and ran
away.. Meantime he worked and worked
away, till he made a hole large enough to put
out his head.
168 00174.jpg
.s'
"r~ ,c~
-r
-~Is
"~.- I~alB;
x 'i
~ i
iii ,~
~1 4
; ~~~p;"O~sl
169 00176.jpg
When the horseman came up, he proved to
be a student, a merry fellow, who was journey-
ing along on his nag, and singing as he went.
As soon as the man. in the sack saw him pass-
ing u under the tree, he cried out, Good morn-
ing! good morning to thee, my friend!" The
student-looked about every where; and seeing
no one, and not knowing where the voice came
from, cried out, Who calls me?"
Then the man in the tree answered, Lift
up thine eyes, for behold here I sit in the sack
of wisdom; here have I, in a short. time, learned
great and wondrous things. Compared to this
seat, all the learning of the schools is as empty
air. A little longer, and I shall know all that
man can know, and shall come forth wiser than
the wisest of mankind. Here I discern the
signs and motions of the heavens and the stars;
the laws that control the winds; the number
of the sands on the sea-shore; the healing of
the sick; the virtues of all simples, of birds,
and:of precious stones. Wert thou but once
here, my friend, thou wouldst feel and own
the power of knowledge."
The student listened to. all this and won-
H2
THE TURNIMP.
170 00177.jpg
THE TURNIP.
dered much; at last he said, Blessed be the
day and hour when I found you; cannot you
contrive to let me into the sack for a little
while?" Then the other answered, as if very
unwillingly, A little space I may allow thee
to sit here, if thou wilt reward me well and
entreat me kindly; but thou must tarry yet an
hour below, till I have learnt some little mat-
ters that are yet unknown to me."
So the student sat himself down and waited
a while; but the time hung heavy upon him,
and he begged earnestly that he might ascend
forthwith, for his thirst of knowledge was great.
Then the other pretended to give way, and
said, Thou must let the sack of wisdom de-
scend, by untying yonder cord, and then thou
shalt enter." So the student let him down,
opened the sack, and set him free. Now
then," cried he, "let me ascend quickly." As
he began to put himself into the sack heels
first, Wait a while," said the gardener,
" that is not the way." Then he pushed him
in head first, tied up the sack, and soon swung
up the searcher after wisdom dangling in the
air. How is it with thee, friend?" said he,
Old Sultan
171 00178.jpg
OLD SULTAN.
(< dost thou not feel that wisdom comes unto
thee? Rest there in peace, till thou art a
wiser man than thou wert."
So saying, he trotted off on the student's
nag, and left the poor fellow to gather wisdom
till somebody should come and let him down.
OLD SULTAN.
A SHEPHERD had a faithful dog, called Sul;
tan, who was grown very old, and had lost alt
his teeth. :And one day when the: shepherd
and his wife were standing together before the
house, the shepherd said, I will shoot old
Sultnn to-morrow morning, for he is of ho use
now." But his wife said, Pray let the poor
faithful creature live; he has served us well a
great many years, and we ought to give him
a livelihood for the rest of his days." But
what can we do with him ?" said the shepherd,
"he has not a tooth in his head, and the
thieves don't care for him at all; to be sure he
172 00179.jpg
150 O~LD SULTAN.
has served us, but then he did it to earn his
livelihood; to-morrow shall be his last day,
depend upon it."
Poor Sultan, who was lying close by them,
heard all that the shepherd and his wife said
to one another, and was very much frightened
to think to-morrow would be his last day; so
in the evening he went to his good friend the
wolf, who lived in the wood, and told him all
his sorrows, and how his master meant to kill
him in the morning. 1Make yourself easy,"
said the wolf, I will give you some good ad-
vice. Your master, you know, goes out every
morning very early with his wife into the field:
and they take their little child with them, and
lay it down behind the -hedge in the shade
While they are at work. Now do yo lie down
close by the child, and pretend to be watching
it, and I will come out of the wood and run
away with it: you must un after me as.fastfas
you can, and I will let it drop; then you may
carry it back, and they will think you :have
saved their child, and will be so thankful to
you that they will take care of you as long as
youa ive." The dog lked this plan very well;
173 00180.jpg
OLD SULTAN.
and accordingly so it was managed. Thewolf
ran with the child a little way; the shepherd
and his wife screamed out; :but Sultan soon
overtook him, and carried the poor little thing
back to.his master and mistress. Then :the
shepherd patted him on the head,, ad said,
" Old Sultan has saved owu child from the wolf,
:and thereforehe shalllive and be well taken care
of, and :have plenty to eat. Wife, go home,
and give him a good dinner, and let him have
my old cushion to sleep on as long as he lives."
So from this time forward Sultan had all that
he could wish for,
! ': Soon afterwards the wolf came and wished
him joy, and said, Now, my good fellow, you
musttell no tales, but turn your head the other
way when I want to taste one of the old shep-
heprd's fine fat sheep." "No," said Sultan: "I
will be true to mymaster." However, the wolf
thought he was in joke, and came one night
Sto get a dainty norsel. But Sultan had told his
master what the wolf meant to do; so he laid
wait for him behind the barn-door, and when
the wolf was busy looking out for a good fat
4heep, he had a stout cudgel laid about his
back, that combed his locks for him finely.
174 00181.jpg
OLD SULTAN.
Then the wolf was very angry, and called
Sultan an old rogue," and swore he would
have his revenge. So the next morning the
wolf sent the boar to challenge Sultan to come
into the wood to fight the matter out. Now
Sultan had no body he could ask to be his se-
cond but the shepherd's old three-legged cat;
so he took her with him, and as the poor thing
limped along with some trouble, she stuck up
her tail'straight in the air.
The wolf and the: wild boar were first on
the.giround; and when they espied their ene-
mies coming, and saw the cat's long tail stand-
ing straight in the'air, they thought she'was
carrying a sword for Sultan to fight with; and
every time she limped, they thought she was
picking up a stone to throw at them; so they
said they should not like this way of fighting,
and the boar lay down behind a bush, and the
wolfjumped up into a tree. Sultan and the cat
soon came up, and looked about, andwondered
that no one was there. The boar, however, had
not quite hidden himself, for his ears stuck out
of the bush; and when he shook one of them
:a little, the cat, seeing something moye, and
thinking it was a mouse, sprang upon it, and
The Lady and the Lion
175 00182.jpg
THE LADY AND THE LION. 15S
bit'and scratched it, so that the boar jumped
up and grunted, and ran away, roaring out,
" Look up. in the tree, there sits the one who
is to blame." So they looked up, and espied
the wolf sitting amongst the branches; and
they called him a cowardly rascal, and would
not suffer him to come down till he was heartily
ashamed of himself, and had pi'omised to be
good friends again with old Sultan.
THE LADY AND THE LION.
A MERCHANT, who had three daughters, was
once setting out upon a journey; but before
he went he asked each daughter what gift hie
should bring back for her. The eldest wished
for pearls; the second for jewels; but the third
said, Dear father, bring me a rose." Now
it was no easy task to find a rose, for it was the
middle of winter; yet, as she was the fairest
daughter, and was very fond of flowers, her
father said he would try 1haut he could do. So
176 00183.jpg
S5+ THE LADY ANTD THE LION.
.ekissed.all three, and:bidthem good-bye. And
when the time camefor Iiir return, head boiht
pearls and jewels for the two eldest, but he had
sought .every where in vain for the rose; and
when he went into any garden and inquired
:for such a thiing, the people laughed at him, and
asked him whether he thought roses grew in
snow. This grieved him 'erv much, for his third
daughter was his dearest child; and as he was
journeying home, thinking what he should
bring her, he came to a fine castle; and around
the castlewas a garden, in half of which it ap-
peared to be summer time, and in the other half
winter. fOn one side die finest flowers were in
full bloom, and on the other every thing looked
desolate and buried in snow. "'A lucky hit!"
said ie as he called to his servant, and told
nim to go to a beautiful bed of roses that was
there, and bring .lim naway one of the flowers.
This done, they were riding away well pleased,
when a fierce lion sprung up, and rToard out,
' Whoeverdares to steal my roes shall be enten
tip alive.'" Then the man said, -"I knew not
that he gasdenbelonged to you; can nothing
save my life;?" -'i.NoE" said the lion, -" nothing.
177 00184.jpg
T&E LADY AND THaE LION.
lnaless you promise to give me whatever meets
.you first onyour return home; i you agree to
this, I will give you your life, and the rose too
*for your daughter." But the man was unwill-
ing to do so, and said, "Jt my be m b y young-
es daughter, who loves meimost, and always
rinsto meet me when go home." Then the
servant was greatly frightened. and said, "it
may perhaps be only a eat or a.dog." And at
last the ran yielded with a heavy heart, and
took the roseA and promised ,the lion whatever
sliou4d =meet him first on his return.
And as he fame near home, it was his
youngest and dearest daughter that met him;
she came runnAig and kissed him, and wel-
co.ed him home; :and when she saw that he
had brought her the rose, she rejoiced still
more.. But her father began .to be very melan-
choly, and to weep, saying, Alas! my.dearest
child'! I have bought tis flower at a highprice,
for L havy promised to :give you toa wild lion,
and vwhen he has you, h will tear you in
pieces, :and eat you.'^ And he told her all
that had happened; and said she should not
go, let what would happen,
'. 155
178 00185.jpg
156 THE LADY AND THE LION.
But she comforted him, and said, Dear
father, what you have promised must be ful-
filled; I will go to the lion, and soothe him,
perhaps he will let me return safe home again."
The next morning she asked the way she was
to go, and took leave of her father, and went
forth with a bold heart into the wood. But the
lion was an enchanted prince, and by day he
and all his court were lions, but in the evening
they took their proper forms again. And when
the lady came to the castle, he welcomed her
so courteously that she consented to marry
him. The wedding-feast was held, and they
lived happily together a long time. The prince
was only to be.seen as soon as evening came,
and then he held his court; but every morning
he left his bride, and went away by himself, she
knew not whither, till night came again.
After sometime he said to her, "To-morrow
there will be a great feast in your father's
house, for your eldest sister is to be married;
and, if you wish to go to visit her, my lions
shall lead you thither." Then she rejoiced
much at the thoughts of seeing her father once
more, and set out with the lions; and every one
179 00186.jpg
THE LADY AND THE LION.
was overjoyed to see her, for they had thought
her dead long since. But she told them how
happy she was; and stayed till the feast was
over, and then went back to the wood.
Her second sister was soon after married;
and when she was invited to the wedding, she
said tothe prince,, "I willnotgo alone this time;
you must go with me." But he would not, and
saidthat would be a very hazardous thing, for
if the least ray of the torch light should fall upon
him, his enchantment would become still worse,
for he should be changed into a dove, and be
obliged to wander about the world for seven
long years. However, she gave him no rest,
and said she would take care no light should fall
upon him. So at last they set out together, and
took with them their little child; and she chose
a large hall with thick walls, for him to sit in
while the wedding torches were lighted; but
unluckily no one observed that there was a
crack in the door. Then the wedding was held
with great pomp; but as the train came from
the church, and passed with the torches before
the hall, a very small ray of light fell upon the
prince. In a moment he disappeared; and
180 00187.jpg
158 THE LADY A-N) TyE IaD.
when his wife came in, and looked for him, she
found only a white dove. Then he said to her,
"Seven years must I fly up and down over the
face of the earth; but every now and then I
will let fall a white feather, thatshall showyou
the way I am.going; follow it, and at last you
may overtake 'and set me free."
This-said, he flew.out at the door, and:she
followed; andlevery now and then a whitefea-
therfell, and al iowed her die way she was tojour-
ney. Th us she went roving on through the wide
world, and looked neither to the righthaindnor
to the left, nor took any rest for.seven years.
Then she beganto rejoice, and thought toher,
self that the time was fast coming when all her
troubles shouldcease,: .yet repose was still far
off; for one day as she was travelling .on, she
missed the white feather, and when she lifted
up her eyes she could no where see the dove.
