Grimm's fairy tales

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Material Information

Title:
Grimm's fairy tales stories and tales of elves, goblins and fairies
Uniform Title:
Little Red Riding Hood
Sleeping Beauty
Cinderella
Snow White and the seven dwarfs
Hansel and Gretel
Physical Description:
9 p. l., 443 1 p. incl.front. (2 port.) illus. : plates. ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
German
Creator:
Grimm, Jacob, 1785-1863
Grimm, Wilhelm, 1786-1859
Books, Inc
Publisher:
Harper & Bros.
Place of Publication:
New York
London
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Folklore -- Juvenile fiction -- Germany   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1917   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1917
Genre:
Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by the Brothers Grimm; with many illustrations and decorations by Louis Rhead.
General Note:
Includes Biographical note

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 028979696
oclc - 01933349
lccn - 17031071
Classification:
lcc - PZ8.G882 F7
System ID:
AA00011867:00001


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.GRIIMM'~S FAIRY TALES




































































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FAIRY TALEiS
Stories and Tales
of ElvesGoblins
and Fairies.
The ~Brothers. Grimm
with many ilustrations
and decorations by
p 1~i L ZOUIS EIHIEAD


BOOKS, INC.
NEW YORK





Ganma's PauryTALES

Cowyright, 1917. by Harper & Brothere
Printed in the Unhled States of America






























PAGEB
BIOGRAPHIICAL NOTE .. .. .. .. .. .. ... Ki
: REACE .. .. .. .. .. .. X111
flmE RED RIDINGHOOD ................ I
Tee GOLDEN GOOSE ..... .... ......... 8
THE \ISHING-TABLE, THE GOLD ASS, AND THE CUDGEL .. .. 14
iHlE MOUSE, THE BIRD, AND THE SAUSAGE .. .. ... 28
STHE FOX'S RUSH . jI
TH~E FISHERMAN AND H1S WVIFE .. .. .. .. .. 41
fTHE TWELVE BROTHERS ..... ............ So
iSLEEPING BEAUTY..... ...... ......-- 59
.THE RAVEN ........ ... .......... 6)
SFRI-nAND HIS FRIENDS ... .............. 75
T~HE EzLIN GROVE ......... .......... 80
gBEARSKIN ................... ... 89
:.THE ADVENTURES OF CHArNTCLEER AND PARTLET 97
~OLD SuLTAN ro4
THEe IANIN THE BUSB .. I07
~THE ROBBER BRIDEGROOM .. .. .. .. .. ... II2
TASHPUTTEL ................... .. Ilf
THE THREE SPINNING FAIRIES ; ... .. .... 127
URLMPEL-STI LTS-KEN .................,. IS
MOHER HOLLE ................... ..I)7
THE NOSE-TREE ................... I41
THE GOOSE-GlRL ................... I5o
FAITHFUL JOHN ................... 159
TuE SEVEN RAVENS .................. I6
HE THREE SLUGGARDS .. .. .. .. 3
~1NaGRIZZLE-BEARD.. .. .. .. 17(









CONTENT.S
PAGE
THE TOM-TIT ANrD THE BEAR .. .... .. .. .. 179
THE WONDERFUL hlUSICIAN .. .. .. .. .. .. .. I83
THE IUEEN BEE .............,......I87
THE DOG AND THE SPARROWY...............I19o
THE hAN INTHE BAG ..........,.......I94
THe FORBIDDEN ROOM .........,........198
1CRL TZ. ...........,.........203
FREDERICK AND CATHERINE .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 2iI
THE THREE CHILDREN OF FORTUNE .. ... .. .. 2If
hlRs.FOX ................... ...22I
THE CHANGELING ...........,........225
HANS IN LucK................... .227
THE BEAR AND THE SKRATTEL ..............236
TOMrTHUMBle....................,.248
SIYow-WHITE.................. ...257
THE FOUR CRAFT5MEN ..................266
CAT-SKIN... ................... 27I
JORINDA AND JORINDEL ................. 277
THUMBLING~ THE DW'ARF AND THUMBLING TBZ GIANT ... 28I
THE JUNIPER-TRCEE......... ......... 29o
Tue VATER OF LIFE .......... ........ 302
THE BLUE LIGHT ...... .............3I2
THE MATER :'AIRY ...... .. ......... 3ly
THE THREE CROWS ,......... ... ...... 328
TH.EFROG-PRINCE ,******..... ........ 332
THE ELVES AND THE COBBLER .. .. .. .., ]8
THE FROG-BRIDE .. .. .. .. j3 4
THE DANCING SHOES .. .. .. 349
THE VALIANT TAILOR .. .. . 355
GIANr GOLDEN-BEARD .... .............. 360
PEE-WI .. .. .. .368
HANSEL AND GRETHEL .. .. .. 373
LILY AND THE LION .. 384
RAPUNZEL ...,...................39I
DONICEY-WORT ..............,........397
THE KING OF THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN *.. 40
THE BJREME-N TOWN MUSICIANS .. .. ... .. .. 413
BROTHER AND SISTER.. .. .. ** 419
THE FOX AND THE HORSE.. .. .. .* 424
HANS AND HIS WIFE GRETT~EL .. .. ... 426
THE FIVE SERVANTS .................. 438





WHATT A TERRIBLE LARGE MOUTH YOU HAVE GOTI)). .. Facing.
LAND SO THEY MADE SEVEN, ALL RUNNING TOGETHER AFTER
DUMMLING AND RJS GOOSEI .. ... .. sc
(LTHE LANDLORD CRIED OUT FOR MERCY) ... .. as

THEY TRAVELLED 11SO QUICKLY THAT TREIR HAIR WHISTLED IN
THE WIND1 ................. L 2
LDO GO BACK AND TELL THE FISH WE WANT A SNUG LITTLE COTTAGE) 4
TW7~~ELVE RAVENS CAME FLYING DOW\N1 ... L 54
IAND THERE SHE LAY FAST ASLEEP ON A COUCH) ... sc 6
THE RAVEN SAID, "I AMl BY BIRTH A KING S DAUGHTER" .. 1 6
(AND SO, PRETTY ROSEKEN, YOU ARE COME AT LAST TO SEE US?) as 8
ASBPUTTEL PUT ON THE GOLDEN SLIPPER .. .. .. 122
(WHAT WILL YOU GIVE MlE TO DO IT FOR YOUF) SAID THE BOB-

GOBLIN ................... -s I)2
SO THEY TRACED IT UP, TILL AT LAST THEY FOUND THEIR POOR
COMRADE .................. 44
THE GIRL WENT ON COMBING AND CURLING BER RAIR .. IS4
AS SOON AS HE SAWr THE LIKENESS OF THE LADY HE FELL DOWN
UPON THE FLOOR SENSELESS .I .... I
KARL THOUGHT HE NEVER TASTED ANYTHING HALF SO GOOP
BEFORE ................... s

BARK YEI MY WORTHY FRIEND, YOUR PIG MIAY GET YOU INTO
A SCRAPE) .................. 2O

THE BEAR GRINNED AT HIS ENEMY, WHO, SOMEWHAT ALARMED, RAN
BACK AFEW PACES. .............. as24
THE COOK GOT UP EARLY, BEFORE DAYBREAK, TO FEED THE COWS as 25o

THE SEVEN( DWARFS FIND SNOW-WHITE IN THEIR LTl"ILE BED 258








ILLUSTRATIONS

THE GRANT PICKED UP MASTER TIlHUMBLING, TO LOOK AT AHIM AS HE
WOULD AT A BEETLE OR A COCKCEIAFER .. .. Facing 0. 2
TB1N SHE I.AID THEM IN THE GREEN GRASS UNDER THE JUNIPER-
TREE 292
I' WILL GIVE YOU AN 1RON W'AND AND TWO LITTLE LOAVES OF
BREAD .. .. .. .. ... .. 30
A LITTLE BLACK DWARF WAS SEEN MAKING R15 WAY THROUGH THE
MIDST OF THE BLUE LIGHT ......14
AT FIRST HE WAS STRUCK DUMBD, BUT HER KIND TONES REVIVED
HTS COURAGE.. .. 320
THE FROG DIVED DEEP AND CAMlE UP AGAIN WITH THE BALL IN
HIS MOUTH. 32
THE SHOEMIAKER AND HIS WIFE WATCHED FROMI BEHIND THE
CURTAIN .
AS SOON AS HE BEGAN TO SNORE SHE SElZED ONE OF TBE GOLDEN
HAIRS OF HIS BEARD AND PULLED IT OUT .L ..62
CCREEP IN, SAID THE WITCH, LAND SEE IF IT IS PROPERLY HOT) 1' 37
AND SBE LET DOW~N HER HAIR, AND THEL KCING S SON CLIMBED UP
BY IT c 392
THE LITTLE BLACK DWARF W'ALKED ROUND AND ROUND ABOUT TFIE
CIRCLE 0
THE ASS BRAYED, THE DOG BARKED, THE CAT MEWED, AND THE COCK
SCREAMED. se q
THE DOCS EAT UP ALL THE BACON AS RANS WALKS HOME ... 430











BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE


J ACOB LUDWIG KARL GRIMM was born at Hanan in
was born, also at Hanan, leDruary 24, I786.
The elder brother, Jacob, studied at Marburg and at Paris,
and in 1808 he was appointed lIbrarian to Jerome Bonaparte,
King of Westphalia. In 1813-15 he served as secretary to the
Prince of Hesse at Paris and at the Congress of Vienna.
The brothers Grimm brought out the first volume of their
folk-lore in r812, the second volume following in 18141, and the
third in IS82. In 1828 the brothers removed to Gattingen, where
Jacob became professor and librarian, and Wilhelm under-
librarian. Both the Grimms were dismissed in 1837 for joining
in the protest against the abolition of the Constitution by the
King of Hanovrer. In r840 the Grimms were appointed to pro-
fessorships at the University of Berlin, and were elected mem-
bers of the Academy of Sciences. Wilhelm died December r6,
I859; and Jacob, September 20, I863-
Together with Wilhelm, Jacob edited many of the old German
classics, and he was the sole author of the Deutsche Grammatik
(r8I9), the greatest philological work of the age. Wilbelm was
also an eminent philologist, but the brothers Grimm may safely
rest their title to immortality upon these well-beloved tales from
the Teutonic folk-lore.
























ST is more than one hundred years ago, to be exact, in the
y~ear r812, that a first selection of stories appeared in book
form under the title of Children's and HoZnslOchol Tales., chosen
from a large number obtained from the mouths of German
peasants byl the indefatigable exertions of the brothers Jacob and
Wilhelm Grimm. The first translation published in the English
language in 1823 was a selection made by M~r. Edgar Taylor,
accompanied with twelve wonderful etchings by George Cruik-
shank, which John Ruskin very eloquently describes in detail in
his Elemenlts of Drawing. A second collection of these stories
was issued three years later by the same translator, wTith ten
more etchings by the same great artist, whose power in depicting
fairyland has no equal. Mr. Taylor's interesting and valuable
notes at the end of the ~present volume are reprinted from the
original edition.
These world-famous stories are by no means of one nationality,
for wve find counterparts of them in the literature of Scandinavia,
Russia, England, and in other sources. The two brothers, both
learned in other branches of the literature of their owTn country,
gained enduring fame, mostly from these stories-ostensibly
written for the education of the young. Like the tales of the great
Danish story-teller, Hans Andersen, the stories have an equal
Fascination for boys and girls.
A wack of art is often more easily understood when a com-






PREFACE

prison is made with some masterpiece of another age and coun-
try, and the difference between the Grimms and Andersen is that
the former, as it seems to me, have an advantage in their cheer-
ful humor and their many mirth-provoking situations. A
pathetic sadness runs through many stories of Andersen, and the
endings of some are very mournful, often tragic. It is not so
with the Grimms. However fearful a calamity may be, they
deftly develop dire situations into a most laughable and pleasing
climax. So true, so natural do they seem, that not only the
young, but those of graver years read "these gay creations of
the imagination with keenest pleasure.
Many of the comic situations are produced by the introduc-
tion of wild or domestic animals and birds. Even commonplace
objects about the house take the part of characters that talk
and move about in the most natural, and yet most ludicrous,
manner. Pins and needles, sausages, a cudgel, or a table--all are
made to do things by the magic of "make-believe," together
with the assistance of some kind goblin, fairy, or good-natured
elf, and this is done in such a way that the reader is fairly con-
vinced that the situation is real.
This sense of reality must have influenced one dear little girl
of nine, who was asked by her grandmother to mark the stories
which she preferred to have read to her. She gravely set to work
to cut sixtyr-seven pieces of paper in order to mark every story
in the book which she had read several times before. "But,
Marion," said Grandma, "which one shall we start with?"
"Oh!" said the child. Begin at the first and go right through.
Every one of them is the best, so I cannot make a choice."
It is to be regretted that some later translators of these inim-
itable stories have made numerous changes in the titles of various
tales, venerated through so many years of affectionate usage.
In some versions "Red Ridinghood" is called "Little Redcap,"
"LSnow-White") becomes "Snowdrop," "Sleeping Beauty" is
transformed into the Briar Rose," and many other changes in
titles have been made. The well-known story of "Hansel and






PREFACE
Grethel," which in its original form found a worthy and apprecia-
tive place in opera and on the stage, has been altered by a modern
translator into a story far inferior to the original and unworthy
of the Grimms. The present edition has retained the favorite
old titles.
Louis RHEAD.