Now;" thought she to herself, "noo humanaid
can be of use to me;" so she went to the sun,
and said, "Thou shinest every where, on the
mountain's top, and the valley's depth: hast
thou any where seen my white dove?" No,'"
said the sun, I have not seenit; but I will
181 00188.jpg
THE LADY AMBD TMIE LION. 159
give thee a casket-open it when thy hour of
need comes." So she thanked the sun, and
went on her way till eventide; and when the
moon arose, she cried unto it, and said, Thou
shinest through all the night, over field and
grove: hastthouno where seen mywhite dove?"
"No," said the moon, I cannot help thee;
but I will give thee an egg-break it whenneed
comes." Then she thanked the moon, and went
on tll t he night-wind.blew; and she raised up
hervoice toit, and said, "Thoublowestthrough
every tree and under every leaf: hastthou not
seen the white dove?" No," saidthe night-
wind; "but I will ask three other winds; per-
haps they have seen it." Then, the east wind
and the west wind came, and said they too had
not seen it; but the south wind said, "I have
seen -the white dove; he has fled to the Red
Sea, and is changed once more into alion, for
the seven years are ,passed away; and there he
is fighting with a dragon, .and the dragon is an
enchanted princess, who seeks to separate him
from you." Then the night-wind said, I will
give thee' counsel Go to the Red Sea;,.oa the
right shore stand many rods; number:them,
and when thou comest to the eleventh, break
182 00189.jpg
160 THE LADY AND THE LION.
it offand smite the dragon with it; and so the
lion will have the victory, and both of them
will appear to you in their human forms.
Then instantly set out with thy beloved prince,
and journey home over sea and land."
So our poor wanderer went forth, and found
all as the night-wind had said; and she plucked
the eleventh rod, and smote the dragon, and
immediately the lion became a prince and the
dragoi a princess again. But she forgot the
counsel which the night-wind had given; and
the false princess watched her opportunity,
and took the prince by the arm, and carried
him away,
Thus the unfortunate traveller was again
forsaken and forlorn; but she took courage and
said, "As far as the wind blows, and so long
as the cock crows, I will journey on till I find
him once again." She went on for along
long way, till at length she came to the castle
whither the princess had carried the prince;
and there was a feast prepared, and she heard
that the wedding was about to be held. "Hea-
vea aid me now!" said she; and she took the
casket that the sun had given her, and found that
within it lay a dress as dizziig as the sun it-
183 00190.jpg
THE LADY AND THE LION. 161
self. So she put it on, and went into the
palace; and all the people gazed upon her;
and the dress pleased the bride so much that
she asked whether it was to be sold: Not
for gold and silver," answered she; but for
flesh and blood." The princess asked what
she meant; and she said, "Letme speak with
the bridegroom this night in his chamber,
and I will give thee the dress." At last the
princess agreed; but she told her chamberlain
to give the prince a sleeping-draught, that he
might not hear or see her. When evening
came, and the prince had fallen asleep; she
was led into his chamber, and she sat herself
down at his feet and said, I have followed
thee seven years; I have been to the sun, the
moon, and the night-wind, to seek thee; and
at List I have helped thee to overcome the
dragon. Wilt thou then forget me quite? "
But the prince slept so soundly that her voice
only passed over him, and seemed like the
murmuring of the wind among the fir-trees.
Then she was led away, and forced to give
up the golden dress; and when she saw that
there was no help for her, she went out into a
184 00191.jpg
THE LADY AND THE LION.
meadow and sat herself down and wept. But
as she sat she bethought herself of the egg that
the moon had given her; and when she broke
it, there ran out a hen and twelve chickens of
pure gold, that played about, and then nestled
under the old one's wings, so as to form the
most beautiful sight in the world.. And she
rose up,.and drove them befbrether till the bride
saw them from her window, and was so pleased
that she came forth, and asked her if she would
sell the brood. N Not for gold or silver; but
for flesh and blood: let me again this evening
speak with the bridegroom in his chamber."
Then the princess thought to betray her as
before, and agreed to what she asked; but
when the prince went to his chamber, he asked
the chamberlain why the \ ind had murmured
so in the night. And the chamberlain told him
all; how he had given him a sleeping-draught,
-and a poor maiden had come and spoken 'to
him in his chamber, and was to come again
that night. Then the prince took care to throw
awaythe sleeping-draught; and when she came
and began again to tell him what woes had be-
fallen her, and how faithfd1 and true to him she
The Jew in the Bush
185 00192.jpg
THE JEW IN THE BUSH.
had been, he 'knew his beloved wite's voice,
and sprung up, and said, '; You have awak-
ened me as from a dream; for the strange
princess had thrown a spell around me, .so
that I had altogether forgotten you: but hea-
ven hath sent you to me in a lucky hour."
And they stole away out of the palace by
night secretly, (for they feared the princess,)
and journeyed home; and there they found
their child, now grown comely and fair, and
lived happily together to theend of their days.
THE JEW IN THE BUSH.
A FARMER had a faithful and diligent servant,
who had worked hard for him-three years,
without having been paid any wages. At last
it came into the man's head that he would:not
-go on thus without pay any longer; so he went
to his master, and said, I have worked hard
for you a long time, I will trust to you to give
me what I deserve to have for'my trouble."
The farmer was a sad miser, and knew that his
186 00193.jpg
164 THE JEW IN THE BUSH.
man was very simple-hearted; so he took out
threepence, and gave him for every year's ser-
vice a penny. The poor fellow thought it was
a great deal of money to have, and said to
himself, Why should I work hard, and live
here on bad fare any longer? I can now travel
into the wide world, and make myself merry."
With that he put his money into his purse,
and set out, roaming over hill and valley.
As he jogged along over the fields, singing
and dancing, a little dwarf met him, and asked
him what made him so merry. Why, what
should make me down-hearted ?" said he;
"I am sound in health and rich in purse, what
should I care for? I have saved up my three
years' earnings, and havy it all safe in my poc-
ket." How 'much may it come to?" said
the little man. Full threepence," replied the
-countryman. I wish you would give them
to me," said the other; I am very poor."
Then the man pitied him, and gave him all he
had; and the little dwarf said in return, As
you have such a kind honest heart, Iwill grant
you three wishes-one for each penny; so
choose whatever you like." Then the count.
187 00194.jpg
.THE JEW IN THE BUSH.
tryman rejoiced at his good luck, and said;
" I like many things better than money: first,
I will have a bow that will bring down every
thing I-shoot at; secondly, a fiddle that will
set every one dancing that hears me play upon
it; and thirdly, I should like that every one
should grant what I ask." The dwarf said he
should have his three wishes; so he gave him
the bow and fiddle, and went his way.
Our honest friend journeyed on his way too;
and if he was merry before, he was now ten
times more so. He had not gone far before
he met an old Jew: close by them stood a tree,
and on the topmost twig sat a thrush singing
away most joyfully. Oh, what a pretty
bird!" said the Jew; I would give a great deal
of money to have such a one." If that's
all," said the countryman, I will soon bring
it down." Then he took up his bow, and down
fell the thrush into the bushes at the foot of the
tree. The Jew crept into the bush to find it;
but directly he had got into the middle, his
companion took up his fiddle and played away,
and the Jew began to dance and spring about,
capering higher and higher in the air. The
thorns soon began to tear his clothes.till they
188 00195.jpg
THE JEW IN THE BOUH.
all hung in rags about him,.and he himself was
all scratched and wounded, .so that the blood
ran.down.. Oh, for heaven's sake cried
the Jew, "master master! pray let the fiddle
alone.. W;What have I done to deserve this?"
" Thou. hast shaved many a .poor soul close
enough," said the other; -" thou art only meet-
ing thy reward:" sohe played up another tune.
Then the Jew began to beg and promise, and
offered money for his liberty; but he did not
come'up to the musician's price for some time,
and he danced him along brisker and brisker,
and:the Jew bid higher and higher, till atlast
he offered a roind hundred' of florins that he
had in his. purse and had-just gained by cheat-
ing some poor fellow. When the countryman
saw so much money, he said, I will agree to
your proposal." So.he took the purse, putup
his fiddle, and travelled on, very well-pleased
with his bargain.
Meanwhile the Jew crept out of the bush
half-naked and in a piteous plight, and began
toqponder how he should take his revenge, and
serve his late companion some trick. At last
he went to the judge, and complained that a
rascal had robbed him of his money, and
189 00196.jpg
T9h IfW .N THE BUSH.
beaten him into the bargain ; and that the fel-
low wha did it carried a bow at his back and a
fiddle hung round his neck. Then the judge
sent out his officers to bring up the accused
wherever they should find him; and he was
soon caught andi brought up to be' tried.
The Jew began:to tell his tale, and said he
had been robbed of his money. "No, you
gave it me for playing a tune to you." said the
countryman; but the j judge told him that was
not likely, and cut the'matter short by order-;
ing hin off to- the gallows.
So away he was taken; but as he stood on
the steps he said, My Lord Judge, may it
please you to grant me one last request."
"Any thing but thy life," replied the other.
" No," said he, I do not ask my life; only
let me play upon my fiddle for the last time."
The Jew cried out," Oh, no! no! for heaven's
sake don't listento him! don't listen to him!"
But the judge said, It is, only for this once,
he will soon have done." The fact was, he
could not refuse the request, on account of the
dwarfs third gift.
.Then the Jew said, Bindme fast, bind me
190 00197.jpg
168 THE JEW IN THE BUSH.
fast, for pity's sake." But the countryman
seized his fiddle, and struck up a tune, and at
the first note judge, clerks, and jailer, were in
motion; all began capering, and no one could
hold the Jew. At the second note the hang-
man let his prisoner go, and danced also, and
by the time he had played the first bar of the
tune, all were dancing together-judge, court,
and Jew, and all the people who had followed
to look on. At first the thing was merry and
pleasant enough; but when it had gone on a
while, and there seemed to be no end of play-
ing or dancing, they began to cry out, and beg
him to leave off; but he stopt not a whit the
more for their entreaties, till the judge not
only gave him his life, but promised to return
him the hundred florins.
SThen he called to the Jew, and said, Tell
us now, you vagabond, where you got that
gold, or I shall play on for your amusement
only." I stole it," said the. Jew in the pre-
sence of all the people; I acknowledge that
I stole it, and that you earned it fairly." Then
the countryman stopt his fiddle, and left the
Jew to take his place at the gallows.
191 00198.jpg
U~~~. I ___ -,
ii~ilh~~~B~
The King of the Golden Mountain
192 00200.jpg
169
THE
KING OF THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN.
A CERTAIN merchant had two children, a son
and daughter, both very young, and scarcely
able to run alone. He had two richly laden
ships then making a voyage upon the seas, in
which he had embarked all his proi)erty, in
the hope of making great gains, when the news
came that they were lost. Thus from being a
rich.man he became very poor, so that nothing
was left him but one small plot of land; and, to
relieve his mind a little of his trouble, he often
went out to walk there.
One day, as he was roving along, a little
rough-looking dwarf stood before him, and
asked him why he was so sorrowful, and what
it.was that he took so deeply to heart. But
the merchant replied, Ifyou could do me any
good, I would tell.you." "Who knows but I
may?" said thd little man; "tell me what is the
matter, and pilhap; I can be of some service."
I
193 00201.jpg
170 THE KING OF
Then the merchant told him how all his wealth
was gone to the bottom of the sea, and how
he had nothing left except that little plot pf
land.. Oh! trouble not yourself about that,"
said the dwarf; only promise to bring me
here, twelve years hence, whatever meets you
first on your return home, and I will give
you as much gold as you please." The mer-
chant thought this was no great request; that
it would most likely be his dog, or something
of that sort, but forgot his little child : so he
agreed to the bargain, and signed and sealed
the engagement to do what was required.
But as he drew near home, his little boy was
so pleased to see him, that he crept behind him
and laid fast hold of his legs. Then the father
started with fear, and saw what it was that he
had bound himself to do; but as no gold was
come, he consoled himself by thinking that it
was only a joke that the dwarf was playing him.
About a month afterwards he went up stairs
into an old lumber room to look for some old
iron, that he might sell it and raise a little mo-
hey; and there he saw a large pile of gold lying
194 00202.jpg
THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN.
on the floor. At the sight of this he was greatly
delighted, went into trade again, and became
a greater merchant than before.
Meantime his son grew up, and as the end
of the twelve years drew near, the merchant
became very anxious and thoughtful; so that
care and sorrow were written upon his face.
The son one day asked what was the matter,
biut his father refused to tell for some time; at
lasthowever he said that he had, without know-
ing it, sold him to a little ugly-looking dwarf
for a great quantity of gold; and that the twe e
years were coming round when he must per-
form his agreement. Then the son said, Fa-
ther, give yourself very little trouble about that;
depend upon it I shall be too much for the
little man."
'When the time came, they went out toge-
ther to the appointed place; and the son drew
a circle on the ground, and set himself and his
fatherin themiddle. The little dwarf soon came,
and said to the merchant, Have you brought
me what you promised?" The old man was
silent, but his son answered, "What do you
want here ?" The dwarf said, I come to
S2
195 00203.jpg
THE KING OF
talk with your father, not with you." You
have deceived and betrayed my father," said
the son; give him up his bond." No,"
replied the other, I will not yield up my
rights." Upon this a long dispute arose; and
at last it was agreed that the son should be put
into an open boat, that lay on the side of a
piece of water hard by, and that the father
should push him off with his own hand; so
that he should be turned adrift. Then he took
leave of his father, and set himself in the boat;
andas it was pushed off it heaved, and fell
on one side into the water: so the merchant
thought thdt his son was lost, and went home
very sorrowful.
But- the boat went safely on, and did not
sink; and the young man sat securely within,
till at length it ran ashore upon an unknown
land. As he jumped upon the shore, he saw
before him a beautiful castle, but empty and
desolate within, for it was enchanted. At last,
however, he found a white snake in one of the
chambers.
Now the white snake was an enchanted
princess; and she rejoiced greatly to see him,
196 00204.jpg
THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN. 173
nind said, Art thou at last come to be my de-
liverer? Twelve long years have I waited for
thee, for thou alone canst save me. This night
twelve men will come: their faces will be
black, and they will be hunground with chains.
They will ask what thou dost here; but be si-
lent, give no answer, and let them do what
they will-beat and torment thee. Suffer all,
only speak not a word, and at twelve o'clock
they must depart. The second night twelve
others will come: and the third night twenty-
four, who will even cut off thy head; but at
the twelfth hour of that night their power is
gone, and I shall be free, and will come and
bring-thee the water of life, and will wash thee
with it, and restore thee to life and health."
And all came to pass as she had said; the
merchant's son spoke not a word, and the
third night the princess appeared, and fell on
his neck "and kissed him; joy and gladness
burst forth throughout the castle; the wedding
was celebrated, and he was king of the Golden
Mountain.
! They lived together very happily, and the
queen had a'son. Eight years had passed over
197 00205.jpg
THE KING OF
their heads when the king thought of his fa-
ther: and his heart was moved, and he longed
to see him once again. But the queen opposed
his going, and said, I know well that misfor-.
tunes will come." However, he gave her no
rest till she-consented. At his departure she
presented him with a wishing-ring, and said,
" Take this ring, and put it on your finger;.
whatever-you wish it will bring you:: only pro-
mise that you will not make use of it to bring,
me hence to your father's." Then he promised,
what she asked, and put the ring on his finger,
and wished himself' near the town where his
father lived. He found himself at the gates in.
a moment; but the guards would not let him
center, because he was so strangely clad. .So
he went up to a neighboring mountain where
a shepherd dwelt, and borrowed his old frok,;
and thus passed unobserved into the town.
When he came to his father's house, he said he,
was hisson; butthe merchantwould notbelieve
him, and said he had had but one son, who he
knew was'long since dead: and as he was only:
dressed like poor shepherd, he would not even
offer him any thing to eat. The king however
198 00206.jpg
THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN;
persisted thathewas his son, and said, "Is there
no mark by which you would know if I am
really your son?" "Yes," observed his mother,
"our son has a mark like a raspberry under the
right arm." Then he showed them the mark, and
they were satisfied that what he had said was
true. He next told them how he was king of
the Golden Mountain, and was married to a
princess, and had a son seven years old. But
themerchantsaid, Thatcan neverbe true; he
must be a fine king truly who travels about in
a shepherd's frock." At this the son was very
angry; and, forgetting his promise, turned his
ring, and wished for his queen and son. In an
instant they stood before him; but the queeri
wept, and said he had broken his word, and
misfortune would follow. He did all.he could
to soothe her, and she at last appeared to be
appeased; but she was not so in reality, and
only meditated how she should take her re-
venge.
One day he took her to walk with him out
of the town, and showed her the spot where
the boat was turned adrift upon the wide wa-'
ters. Then he sat himself down, and said, I
199 00207.jpg
176 .- THr KTNG OF
am very much tired; sit by me, I will rest my
head in yourd;ap, and sleep a while." As soon
as he had fallen asleep, however, she drew the
ring from his finger, and crept softly away, and
wished herself and her son at home in their
kingdom. And when the king awoke, he found
himself alone, and saw that the ring was gone
from his finger. I can never return to my
father's house," said he; they would say I am
a sorcerer :, I will journey forth into the world
till I come again to my kingdom."
SSosaying, he set out and travelled till he
came to a mountain, where three giants were
sharing.their inheritance ; and as they saw him
pass, they cried out and said." Little men have
sharp. wits: he'shall divide the inheritance be-
tween us.". No%\ it consisted of a sword that
cut .off an enemy's head whenever the wearer
gave the:words Heads. off! "-a cloak that
made the owner invisible, or gave him any form
he pleased; and a pair of boots that transported
theperson who:put them on wherever hewished.
The king said they must first let him try these
wonderful :tings, that he might know how:to
set a value upon them. Then they gave him
200 00208.jpg
,41
201 00210.jpg
THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN.
the cloak, and he wished himself a fly, and in
a moment he was a fly. The cloak is very
well," said he; now give me the sword."
" No," said they, not unless you promise
not to say Heads off!' for if you do, we are
all dead men." So they gave it him on condi-
tion that he tried its virtue only on a tree. He
next asked for the boor. also; and the moment
he had all three in his possession he wished
himself at the Golden Mountain;. and there he
was in an instant. So the giants were left behind
with no inheritance to divide or quarrel about.
As he came near to the castle he heard the
sound of merry music; and the people around
told him that his.queen w:ls about to celebrate
her marriage with another prince. Then he
threw his cloak around him, and passed through
the castle, and placed himself by the side of his
queen, where no one saw him. But when any
thing to eat was put upon her plate, he took it
away and ate it himself; and when a glass of
wine was handed to her, he took and drank it:
and thus, though they kept on serving her
with meat and drink, her plate continued al-
ways empty.
The Golden Goose
202 00213.jpg
178 THE GOLDEN GOOSE.
Upon this, fear and remorse came over her,
and she went into her chamber and wept; and
he followed her there. Alas !" said she to
herself, did not my deliverer come ? why
then doth enchantment still surround me?"
Thou traitress I said he, thy deliverer
indeed came, and now is near thee: has he
deserved this of thee ?" And he went out and
dismissed the company, and said the wedding
was at an end, for that he was returned to his
kingdom: but the princes and nobles and
counsellors mocked at him. However, he
would enter into no parley with them, but only
demanded whether they would depart in peace,
or not. Then they turned and tried to seize
him; but he drew his sword, and, with a word,
the traitors' heads fell before him; and he was
once more king of the Golden Mountain.
THE GOLDEN GOOSE.
THERE was a man who had three sons. The
youngest was called Dummling, and was on all
203 00213a.jpg
-4r 4- l_
VP
204 00214.jpg
THE GOLDEN GOOSE.
occasions despised and ill-treated by the whole
family. It happened that the eldest took it
into his head one day to go into the wood to
cut fuel; and his mother gave him a delicious
pasty and a bottle of wine to take with him,
that he might refresh himself at his work. As
he went into the wood, a little old man bid him
good day, and said, Give me a little piece
of meat from your plate, and a little wine out
of your bottle; I am very hungry and thirsty.":
But this clever young man said, Give you
my meat-and wine! No, I thank you; I
should not have enough left fr myself:"' and
away he went. He soon began to cut down
a tree; .but he had not worked long before he
missed his stroke, and cut himself, and was
obliged to go home to have the wound dressed.
Now it was the little old man that caused him
this mischief.
Next went out the second son to work; and
his mother gave him too a pasty and a bottle
of wine. And the same little old man met
him also, and asked him for something to eat
and drink. But he too thought himself vastly
clever, and said, Whatever you get, I shall
205 00215.jpg
THE GOLDEN GOOSE.
lose; so go your way!" The little man took
care that he should have. his reward; and the
second stroke that he aimed against a tree, hit
him on the leg; so that he too was forced to
go home.
Then Dummling said, "Father, I should
like to go and cut wood too." But his.father
answered, Your. brothers have both lamed
themselves; you had better stay at home, for
you know nothing of the business." But
Dummling was very pressing; and at last his
father said, "Go your way; you will be wiser
when .you have suffered for your folly.". And
his mother gave him only some dry bread, and
a bottle of sourq beer: but when he went into
the wood, he met the little old man, who said,
' Give me some meat and drink, for I am very
hungry and thirsty." Dummling said, "Ihave
only dry bread and sour beer; if that will suit
you, vwe will sit down and eatit together.". So
they sat down; and when the lad pulled out
his bread, behold it was turned into a capital
pasty, and his sour beer became delightful wine.
They ate and drank heartily; and when,they
had done, the little man said, "As you have a
206 00216.jpg
THE GOLDEN GOOSE. 181
kind heart, and have been willing to share every
thing with me, I will send a blessing upon
you. There stands an old tree; cut it down,
and. you will find something at the .root."
Then he took his leave, and went his way.
SDummling set to work, and cut down the
tree; and when it fell, he found in a hollow
under the roots a goose with feathers of pure
gold. He took it up, and went on to an
inn, where he proposed to. sleep for the night.
The landlord had three daughters; and when
they saw the goose, they were very curious to
examine what this wonderful bird could be,
and wished very much to. pluck one of the
feathers out of its tail. At last the eldest said,
'I must and will have a feather." So she
waited till his back was turned, and then
seized the goose by the wing; but to her great
surprise there she stuck, for neither hand nor
finger could she get away again. Presently in
came the second sister, and thought to have a
feather too; but the moment she touched her
sister, there she too hung fast. -At last came
:the third, and wanted a feather; but the other
ttwo cried out, "Keep away! for heaven's sake,
207 00217.jpg
THE GOLDEN GOOSE.
keep away!" However, she didnotunderstand
what they meant. "If they are there," thought
she, I may as well be there too." So she
went up to them; but the moment she touched.
her sisters she stuck fast, and hung to the goose
as they did. And so they kept company with
the goose all night.
The next morning Dummlingcarriedoffthe.
goose under his arm; and.took no notice of the
three girls, but went.out with them sticking fast.
behind; and wherever he travelled, they too
were obliged to follow, whether they would or.
no, as fast as their legs could carry them.
In the middle of a field the parson met them;
and when hesaw the train, he said, "Are you.
not ashamed of yourselves, you bold girls, to
run after the young man in.that way over the
field ? is that proper behaviour?" Then he
took the youngest by the hand to lead her
away; but the moment he touched her he too.
hung fast, aiid followed in the train. Presently.
up came the clerk; and when he saw his master
the parson running after the three girls, he won-
dered greatly, and said, Hollo hollo! your
reverence! whither so fast? there is a christen-
208 00218.jpg
THE GOLDEN GOOSE.
ing to-day." Then he ran up, and took him
by the gown, and in a moment he was fast too.
As the five were thus trudging along, one be"
hind another, they met two labourers with
their mattocks coming from work; and the
parson cried out to them to set him free. But
scarcely had they touched him, when they too
fell into the ranks, and so made seven, all run-
ning after Dummling and his goose.
At last they arrived at a city, where reigned
a king who had an only daughter. The prin-
cess was of so thoughtful and serious a turn of
mind that no one could make her laugh; and
the king had proclaimed to all the world, that
whoever could make her laugh should have
her for his wife. When the young man heard
this, he went to her with his goose and all its
train; and as soon as she saw the seven all
hanging together, and running about, treading
on each other's heels, she could not help burst-
ing into a long and loud laugh. Then Dumin-
ling claimed her for his wife; the wedding was
celebrated, and he was heir to the kingdom,
and lived long and happily with his wife.