GRIMM'S FAIRY TALES







18ea~tbs~s~is~


RIDINGHOOD


TPHERE was once a sweet little maid, much beloved by
Everybody, but most of all by her grandmorber, who never
knew how to make enough of her. Once she sent her a
little cap of red velvet, and as it was very becoming to her, and
she never wore anything else, people called her Little Red
Ridinghood. One day her mother said to her:
"Come, Little Red Ridinghood, here are some cakes and a
flask of wine for you to take to grandmother; she is weak
and ill, and they will do her good. Make haste and start
before it grows hot, and walk properly and nicely, and don't
run, or you might fall and break the flask of wine, and there
would be none left for grandmother. And when you go into
her room don't forget to say good morning, instead of staring
about you."
"I will be sure to take care," said Little Red Ridinghood to
her mother, and gave her hand upon it. Now the grandmother
lived away in the wood, half an hour's walk from the village;
and when Little Red Ridinghood had reached the wood she met







GRIM M' S

thle wolf; but as she did not know what a bad sort of animal
he was, she did not feel frightened.
"Good day, Little Red Ridinghood," said he.
"Thank you kindly, Wolf," answered she.
"Where are you going so early, Little Red Ridinghood?"~
"To my grandmother's."
"What are you carrying under your apron?"
"Cakes and wine; we
c 1 baked yesterday; and my
1 .l .1- grandmother is very weak
and ill, so they will do her
good and strengthen her."
"W~here does your grand-
Smother live, Little Red Rid-
5~ "inghood ?"
pltP j "A quarter of an hour's
9 ~ walk from here; her house
stands beneath the three oak-
;I E Ytrees, and you may know it
.t by the hazel-bushes," said
Little Red Ridinghood.
.,r The wolf thought to him-
self: "That tender young
thing would be a delicious
~morsel, and would taste bet-
ter than the old one; I must
manage somehow to get both
of them."
Then he walked by Little Red Ridinghood a little while, and
said: "'Little Red Ridinghood, just look at the pretty flowers
that are growing all round you, and I don't think you are listen-
ing to the song of the birds; you are posting along just as if you
were going to school, and it is so delightful out here in the
wood.")
Little Red Ridinghood glanced round her, and when she saw







FAIRY TALES

the sunbeams darting here and there through the trees, and
lovely flowers everywFhere, she thought to herself:
"If I were to take a fresh nosegay to my grandmother she
would be very pleased, and it is so early in the day that I shall
reach her in plenty of time." And so she ran about in the wood
looking for flowers. And as she picked one she saw a still pret-
tier one a little farther off, and so she went farther and farther
into the wood. But the wolf went straight to the grandmother's
house and knocked at the door.
"Who is there?" cried the grandmother.
"Little Red Ridinghood," he answered, "and I have brought
you some cake and wine. Please open the door."
"Lift the latch," cried the grandmother; "I am too feeble
to get up."
So the wolf lifted the latch and the door flew open, and he fell
on the grandmother and ate her up without saying one word.
Then he drew on her clothes, put on her cap, lay down in her
bed, and drew the curtains.
Little Red Ridinghood was all this time running about among
the flowers, and when she had gathered as many as she could
hold she remembered her grandmother, and set off to go to her.
She was surprised to tind the door standing open, and when she
came inside she felt very strange, and thought to herself:
"'Oh dear, how uncomfortable I feel, and I was so glad this
morning to go to my grandmother!"
And when she said, "Good morning," there was no answer.
Then she went up to the bed and drew back the curtain, there
lay the grandmother with her cap pulled over her eyes, so that
she looked very odd.
"Oh, grandmother, what large ears yrou have got!"
"The better to hear with."
"LOh, grandmother, what great eyes ylou have got!"
"LThe better to see with.")
"Oh, grandmother, what large hands you have got!"
"The better to take hold of you with."
[13







GRIMM' S

But, grandmother, what a terrible large mouth you have got!"'
"The better to devour you!" And no sooner had the wolf
said it than he made one bound from the bed and swallowed
up poor Little Red Ridinghood.
Then the wolf, having satisfied his hunger, lay down again
in the bed, went to sleep, and began to snore loudly. The hunts-
man heard him as he was passing by the house, and thought:
How the old woman snores! I had better see if there is any-
thing the matter with her."
Then he went into the room and walked up to the bed and saw
the wolf lying there.
"At last I find you, you old sinner!" said he; "I have been
looking for you a long time." And he made up his mind that
the wolf had swallowed the grandmother whole, and that she
might yet be saved. So be did not fire, but took a pair of shears
and began to slit up the wolf's body. When he made a few
snips Little Red Ridinghood appeared, and after a few more
snips she jumped out and cried: "Oh dear, how frightened I
have been! It's so dark inside the wolf!" And then out came
the old grandmother, still living and breathing. But Little Red
Ridinghood went and quickly fetched some large stones, with
which she filled the wolf's body, so that when he waked up and
was going to rush away the stones were so heavy that he sank
down and fell dead.
They were all three very pleased. The huntsman took off
the wolf's skin and carried it home. The grandmother ate the
cakes and drank the wine and held up her head again, and Little
Red Ridinghood said to herself that she would never more stray
about in the wood alone, but would mind what her mother told
her.
It must also be related how a few days afterwards, when
Little Red Ridinghood was again taking cakes to her grand-
mother, another wolf spoke to her, and wanted to tempt her to
leave the path; but she was on her guard, and went straight on
her way, and told her grandmother how that the wolf had-met
































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~i-~;5~ ~i~F-~C-s
u
/ ~C~_


I"'o~l ,i 51


-e 'V~e L~,`


"WHAT A TERRIBLE LARCE MOUrTH YOU HAVE GOTI"


FAIR Y


TALES










FAIRY TALES

her and wished her good day, but had looked so wicked about
the eyes that she thought if it had not been on the highroad he
would have devoured her.
"LCome,") said the grandmother, "we will shut the door so
that he may not get in."
Soon after came the wolf knocking at the door and calling out:
"Open the door, grandmother. I am Little Red Ridinghood,
bringing you cakes." But they remained still and did not open
the door. After that the wolf slunk by the house, and got at
last upon the roof to wait until Little Red Ridinghood should
return home in the evening; then he meant to spring down upon
her and devour her in the darkness. But the grandmother dis-
covered his plot. Now there stood before the house a great
stone trough, and the grandmother said to the child, "Little
Red Ridinghood, I was boiling sausages yesterday, so take the
bucket, and carry away the water they were boiled in, and pour
it into the trough."
And Little Red Ridinghood did so until the great trough was
quite full. When the smell of the sausages reached the nose of
the wolf he snuffed it up, and looked round, and stretched out
his neck so far that he lost his balance and began to slip, and
he slipped down off' the roof straight into the great trough, and
was drowned. Then Little Red Ridinghood went cheerfully
home, and came to no harm.























THE GOLDEN GOOSE


THERE was a man who had three sons. The youngest was
called Dummling-wFhich is much the same as Dunder-
head, for all thought he was more than half a fool--and
he was at all times mocked and ill-treated by) the whole house-
hold.
It happened that the eldest son took it into his head one
day to go into the wood to cut fuel; and his mother gave
him a nice pasty and a bottle of wine to take with him, that
he might refresh himself at his work. As he went into the
wood, a little old man bid him good day, and said, "Give
me a little piece of meat from y.our plate, and a little wine
out of your bottle, for I am very hungry and thirsty." But
this clever young man said: "Give you my meat and wilne?
No, I thank yrou, I should not have enough left for myself";
and away he went. He soon began to cut down a tree; but
he had not worked long before he missed his stroke, and cut him-
self, and was forced to go home to have the wound dressed. Now
it was the little old man that sent him this mischief.


GRIMM'S






FAIRY TALES

Next went out the second son to work: and his mother gave
him, too, a pasty and a bottle of wine. And the same little
old man met him also and asked him for something to eat and
drink. But he, too, thought himself very clever, and said,
"The more you eat the less there would be for me; so go your
way!" The little man took care that he, too, should have
his reward, and the second stroke that he aimed against a tree
hit him on the leg; so that he, too, was forced to go home.
Then Dummling said, Father, I should like to go and cut
wood, too." But his father said, "Y'our brothers have both
lamed themselves; you had better stay at home, for you know
nothing about the business of wood-cutting." But Dummling
was very pressing; and at last his father said, "Go your way!
you will be wiser when you have smarted for your folly." And
his mother gave him only some dry bread and a bottle of sour
beer. But when be went into the wood he met the little old
man, who said, Give me
some meat and drink, for
I am very hungry and
thirsty.") Dummling
said, "I have only dry i

that will suit you, we
will sit down and eat it,
such as it is, together."
So they sat down; and-
when the lad pulled out h~~~~~~
Shis bread, behold it was --
turned into a rich pasty,
and his sour beer, when they tasted it, was delightful wine. They
ate and drank heartily; and when they had done, the little
man said, "As you havre a kind heart, and have been willing
to share evrerytrhing with me, I willl send a blessing upon you.
There stands an old tree; cut it dowPn, and ylou will tind some-
thing at the root." Then he took his leave and went his way.
[91









Dummling set to work, and cut down the tree; and when
it fell, he found, in a hollow under the roots, a goose with feathers
of pure gold. He took it up, and went on to a little inn by
the roadside, where he thought to sleep for the night on his
way home. Now the landlord had three daughters; and when
they saw the goose they were very eager to look what this won-
derful bird could be, and wished very much to pluck one of the
feathers out of its tail. At last the eldest said, "I must and
will have a feather."' So she waited till Dummling was gone to
bed, and then seized the goose by the wing; but to her great
wonder there she stuck, for neither hand nor finger could she
get away again. Then in came the second sister, and thought to
have a feather, too; but the moment she touched her sister, there
she too hung fast. At last came the third, and she also wanted
a feather; but the other two cried out: "Keep away! for Hea-
ven's sake, keep away!" However, she did not understand what
they meant. "If they are there," thought she, "I may as well
be there too." So she went up to them; but the moment she
touched her sisters she stuck fast, and hung to the goose as they
did. And so they kept company with the goose all night in
the cold.
The next morning Dummling got up and carried off the goose
under his arm. He took; no notice at all of the three girls, but
went out with them sticking fast behind. So wherever he
traveled, they too were forced to follow, whether they would or
no, as fast as their legs could carry them.
In the middle of a field the parson met them; and when he
saw the train he said: "Are you not ashamed of yourselves,
you bold girls, to run after a young man in that way over the
fields? Is that good behavior?" Then he took the youngest
by the hand to lead her away; but as soon as he touched her
he too hung fast, and followed in the train; though sorely against
his will, for he was not only in rather too good plight for running
fast, but just then he had a little touch of the gout in the great
toe of his right foot. By and by up came the clerk; and when he
[ zoJ







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"'AND SOT THEY MADE SEVEN, ALL RUNNING TOGETHER
AFTER DUMMLIN~G AND HIS GOOSE"


FAIRY


TI`A LES




psyp






FAIRY TALES
saw his master, the parson, running after the three girls, he won-
dered greatly and said: "Holla! holla! your reverence! whither
so fast? There is a christening to-day." Then he ran up and
took him by the gown; when, 10 and behold! he stuck fast too.
As the five were thus trudging along, one behind another, they
met two laborers with their mattocks coming from work; and
the parson cried out lustily to them to help him. But scarcely
had they laid hands on him when they too fell into the rank;
and so they made seven, all running together after Dummling
and his goose.
Now Dummling thought he would see a little of the world
before he went home; so he and his train journeyed on, till at
last they came to a city where there was a king who had an only
daughter. The princess was of so thoughtful and moody a
turn of mind that no one could make her laugh; and the king
had made known to all the world that whoever could make her
laugh should have her for his wife. When the young man heard
this, he went to her, with his goose and all its train; and as soon
as she saw the seven all hanging together, and running along,
treading on one another's heels, she could not help bursting into
a long and loud laugh. Then Dummling claimed her for his
wife, and married her; and he was heir to the kingdom, and
lived long and happily with his wife.
But what became of the goose and the goose's tail I never
could hear.








UK 1 V1IV










THE WISHING-
TABLE, THE GOLD ASS, AND THE CUDGEL
ALONG time ago there lived a tailor who had three sons,
but only one goat. As the goat supplied the whole
family with milk, she had to be well fed and taken daily
to pasture. This the sons did in turn. One: day the eldest son
led her into the churchyard, where he knew there was Sine
herbage to be found, and there let her browse and skip about
till evening. It being then time to return home, he said to her,
"rGoat, have you had enough to eat?" and the goat answered:
"~I have eaten so much
Not a leaf can I touch, Nan, Nan."
"Come along home, then," said the boy, and he led her by
the.cord round her neck back to the stable and tied her up.
"'Well," said the old tailor, "has the goat had her properly
amount of food ?"
Why, she has eaten so much, not a leaf can she touch,"i
answered the son.
The father, however, thinking he should like to assure him-
self of this, went dow7n to the stable, patted the animal, and said,
caressingly, "Goat, have you really had enough to eat?" The
goat answered:
[ 414








"How can my hunger oe allayed?
About the little gravets I played
And could not find a single blade, Nan, Nan."

"What is this I hear?"' cried the tailor, and running up-stairs
to his son, "You young lIar!" he exclaimed, to tell me thrie
goat had had enough to eat, and all the while she is starving."
And overcome with anger, he took his yard-measure down from
the wall and beat his son out of doors.
The next day it was the second son's turn, and he found a
place near the garden hedge, where there were the juiciest plants
for the goat to feed upon, and she enjoyed them so much that
she ate them all up. Before taking her home in the evening
he said to her, "Goat, have you had enough to eat?" and the
goat answered:
"(I have eaten so much
Not a leaf can I touch, Nan, Nan."

"~Come along home, then," said the boy, and he led her away
to the stable and tied her up.
"Well," said the old tailor, "has the goat had her proper
amount of food ?"
"Why, she has eaten so much, not a leal can she touch,"
answered the boy.
But the tailor was not satisfied with this, and went down to
the stable. "Goat, have you really had enough to eat?" he
asked, and the goat answered:

How can my hunger be allayed ?
About the little graves I played
And could not find a single blade, Nan, Nan."

"The shameless young rascal!" cried the tailor, "to let an
innocent animal like this starve!" and he ran up-stairs and drove
the boy from the house with the yard-measure.
It was nowv the third son's turn, who, hoping to make things
eter for himself, let the goat feed on the leaves of all the shrubs
2 [5






UKIlMM'1'S

be could pick out that were covered with the richest foliage.
"Goat, have you had enough to eat?" he said, as the evening
fell, and the goat answered:
"IJ have eaten so much
Not a leaf can I touch, Nan, Nan."

"Come along home, then," said the boy, and he took her back
and tied her up.
'Well," said the old tailor, "has the goat had her proper
amount of food ?"
"W'hy, she has eaten so much not a leaf can she touch,"
answered the boy.
But the tailor felt mistrustful, and went down .and asked,
"Goat, have you really had enough to eat?" and the mischievous
animal answered:

"How can my hunger be allayed?
About the little graves I: played
And could not find a single blade, Nan, Nan."

"Oh, what a pack of liars!" cried the tailor. "One as wicked
and deceitful as the other, but they shall not make a fool of
me any longer.'" And beside himself with anger, he rushed
up-stairs and so belabored his son with the yard-measure that
the boy fled from the house.
The old tailor was now left alone with his goat. The fol-
lowing morning he went down to the stable and stroked and
caressed her. "Come along, my pet," he said. "I will take
you out myself to-day," and he led her by the green hedge-
rows and weed -grown banks, and wherever he knew that
goats love to feed. "Yrou shall eat to your heart's content
for once,"' he said to her, and so let her browse till evening.
"Goat, have you had enough to eat?") he asked her at h
close of the day, and she answered:
"LI have eaten so much
Not a leaf can I touch, Nan, Nan."
( 16 ]






WAlK Y T1ALES

::"Come along home then," said the tailor, and he led her to
he stable and tied her up. He turned round, however, before
leaving her, and said once more, "You have really had enough
: to eat for once?" But the goat gave him no better answer than
her usual one, and replied:
"Howv can my hunger be allayed?
About the little graves I played
And could not 6nd a single blade, Nan, Nan."

On hearing this the tailor stood struck dumb with astonish-
ment. He saw now how unjust he had been in driving away his
sons. When he found his voice he cried: Wait, you ungrate-
ful creature! it is not
enough to drive you
away, but I wsill put such t
a~I mark upn o ta
you will not dare to show i :
your face again among 1
Honest tailors." And so
saying, he sprang up-
stairs, brought down his
razor, lathered the goat's
head all over, and shaved V
it till it was as smooth
as the back of his hand. /_;
Then he fetched the -
wRhip--his yard-measure
he considered was too
good for such work-and dealt the animal such blows that she
leaped into the air and away.
Sitting now quite alone in his house, the tailor fell into great
.melancholy, and would gladly have had his sons back again, but
no one knew what had become of them.
The eldest had apprenticed himself to a joiner, and had set
himself cheerfully and diligently to learn his trade. When the






GRIMM' S

time came for him to start as a journeyman his master made
him a present of a table, which was of ordinary wood, and to all
outward appearance exactly like any other table. It had, how-
ever, one good quality, for if any one set it down and said,
"LTable, serve up a meal," it was immediately covered with a
nice fresh cloth, laid with a plate, knife and fork, and dishes
of boiled and baked meats, as many! as there was room for, and
a glass of red wine, which only to look at made the heart rejoice.
"'I have enough now to last me as long as I live," thought the
young man to himself, and accordingly he went about enjoying
himself, not minding whether the ;nns he stayed at were good or
bad, whether. there was food to be had there or not. Sometimes
it pleased him not to seek shelter within them at all, but to turn
into a' feld or a wood, or wherever else he fancied. WIhen there
he put down his table, and said, "Serve up a meal," and he was
at once supplied with everything he could desire in the way of
food.
After he had been going about like this for some time, he he-
thought him that he should like to go home again. His father's
anger would by this time have passed awvay, and now that he
had the wishing-table with him, he was sure of a readyl welcome.
He happened, on his homewiard way, to come one evening to
an inn full of guests. They bid him welcome and invited him
to sit down with them and share their supper, otherwise, they
added, he would have a difficulty in getting anything to eat.
But the joiner replied, "'I will not take from you what little
you have; I would rather that you should consent to be my
guests," whereupon they all laughed, thinking he was only jok-
ing with them. He no~w put-down his table in the middle of
the room, and said, "Table, serve up a meal," and in a moment
it was covered with a variety of food of better quality than any
the host could have supplied, and a fragrant steam rose from the
dishes and greeted the nostrils of the guests. "Now, friends,
fall to," said the young inan, and the guests, seeing that the
invitation was well intended, did not wait to be asked twice,
[r8 ]






FAIRY TALES

but drew up their chairs and began vigorously to ply their knives
and forks. What astonished them most was the way in which,
as soon as a dish was empty, another full one appeared in its
place. Meanwhile the landlord was standing in the corner of
the room looking on; he did not know what to think of it all,
but said to himself, "I could make good use of a cook like that."
The joiner and his friends kept up their merriment late into
the night, but at last they retired to rest, the young journeyman
placing his table against the wall before going to bed.
The landlord, however, could not sleep for thinking of what
he had seen; at last it occurred to him that up in his lumber-
room he had an old table, which was just such another one to
all appearance as the wishing-cable; so be crept away softlyr to
fetch it, and put it against the wall in place of the other.
When the morning came the joiner paid for his night's lodging,
took up his table, and left, never suspecting that the one he was
carrying was not his own.
He reached home by midday, and was greeted with joy by
his father. "And now, dear son," said the old man, "what
trade have you learned ?"
"(I am a joiner, father."
"A capital business," responded the father; "and what
have you brought home with you from your travels?"
"iThe best thing I have brought with me, father, is that
table."
The tailor carefully examined the table on all sides. "Well,"
he said at last, "you have certainly not brought a masterpiece
back with you; it is a wretched, badly made old table."
"But it is a wishing-table," interrupted his son; "if I put it
'dowfn and order a meal, it is at once covered with the best of
food and wine. If you will only invite your relations and friends
they shall, for once in their lives, have a good meal, for no one
ever leaves this' table unsatisfied."
Wnhen the guests were all assembled, he put his table down as
uosual, and said, "Table, serve up a meal," but the table did not
[ 19 I






GRIMM' S

stir, and remained as empty as any ordinary table at such a
command. Then the poor young man saw that his table had
been changed, and he was covered with shame at having to
stand there before them all like a liar. The guests made fun of
him, and had to return home without bite or sup. The tailor
took our his cloth and sat down once more to his tailoring, and
the son started work again under a master joiner.
The second son had apprenticed himself to a miller. When
his term of apprenticeship had expired, the miller said to him,
"As you have behaved so well, I will make you a present of an
ass; it is a curious animal; it will neither draw a cart nor carry
a sack."
"Of what use is he then?" asked the young apprentice.
"He gives gold," answered the miller; "if you stand him on a
cloth, and say,'Bricklebric,' gold pieces will fall from his mouth."
"'That is a handsome present," said the young miller, and he
thanked his master and departed.
After this, whenever he was in need of money, he had only to
say "Bricklebrit," and a shower of gold pieces fell on the ground,
and all he had to do was to pick them up. He ordered the best
of everything wherever he went; in short, the dearer the better,
for his purse was always full.
He had been going about the wJorld like this for some time,
when he began to think he should like to see his father again.
"'When. he sees my gold ass," he said to himself, "he will forget
his anger and be glad to have me back."
It came to pass that he arrived one evening at the same inn
in which his brother had had his table stolen from him. He was
leading his ass up to the door, when the landlord came out and
offered to take the animal, but the young miller refused his help.
"Do not trouble yourself," he said; "I will take myr old Grey-
coat myself to the stable and fasten her up, as I like to know
where she is."
The landlord was very much astonished at this; the man
cannot be very well off, he thought, to look after his own ass.
120]






FAIRY TALES

When the stranger, therefore, pulled two gold pieces out of his
pocket, and ordered the best of everything that could be got
in the market, the landlord opened his eyes, but he ran off with
alacrity to do his bidding.
Having finished his meal, the stranger asked for his bill, and
the landlord, thinking he might safely overcharge such a rich
customer, asked for twro more gold pieces. The miller felt in his
pocket, but found he had spent all his gold. "WVair a minute,"
he said to the landlord. "I will go and fetch some more money."
Whereupon he went out, carrying the table-cloth with him.
This was more than the landlord's curiosity could stand, and
he followed his guest to the stable. As the latter bolted the door
after him, he wcent and peeped through a hole in the wall,
and there he saw the stranger spread the cloth under his ass,
and heard him say "Brickrlebrit," and immediately the floor was
covered with gold pieces, which fell from the animal's mouth.
"A good thousand, I declare," criedithe shot; "the gold
pieces do not take long to coin! it's not a bad thing to have a
money-bag like that."
The guest settled his account and went to bed. During the
night the landlord crept down to the stable, led away the gold-
coining ass, and fastened up another in its place.
Earlyr the next morning the young miller went off with his ass,
thinking all the time that he was leading his own. By noonday
he had reached home, where his father gave him a warm welcome.
What have you been doing with yourself, my son?" asked
the old rnan.
"LI am a miller, dear father," he answered.
"And what have you brought home with you from your
travels?"
"LNothing but an ass, father."
"LThere are asses eriough here," said the father. "I should
havre been better pleased if it had been a goat."
"Very likely," replied the son, "but this is no ordinary ass;
;t is an ass that coins money; 'if I say 'Bricklebrit' to it, a
[ 21 ]