Mrs. Fox
209 00219.jpg
MRs. FOX.
THERE was once a sly old fox with nine tails,
who was very curious to know whether his
wife was true to him: so he stretched himself
out under a bench, and pretended to be as
dead as a mouse.
Then Mrs. Fox went up into her own room
and locked the door: but her maid, the cat,
sat at the kitchen fire cooking; and soon after
it became known that the old fox was dead,
someone knocked at the door, saying,
Miss Pussy Miss Pussy how fare you to-day?
Are \oi; ep;lng or watching the time away? "
Then the cat went and opened the door, and
there stood a young fox; so she said to him,
No, no, Master Fox, I don't sleep in the day,
I'm making some capital white wine whey.
Will your honour be pleased to dinner to stay?"
"' No, I thank you," said the fox; but how
is poor Mrs. Fox?" Then the cat answered,
She sits all alone in her chamber up stairs,
And bewails her misfortune with floods of tears:
She weeps till her beautiful eyes are red;
For, alas! alas! Mr. Fox is dead."
210 00220.jpg
MRS. FOX.
"Go to her," said the other, and say that
there is a young fox come, who wishes to
marry her."
Then up went the cat,-trippety trap,
And knocked at the door,-tippety tap;
"Is good Mrs. Fox ithinil ?" said she.
Alas my dear, what want you with me?"
"There waits a suitor below at the gate."
Then said Mrs. Fox,
"How looks he, my dear ? is he tall and straight ?
Has he nine good tails ? There must be nine,
Or he never shall be a suitor of mine."
"Ah i" said the cat, he has but one."
" Then I wNill never have him," answered Mrs.
Fox.
So the cat went down, and sent this suitor
about his business. Soon after, some one else
knocked at the door; it was another fox that
had two tails, but he was not better welcomed
than the first. After this came several others,
till at last one came that had really nine tails
just like the old fox.
When the widow heard this, she jumped
up and said,
211 00221.jpg
16B0 MRS. FOX.
"Now, Pussy, my dear, open windows and doors,
And bid all our friends at our wedding to meet;
And as for that nasty old master of ours,
Throw him out of the window, Puss, into the street."
But when the wedding feast was all ready,
up sprung the old gentleman on a sudden, and
taking a club drove the whole company, to-
gether with Mrs. Fox, out of doors.
After some time, however, the old fox really
died; and soon afterwards a wolf came to pay
his respects, and knocked at the door.
Wolf. Good day, Mrs. Cat, with your. whiskers so
trim;
How comes it you're sitting alone so prim ?
What's that you are cooking so nicely, I pray ?
Cat. 0, that's bread and milk for my dinner to-day.
Will your worship be pleased to stay and dine,
Or shall I fetch you a glass of wine?
No, I thank you: Mrs. Fox is not at home,
I suppose ?"
Cat. She sits all alone,
Her griefs to bemoan;
For, alas! alas! Mr. Fox is gone.
212 00222.jpg
MRS. FOX.
Wolf. Ah! dear Mrs. Puss that's a loss indeed:
D'ye think she'd take me for a husband instead
Cat. "Indeed, Mr. Wolf, I don't know but she may;
If you'll sit down a moment, I'll step up and see."
So she gave him a chair, and shaking her ears,
She very obligingly tripped it up stairs.
She knocked at the door with the rings on her toes,
And said, Mr,. Fox, you're within, I suppose?"
"Oyes," said the widow, "pray come in, my dear,
And tell me whose voice in the kitchen I hear."
"It's a wolf," said the cat, with a nice smooth skin,
Who was passing this way, and just stepped in
To see (as old Mr. Fox is dead)
If you like to take him for a husband instead."
But," said Mrs, Fox, "has he red feet and
a sharp snout ?" "No," said the cat. Then,
he won't do for me." Soon after the wolf was.
sent about his business, there came a dog,
then a goat, and after that a bear, a lion, and
all the beasts, one after another. But they all;
wanted something that old Mr. Fox had, and
the cat was ordered to send them all away.
At last came a young fox, and Mrs. Fox said,
"Has he four red feet and a sharp snout?"
"Yes," said the cat.
Hansel and Grettel
213 00223.jpg
HANSEL AND GRETTEL.
"Then, Puss, make the parlour look clean and neat,
And throw the old gentleman into the street;
A stupid old rascal! I'm glad that he's dead,
Now I've got such a charming young fox instead."
So the wedding was held, and the merry bells rung,
And the friends and relations they danced and they
sung,
And feasted and drank, I can't tell how long.
HANSEL AND GRETTEL.
HANSEL one day took his sister Grettel by
the hand, and said "Since our poor mother
died we have had no happy days; for our new
mother beats us all day long, and when we
go near her, she pushes us away. We have
nothing but hard crusts to eat; and the little
dog that lies by the fire is better off than we;
for he sometimes has a nice piece of meat
thrown to him. Heaven have mercy upon
us! 0 if our poor another knew how we are
used! Come, we will go and travel over the
wide world." They went the whole day walk-
214 00224.jpg
HANSEL AND GRETTEL.
ing over the fields, till in the evening they
came to a great wood; and then they were so
tired and hungry that they sat down in a hol-
low tree and went to sleep.
In the morning when they awoke, the sun
had risen high above the trees, and shone
warm upon the hollow tree. Then Hansel
said, Sister, I am very thirsty; if I could.find
a brook, I would go and drink, and fetch you
some water too. Listen, I think I hear the
sound of one." Then Hansel rose up and took
Grettel by the hand and went in search of the
brook. But their cruel step-mother was a
fairy, and had followed them into the wood to
work them mischief: and when they had found
a brook that ran sparkling over the pebbles,
Hansel wanted to drink; but Grettel thought
she heard the brook, as it babbled along, say
" Whoever drinks here will be turned into a
tiger." Then she cried out, Ah, brother! do
not drink, or you will be turned into a wild
beast and tear me to pieces." Then Hansel
yielded, although he was parched with thirst.
" I will wait," said he, for the next brook."
But when they came to the next, Grettel
215 00225.jpg
HANSEL AND GRETTEL.
listened again, and thought she heard Who-
ever drinks here will become a wolf." Then
she cried out Brother, brother, do not drink,
or you will become a wolf and eat me." So
he did not drink, but said, will wait for the
next brook; there I must drink, say what you
will, I am so thirsty."
As they came to the third brook, Grettel list-
ened, and heard Whoever drinks here will
become a fawn." Ah brother !" said she,
4" do not drink, or you will be turned into a
fawn and run away from me." But Hansel
had already stooped down upon his knees, and
the moment he put his lips into the water he
was turned into a fawn.
Grettel wept bitterly over the poor creature,
and the tears too rolled down his eyes as he
laid himself beside her. Then she said, Rest
in peace, dear fawn, I will never never leave
thee." So she took off her golden necklace
and put it round his neck, and plucked some
rushes and plaited them into a soft string to
fasten to it; and led the poor little thing by her
side further into the wood.
After they had travelled a long way, they
216 00226.jpg
HANSEL AND GRETTEL.
came at last to a little cottage; and Grettel,
having looked in and seen that it was quite
empty, thought to herself, We can stay and
live here." Then she went and gathered leaves
and moss to make a soft bed for:the fawn: and
every morning she went out and plucked nuts,
roots, and berries for herself, and sweet shrubs
and tender grass for her companion; and it
ate out of her hand, and was pleased, and
played and frisked about her. In the even-
ing, when Grettel was tired, and had said her
prayers, she laid her head upon the fawn for
her pillow, and slept: and if poor Hansel could
but have his right form again, they thought
they should lead a very happy life.
They lived thus a long while in the wood by
themselves, till it chanced that the king of that
country came to hold a great hunt there. And
when the fawn heard all around the echoing of
the horns, and the baying of the dogs, and the
merry outss of the huntsmen, he wished very
much to go and see what was going on. "' Ah
sister! sister!" said he, "letme go out into the
wood, I can stay no longer." And he begged
so long, that she at last agreed to let him go.
217 00227.jpg
HANSEL AND GRETTEL.
But," said she, be sure to come to me in
the evening; I shall shut up the door to keep
out those wild huntsmen; and if you tap at it,
and say Sister, let me in,' I shall know you;
but if you don't speak, I shall keep the door
fast." Then away sprang the fawn, and frisked
and bounded along in the open air. The king
and his huntsmen saw the beautiful creature,
and followed but could not overtake him; for
when they thought they were sure of their
prize, he sprung over the bushes and was out
of sight in a moment.
As it grew dark he came running home to
the hut, and tapped, and said Sister, sister,
let me in.". Then she opened the little door,
and in he jumped and slept soundly all night
on his soft bed.
Next morning the hunt began again; and
when he; heard the huntsmen's horns, he
said Sister, open the door for me, I must go
again." Then she let him out, and said Come
back in the evening, and remember what you
are to say." When the king and the hunts-
men saw the. fawn with, the golden collar
again, they gave him chase; but he was too
218 00228.jpg
1HANSEL.AND GRETTEL. 193
quick for them. The chase lasted the whole
day; but at last the huntsmen nearly sur-
rounided him, and one of them wounded him
in the foot, so that he became sadly lame and
'could hardly crawl home. The man who had
wounded hium Ibllowed close behind, and hid
himnsel, and heard the little fawn say, :.( Sis-
ter, sister, let me in:" upon which the door
opened and soon shut again. The huntsman
marked all well, and went to the king and told
him what he had seen and heard; then the
king said, To-morrow we will have another
chase."
Grettel WAas very much frightened when she
saw that her dear little fiwn was wounded;
but s he washed the blood away and put some
healing herbs on it, and said, Now go to bed,
dear fawn, and you will.'oon be well again."
The wound was so small, thai in the morning
there was nothing to be seen of it; and when
the horn blew, the little creature vbdid I can't
stay here, Imust go and look oin I will take
care that none of them shall catch me." BI t
Grettel said, I am sure they wl ill kill ou
ihh. time, I wi:l not let you go." I h, all
K
219 00229.jpg
HANSEL AND GRETTEL.
die of vexation," answered he, if you keep
me here; when I hear the horns, I feel as if I
could fly." Then Grettel was forced to let him
go; so she opened'the door with a heavy heart,
and he bounded out gaily into the wood.
When the king saw him, he said to his
huntsman, Now chase him all day long till
you catch him; but let none of you do him any
harm." The sun set, however, without their
being able to overtake him, and the king called
away the huntsmen, and said to the one who
had watched, Now come and show me the
little hut." So they went to the door and tap-
ped, and said, Sister, sister, let me in." Then
the door opened and the king went in, and there
stood a maiden more lovely than any he had
ever seen. Grettel was frightened to see that
it was not her fawn, but a king with a golden
crown, that was come into her hut: however,
he spoke kindly to her, and took her hand,
.and said, Will you come with me to my
castle and be my wife?" Yes," said the
:maiden; but my fawn must go with me, I
cannot part with that." Well," said the
king, he shall come and live with you all
The Giant with the Three Golden Hairs
220 00230.jpg
HANSEL AND GRETTEL;
your life, and want for nothing." Just at that
moment in sprung the little fawn: and his sis-
ter tied the string to his neck, and they left the
hut in the wood together.
Then the king took Grettel to his palace,
and celebrated the marriage in great state.
And she told the king all her story; and he
sent for the fairy and punished her: and the
fawn ivas changed into Hansel again, and he
and his sister loved one another, and lived
happily together all their days.
THE GIANT WITH THE THREE
GOLDEN HAIRS.
THERE was once a poor man who had an
only son born to him. The child was born
under a lucky star; and those who toid his for-
tune saidthat in.his fourteenth year he would
marry the king's daughter. It so happened
that the king of that land, soon after the child's
birth, passed through the village in disguise,
and asked whether there was anynews. "Yes,"
K2
221 00231.jpg
1U(i 'ITE GIANT WITH THE
said the people, a child has just been born,
that they say is to be a lucky one, and when he
is fourteen years old, he is fated to marry the
king's daughter." This did not please the
king; so he went to the poor child's parents
and asked them whether they would sell him
their son? "No," said they; but the stranger
begged very hard and offered a great deal of
money, and they had scarcely bread to eat; so
at last they consented, thinking to themselves,
he is a luck's child, he can come to no harm.
The king took the child, put it into a box,
and rode away; but when he came to a deep
stream, he threw it into the current, and said
to himself, That young gentleman will never
be my daughter's husband." The box how-
ever floated down the stream; some kind spirit
watched over it so that no water reached the
child, and at last about two miles from the
king's capital it stopt at the dam of a mill. The
miller soon saw it, and took a long pole,' and
drew it towards the shore, a nd finding it heavy,
:thought there was gold inside; but when he
opened it, he found a pretty little boy, that
smiled upon himxnerrily. Now the miller and
222 00232.jpg
THREE GOLDEN HAIRS.
his wife had no children, snd therefore rejoiced
to see their prize, saying, Heaven has sent
it to us;" so they treated it very kindly, and
brought it up with such care that every one
admired and loved it.
About thirteenyears passed over their heads,
when the king came by accident to the mill,
and asked the miller if that was his son. No,"
said he, I found him when a babe in a box
in the mill-dam." How long ago?" asked
the king. Some thirteen years," replied the
miller. He is a fine fellow," said the king,
"can you spare him to carry a letter to the
queen? it will oblige me very much, and I will
give him two pieces of gold for his trouble."
"As your majesty pleases," answered the miller.
Now the king had soon guessed that this
was the child whom he had tried to drown;
and he wrote a letter by him to the queen,
saying, "As soon as the bearer of this arrives,
let him be killed and immediately buried, so
that all may be over before I return."
The young man set out with this letter, but
missed his way, and came in the evening to a
dark wood. Through the gloom he perceived
223 00233.jpg
THE GIANT WITH THE
a light at a distance, towards which he directed
his course, and found that it proceeded from a
little cottage. There was no one within except
an old woman, who was frightened at seeing
him, and said, Why do you come hither, and
whither are you going?" I am going to the
queen, to whom I was to have delivered a
letter; but I have lost my way, and shall be
glad if you will give me a night's rest." '' You
are very.unlucky," said she, "for this is a rob-
bers' hut,. and if the band returns while you
are here it may be worse for you." "I am so
tired, however," replied he, that I must take
my chance, for I can go no further;" so he laid
the letter on the table, stretched himself out
upon a bench, and fell asleep.
When the robbers came home and saw him,
hey asked the old woman who the strange lad
s. I have given him shelter for charity,"
said she; he had letter to carryto the queen,
and lost his way." The robbers took up the
letter, broke it open and read the directions
which it contained to murder the bearer. Then
their leader tore it, and wrote a fresh one de-
siring the queen, as soon as the young man
224 00234.jpg
THREE GOLDEN HAIRS.
arrived, to marry him to the king's daughter.
Meantime they let him sleep on till morning
broke, and then showed him the right way to
the queen's palace; where, as soon as she had
read the letter, she had all possible prepara-
tions made for the wedding; and as the.young
man was very beautiful, the princess took him
willingly for her husband.
After a while the king returned; and when
he saw the prediction fulfilled, and that this
child of fortune was, notwithstanding all his
cunning, married to his daughter, he inquired
eagerly how this had happened, and what were
the orders which he had given. Dear hus-
band," said the queen, here is your letter,
read it for yourself." The king took it, and
seeing that an exchange had been made, asked
his son-in-law what he had done with the
letter which he had given him to carry. I
know nothing of it," answered he; it must
have been taken away in the night while I
slept." Then the king was very wroth, and
said, No man shall have my daughter who
does not descend into the wonderful cave and
bring me three golden hairs from the head of
225 00235.jpg
THE GIANT WITH THE
the giant king who reigns there; do this and
you shall have my consent." I will soon ma-
nage that," said the youth;-so he took leave
of his wife and set out on his journey.
At the first city that he came to, the guard
of the gate stopt him, and asked what trade he
followed, and what he knew. I know every
thing," said he. If that be so," replied they,
you are just the man we want; be so good
as to tell us why our, fountain in the market-
place is dry and will give no water; find out
the cause of that, and we will give you two
asses loaded with gold." With all my
heart," said'he, when I come back."
Then he journeyed on and came to another
city, and there the guard also asked him what
trade he followed, and what he understood.
" I know every thing," answered he. Then
pray do us a piece of service," said they, tell
us why a tree which used to bear us golden ap-
ples, now does not even produce aleaf." "Most
willingly," answered he, as I come back."
At last his way led him to the side of a great
lake of water over which he must pass. The
ferryman soon began to ask, as the others had
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227 00236.jpg
THREE GOLDEN HAIRS. 203
that used to bear golden apples, and now has
not even a leaf upon it; what is the reason of
that?" Aha! said the giant, they would
like very well to know that secret: at the root
of the tree a mouse is gnawing; if they were
to kill him, the tree would bear golden apples
again; if not, it will soon die. Now let me
sleep in peace; if you wake me again, you
shall rue it."
Then he fell once more asleep; and when
she heard him snore she pulled out the third
golden hair, and the giant jumped up and
threatened her sorely; but she zootled him,
and said, It was a strange dream: methought
I saw a ferryman who was fated to ply back-
wards and forwards over a lake, and could
never be set at liberty; what is the charm that
binds him?" "A silly fool said the giant:
" If he were to give the rudder into the hand
of any passenger, he would find himself at li-
berty, and the other would be obliged to take
his place. Now let me sleep."
In the morning the giant arose and went
out; and the old woman gave the young man
the three golden hairs, reminded him of the
228 00237.jpg
YU+ THE GIANT WITH THE
answers to his three questions, and sent him
on his way.
He soon came to the ferryman, who knew
him again, and asked for the answer which he
had promised him. Ferry me over first,"
said he, and then I will tell you." When
the boat arrived on the other side, he told him
to give the rudder to any of his passengers,
and then he might run away as soon as he
pleased. The next place he came to was.the
city where the barren tree stood: Kill the
mouse," said he, that gnaws the root, and
you will have golden apples again." They
gave him a:rich present, and he journeyed on
to the city where the fountain had dried up,
and the guard demanded his answer'to their
question. So he told them. how to cure the
mischief, and they thanked him and gave imi
the two asses laden with gold.
And now at last this child of fortune reached
home, and his wife rejoiced greatly to see him,
and to hear how well every thing had gone
with him. He gave the three golden hairs to
the king, who could no longer raise any ob-
jection to him, and when he saw all the trea-
The Frog-Prince
229 00238.jpg
THREE GOLDEN HAIRS.
sure, cried out in a transport of joy, Dear
son, where did you find all this:gold?" By
the side of a lake," said the youth, where
there is plenty more to be had." Pray, tell
me," said the king, that I may go and get
some too." As much as you please," replied
the other; you will see the ferryman on the
lake, let him carryyou across, and there you will
see gold as plentiful as sand upon the shore."
Away went the greedy king; and when he
came to the lake, he beckoned to the ferryman,
who took him into his boat, and as soon as he
was there gave the rudder into his hand, and
sprung ashore, leaving the old king to ferry
away as a reward for his sins.
And is his majesty plying there to this
day?" You may be sure of that, for nobody
will trouble himself to take the rudder out of
his hands.
THE FROG-PRINCE.
ONE fine evening a young princess went into
a wood, and sat down by the side of a cool
spring of water. She had a golden ball in her
hand, which was her favourite play-thing, and
230 00239.jpg
THE FROG-PRINCE.
she amused herself with tossing it into the air
and catching it again as it fell. After a time
she threw it up so high that when she stretched
out her hand to catch it, the ball bounded away
and rolled along upon the ground, till at last it
fell into the spring. The princess looked into
the spring after her ball; but it was very deep,
so deep that she could not see the bottom of it.
Then she began to lament her loss, and said,
" Alas if I could only get my ball again, I
would give all my fine clothes and jewels, and
every thing that I have in the world." Whilst
she was speaking a frog put its head out of the
water, and said Princess, why do you weep
so bitterly?" 'Alas!" said she, "what can
you do for me, you nasty frog ? My golden
ball has fallen into the spring." The frog said,
'" I want not your pearls and jewels and fine
clothes; but if you will love me and let me live
with you, and eat from your little golden plate,
and sleep upon your little bed, I will bring you
your ball again." What nonsense," thought
the princess, this silly frog is talking I He
can never get out of the well: however, he
may be able to get my ball for me; and there-
fore I will promise him what he asks." So she
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232 00240.jpg
THE FROG-PRINCE.
little bed, where he slept all night long. As
soon as it was light he jumped up, hopped
down stairs, and went out of the house.
" Now," thought the princess, he is gone,
and I shall be troubled with him no more."
But she was mistaken; for when night came
again, she heard the same tapping at the door,
and when she opened it, the frog came in and
slept upon her pillow as before till the morning
broke; and the'third night he did the same:
but when the princess awoke on the following
morning, she was astonished to see, instead of
the frog, a handsome prince gazing on her with
the most beautiful eyes that ever were seen,
and standing at the head of her bed.
He told her that he had been enchanted by
a malicious fairy, who had changed him into
the form of a frog, in which he was fated to
remain till some princess should take him out
of the spring and let him sleep upon her bed
for three nights. You," said the prince,
" have broken this cruel charm, and now I
have nothing to wish for but that you should
go with me into my father's kingdom, where
I will marry you, and love you as long as
you live."
The Fox and the Horse
233 00241.jpg
210 THE FOX AND THE HORSE.
The young princess, you may be sure, was
not long in giving her consent; and as they
spoke, a splendid carriage drove up with eight
beautiful horses decked with plumes of fea-
thers and golden harness, and behind rode the
prince's servant, the faithful Henry, who had
bewailed the misfortune of his dear master so
long and bitterly that his heart had well nigh
burst. Then all set out full of joy for the
Prince's kingdom; where they arrived safely,
and lived happily a great many years.
THE FOX AND THE HORSE.
A FARMER had a horse that had been an ex-
cellent faithful servant to him: but he was now
grown too old to work: so the farmer would
give him nothing more to eat, and said I
want you-no longer, so take yourself off out of
my stable: I shall not take 3 ou back again
until you are stronger than a lion." Then he
opened the door and turned him adrift.
The poor horse was very melancholy,"and
wandered up and down in the wood, seeking
some little shelter from the cold wind and rain.
234 00242.jpg
THE FOX AND THE HORSE.
Presently a fox met him: What's the matter,
my friend?" said he, "why do you hang down
your head and looks lonely and woe-begone?"
"Ah!" replied the horse, "justice and avarice
never dwell in one house; my master has for-
gotten all that I have done for him so many
years, and because I can no longer work he
has turned me adrift, and says unless I 'be-
come stronger than a lion he will not take
me back again; what'chance can I have of
that ? he knows I have none, or he would not
talk so."
However, the fox bid him be of good cheer,
and said, "I will help you; lie down there,
stretch yourself out quite stiff, and pretend to
be dead." :The horse did as he was told, and
the fox went straight to the lion who lived in
a cave close by, and said to him, A little
way off lies a dead horse; come with me and
you may make an excellent meal of his car-
case." The lion was greatly pleased, and set
off immediately: and when they came to the
horse, the fox said You will not be able to
eat him comfortably here; I'll tell you what-
I will tie you fast to his tail, and then you can
235 00245.jpg
212 THE FOX AND TIHE HORSE;
draw him to your den, aud eat him at your
leisure."
This advice pleased the lion, so he laid him-
self down quietly for the fox to make him fast
to the horse. But the fox managed to tie his
legs together, and bound all so hard and fast
that with all his strength he could not set him-
self fi-ee. When the work was done, the fox
clapped the horse on the shoulder, and said
"Jip Dobbin Jip! Then up he sprang,
and moved off, dragging the lion behind him.
The beast began to roar and bellow, till all the
birds of the wood flew away for fright; but
the horse let him sing on, and made his way
quietly over the fields to his master's house.