GRIM M' S

whole sackful of gold pours from its mouth. Call all your rela-
tions and friends together; I will turn you all into rich people."
"I shall like that well enough," said the tailor, "for then I
shall not have to go on plaguing myself with stitching." And
he ran out himself to invite his neighbors. As soon as they were all
assembled, the young miller asked then to clear a space, and he
then spread his cloth and brought the ass into the room. "Now
see," said he, and cried Bricklebrit," but not a single gold piece
appeared, and it was evident that the animal knew nothing of
the art of gold-coining, for it is not every ass that attains to
such a degree of excellence.
The poor young miller pulled a long face, for he saw that he
had been tricked; he begged forgiveness of the company, who
all returned home as poor as they came. There was nothing
to be done now but for the old man to go back to his needle, and
the young one to hire himself to a miller.
The third son had apprenticed himself to a turner, which,
being a trade requiring a great deal of skill, obliged him to serve
a longer time than his brothers. He had, however, heard from
them by letter, and knew how badly things had gone witrh them,
and that they had been robbed of their property by an inn-
keeper on the last evening before reaching home.
W'hen it was time for him to start as a journeyman, his master,
being pleased with his conduct, presented him with a bag, say-
ing as he did so, "You will find a cudgel inside."
"The bag I can carry over my shoulder, and it will no doubt
be of great service to me, but of what use is a cudgel inside?
It will only add to the weight."
"I will explain," said the master. "If any one at any time
should behave badly to yrou, you have only to say, Cudgel, out
of the bag,' and the stick will jump out and give him such a
cudgeling that he will not be able to move or stir for a week
afterwards, and it will not leave off till you say, 'Cudgel, into
the bag.'"
The young man thanked him, hung the bag on his back, and
122]







FAIRY TALES

when any one threatened to attack him, or in anyr wvay to do
him harm, he called out, "Cudgel, out of the bag," and no
sooner were the words said than out jumped the stick, and beat
the offenders soundly on the back till their clothes were in rib-
bons, and it did it all so quickly that the turn had come round
to each of them before he was aware.
It was evening when the young turner reached the inn where
his brothers had been so badly treated. He laid his bag down
on the table and began giving an account of all the wonderful
things he had seen while going about the world.
"One may come across a wishing-table," he said, "or an ass
that gives gold, and such like; all very good things in their way,
but not all of them put together are worth the treasure of which
I have possession and which I carry~ with me in that bag."
The landlord pricked up his ears. "W!hat can it be?" he asked
himself; "'the bag must be filled with precious stones; I must
try and get hold of that cheaply, too, for there is luck in odd
numbers."
Bedtime came, and the guest stretched himself out on one of
the benches and placed his bag under his head for a pillow. As
soon as the landlord thought he was fast asleep he went up to
him and began gently and cautiously pulling and pushing at the
bag to see if he could get it away and put another in its place.
But the young turner had been waiting for this, and just as
the landlord was about to give a good last pull, he cried, "Cudgel,
out of the bag," and at the same moment the stick was out and
beginning its usual dance. It beat him with such a vengeance
that the landlord cried out for mercy, but the louder his cries
the more lustily did the stick beat time to them, until he fell
to the ground exhausted.
"If you do not give up the wishing-table and the gold ass,"
said the young turner, the game shall begin over again."
"No, no," cried the landlord in a feeble voice, "I will give
Everything back if only you will make that dreadful demon of
a stick return to the bag."







GRIMM' S

"(This time," said the turner, "I will deal with you according
to mercy rather than justice, but beware of offending in like
manner again." Then he cried, "Cudgel, into the bag," and let
the man remain m peace.
The turner journeyed on next day to his father's house, taking
with him the wishing-table and the gold ass. The tailor was
delighted to see his son again, and asked him, as he had the
others, what trade he had learned since he left home.
"LI am a turner, dear father," he answered.
"A highly skilled trade," said the tailor, "and what have you
brought back with you from your travels?"
"An invaluable thing, dear father," replied the son; "a
cudgel."
"What! a cudgell" exclaimed the old man; that was certainly
well worth while, seeing that you can cut yourself one from the
first tree you come across."
But not such a one as this, dear father; for if I say to it,
'Cudgel, out of the bag,' out it jumps, and gives any one who has
evil intentions towards me such a bad time of it that he falls
down and cries for mercy. And know that it was with this
stick that I got back the wishing-table and the gold ass which
the dishonest innkeeper stole from my brothers. Now go and
call them both here, and invite all your relations and friends,
and I will feast them and fill their pockets with gold."
The old tailor was slow- to believe all this, but nevertheless he
went out and gathered his neighbors together. Then the turner
put down a cloth, and led in the gold ass, and said to his brother,
"Now, dear brother, speak to him." The miller said Brickle-
brit," and the cloth was immediately covered with gold pieces,
wcchich continued to pour from the ass's mouth until every one
had taken as many as he could carry. (I see by your faces that
you are all wishing you had been there.)
Then the turner brought in the wishing-table, and said, "Now,
dear brother, speak to it."l And scarcely had the joiner cried,
"Table, serve up a meal," than it wpas covered with a profusion
124]





FAIRY TALES


"THE LANDLORD CRIED OUT FOR MERCY"




4/ st







FAIRY TALES

of daintily dressed meats. Then the tailor and his guests sat
down to a meal such as they had never enjoyed before in their
lives, and they all sat up late into the night, full of good cheer
and jol;ty.
The tailor put away his needle and thread, his yard-measure
and his goose, and he and his three sons lived together henceforth
in contentment and luxury.
Meanwhile, what had become of the goat, who had been the
guilty cause of the three sons being driven from their home?
I will tell you.
She was so ashamed of her shaven crown that she ran and
crept into a fox's hole. W~hen the fox came home, he was met
by two large: glittering eyes that gleamed at him out of the
darkness, and he was so frightened that he ran away. The bear
met him, and perceiving that he was in some distress, said:
"Wlhat is the matter. Brother Fox? W~hy are: you pulling such
a long face?" "A~h!"' answerred Redskin, "there is a dreadful
animal sitting in my hole, w-hich glared at me with tiery eyes."
"We w;ll soon drive him out," said the bear, and he trotted
back with his friend to the hole and looked in, but the sight of
the fiery ey~es was5 qulite enough for him, and he turned and took
to his heels.
The bee met him, and noticing that he was somewhat ill at
ease, said: "Bear, you look remarkably out of humor. Where
have you left your good spirits?" "It's easy for you to talk,"
replied the bear; "'a horrible animal with red goggle-eyes is
sitting in the fox's hole and we cannot drive it out."
The bee said: "I really am sorry for you, Bear; I am but a
poor weak little creature that: yo'u scarcely deign to look at in
passing, but, for all that, I think I shall be able to help you."'
With this the bee flew to the fox's hole, settled on the smooth-
shaven head of the goat, and stung her so violently that she
leaped high into the air, crying "Nan, nan!" and fled away like
a mad thing into the open country; but no one, to this hour,
has found out what became of her after that.
[ 27 )






'S


THE MOUSE, THE BIRD, AND THE
SAUSAGE
ONCE upon a time, a mouse, a bird, and
a sausage entered into partnership and
set up house together. For a long time
all went well; they lived in great comfort, and
prospered so far as to be~ able to add consider-
ably to their scores. The bird's duty was to fly
daily into the wood and bring in the fuel; the
mouse fetched the water, and the sausage saw to
the cooking.
When people are too well off they always
begin to long for something new. And
so it came to pass ;r


[ 28


GRIMMI~C







FAIRY TALES

that the bird, while out one day, met a fellow-bird, to whom he
boastfully expatiated on the excellence of his household arrange-
ments. But the other bird sneered at him for being a poor
simpleton, who did all the hard work, while the other two stayed
at home and had a good time of it. For, when the mouse had
made the fire and fetched in the water, she could retire into her
little room and rest until it was time to set the table. The
sausage had only to watch the pot to see that the food was
properly cooked, and when it was near dinner-time he just
threw himself into the broth, or rolled in and out among the
vegetables three or four times, and there they were, buttered
and salted, and ready to be served. Then, when the bird came
home and had laid aside his burden, they sat down to table,
and when they had finished their meal they could sleep their
fill till the following morning, and that was really a very de-
lightful life.
Influenced by these remarks, the bird next morning refused
to bring in the wood, telling the others that he had been their
servant long enough and had been a fool into the bargain, and
that it was now time to make a change and to try some other
way of arranging the work. Beg and pray as the mouse and the
sausage might, it was of no use; the bird remained master of
the situation, and the venture had to be made. They therefore
drew lots, and it fell to the sausage to bring in the wood, to the
mouse to cook, and to the bird to fetch the water.
And now what happened? The sausage started in search of
wood, the bird made the fire, and the mouse put on the pot, and
then these two waited till the sausage returned with the fuel for
the following day. But the sausage remained so long away, that
they became uneasy and the bird flew out to meet him. He
had not flown far, however, when he came across a dog who,
having met the sausage, had regarded him as his legitimate booty,
and so seized and swallowed him. The bird complained to the
dog of this barefaced robbery, but nothing he said was of any
avail, for the dog answered that he had found false credentials
1 29 1







GRIMM' S

on the sausage, and that was the reason his life had been for-
fei ted.
The bird picked up the wood and flew sadly home, and told
the mouse all be had seen and heard. They were both very un-
happy, but agreed to make the best of things and to remain
with each other.
So now the bird set the table, and the mouse looked after
the food, and wishing to prepare it in the same way as the sau-
sage, by rolling in and out among the vegetables to salt and
butter them, she jumped into the pot; but she stopped short
long before she reached the bottom, having already parted not
only with her skin and hair, but also with life.
Presently the bird came in and wanted to serve up the dinner,
but he could nowhere see the cook. In his alarm and flurry,
he threw the wood here and there about the floor, called and
searched, but no cook; was to be found. Then some of the wood
that had been carelessly thrown down caught fire and began
to blaze. The bird hastened to fetch some water, but his pail
fell into the well, and he after it, and as he was unable to recover
himself he was drowned.






FAIRY TALES










THE FOX BRUSH

T HE1 Kigo h atha euiu areadi h





angry at n this andt told threat gardenert ke watcnder the


tree all night.
The gardener set his eldest son to watch, but about twelve
o'clock: he fell asleep, and in the morning another of the apples
WaS mlSsimg.
Then the second son was set to watch, and at midnight he
trOo fell asleep, and in the morning another apple was gone.
Then the third son offered to keep watch; but the gardener
at first would not let him, for fear some harm should come to
him. However, at last he yielded, and the young man laid him-
self under the tree to watch. As the clock struck twelve he
heard a rustling noise in the air, and a bird came flying and sat.
upon the tree. This bird's feathers were all of pure gold; and
as it was snapping at one of the apples with its beak, the gar-







GRIM M': S

dener's son jumped up and shot an arrow at It. The arrow, how-
ever, did the bird no harm, it only dropped a golden feather from
its tail and flew away. The golden feather was then brought
to the king in the morning, and all his court were called together.
Every one agreed that it was the most beautiful thing that had
ever been seen, and that it was worth more than all the wealth
of the kingdom; but the king said, "One feather is of no use to
me. I must and will have the whole bird."
Then the gardener's eldest son set out to find this golden bird
and thought to find it very easily; and when he had gone but a
little way he came to a wood, and by the side of the wood he
saw a fox sitting. The lad was fond of a little sporting, so he
took his bow and made ready to shoot at it. Then Mr. Rey-
nard, who saw what he was about, and did not like the thought
of being shot at, cried out: Softly, softly! do not shoot me. I
can give you good counsel. I know what your business is, and
that you want to find the golden bird. Y'ou will reach a village
in the evening, and when you get there you will see two inns,
built one on each side of the street. The right-hand one is very
pleasant and beautiful to look at, but go not in there. Rest for
the night in the other, though it may seem to you very poor and
mean." "What can such a beast as this know about the mat-
ter?" thought the silly lad to himself. So he shot his arrow at
the fox, but he missed it, and it only laughed at him, set up its
tail above its back, and ran into the wood.
The young man went his way, and in the evening came to
the village where the two inns were. In the right-hand one
were people singing, and dancing, and feasting, but the other one
looked very dirty and poor. "I should be very silly," said he,
"if I went to that shabby house and left this charming place";
so he went into the smart house and ate and drank at his ease;
and there he stayed, and forgot the bird and his country, too.
Time passed on, and as the eldest son did not come back, and
no tidings were heard of him, the second son set out, and the
same thing happened to him. He met with the fox sitting by
[32 I





THEY TRAVELLED SO QUICKLY THAT THEIR HAIR
WHISTLED IN THE WIND"