'Here he is, master," said he, I have got
the better of him:" nnd when the farmer saw
his old servant, his heart relented, and lie said
" Thou shalt stay in thy stable and be well
taken care of." And so the poor old horse
had plenty to eat, and lived-till he died.
236 00245a.jpg
i, ; ,,
FA/*
ITT 75ATOBllr~-
Rumpel-stilts-kin
237 00246.jpg
RUMPEL-STILTS-KIN.
IN a certain kingdom once lived a poor miller
who had a very beautiful daughter. She was
moreover exceedingly shrewd and clever; and
the miller was so vain and proud of her, that he
one day told the king of the land that hisda ugh-
ter could spin gold out of straw. Now this king
was very fond of money; and when he heard
the miller's boast, his avarice was excited, and
he ordered the girl to be brought before him.
Then he led her to a chamber where there
was a great quantity of straw, gave her a spin-
ning-wheel, and said "All this must be spun
into gold before morning, as'you value your
life." It was in vain that the poor maiden
declared that she could do no such thing, the
chamber was locked and she remained alone.
She sat down in one corner of the room and
:began to lament over her hard fate, when on
a sudden the door opened, and a droll-looking
little man hobbled in, and said Good morrow
to: you, my good lass, what are you weeping
238 00247.jpg
RUMPEL-STILTS-KIN.
for?" "Alas!" answered she, "I must spin
this straw into gold, and I know not how."
"What will you give me," said the little man,
"to do it for you ?" My necklace," replied
the maiden. He took her at her word, and
sat himself down to the wheel; round about
it went merrily, and presently the work was
done and the gold all spun.
When the king came and saw this, he was
greatly astonished and pleased; but his heart
grew still more greedy of gain, and he shut up
the poor miller's daughter again with a fresh
task. Then she knew not what to do, and sat
down once more to weep; but the little man
presently opened the door, and said What
will you give me to do your task?" "The
ring on my finger," replied she. So her little
friend took the ring, and began to work at
the wheel, till by the morning all was finished
again.'
The king was vastly delighted to see all
this glittering treasure; but still he was not
satisfied, and took the miller's daughter into
a yet larger room, and said "All this must be
spun to-night; and if you succeed, you shall be
239 00248.jpg
IUMPEL-STILTS-KIN.
my queen." As soon as she was alone the
dwarf came in, and said "What will you give
me to spin gold for you this third time ?" "I
have nothing left," said she. "Then promise
me," said the little man, "your first little child
when you are queen." "That may never be,"
thought the miller's daughter: and as she
knew no other way to get her task done, she
promised him what he asked, and he spun
once more the whole heap of gold. The king
came in the morning, and finding all he
wanted, married her, and so the miller's
daughter really became queen.
At the birth ofher first little child the queen
rejoiced very much, and forgot the little man
and her promise; but one day he came into
her chamber and reminded her of it. Then
she grieved sorely at her misfortune, and of-
fered him all the treasures of the kingdom in
exchange; but in vain, till at last her tears
softened him, and he said "I will give you
three days' grace, and if during that time you
tell me my hame, you shall keep your child."
Now the queen lay awake all night, think-
ing of all the odd names that she had ever
240 00249.jpg
TRUMPEL-STILTS- KIN.
heard, and dispatched messengers all over the
land to inquire after new ones. The next day
the little man came, and she began with Ti-
mothy, Benjamin, Jeremiah, and all the names
she could remember; but to all of them he
said, "That's not my name."
The second day she began with all the co-
mical names she could hear .of. Bandy-legs,
Hunch-back, Crook-shanks, and so oni; but
the little gentleman still said to every one of
them, That's not my name."
The third day one of the messengers came
back, and said "I can hear of no other
names; but yesterday, :as I was climbing a
high hill among the trees of the forest here
the fox and .the hare bid each other good
night, I saw a little hut, and before.the hut
burnt a fire, and round about the fire a
funny little man danced upon one leg, and
sang
"Merr ily the feast I'll make,
To-day I'll brew, to-morrow bake;
Merrily I'll dance and sing,
For next day will a stranger bring:
Little does my lady dream
SRumpel-Stilts-kin is my name !"
16
241 00250.jpg
RUMPEL-STILTS-KIN. 217
When the queen heard this, she jumped for
joy, and as soon as her little visitor came, and
said Now, lady, what is my name ?" Is it
John?" asked she. No!" "Is it Tom?"
" No!"
"Can your name be Rumpel-stilts-kin ? "
" Some witch told you that! Some witch told
you that!" cried the little man, and dashed
his right foot in a rage so deep into the floor,
that he was forced to lay hold of it with both
hands to pull it out. Then he made the best
of his way off, while every body laughed at
him for having all his trouble for nothing.
242 00251.jpg
Notes
243 00252.jpg
N T El S.
Preface, p. vii.-We have another popular song to
the Lady-bird under a different name,
-" Bless you, bless you, Buinie-bee,
Tell me when your wedding be;
If it be to-morrow day,
Take your wings and fly away."
Hans in Luck, p. 1.-The "Hans im Ghick" of
MM. Grimm; a story of popular currency communicated
by Aug. Wernicke to the liinschelrutte, a peiodcal
publication, IIS, No. 33,-A friend informs us, that
this story is well known in the northern parts of En-
gland.
The TravellingMusicians, or The JTT( i of Bretneni,p.9.
-The" Bremer Stadtmusikanten of Grinln; current
in Paderborn. Rollenhagen, who in th: 16th century
wrote his poem called Frosherimdueler, (a collection of
popular satirical dramatic scenes, in which animals are'
the acting characters.) has admirably versified the lead-
ing incidents of this story. The occup:Ait parties who
are ejected hvythe travellers are, with him, wild beats,
244 00253.jpg
2'Q NOTES.
not robbers. The Germans are eminently successful in
their beast stories. The origin of them it is not easy to
trace: as early as the age of the Minnesingers (in the
beginning of the 13th century) a collection of fables,
told with great spirit and humour by Boner, was cur-
rent; but they are 'more 1Esopian, and have not the
dramatic and instructive character of the tales before
us, which bear the features of the oldest Oriental fables.
In later times Reineke de Vosa seems to be the matured
result of this taste, and whether originating in Germany
or elsewhere, it had there its chief popularity. To that
cycle belong manyof the tales collected by MM.Grimm;
and accordingly the Fox is constantly present, and dis-
plays every where the same characteristics. The moral
tendency of these delightful fables is almost invariably
exemplary; theyalways give their rewards to virtue and
humanity, and afford protection to the weaker but more
amiable animals, against their wily or violent aggres-
sors. Man is sometimes introduced, but generally, as
in The Dog and the Sparrow," to his disadvantage,
and for the purpose of reproof and correction.
The Golden Bird, p. 16.-" Der Goldene Vogel'" a
Hessian story; told also with slight variations in Pader-
born. The substance of this tale, in which the Golden
Bird is generally called the Phoenix, is of great antiquity.
Perinskiold in the catalogue to Hickes mentions the
Saga afArtus Fagra, and describes the contents thus:
'' Hist. de tribus fratribus, Carolo, Vilhialmo, atque Ar-
turo, cogn. Fagra, regis Anglim filiis, qui ad inquiren-
dum Phoenicem, ut e. curaretur morbus immedicabilis
patris illorum, in ultimas usque Indie oras missi sunt."
245 00254.jpg
NOTES.
It appears that the same subject forms a Danish popu-
lar tale. The youngest and successful son' is a cha-
racter of perpetual recurrence in the German tales. He
is generally despised for diminutive stature, or sup-
posed inferiority of intellect, and passes bythe con-
temptuous appellation of the Dummling," of whom
we shall have occasion to say more hereafter.
The Fisherjimai and his Wifej p. 27.-" De Fischer
un siine Fru," a story in the Pomeranian Low German
dialect, admirably adapted to this species of narrative,
and particularly pleasing to an English ear, as bearing
a remarkable affinity to his own language, or rather that
of the Lowland-Scotch. Take the second sentence as
a specimen: "Daar satt he eens an de see, bi de angel,
un sach in dat blanke water, un he sach immer (ever)
na de angel," &c. During the fervour of popular feel-
ing on the downfall of.the power of the-late Emperor
of France, this tale became a great favourite. In the
original the last object of the wife's desires is to be as
"de lewe Gott" (der liebe Gott, le bon Dieu). We
have softened the boldness of the lady's ambition.
The Tnmtit anrl the Bear, p. 38 -" DerZaunk6nigund
der Bar;" from Zwehrn. We have Reynard here in his
proper character, and the smaller animals triumphing
by superior wit over the larger, in the same manner as
in many of the Northern traditions the dwarfs obtain a
constant superiority over their opponents the giants.
In TIhti Nameh's eighth fable [Calcutta and London,
1801], an elephant is punished for an attack upon the
sparrow's nest, by an alliance which she forms with an-
other bird, a frog, and a bee.
246 00255.jpg
NOTES.
The Twelve Dancing Princesses, p. 43.-" Die zer-
tanzten Schuhe;" a Munster tale; known also with va-
riations in other parts, and even in Poland, according
to the report made by Dobrowsky to MM. Grimm.
The story is throughout of a very'Oriental cast, except
that the:soldier has the benefit of the truly Northern
Nebel, or Tarn-kappe, which makes the wearer invisi-
ble. It should be observed, however, that in the Cal-
muck Relations of Ssidi Kur we have the cap, the
wearer of which is seen neither by the gods nor men,
nor Tchadkurrs," and also the swiftly moving boots or
shoes.
Rose-Bud, p 51.-" Dornr6schen;" a Hessian story.
We have perhaps in our:alterationof the heroine's name
lost one of the. links of connexion, which M. Grimm
observe between this fable and that of the ancient tra-
dition of the iretoration of Biyrihilda, by Sigurd, as
narrated in.the Edda of Smmund, in l'iiUoi a ,,S'u.
Sig'id pleices the enchantEd fortifications, and rouses
the heroine. "Who is it," said she, "of might sufficient,
to rend my armour and to break my sleep? She after-
wards tells the cause of her trance: "Two kings con-
tended; one light Hialmgunnar, and he was old but of
mickle might, and Odin had promised him the victory.
I felled him in fght ; but Odin struck my head with the
sleepy-thorn, [the Thorn-rose or Dog-rose, see Alt-
deutsche Walder, I. 135.] and said I should never be
again victorious, and should be hereafter wedded." Her-
bert's Miscell. Poetry, vol. ii. p. 23. Though the allu-
sion to the sleep-rose is preserved in our heroine's
name, she suffers from the wound of a spindle, as in the
Pentamerone of G. B. Basile, V. 5, The further pro-
247 00256.jpg
NOTES.
gFessof Sigurd's, or Siegfried's, adventures will be seen
in "The King of the Golden Mountain."
Tom Thumb, p. 57.-The Daumesdick of Grimm,
from Miihlheim, on the Rhine. In this tale the hero
appears in his humblest domestic capacity; but there
are others in whichhe plays a most important and he-
roic character, as the outwitter and vanquisher of giants
and other powerful enemies, the favourite of fortune,
and the winner of the hands of kings' daughters. WO
should have been glad, if it had been consistent with the
immediate design of this publication, to have given two
or three other stories from different parts of Germany,
illustrative of the worth and ancient descent of the per-
sonage who appears with the same general characteris-
tics, under the variouss names in England of Tom Thumb,
Tom-a-lyn, Tamlane, Tommel-finger, &c.; in Germany
oi Dauniesdick, Daumling, Daunerling and Dutmnling
rfor though the latter word bears a different and inde-
pendent meaning, we incline to think it originally the
same); in Austria of Daumenlang; in Denmark of Svend
Tomling, or Swain Tomling; and further north, as the
Thaumlin, or dwarfish hero of Scandinavia.
We must refer to the Quarterly Review, No. XLT.,
for a speculation as to the connexion of Tom's adven-
tures, particularly that with the cow, with some of the
mysteries of Indian mythology. It must suffice here
briefly to notice the affinities which some of the present
stories bear to the earliest Northern traditions, leaving
the reader to determine whether,.as Hearne concludes,
our hero was King Edgar's page, or, as tradition says,
ended his course and found his last home at Lincoln.
248 00257.jpg
2% NOTES.
In one of the German stories, "Des Schneiders Dau-
merling Wanderschaft," (the Travels of the Tailor's
Thumbling,) his first wandering is through the re-
cesses of a glove, to escape his mother's anger. So
Thor, in the 23rd fable of the Edda, reposes in the
giant's glove. In another story, Der junge Riese"
(The young Giant), the hero is in his youth a thumb
long; but, being nurtured by a giant, acquires wonder-
ful power, and passes through a variety of adventures,
resembling at various times thoseof Siegfried,or Sigurd,
(the doughty champion, who according to the Helden-
buch caught the lions in the woods and hung them
over the walls by their tails"), of Thor,andof Grettir(the
hero who kept geese on the common), and correspond-
ing with the achievements ascribed in England to his
namesake, to Jack the Giant-killer, and Tom Hycophric
(whose sphere of action Hearne would limit to the
contracted boundaries of Tylney in Norfolk), and in the
Servian tale, quoted by MM. Grimm from Schottky,
given to "the son of the bear," Medvedovitsh.
He serves the smith, whose history as the Velint (or
Weyland) of Northern fable is well known; outwits,
like Eulen-spiegel (Owl-glass), those who are by na-
ture his betters wields a weapon as powerful as
Thor's hammer; and, like his companion, is somewhat
impregnable to tolerably rude attacks. He is equally
voracious, too, with Loke, whose art consisted in eat-
ing more than any other man in the world," and with
the son of Odin, when "busk'd as a bride so fair," in
the Song of Thrym,
Betimes at evening he approached,
And the mantling ale the giants broached;
249 00258.jpg
NOTES.'
The spouse ofSifia ate alone
Eiglt salmon's and an ox full grown,
And all the cates on which women feed,
And drank three firkins of sparkling mead.".
HERBERT's Icelandic Poetry, i. p. 6.
In one of the tales before us, a mill-stone is treache-
rously thrown upon him while employed in digging at
the bottom of a well. Drive away the hens," said he;
they scratch the sand about till it flies into my eyes:'
So in the Edda, the Giant Skrymmer only notices the
dreadful blows of Thor's hammer as the falling of a leaf,
or some other trifling matter. In the English story of
Jack the Giant-killer, Jack under similar circumstances
says, that a rat had given him three or four slaps with
his tail.
In the story of "The Kingof the Golden Mountain," it
vill be seen how the giants are outwitted and deprived
of the great Northern treasures, thetarn-kap,the shoes,
and the sword, which are equally renowned in the re-
cords of the Niebelungen-lied and Niflunga Saga, and
in our own Jack the Giant-killer. The other Thumb
tales- are full of such adventures. They are all exceed-
ingly curious, and deserve to be brought together in,
one view as forming a singular group. At present we
can only ri-fer to the pages of MM. Grimm, and parti-
cularly to the observations in their notes.
The Gratefid Beasts, p. 68.-" Die treuen Thiere;"
from the Schwalmgegend, in Hesse. It is singular
that nearly the same story is. to be found in the Re-
lations of Ssidi Kur, a collection of tales current
among the Calmuck Tartars. A benevolent Bramin.
250 00259.jpg
%6i, NOTES,-
there receives the grateful assistance of a mouse, a
bear, and a monkey, whom he has severally rescued
from the hands of their tormentors; Quarterly Review,
No. XLI. p. 99. There is a very similar story, "fLo
Scarafone, lo Sorece, e lo Grillo," in the Pentame-
rone, iii. 5. Another in the same work, iv. I, La
Preta de lo Gallo," embraces the incidents of the latter
part of our tale. The Gesta Romanorum also con-
tains a fable somewhat similar in plot, though widely
different in details. The cunning device of the mouse
reminds MM.Grimm of Loke, in the form of a fly, sting-
ing the sleeping Freya till she throws off her necklace.
Jorinda andJorindel,.p 75,-" Jorinde und Joringel."
This is taken from Heinrich Stillings Leben, i.104-108;
but a story or precisely the same nature is popular in
the Schwalmgegend.
The Waggish Muscian, p. 81.-" Der Wunderliche
Spielmann," from Lorsch, by Worms. The story seems
imperfect, as no. reason appears for the spite of the
musician towards the animals who follow his Orphean
strains.
The Queen Bee, p. 86.-" Die Bienen-k6nigin;" from
Hesse; where another story of similar plot is current.
The resemblance to that of "The Grateful Beasts,"
will of course be obvious. We have here the favourite
incident of the despised and neglected member of the
family, who bears the, name of "Dummling," setting
out on his adventures, and overcoming all disadvan-
tages by talent and virtue. (See note on The Gol-
251 00260.jpg
NOTES;
den Goose," in which story we have left the hero his
name, as perhaps we ought to have done here.) MM.
Grimm mention a Jewish tale of Rabbi Chanina who
befriends a raven, a hound, and a fish, and.receives si-
milar tokens of gratitude. In hle Hungali;n stolie..
collected from popular narration by Georg von Gaal,
(Vienna, 1822,) there is one (No. 8.) to the same effect.
The incident of picking up the pearls will remind .the
reader of the task of Psyche, in Apulehw, lib. vi.,. in
which she is assisted by the ants.
The Dog and the Sparrow, p. 90.-" Der Hund und
der Sperling;" told with variations in Zwehrn, Hesse,
and. Gttingen.
Frederick and Catherine, p. 96.-" Der Frieder und
das Catherlieschen;" from Zwehrn and Hesse. Some
of the incidents in this story are to be found in that of
Bardiello, in the Pentamerone, i. 4. We have frequent-
ly heard it told in our younger days as a popular story
in England.
The Three Children'of Fortune, p. 106.-" Die drei
Gliickskinder;" from Paderborn. It is not necessary to
point out the coincidence of. one of the adventures of.
this itru y with that of Whittington, once Lord Mayor of
London. But it is not merely in Germany that the
same tale is traced. We learn from Mr. Morier's en-
tertaining narrative that Whittiugton's cat realized its
price in India." In Italy, the merry priest Arlotto
told the story in his Facezie, before the Lord Mayor
was born or thought of; be describes the adventure
252 00261.jpg
%28, NOTES.
as happening to a Geneway merchant, and adds that
another upon hearing of the profitable adventure made
a voyage to Rat Island with a precious cargo, for which
the king repaid him with one of the cats.--Quarterly
Review, XLI. p 100.
King Grisy-beard, p. 11 .-" K6nig Drossetbart;"
from Hesse, the Main and Paderborn./ The story of
La Soperbia castecata," Pentamnerone, iv. 10, has a
similar turn. There are of course many other tales in
different countries, having for their burthen "The
Taming of the Shrew." It hardly need be observed
that our title is not meant as a translation of the Ger-
man name,
Chanticleer and Partlet, p. 118. This comprizes
free stories, "Das Lumpengesindel," Herr Kor-
bes," and Von dem Tod des Hiihnchens," from Pa-
derborn, the Main and H-esse, placed together as natu-
rally forming one continuous piece of biography. We
shall perhaps be told that the whole is tolerably child-
ish; but we wished to give a specimen of each variety of
these tales, and at the same time an instance of the
mode in which inanimate objects are pressed into the
service. The death of Hiihnchen forms a balladized
story published in Wunderhorn, vol. iii., among the
Kinderlieder. Who "Herr Korbes" is, or what his
name imports, we know not; and we should therefore
observe that we have of our own authority alone turned
him into an enemy, and named him the fox," in order
to give some sort of reason for the outrage committed
on his hospitality by uninvited guests.
253 00262.jpg
NOTES.
SSnow-drop, p. 128.-" Sneewitchen;" told with se-
veral minor variations in Hesse also at Vienna with
more important alterations. In one version, Spiegel
(the glass) is the name of a dog, who performs the
part of the queen's monitor. The wish of the queen
which opens this story has been illustrated in the A-lt.
deutsche Walder, vol. i. p. 1, in a dissertation on a cu-
rious passage in Wolfram von Eschenbach's romance
of Parcifal, where the hero bursts forth into a pathetic
allusion to his lady's charms on seeing drops of blood
fallen on snow,
Trois gotes de fres sane
Qui enluminoient le blane,"
as Chretien de Troyes expresses it in the French ro-
mance on the same subject;
-- panse tant, qu'il s'oblie;
Ausins estoit en son avis
Li vermauz sor le blanc asis,
Come les gotes de sane furent,
Qui desor le blanc aparurent;
Au l'esgarder, que il faisoit,
Li est avis, tant li pleisoit,
Qu'il veist la color novelle
De la face s'amie belle."
Several parallel wishes are selected from the ancient
traditionary stories of different countries, from the Irish
legend of Deirda and Navis, the son of Visneach, in
Keating's History of Ireland, to the Neapolitan stories
in Pentamerone, iv. 9. & v. 8.
O cielo!" says the hero in the latter, e non por-
ria havere un mogliere acossi janco, e rossa, comme e
chella preta, e che havesse li capello e le ciglia acossi
254 00263.jpg
NOTES;
negro, come fo le penne di chisto cuervo," &c. The
unfading corpse placed in the glass coffin is to be found
also in the Pentamerone, ii. 8. (la Schiavottella): and in
Haralds Saga, Snifridr his beauteous wife dies, but her
countenance changes iot, its bloom continuing; and
the king sits by the body watching it three years.
The dwarfs who appearing this story are of genuine
Northern descent. They are Metallarii, live in moun-
tains, and are of the benevolent class; for it must be
paiticulaily observed that this, and the mischievous
race, are clearly distinguishable. The Heldenbuch
says, "God produced the dwarfs because, the moun-
tains lay waste'and useless, and valuable stores of sil-
ver and gold with gems and pearls were concealed in
them. Therefore he made them right wise, and
crafty, that they could distinguish good and bad, and to
what use all things should be applied. They knew the
use of gems ; that some of them gave strength to the
wearer, others made him invisible, which were called
fog-caps; therefore God gave art and wisdom to them,
that they built them hollow hills," &c. (Illustrations
of Northern Antiquities, p. 41.) The most beautiful
example of the ancient Teutonic romance is that which
contains the adventures, and the description of the
abode in the mountains, of Laurin the King of the
Dwarfs. Those who wish to obtain full and accurate
information on the various species, habits and manners
of these, sons of the mountains, may consult Olaus
Magnus, or, at far greater length, the Anthropodemus,
Plutonicus of Praetdrius.
We ought to observe that this story has been some-
what shortened by us, the style of telling it in the ori-
255 00264.jpg
NOTES.
ginal being rather diffuse;; and we have not entered
into the particulars of the queen's death, which in the
German is occasioned by the truly Northern punish-
ment of being obliged to dance in red-hot slippers or
shoes.
The Elves and the Shoemaker, p. 140.-" Die Wich-
telmanner-von einem Schuster dem sie die Arbeit ge-
macht," a Hessian tale. We have no nomenclature
sufficiently accurate for the classification of the goblin
,tribes of the North. The personages now before us-
are of the benevolent and working class ; they partake
of the general character given of such personages by
Olaus Magnus, and of the particular qualities of the
Housemen (Hausminner), for whose,history we must.
refer to Prcetorius, cap. viii. These sprites were
of a very domestic turn, attaching themselves to par-
ticular households, very pleasant inmates when favour-
ably disposed, very troublesome when of a mischievous
temperament, and generally expecting some share of
the good things of the family .as a reward for services
which they were not accustomed to give gratuitously.
"The drudging goblin" works, but does so
To earn his cream-bowl duly set,
When in one night, e'er glimpse of morn,
His shadowy flail had thresh'd.the corn,
That ten day labourers could not end."
MILTON, L'Allegro.
TTe Turnip, p. 143.-"-Die Riibe." The first part
of this story is well known. The latter part is the sub-
ject, of an old Latin poem of the 14th century, entitled
"Raparius" (who was probably the versfil,, i i i-t;ng
256 00265.jpg
NOTES.
in MS. at Strasburg, and also at Vienna. MM.
Grimm think they see, through the comic dress of
this story, various allusions to ancient Northern tra-
4itions, and they particularly refer to the wise man
(Runa capituli), who imbibes knowledge in his airy sus-
pension.