FAIRY


TALES










FAIRY TALES

the roadside, who gave him the same good advice as he had
given his brother; but when he came to the two inns, his eldest
brother was standing at the window where the merry~making
was, and called to him to come in; and he could not withstand
the temptation, but went in, joined the merrymaking, and
there forgot the golden bird and his country~ in the same manner.
Time passed on again, and the youngest son too wished to
set out into the wide world, to seek for the golden bird; but
his father would not listen to him for a long while, for he was
very fond of his son and was afraid that some ill-luck might
happen to him also and hinder his coming back. However, at
last it was agreed he should go. For, to tell the truth, he would
not rest at home. As he came to the wood he met the fox, who
gave him the same good counsel that he had given the other
brothers. But he was thankful to the fox, and did not shoot at
him, as his brothers had done. Then the fox said, "Sit upon my
tail and you will travel faster."f So he sat down; and the fox
began to run, and away they went over stock and stone, so
quickly that their hair whistled in the wind.
W'hen they came to the village the young man was wvise
enough to follow the fox's counsel, and, without looking about
him, went straight to the shabby inn, and rested there all night
at his ease. In the morning came the fox again, and met him
as he was beginning his journey, and said, "Go straight forward
till you come to a castle, before which lie a whole troop of sol-
diers fast asleep and snoring; take no notice of them, but go
into the castle, and pass on and on till you come to a room
where the golden bird sits in a wooden cage; close by it stands
a beautiful golden cage; but do not try to take the-bird out of
the shabbyr cage and put it into the handsome one, otherwiise
you will be sorry for it." Then the fox stretched out his brush
again, and the young man sat himself down, and away they
went over stock, and stone till their hair whistled in the wind.
Before the castle gate all was as the fox had said; so the lad
went in, and found the chamber where the golden bird hung in
1351







GRIMM' S

a wooden cage. Below stood the golden cage; and the three
golden apples that had been lost were lying close by its side.
Then he thought to himself, "It will be a very droll thing to
bring away such a fine bird in this shabby cage"; so he opened
the door and took; hold of the bird and put it into the golden
cage. But it set up at once such a loud scream that all the sol-
diers awoke; and they took him prisoner and carried him before
the king.
TIhe next morning the court sat to judge him; and when all
was heard, it doomed him to die unless he should bring the king
the golden horse that could run as swiftly as the wind. If he
did this he was to have the golden bird given him for his own.
So he set out once more on his journey, sighing, and in great
despair; when, on a sudden, he met his good friend the fox, taking
his morning's walk. "Heyday, young gentleman!" said Rey-
nard; "you see now what has happened from not listening to
my advice.' I will still, however, tell you how you may find the
golden horse, if you will do as I bid you. You must go straight
on till you come to the castle where the horse stands in his stall.
By his side will lie the groom fast asleep and snoring; take away
the horse softly; but be sure to. let the old leather saddle be
upon him, and do not put on the golden one that is close by."
Then the young man sat down on the fox's tail; and away they
went over stock and stone till their hair whistled in the wind.
All went right, and the groom lay snoring, with his hand
upon the golden saddle. But when the lad looked at the horse,
he thought it a great pity to keep the leather saddle upon it.
"I will give him the good one," said he; "I am sure he is wPorth
it." As he took up the golden saddle the groom awoke, and
cried out so loud that all the guards ran in and took him prisoner;
and in the morning he was brought before the king's court to
be judged, and was once more doomed to die. But it was agreed
that if he could bring thither the beautiful; princess, he should live
and have the horse given him for his own.
Then he went his way again, very sorrowful; but the old fox
[36 ]







FAIRY TALES
once more met him on the road, and said: "Why did you not
listen to me? If you had, you would have carried away both
the bird and the horse. Yet I will once more give you counsel.
Go straight on, and in the evening you will come to a castle.
At twelve o'clocki every night the princess goes to the bath;
go up to her as she passes, and give her a kiss, and she will let
you lead her away; but take care you do not let her go and take
leave of her father and mother." Then the fox stretched out
his tail, and away they went over stock and stone till their hair
whistled again.
As they came to the castle all was as the fox had said; and
at twelve o'clock the young man met the princess going to t~he
bath, and gave her the kiss; and she agreed to run away with
him, but begged with many tears that he would let her take
leave of her father. At first he said, "No!" but she wept still
more and more, and fell at his feet, till at last he yielded; but
the moment she came to her father's door the guards awoke,
and he was taken prisoner again.
So he was brought at once before the king wcho lived in that
castle. And the king said, "You shall never have my daughter,
unless in eight days you dig away the hill that stops the view
from my window."! Now this hill was so big that all the men
in the whole world could not have taken it away; and when he
had worked for seven days, and had done very little, the fox
came and said: "Lie down and go to sleep!i I will work for you."
In the morning he aw7Coke, and the hill was gone; so he went
merrily to the king, and told him that now it was gone he must
give him the princess.
Then the king was obliged to keep his word, and away went
the young man and the princess. But the fox came and said
to him: "That will not do; we will have all three--the prin-
cess, the horse, and the bird." "Ah!" said the young man,
"that would be a great thing; but how can it be?"
If you wTill only listen," said the fox, "it can soon be done.
When you come to the king of the castle where the golden horse
1371







GRIM M' S

is, and he asks for the beautiful princess, you must say, 'Here
she is!' Then he will be very glad to see her, and will run to
welcome her; and you wrill mount the golden horse that they
are to give you, and put out your hand to take leave of them;
but shake hands with the princess last. Then lift her quickly
on to the horse, behind you; clap your spurs to his side, and
gallop away as fast as you can."
All went right; then the fox said: "W~hen you come to the
castle where the bird is, I will stay with the princess at the door,
and you wdll ride in and speak to the king; and when he sees
that it is the right horse, he will bring out the bird; but you
must sit still, and say that you want to look at it, to see whether
it is the true golden bird or nor; and when you get it into your
hand ride away as fast as you can."
This, too, happened as the for said; they carried off the
bird; the princess mounted again, and off they rode till they
came to a great wood. On their way through it they met their
old friend Reynard again, and be said, "Pray kill me, and cut
off my head and my brush!" The young man would not do
anyr such thing to so good a friend; so the fox said: "I will
at any rate give you good counsel: beware of two things! ran-
som no one from the gallows, and sit down by the side of no
brook!"' Then away be went. "Well," thought the young
man, "it is no hard matter, at any rate, to follow that advice."
So be rode on with the princess till at last they came to the
village where he had left his two brothers. And there he heard
a great noise and uproar, and when he asked what was the
matter, the people said, "Two rogues are going to be hanged."
As he came nearer, he saw that the two men were his brothers,
who had turned robbers. At the sight of them, in this sad plight
his heart was very heavy, and he cried out, "Can nothing save
them from such a death?" but the people said "'No!" unless he
would bestow all his money upon the rascals, and buy their free-
dom, by repaying all they had stolen. Then he did not stay to
think about it, but paid whatever was asked; and his brothers
[181







FAIRY TALES

were given up and went on with him towards their father's
home.
Now the weather was very hot; and as theyr came to the
wood where the fox: first met them, they found it so cool and
shady under the trees, by the side of a brook that ran close by
that the two brothers said, Let us sit down by the side of this
brook and rest a while, to eat and drink." "'Very well!" said he,
and forgot what the fox had said, and sat down on the side of
the brook; and while he thought of no harm coming to him
they crept behind him, and threw him down the bank, and took
the princess, the horse, and the bird, and went home to the
king their master, and said, "All these we have won by our own
skill and strength." Then there was great merriment made,
and the king held a feast, and the two brothers were welcomed
home; but the horse would not eat, the bird would not sing,
and the princess sat by herself in her chamber and wept bitterly.
The youngest son fell to the bottom of the bed of the stream.
Luckily, it was nearly dry, but his bones were almost broken,
and the bank was so steep that he could find no way to get out.
As he stood bewailing his fate, and thinking what he should do,
to his great joy he spied his old and faithful friend the fox, look-
ing down from the bank upon him. Then Reynard scolded him
for not following his advice, which would have saved him from
all the troubles that had befallen him. "Yet," said he, "silly
as you have been, I cannot bear to leave you here; so lay hold
of my brush, and hold fast!" Then he pulled him out of the
river, and said to him, as he got ulpon the bank, "Your brothers
have set a watch to kill you if they find you making your way
back." So be dressed himself as a poor piper, and came playing
on his pipe to the king'scourt. But he was scarcely within the
gate when the horse began to eat, and the bird to sing, and the
princess left off weeping. And when he got to the great hall,
where all the court sat feasting, he went straight up to the
king and told him all his brothers' roguery. Then it made the
king very angry to hear w~hat they had done, and they were seized
[ 39 ]






GRIMM' S

and punished; and the youngest son had the princess given to
him again; and he married her; and after the king's death he
was chosen king in his stead.
After his marriage he went one day to walk in the wood, and
there the old fox: met him once more, and besought him, with
tears in his ey;es, to be so kind as to cut off his head and his
brush. At last he did so, though sorely against his will, and in
the same moment the fox was changed into a prince, and the
princess knew him to be her own brother, who had been lost a
great many years; for a spiteful fairy had enchanted him, with
a spell that could only be broken by some one getting the golden
bird, and by cutting off his head and his brush.





THE FISHERMAN
AND HIS WIFE


THERE was once a fisherman who lived with his wife in a
pigsty, close by the seaside. The fisherman used to go
out all day long a-fishing; and one day, as he sat on the
shore with his rod, looking at the sparkling waves and watch-
ing his line, all on a sudden his float was dragged away deep
into the water; and in drawing it up he pulled out a great fish.
But the fish said: "Pray let me live! I am not a real fish; I
am an enchanted prince; put me in the water again, and let
me gol" "Oh! ho!" said the man, "you need not make so.
many words about the matter; I will have nothing to do with
a fish that can talk; so swim away, sir, as soon as you please!"
Then he put him back into the water, and the fish darted straight
down to the bottom, and left a long streak of blood behind him
on the wave.
When the fisherman went home to his wife in the pigsty, he
told her how he had caught a great fish, and how it had told
him it was an enchanted prince, and how, on hearing it speak,
he had let it go again. ~"Did not yrou ask it for anything?" said
[41 ]


FAIRY


TALES






UK NI IV 1V

the wife. "No," said the man. "W7hat should I ask for!"'
"A~h!" said the wife, "we live very wretchedly here, in this
nasty. dirty pigsty; do go back and tell the fish we want a
snug -little cottage."
The fisherman did not much like the business; however, he
went to the seashore; and when he came back there the water
looked all yellow and green. And he stood at the water's edge
and said:
"LO man of the seal
Hearken to me!
Myv wife Ilsabill
W'ill have her own will,
A9nd hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!"

Then the fish came swimming to him, and said: "Well, what
is her will? What does your wife want?" "Ah!" said the
fisherman, "she says that when I had caught you, I ought to
have asked you for something before I let you go; she does not
like living any longer in the pigsty, and wants a snug little cot-
tage." "Go home, then," said the fish; "she is n the cottage
already!"' So the man went home, and saw his wife standing
at the door of a nice trim little cottage. "Come in, come in!"
said she; "is not this much better than the filthy pigsty we
had ?" And there was a parlor, and a bedchamber, and a kitchen;
and behind the cottage there was a little garden, planted with
all sorts of flowers and fruits; and there w~as a courtyard behind,
full of ducks and chickens. "A.lh!" said the fisherman, "how
happily we shall live now!" WVe will try to do so, at least,"
SalG h15 Wire.
Everything went right for a week or two, and then Dame
Ilsabill said: "Husband, there is not near room enough for us
in this cottage; the courtyard and the garden are a great deal
too small; I should like to have a large stone castle to live in;
go to the fish again and tell him to give us a castle." "Wife,"
said the fisherman, "I don't like to go to him again, for perhaps
he will be angry; we ought to be easy, with this pretty cottage
[42 ]















































"DO GO BACK: A]ND TELL THE FISH WE WANT A SNUG LITTLE COTTAGE"


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r
SL~-
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_p~_CLl~ SZ*~F~-~i~=_









FAIRY TALES

to live in." "Nonsense!" said the wife; "he will do it very
willingly, I know; go along and tryr!"
The fisherman went, but his heart was very heavy; and when
he came to the sea it looked blue and gloomy, though it was
very calm; and he went close to the edge of the waves, and said:
"O man of the seat
Hearken to me!
My! wrife Ilsabill
Will have~ her or- will,
And hath sten me to beg a boon of thee!"

"Well, what does she want now?" said the fish. "Ah!" said
the man, dolefully, "my wife wants to live in a stone castle."
"Go home, then,"' said the fish; "she is standing at the gate
of it already." So away went the fisherman, and found his
wife standing before the gate of a great castle. "'See," said
she, "is not this grand?" W~ith that they: went into the castle
together, and found a great many servants there, and the rooms
all richly furnished, and full of golden chairs and tables, and
behind the castle was a garden, and around it was a park half a
mile long, full of sheep, and goats, and hares, and deer; and in
the courtyard were stables and cow-houses. "Well," said the
man, now wFpe will live cheerful and happy in this beautiful castle
for the rest of our lives." "Perhaps we may," said the wife;
"but let us sleep upon it before we make up our minds to that."
So they went to bed.
The next morning when Dame Ilsabill awoke it was broad day
light, and she jogged the fisherman with her elbowcp, and said,
"Get up, husband, and bestir yourself, for we must be king of
all the land." "Wife, wife," said the man, "why should we
wish to be king? I will not be king." "Then I will,") said she.
" But wife,"! said the fisherman, "how can you be king? The
fish cannot make you a king." "H-usband," said she, "say no
more about it, but go and try! I will be king." So the mnan
went away quite sorrowful to think that his wife should want to
145 1






GRKIMM' S

be king. This time the sea looked a dark gray color, and was
overspread with curling waves and ridges of foam as he cried out:

"O man of the seal
Harken to mel
My wife ]lsabill
Will have her own will,
And hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!"

"Well, what would she have now?" said the fish. "Alas!"
said the poor man, "my wife wants to be king." "Go home,"
said the fish; "she is king already."
Then the fisherman went home; and as he came close to the
palace he saw a troop of soldiers, and heard the sound of drums
and trumpets. And when he went in he saw his wife sitting on
a high throne of gold and diamonds, with a golden crown upon
her head; and on each side of her stood six fair maidens, each
a head caller than the other. Well, wife," said the fisherman,
"~are you king?" "Yles," said she, "I am king." And when
he had looked at her for a long time, he said, "Ah, wvife!
what a fine thing it is to be king! now we shall never have
anything more to wish for as long as we live." "I don't
know how that may be," said she; "never is a long time. I
am king, it is true; but I begin to be tired of that, and I
think I should like to be emperor." "Ailas, wife! why should
you wish to be emperor?"' said the fisherman. "Husband,"
said she, "go to the fish! I say I will be emperor." "Ah,
wife!" replied the fisherman, "the fish cannot make an em-
peror, I am sure, and I should not like to ask him for such a
thing. "I am king," said Ilsabill, "and you are my slave; so
go at once!"
So the fisherman was forced to go; and be muttered as he
went along, "This will come to no good, it is too much to ask; the
fish will be tired at last, and then we shall be sorry for what we
havre done." He soon came to the seashore; and the water
was quite black and muddy, and a mighty whirlwind blew over
I 46 ]






FAIRY TALES

the waves and rolled them about, but he went as neair as he
could to the water's brink, and said:

"O man of the seal
Harken to me!
1\1y w\ife 11sabill
Will have her own will,
And hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!"

"'What would she have now?" said the fish "Ah!" said the
fisherman, "she wants to be emperor." "(Go home," said the
fish; "she is emperor already."
So he went home again; and as he came near he saw his wife
Ilsabill sitting on a very lofty throne made of solid gold, with a
great crown on her head full two yards high; and on each side
of her stood her guards and attendants in a row, Cach one smaller
than the other, from the tallest giant down to a little dwarf no
bigger than, my finger.' And before her stood princes and dukes
and earls; and the fisherman went up to her and said, "Wife,
are you emperor?" "Yes," said she, "I am emperor." "Ah!i"
said the man, as he gazed upon her, "what a fine thing it is to
be emperor!" "Husband," said she, "why should we stop at
being emperor? I will be pope next." Oh wife, wife!" said he,
"Howr can you be pope? There is but one pope at a time in
Ch ristendom."' "Husband," said she, "I will be pope this very
day." But," replied the husband, "the fish cannot make you
pope." "What nonsense!" said she; "'if he can make an em-
peror, he can make a pope. Go and try him."
So the fisherman went. But when he came to the shore the
wind was raging and the sea was tossed up and down in boiling
waves, and the ships were in trouble and rolled fearfully upon
the tops of the billows. In the middle of the heavens there was
a little piece of blue sky, but towards the south all was red, as
if a dreadful storm was rising. At this sight the fisherman was
dreadfully frightened, and he trembled so that his knees knocked
together: but still he went down near to the shore, and said:
4 C A7 I






GRIM M' S
"O man of the seat
Hearken to me!
My wife Ilsabhill
W;ill have her ow-n will,
And hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!"
"What does she want now?" said the fish. "Ah!" said the
fisherman, "my wife wants to be pope." "Go home," said the
fish; "she is pope already."
Then the fisherman went home, and found Ilsabill sitting on
a throne that was two miles high. And she had th ree great crowns
on her head, and around her stood all the pomp and power of
the church. And on each side of her were two rows of burning
lights, of all sizes, the greatest as large as the highest and biggest
tower in the world, and the least no larger than a small rush-
light. "Wiife," said the fisherman, as he looked at all this
greatness, "are you pope?" "Yes," said she, "I am pope."'
"Well, wife," replied he, "it is a grand thing to be pope; and
no~w you must be easy, for you can be nothing greater." "'I
will think. about that," said the wife. Then they went to bed;
but Dame Ilsabill could not sleep all night for thinking what she
should be next. At last, as she was dropping asleep, morning
broke, and the sun rose. "Hal" thought she, as she wnoke up
and looked at it through the window, "after all I cannot prevent
the sun rising." At this thought she was very angry, and
wakened her husband, and said, "'Husband, go to the fish and
tell him I must be lord of the sun and moon." The fisherman
was half asleep, but the thought frightened him so much that
he started and fell out of bed. "Alas, wife!" said he, cannott
you be easy with being pope?" "No," said she, "'I am very un-
easy as long as the sun and moon rise without my leave. Go
to the fish at once!"
Then the man went shivering with fear; and as he was going
down to the shore a dreadful storm arose, so that the~ trees and
the very rocks shook. And all the heavens became black with
stormy clouds, and the lightning played, and the thunders rolled;
I 48 I






FAIRY TALES

and you might have seen in the sea great black waves, swelling
up like mountains with crowns of white foam upon their heads.
And the fisherman crept toward the sea, and cried out as well
as he could:
"O man of the seal
Hearkien to me!
1\ly w-ife Ilsaibill
WVill have her own will,
And hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!"

"(What does she want now?" said the fish. ";Ah!" said he,
"she wants to be lord of the sun and moon." "Go home," said
the fish, "to your pigstyr again."
And there they live to this very day.






GRIM~M'S














THE TWELVE BROTHERS

THERE were once a king and queen
Swho had lived happily together for
many years. They had twelve
children, but it so happened that all these
children were boys. One day the king said to the queen, "If
our next child should be a girl, all the boys must die, for I
should like my daughter to be very ach and to inherit the
whole of my kingdom." Hereupon he ordered twelve coffins to
be made, and after a little pillow had been placed in each and
they had all been filled with shavings, they were locked up in
a room in the castle. Then the king gave the key to his wife,
and told her on no account to say a word of this matter to
any one.
But the poor mother could do nothing but sit-and griev~e the
whole day long, and, seeing her so sorrowful, her youngest boy,
whom she had named Banjamin after the little son in the Bible,
and who always liked to be near his mother, went to her and
said, "Dear mother, why are you so sad?"
"I may not tell you, dearest child," she answered.
150)






FAIRY TALES

The boy, however, gave her no peace with his questioning,
until at last she rose and led him to the room in which the coffins
were kept.
"LDearest Benjamin," she said, "your father had these coffins
prepared for you and your brothers, for if ever I have a little
daughter you are all to be killed and buried in them." She wept
so bitterly as she told him this, that her son tried to comfort her,
and said,: "Do not weep, dear mother; we will go away from
here, and I am sure we shall be able to look after ourselves."
Then his mother bade him go with his brothers into the wood,
and there find the highest tree. "And let one of you," she con-
tinued, "be always at the top, watching, for you must keep your
eyes on the castle tower. If I have a little son, I will put up a
white flag, and then you will know that it is safe for you to
return home; if I have a little daughter, I will put up a red flag,
and then you must flee for your lives, and may God help and
protect you. Every night I shall rise and pray for you; in win-
,ter, that you may not be without a fire to warm yourselves by;
in summer, that you may be sheltered from the heat."
She then blessed them, and the boys went off to the wood,
and kept watch in turn on the top of the highest oak-tree. The
day came when it was Benjamin's turn to watch, and as he was
looking toward the tower he saw a flag put up. But alast it
was no white flag, but a blood-red flag, warning them that the
hour had come when their father's cruel sentence was to be
carried out.
When the others heard this, they ~flew into a great rage, and
exclaimed in their anger: "Are we to be put to death, just for
the sake of a girl! but we will have our revenge!" So they
swore one and all that they would take the life of any girl who
should cross their path. *
They now thought it safer to go farther into the wood, and
when they had made their way to where the trees were thickest
and the shade deepest, they suddenly came upon a little empty
house, that had been raised by the magic of some good or evil fairy.
151 ]






GRIMM' S

"Oh!" they cried, "this is just the place for us to live in;
you, Benjamin, as you are the youngest and weakest, must stay
at home and keep house, while we go and look for provisions."
So the elder brothers went into the w~ood, and there they
found plenty of game to shoot: wild deer, hares, pigeons and other
birds, as well as many other things that were good for food.
When they had finished their day's sport, they went home, and
then it was Benjamin's turn to busy himself with preparing and
cooking the food, and glad enough they were of a meal, for by
this time they were all very hungry. In this way they lived on
in the little house for ten years, and the time passed so quickly
that the brothers never found it long.
Meanwhile, the little daughter who had been born at the
citstle was growing up. She was good at heart and beautiful in
face, and had a gold star on her forehead.
One day about this time she happened to catch sight of twelve
Eittle shirts which were lying among some of her mother's things.
"Mother," she said, "to whom do these shirts belong? for
they are too small for my father to wear."
It was with a heavy heart that the poor mother answered:
"Those shirts, dear child, belong to your twelve brothers."
"LMy twelve brothers," cried the girl. Why, I never even heard
of them! Where are they now?"
"God alone knows," replied her mother, "but they are wan-
dering somewhere about the world."
Then she took her little daughter to the room where the coffins
wiere hidden, anld, unlocking the door, showed them to her, and
said, "These were meant for your brothers, but they ran away
and escaped," and she related to her all that had happened be-
fore she was born.
"Dear mother," said the girl, "do not weep; I will go and try
to find my brothers."
So she took the twelve shirts and started through the wood
in search of them. On and on she went all through the day,
and as the evening fell she came to the little house. She stepped
152]





FAIRY TALES

in, and there she found a young boy, who looked with astonish-
ment at this beautiful girl, who was dressed like a princess and
had gold star on her forehead. "Wiihence come yrou?" he
asked, "and w~hat are you seeking?"
"(I am a king's daughter," she answered, "and I am, seeking
my twelve brothers; and as far as the blue sky reaches overhead,
will I wander till I find them," and she showed him the twelve
`shirts. Then Benjamin knew that it was his sister. "I am
Benjamin," he cried, "your youngest brother," and at this they
were both so overcome with delight that they began to cry for
joy, and kissed and embraced each other.
At last Benjamin said: "There is one thing that troubles me;
my brothers and I were so angry at being driven out of our king-
dom on account of a girl, that we made a vow to kill every girl
whom we met."
"I would gladly die," said his sister, "if by so doing I could
restore my dear brothers to their home."
"No, no, you shall not die," cried Benjamin, "hide yourself
under this tub, and when the others return I will soon come to
an understanding with them."
The sister did as she was bid, and as soon as it was dark, in
came the brothers from hunting.
They sat down to their supper, and while eating and drinking
asked, "Well, Benjamin, what news have you to tell us?"
"Have you yourselves heard nothing?" said Benjamin.
"Nothing," they replied.
"That is strange," continued Benjamin, "for you have been
out all day, and I have only been in the house, and yet I know
more than you."
"What is it?" they all cried at once; "tell us what it is."
"Only on condition," said Benjamin, "that you promise me
not to kill the first girl you see."
We promise, we promise; she shall find mercy at our hands,"
they all cried again, "only let us hear your news."
Benjamin went to the tub and, lifting it up, said, "Our sister
1531