Veit ek, at ek hiek vindga meidi a
Natur allar niu.
Tha nam ek frevaz ok frodr vera.
"I know that I hung on the wind-agitated tree nine
full nights; there began I to become-wise."
Old Sultan, p. 149.-" Der alte Sultan;" from Hesse
and Paderborn ; in four versions, each varying in some
slight particulars.
The Lady and the Lion, p. 153.-" Das singende,
springende Loweneckerchen;" from Hesse. Another
version with variations comes from the Schwalmgegend,
and from this latter we have taken the opening inci-
dent of the summer and winter garden, in preference to
the parallel adventure in the story which MM. G(imm
have adopted in their text. We have made two or three
other alterations in the way of curtailment of portions of
the story. The common tale of Beauty and the Beast "
has always some affinity to the legend of Cupid and
Psyche. In the present version of the same fable the
resemblance is striking throughout. The poor he-
roine pays the price of her imprudence in being com-
pelled to wander over the world in search of her hus-
band; she goes to heavenly powers for assistance in
her misfortunes, and at last, when within reach of the
257 00266.jpg
NOTES.
object of her hopes, is near being defeated by the al-
lurements of pleasure. Mrs. Tighe's beautiful poem
would seem purposely to describe some of the imme-
diate incidents of our tale, particularly that of the
dove.
The incidents in which the misfortune originates are
to be found in Pentamerone ii. 9 (Lo Catenaccio), and
still further in v. 4 (Lo Turzo d'Oro). The scene in the
bridegroom's chamber is in Pentam. v. 3 (Pintosmauto).
Prmtorius, ii. p. 266, gives a Beauty and the Beast story
from Sweden.
The Jew in the Bush, p. 163.-" Der Jude im Dorn.n
The dance-inspiring instrument will be recognized, in
its most romantic and dignified form, as Oberon's Horn
in Huon de Bordeaux. The dance in the bush forms
the subject of two old German dramatic pieces of the
16th century. A disorderly monk occupies the place
of the Jew; the waggish musician is called Dulla,
whom MM. Grimm connect with Tyll or Dill Eulen-
spiegel (Owl-glass), and the Swedish and Scandina-
vian word, Thulr, (facetus, nugator,) the clown and
minstrel of the populace. In Herrauds ok Bosa Saga,
the table, chairs, &c. join the dance. Merlin in the
old romance is entrapped into a bush, by a charm given
him by his mistress Viviane.
In England we have A mery Geste of the Feree and
the Boye, first emprynted at London in Flete-streete,
at the sygne of the Sonne, by Wynkyn de Worde,"
and edited by Ritson in his Pieces of ancient popular
Poetry. Thy boy receives
-- "'a bowe
Byrdes for to shete,"
258 00267.jpg
NOTES.
and a pipe of marvellous power
"All that may the pype here
Shall not themselfe stere,
But laugh and lepe aboute"
The third gift is a most special one for the annoyance
of his stepdame. The dancing trick is first played on
a "Frere," who loses
His cope and his scapelary
And all his other wede."
And the urchin's ultimate triumph is over the "offy-
cyall" before whom he is brought.
The King of the Golden Mountain, p. 169. -" Der
Kinig vom Goldenen Berg;" from Zwehrn and other
quarters. There are many remarkable features in this
story, more especially its striking resemblance to the
story of Sigurd or Siegfried, as it is to be collected
from the Edda, the Volsunga-Saga, IlI'ilkina Saga, the
Niebeliungen Lied,'and the. popular tale of The Horiu
SiLgfried. It is neatly abridged in Herbert's Misc. Poe-
try, vol. ii. part ii. p. 14. The placing upon the waters;
the arrival at the castle of the dragon or snake; the
treasures there; the disenchantment of Brynhilda (see
our tale of Rose-Bid j; the wishing ring; the gift of the
ring or girdle; the separation from which jealousy
and mischief are to flow; the disguise of the old cloak,
which we can easily believe to have been a genuine
tarn-cap; the encountering of the discordant guardians
of the treasures, as in the Niebelungen Lied; the won-
derful sword Balmung or Mimung;
"(Thro' hauberk as thro' harpelon
The smith's son swerd shall hew; )"
"Ettin Langshanks," translated from the Kiimpe Visir
in the Illustratious of Northern antiquities.
259 00268.jpg
NOTES;
the boots once worn by Loke when he escaped from
Valhalla;"r and the ultimate revenge; are all points
more or less coincident with adventures well known.to
those who have made the old fables of the'North the
objects of their researches. It should be recollected,
however, that both the cap of invisibility and. the boot
of swiftness are to be found in the Relations of Ssidi
Kur. The Hungarian tales published'by Georg VorGial,
Vienna, 1822, contain one very similar to this in many
particulars. Three dwarfs are there the inheritors of,
the wonderful treasures, which consist of a cloak, mile-
shoes, and a purse which is always full.
. The Golden-Goose, p. 178.-" Die Goldene Gans ;"
from Hesse and Paderborn. "The manner in which
Loke, in the Edda, hangs to the.eagle is," MM.Grimm:
observe, "better understood after -a perusal of thec
story of the Golden Goose, to which the lads and la.ses
who touch it adhere."- Quart. Bev. xw, They add tliat
the Golden Goose,.buried at the root Qf ~ar.Qaki and,
fated to be the reward of virtue, and to bring blessing
qn itsvowner, seems- only one of the vaiious types by
l icli. in these tales, happiness, wealth and power, are
conferred on the favourites of fortune. The prize is
here poetically desciibcd ai so attractive, that whatever
approaches clings to it as to a magnet.
The Dummling is drawn with his usual characteris-
tics; he is sometimes inferior in stature, sometimes in
intellect, and at other times in both ; his resemblance
to the Diumling or Thumbling is obvious; and though
his name has now an independent meaning, perhaps
we should suspect it to have been originally the same;
unless the appearance of the character in the Penta-
260 00269.jpg
NOTES.
merone iii. 8, by the unambiguous name of Lo Gno-
rante," be against our theory. \e leave this singular
personage in the hands of MM. Grimm, referring also.:
to the Altdeutsche Walder, where our hero is pointed
out as appearing under the appellation of "Dumme-
klare" in the romance of Parcifal .
Mrs. For, p. 184.-"Von der Frau Fiichsin." A po-
pular fable in several places, clearly belonging.to the
class of which Reynard the Fox is the chief.
Hansel and Grettel, p. 188.-The first part of Bril-
derchen und Schwesterchen;" the remainder we omitted
as branching into a new series of distinct adventures.
Thestoryis very common in Germany, and is also known
in Sweden. Praetorius, vol. ii., p. 255, will give the
curious the whole art, mystery and history, of trans.
formation of men into animals. This story is one of a
most numerous class, in which a stepniother unsuccess-
fully exerts a malicious influence over her charge..
The Giant with the three Golden Hairs, p. 195.- Der
Teufel mit den drei Goldnen Haaren;" from Zwehrn,,
the Main and Hesse. We have taken the appellation
"Giant" to avoid offence, and felt less reluctancein
the alteration when we found that some other versions
of the same story (as the Popanz in Biseching's Volks-
sagen) omit the diabolic agency. For similar seasons
we have not called the cave by its proper name of
"H611e," the Scandinavian Hell. The old lady called
in the German the Eller-mutter," we suspect has
some connexion with the Scandinavian deity "Hela,"
or Hella," whom Odin, (when he "'saddled straight
261 00270.jpg
NOTES.
his coal-black steed,") Hermod Huat, and Brynhilda;
after crossing the water as here, severally found in
the same position, at the entrance of the infernal re-
gions.
The child is described in our translation as owing its
reputation to being born under a lucky star. In the
original it is born with a Gliickshaut (caul). The tra-
dition in Iceland is that a good genius dwells in this en-
velope, who accompanies and blesses the child through
life. The giant's powers of scent will of course remind
the curious reader of the
"Snouk but, Snouk ben,
I find the smell of earthly men,"
in Jack and the Bean-stalk.
So in Mad Tom's'ballad in Shakespeare,
Child Rowland to the dark tower came-'
His word was still-Fie, Foh, Fum,
I smell the blood of a British man," &c.
Is Child Rowlandthe liebste Roland" of the Ger-
man popular story, No. 56 of MM. Grimm's collectionZ
The similarity of the "Child's" adventures with those
of Danish ballads in the Kampe Viser has been pointed
out by Jamieson in his Popular Ballads, and in the Il.
lustrations of Northern Antiquities, p. 397.
-The Fr'og-prince, p. 205.-" Der Froschk6nig, oder.
der-Eiserne Heinrich." This story is from Hesse, but
is also told in other parts with variations. It is one of
the oldest German tales, as well as of extensive cur-
rency elsewhere. Dr. Leyden gives a story of the
" Frog-lover as popular in Scotland. A lady is sent
262 00271.jpg
NOTES.
byjier step-mother to draw water from theVWell of the
World's End. She arrives at the well after encounter-
ing many dangers, but soon perceives that her adven-
tures have not reached a conclusion; a frog emerges
from the well, and before it suffers hei' to draw water
obliges her to betroth herself to him under penalty of
being torn to pieces. The. lady returns safe; but at mid-
night the frog-lover appears at the door and demands
entrance, according to promise, to the great consterna-
tion of the lady and her nurse.
Open the door, my hinny, my heart,
Open the door, mine ain wee thing;
And mind.the words that you and I spak
Down in the meadow by the well-spring."
The frog isadmitted, and addresses her,
Take me upon your knee, my dearie,
Take me upon your knee, my dearie,
And mind the words that you and I spak
At the cauld well sae weary."
The frog is finally.disenchanted, and appears as aw
prince, in his original form. (See Complaint of Scotland,
Edin. 1801.) "These enchanted frogs," says the Quar-
terly Reviewer, have migrated from afar, and we sus-
pect that they were originally crocodiles: we trace
them in The Relations of Ssidi Kur." The name
rron Heniy" in the 'Germah title alludes tdoan inci-
dent which we have omitted, though it is one ofconsi-
derable antiquity. The story proceeds to tell how
Henry,from grief at hi, master's misfiLrtune, had bound
his heart with iron bands to prevent its bursting; and a
doggrel is added, in whidc the prince on his journey,
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NOTES.
hearing, the cracking of the bands which his" servant is
now rending asunder as useless, inquires if the car-
riage is breaking, and receives an explanation of the
cause of the'disturbance.
Heinrich, der Wagen bricht "
Nein, Herr, der Wagen nicht:
Es ist ein Band von-meinem Herzen,
S )as da lag in grossen Schmerzen,
Als ihr in dem Brunnen sast
SAls ihr eine Fretsche (Frosch) wast."
In several of the poets of the age of the Minnesingers
the suffering heart is described as confined in bands;
" stahelhart," according to Heinrich von Sax.
The Fox and Horse, p. 210.-" Der Fuchs und das
Pferd ;" from Munster. See the story of Old Sul-
tan."
Rumpel-stilts-kin, p 217.-" Rumpelstilzchen." A
story of considerable currency, told with several varia-
tions. We remember to have heard a similar story from
Ireland in which the song ran,
Little does my Lady wot
That my name is Trit-a-Trot."
In the "Tour tenebreuse et les jours lumineux,
Contes Anglois tirez d'une ancienne chronique corn-
pos4e par Richard surnommd Ceur de Lion, Roy d'An-
gleterre, Amst. 1708," the story of Ricdin-Ricdon"
contains the same incident. -The song of the dwarf is-
as follows:
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Z10 NOTES.
Si jeune et tendre femelle
''aimant qu'enfantins ebats,
Avoit mis dans sa cervelle
Que Ricdin-Ricdon, je m'appelle,
Point ne viendroit dans mes laqs:
Mais sera pour moi la belle
Car un tel nom ne s9ait pas."
There is a good deal of learned and mythologic spe-
culation in MM. Grimm, as to the spinning of gold, for
which we must refer the reader to their work. The
dwarf has here, as usual, his abode in the almost inac-
cessible part of the mountains. In the original he rends
himself asunder in his efforts to extricate the foot
which in his rage he had struck into the ground.
THE END,
Richard Taylor, Printer,
Shoe-Lane, London.
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