GRIMM' S

is here," and the king's daughter stepped forth in her royal
attire, with the gold star on her forehead, and stood before them
full of tenderness, grace, and beautyv. When the brothers saw
her they: greatly loved her, and came about her and kissed her,
and there was great rejoicing among them.
So now the sister stayed at home wvith Benjamin and helped
him in the house, while the others continued to hunt in the
wood for game. Among other things, she gathered the wood for
cooking, and herbs for vegetables, and put the pots and kettles
on the fire, so that there might always be food ready for her
brothers when they came in. She kept the house in beautiful
order, and made the little beds look sweet and clean with pretty
white covers, and altogether it was no wonder that the brothers
were very happy and comfortable, and that they all lived together
in great peace anld contentment.
One day, the two who stayed at home had prepared a dainty
meal, and as soon as they were all assembled they sat down
to the table, happy and in good spirits. Now there was a little
garden belonging to the house, in which grew twelve tall lily
plants. The sister went out to pick the lilies, for she thought
it would please her brothers to give them each a flower as they
sat at table. But scarcely was the last one gathered when her
brothers were suddenly changed into twleve ravens, that flew
right away over the trees, and in the same moment both the
house and garden entirely disappeared. There was the poor
girl, left alone in the wild wood; turning, however, to look arouIld
her, she saw an old woman standing near, who said, My child,
what is this that you have done? Why did you not leave -those
twelve white lilies untouched ? Those were your brothers, who
are now from this time forth turned into ravens." The girl
asked, weeping, "Is there nothing that I can do to set them fre?"
"Nothing," replied the old woman; "there is one way only
in all the world by which they might be saved, but that would
be far too hard a task for you to perform, for you would have
to remain dumb for severe years, never either speaking or laugh-
1s4 I





r:~~~-~ ~
~~i~c~i
.'~~roc~ ~?~~u~ x~.-

... .:.


1111

"~:~-7iB~`
~
j'
1. ,:


TWELVEE RAVENLS CAMlE FLYING DOWN"


TAL E


FAIRY








FAIRY TALES

ing, and if, when there were only a few minutes wanting to com-
plete the seven years, you were to utter a single word, all your
past endeavor would be in vain, and with that one word you
would have killed your brothers."
The girl was silent, but in her heart she said, "I will set my
dear brothers free, I know that I shall be able to do it."
Then she went and chose out a high tree, and there among its
topmost branches she sat and span, and neither spoke nor
laughed.
Now it happened, one day, that a king was out hunting in the
wood. He had a large greyhound with him, and the dog ran
up to the tree whereon the girl was sitting and began leaping
about and looking up at her and barking. Then the king came
along, and he too looked up and saw the beautiful princess with
the gold star on her forehead, and he was so enchanted with
her beauty that he called to her to ask if she would be his wife.
She did not speak a word, but gave a little nod with her head.
Then the king climbed up into the tree himself and carried her
down, and, lifting her on to his own horse, bore her away to his
home.
The marriage was celebrated with great pomp and amid great
rejoicings, but the bride neither spoke nor laughed.
They had been living happily together for some years, when the
king's mother, who was a bad-hearted woman, began to say
wicked things about the young queen. "That woman you
brought home with you," she said to the king, "is nothing but
a common beggar-maid; who knows what evil tricks she may
be up to in secret. Even if she is dumb and cannot speak, at
least she must be able to laugh, and you know it is said that those
who never laugh have a bad conscience." At first the king would
not believe any of the things that were said against his wife;
but the old mother gave him no peace, accusing the queen first
of one wicked thing and then another, until he allowed himself
at last to be persuaded of her guilt, and condemned her to death.
But the king still dearly loved his wife, and he stood looking
[57 I







GRIM M' S

out of his window and weeping while the fire was being kindled
in the courtyard where the young queen was to be burned.
The queen had been tied to the stake; and now the last mo-
ment of the seven years came just as the angry tongues of the
fire were beginning to play~ about her dress. Then there was heard
in the air above a rushing sound as of wings, and twelve ravens
came flying down~, and no sooner had they alighted on the
ground, than behold! there were her twelve brothers whom she
had set free. They scattered the fire and trampled on the
fRames, and showered kisses and loving words upon their sister
as they untied her fr-om the stake.
And now that she might speak, she was able to tell the kring
wvhy she had been dumb and had never laughed. And he was
rejoiced when he heard her tale and knew that she was guiltless,
and they all lived happily together forever after.
But the wicked old mother-in-law was taken before the judge
and tried, and he condemned her to be put in a vat of boiling
oil, in which there were poisonous snakes, and so she died a
miserable death.





SKING and queen once. upon a time reigned in a country
a great way off, where there were in those days fairies.
Now this king and queen had plenty of money, and plenty
of fine clothes to wear and plenty of good things to eat and drink,
and a coach to ride out in every day; but though they had been
married many years, they had no children, and this grieved them
very much indeed. But one day as the queen was walking by
the side of the river, at the bottom of the garden, she saw a poor
little fish that had thrown itself out of the water, and lay gasp-
ing and nearly dead on the bank. Then the queen took pity on
the little fish, and threw it back again into the river; and before
it swam away it lifted its head out of the water and said, "I
knowc what your wc~ish is, and it shall be fulfilled, in return for
your kindness to me--you will soon have a daughter."' What the
little fish had foretold soon came to pass; and the queen had a.
little girl, so very beautiful that the king could not cease looking
on it for joy, and said he would hold a great feast and make
merry, and show the child to all the land. So he asked his kinE-
1s9I


FAIRY


TALES







GRIMM' S

men, and nobles, and friends, and neighbors. But the queen
said, "I will have the fairies also, that they might be kind and
good to our little daughter." Now there were thirteen fairies in
the kingdom; but as the king and queen had only twelve golden
dishes for them to eat out of, they were forced to leave one of
the fairies without asking her. So twelve fairies came, each with
a high red cap on her head, and red shoes with high heels on her
feet, and a long white wand in her hand: and after the feast was
over they gathered round in a ring and gave all their best gifts to
the little princess. One gave her goodness, another beauty, an
other riches, and so on till she had all that was good in the world.
Just as eleven of them had done blessing her, a great noise was
heard in the courtyard, an~d word was brought that the thirteenth
fairy was come, with a black cap on her head, and black shoes
on her feet, and a brooms:ick in her hand; and presently up she
came into the dining-room. Now: aC she had not been asked
to the feast she was very angry, and scolded the king and queen
very much, and set to work to take he'r revenge. So she cried
out, "The king's daughter shall, in her fifteen year, be wounded
by a spindle and fall down dead." Then the twelfth of the
friendly fairies, who had* not yet given her gift, came forward,
and said that the evil wish must be fulfilled, but that she could
soften its mischief; so her gift was that the king's daughter,
when the spindle wounded her, should not really die, but should
only fall asleep for a hundred years.
However, the king hoped still to save his dear child altogether
from the threatened evil; so he ordered that all the spindles in
the kingdom should be bought up and burnt. But all the gifts
of the first eleven fairies were in the meantime fulfilled; for the
princess was so beautiful, and well-behaved, and good, and
wise, that every one who knew her loved her.
It happened that, on the very day she was fifteen years old,
the king and queen were not at home, and she was left alone in
the palace. So she roved about by herself, and looked at all the
rooms and chambers, till at last she came to an old tower, to
160]





" AND THERE SHE LAY FAST ASLEEP ON A COUCH "


TA LES


FAIRY









FAIRY TALES

which there was a narrow staircase ending with a little door.
In the door there was a golden key, and when she turned it the
door sprang open, and there sat an old lady spinning away very
busily. "W'hy, how now, good mother," said the princess;
"wvhat are you doing there?" Spin ning,"' said the old lady, and
nodded her head, humming a tune, while buzz! went the wheel.
"How prettily that little thing turns round!"' said the princess,
and took the spindle and began to try and spin. But scarcely
had she touched it, before the fairy's prophecy was fulfilled;
the spindle -wounded her, and she fell down lifeless on the
ground.
However, she was not dead, but had only fallen into a deep
sleep; and the king and the queen, who had just come home, and
all their court, fell asleep too; and the horses slept in the stables,
and the dogs in the court, the pigeons on the house-top, and the
very flies slept upon the walls. Even the fire on the hearth left
off blazing and went to sleep; the jack stopped, and the spit
that was turning about with a goose upon it for the king's
dinner stood still; and the cook, who was at that moment
pulling the kitchen-boy by the hair to give him a box on the
ear for something he had done amiss, let him go, and both
fell asleep; the butler, who was slyly tasting the ale, fell asleep
with the jug at his lips; and thus everything stood still and
slept soundly.
A large hedge of thorns soon grew round the palace, and every
year it became higher and thicker; till at last the old palace
was surrounded and hidden, so that not even the roof or the
c~himney~s could be seen. But there went a report through all the
land of the beautiful Sleeping Beauty (for so the king's daughter
was called): so that, from time to time, several kings' sons came
and tried to break through the thicket into the palace. This:
however, nore of them could ever do; for the thorns and bushes
laid hold of them, as it were with hands; and there they stuck
fast and died wretchedly.
After many, many years there came a king's son into that
5 [63]






GRIMM' S

land; and an old man told him the story of the thicket of thorns,
and how a beautiful palace stood behind it, and how a wonder-
ful princess, called Sleeping Beauty, lay in it asleep, with all
her court. He told, too, how he had heard from his grandfather
that many, many princes had come, and had tried to break
through the thicket, but that they had all stuck fast in it, and
died. Then the young prince said, "All this shall not frightren
me; I will go and see this Sleeping Beauty." The old man tried
to hinder him, but he was bent upon going.
Now that very day the hundred years were ended; and as
the prince came to the thicket he saw nothing but beautiful
flowering shrubs, through which he went with ease, and they
shut in after him as thick as ever. Then he came at last to
the palace, and there in the court lay the dogs asleep; and the
horses were standing in the stables, and on the roof sat the
pigeons fast asleep, with their heads under their wings. And
when he came into the palace, the flies were sleeping on the
walls; the spit was standing still; the butler had the jug of ale
to his lips, going to drink a draught; the maid sat with a fowl in
her lap ready to be plucked; and the cook in the kitchen was
still holding up her hand, as if she was going to beat the boy.
Then he went on still farther, and all was so still that he could
hear every breath he drew; till at last he came to the old tower,
and opened the door of the little room in which Sleeping Beauty
was; and there she lay, fast asleep in a couch by the window.
She looked so beautiful that he could not take his eyes off her,
so he stooped down and gave her a kiss. But the moment he
kissed her she opened her eyes and awoke, and smiled upon him;
and they went out together; and soon the king and queen also
awoke, and all the court, and gazed on one another with great
wonder. And the horses shook themselves, and the dogs jumped
up and barked; the pigeons took their heads from under their
wings and looked about and flew into the fields; the flies on the
walls buzzed again; the fire inl the kitchen blazed up; round
went the jack, and round went the spit, with the goose for the
[ 64 1





king's dinner upon it; the butler Sinished his draught of ale;
the maid went on plucking the fowl; and the cook gave the boy
the box on his ear.
And then the prince and Sleeping Beauty were married, and
the wedding feast was given; and they lived happily together
all their hives long.


FAIRY


TALES







GRIMM' S






I






THE RAVEN


T HERE: was once a queen who had a little daughter, still
too young to run alone. One day the child was very
troublesome, and the mother could not quiet it, do wvhat
she would. She grew impatient, and, seeing the ravens flying
round the castle, she opened the window, and said, "I wish
you were a raven and would fly away; then I should have a
little peace." Scarcely were the words out of her mouth, when
the child in her arms was turned into a raven and flewF away
from her through the open window. The bird took its flight to
a dark wood and remained there for a long time, and meanwhile
the parents could hear nothing of their child.
Long after this, a man was making his way through the wood
when he heard a raven calling, and he followed the sound of the
voice. As he drew near, the raven said, "I am by birth a king's
daughter, but am now under the spell of some enchantment,
you can, however, set me free." "What am I to do?," he asked.
"Go farther into the wcood until you come to a house wherein
lives an old woman; she will offer you food and drink, but you
must not take of either; if you do you will fall into a deep sleep,
and will not be able to help me. In the garden behind the house
166 ]







FAIRY TALES

is a large tan-heap, and on that you must stand and watch for
me. I shall drive there in my carriage at two o'clock in the
afternoon for three successive days; the farst day it will be drawn
by four white, the second by four chestnut, and the last by four
black horses; but if you fail to keep awake and I f6nd y~ou sleep-
ing, I shall not be sec free."
The man promised to do all that she wished, but: the raven
said: "Alas! I know even now that you will take something
from the wcpoman and be unable to save me." The man assured
her again that he would on on account touch a thing to eat or
drink.
When he came to the house and went inside, the old woman
met him, and said: "Poor man! how tired you are! Come in
and rest and let me give you something to eat and drink."
"No," answered the man, "I will neither eat nor drink."
But she would not leave him alone, and urged him, saying:
"If you will not eat anything, at least you might take a draught
of wine; one drink counts for nothing," and at last he allowed
himself to be persuaded, and drank.
As it drew toward the appointed hour, he went outside into
the garden and mounted the tan-heap to await the raven. Sud-
denly a feeling of fatigue came over him, and, unable to resist it,
he lay down for a little while, fully determined, however, to keep
awvake; but in another minute his eyes closed of their own ac-
cord and he fell into such a deep sleep that all the noises in the
world would not have awakened him. At two o'clock the raven
came driving along, drawn by her four white horses; but even
before she reached the spot, she said to herself, sighing, "I
know he has fallen asleep." WT~1hen she entered the garden,
there she found him, as she had feared, lying on the tan*
heap, fast asleep. She got out of her carriage and went to
him; she called him and shook him, but it was all in vain, he
still continued sleeping.
The next day at noon, the old woman came to him again with
food and drink, which he at first refused. At last, overcome by
[ 67 1







GRIMM':' S

her persistent entreaties that he would tak~e something, he lifted
the glass and drank again.
Toward ntwo o'clock he went into the garden and on to the
tan-heap to watch for the raven. He had not, been there long
before he began to feel so tired that his limbs seemed hardly able
to support him and he could not stand upright any longer; so
again he lay down and fell fast asleep. As the raven drove along
with her four chestnut horses, she said, sorrowfully, to herself, "I
know he has fallen, asleep." She went as before to look for him,
but he slept, and it was impossible to awaken him.
The following day the old woman said to him: "WVhat is this?
You are not eating or drinking anything. Do you want to kill
yourself?"
He answered, "'I may not and will not either eat or drink."'
But she put down the dish of food and the glass of wine in
front of him, and when he smelt the wine he was unable to
resist the temptation, and took a deep draught.
WShen the hour came round again he went as usual on to the
tan-heap in the garden to await the king's daughter, but he felt
even more overcome with weariness than on the two previous
days, and, throwing himself down, he slept like a log. At two
o'clock the raven could be seen approaching, and this time her
coachman and everything about her, as well as her horses, were
black.
She was sadder than ever as she drove along, and said, mourn-
fully, "I know he has fallen asleep andl will not be able to set
me free." She found him sleeping heavily, and all her efforts
to awaken him were of no avail. Then she placed beside him
a loaf, some meat, and a flask of wine, of such a kind that how-
ever much he took of them, they would never grow less. After
that she drew a gold ring, on which her name was engraved, off
her finger, and put it upon one of his. Finally, she laid a letter
near him, in which, after giving him particulars of the food and
drink she had left~for him, she finished with the following words:
"I see that as long as you remain here you will never be able to
168)


























THE RAVEN SAID, "I AM BY BIRTH A KING'S
DAUGHTER "


FAIRY TALES









FAIRY TALES

set me free; if, however, you still wish to do so, come to the
golden castle of Stromberg; this is well within your power to
accomplish." She then returned to her carriage and drove to
the golden castle of Stromberg.
When the man awoke and found that he had been sleeping,
he was grieved at hs art, and said, "She has no doubt been here
and driven away again, and it is now too late for me to save
her." Then his eyes fell on the things which were lying beside
him; he read the letter, and knew from it all that had happened.
He rose up without delay, eager to start on his way and to reach
the castle of Stromberg, but he had no idea in which direction
he ought to go. He traveled about a long time in search of it
and came at last to a dark forest, through which he went on walk-
ing for fourteen days and still could not find a way out. Once
more night came on, and, worn out, he lay down under a bush
and fell asleep. Again the next day he pursued his way through
the forest, and that evening, thinking to rest again, he lay down
as before, but he heard such a howling and wailing that he found
it impossible to sleep. He waited till it was darker and people
had begun to light up their houses, and then seeing a little glim-
mer ahead of him, he went toward it.
He found that the light came from a house which looked smaller
than it really was, from the contrast of its height with that of
an immense giant who stood in front of it. He thought to him-
self, If the giant sees me going in, my life will not be worth
much." However, after a wcphile he summoned up courage and
went forward. When the giant saw him, he called out: "It is
lucky for me that you have come, for I have not had anything to
eat for a long time. I can have you nowci for my supper." "I
would rather you let that alone," said the man, "for I do not
willingly give myself up to be eaten; if you are wanting food I
have enough to satisfy your hunger." "If that is so," replied the
giant, "I will leave you in peace; I only thought of eating you
because I had nothing else.
So they went indoors together and sat down, and the man
S7: ]







GRIM M' S

brought out the bread, meat, and wine, which, although he had
eaten and drunk of them, were still unconsumed. The giant was
pleased with the good cheer, and are and drank to his heart's
content. When he had finished his supper the man asked him
:f he could direct him to the castle of Stromberg. The giant
said: "I will look on my map; on it are marked all the towns,
villages, and houses." So he fetched his map, and looked for the
castle, but could not find it. "Never mind," he said, "I have
larger maps up-stairs in the cupboard, we will look on those,"
but they searched in vain, for the castle was not marked even on
these. The man now thought he should like to continue his
journey, but the giant begged him to remain for a day or two
longer until the return of his brother, who was away in search
of provisions. When the brother came home, they asked him
about the castle of Stromberg, and he told them he would look
on his own maps as soon as he had eaten and appeased his hunger.
Accordingly, when he had finished his supper, they all went up
together to his room and looked through his maps, but the castle
was not to be found. Then he fetched other maps, and they
went on looking for the castle until at last they found it, but
it was many thousand miles away. "How shall I be able to
get there?" asked the man. "I have two hours to spare," said
the giant, "and I will carry you into the neighborhood of the
castle; I must then return to look after the child who is in our
care."
'The giant thereupon carried the man to within about a
hundred leagues of the castle, where he left him, saying, "You
will be able to walk the remainder of the way yourself." The
man journeyed on day and night till he reached the golden castle
of Stromberg. He found it situated, however, on a glass moun-
tain, and looking up from the foot he saw the enchanted maiden
drive round her castle and then go inside. He was overjoyed
to see her, and longed to get to the top of the mountain, but the
sides were so slippery that every time he attempted to climb he
fell back again. When he saw that it was impossible to reach
172 ]






FAIRY TALES

her, he was greatly grieved, and said to himself, "I will remain
here and wait for her," and so he built himself a little hut, and
there he sat and watched her for a whole year, and every day
he saw the King's daughter driving round her castle, but still
was unable to get nearer to her.
Looking out from his but one day he saw three robbers fight-
ing, and he called out to them, "God be with you." They
stopped when they heard the call, but, looking round and seeing
nobody, they went on again with their fighting, which now
became more furious. "God be with you," he cried again, and
again they paused and looked about, but, seeing no one, went
back to their fighting. A third time he called out, "God be
with you," and then thinking he should like to know the cause
of dispute between the three men, he went out and asked them
why they were fighting so angrily with one another. One of
them said that he had found a stick, and that he had but to
strike it against a door through which he wished to pass, and
it immediately flew open. Another told him that he had found
a cloak which rendered its wearer invisible; and the third had
caught a horse which would carry its rider over any obstacle
and even up the glass mountain. They had been unable to de-
cide whether they would keep together and have the things in
common, or whether they would separate. On hearing this,
the man said, "I will give you something in exchange for those
three things; not money, for that I have not got, but something
that is of far more value. I must first, however, prove whether
all you have told me about your three things is true." The rob-
bers, therefore, made him get on the horse, and handed him the
stick and the cloak, and when he had put this round him he was
no longer visible. Then he fell upon them with the stick and
beat them one after another, crying, "There, you idle vagabonds,
you have got what you deserve; are y-ou satisfied now!"
After this he rode up the glass mountain. When he reached
the gate of the castle, he found it closed, but he gave it a blow
with his stick, and it flew wide open at once and he passed
[73 ]






GRIMM' S
through. He mounted the steps and entered the room where
the maiden was sitting, with a golden goblet full of wine in front
of her. She could not see him, for he still wore his cloak. He
took the ring which she had given him off his finger, and threw
it into the goblet, so that it rang as it couched the bottom.
"That is my own ring," she exclaimed, "and if that is so the
man must also be here who is coming to set me free."
She sought for him about the castle, but could find him no-
where. Meanwhile he had gone outside again and mounted his
horse and thrown off the cloak. When, therefore, she came to
the castle gate she saw him, and cried aloud for joy. Then. he
dismounted and took her in his arms; and she kissed him, and
said, "No~w you have indeed set me free, and to-morrow we will
celebrate our marriage."





FRITZ AND HIS FRIENDS


HONEST Fritz had worked hard all his
life, but ill-luck befell him; his cattle
died, his barns were burned, and he lost
almost all his money. So at last he said, "'Be-
fore it is all gone I will buy goods, and go out
4-:? into the world, and see whether I shall have $'
the luck to mend my fortune."
The first place he came to- was a village,
where the boys were running about, crying and
shouting. "What is the matter?" asked he.
"See here!" said they, "wpe have got a mouse
that we make dance to please us. Do look at
him; what a droll sight it is! How he jumps
about!" But the man pitied the poor little thing, and said, "'Let
the poor mouse go, and I will give you money." So he gave
them some money, and took the mouse and let it run; and it soon
jumped into a hole that was close by, and was out of their reach.
1751


FAI RY


TAL E S






GRIMM' S

Then he traveled on and came to 'another village; and there
the boys had got an ass that they made stand on its hind legs
and tumble and cut capers. Then they laughed and shouted,
and gave the poor beast no rest. So the good man gave them,
too, some of his money, to let the poor thing go away in peace.
At the next village he came to, the young people were leading
a bear that had been taught to dance, and were plaguing the
poor thing sadly;. Then he gave them, too, some money, to let
the beast go; and Master Bruin was very glad to get on his four
feet and seemed quiet at his ease and happy again.
But now our traveler-found that he had given way all the
money he had in the world, and had not; a shilling in his pocket.
Then said he to himself: "The king has heaps of gold in his
strong box that he never uses; I cannot die of hunger; so I hope
I shall be forgiveri if I borrow a little from him, and when I get
rich again I will repay it all."
So he managed to get at the king's strong box, and took a
very little money; but as he came out the guards saw him, and
said he was a thief, and took, him to the judge. The poor man
told his story; but the judge said that sort of borrowing could
not be suffered and that those who took other people's money
must be punished; so the end of his trial was that Frita was
found guilty, and doomed to be thrown into the lake, shut up in
a box. The lid of the box was full of holes to let in air; and one
jug of water and one loaf of bread were given him.
When he was swimming along in the water very sorrowfully,
he heard something nibbling and biting at the lock. All of a
sudden it fell off, the lid flew open, and there stood his old friend
the little mouse, who had done him this good turn. Then came
the ass and the bear, too, and pulled the box ashore; and all
helped him because he had been kind to them.
But now they did not know what to do next, and began to
lay their heads together; when on a sudden a wave threw on
the shore a pretty white stone that looked like an egg. Then the
bear said, "That's a lucky thing This is the wonderful stone;
[76 ]







FAIRY TALES

whoever has it needs only to wish, and everything he wishes for
comes to him at once." So Fritz went and picked up the stone,
and wished for a palace and a garden and a stud of horses; and
his wish was fulfilled as soon as he had made it. And there he
lived in his castle and garden, with fine stables and horses;
and all was so grand and beautiful that he never could wonder
and gaze at it enough.
After some time some merchants passed by that way. "See,"
said they, "what a princely palace! The last time we were here
it was nothing but a desert waste." They were very eager to
know how all this had happened, and went in and asked the
master of the palace how it had been so quickly raised. "I
have done nothing myself," said he; "it is the wonderful
stone that did all." "What a strange stone that must be!"
said they. Then he asked them to walk in, and showed it to
them.
They asked him whether he would sell it, and offered him all
their goods for it; and the goods seemed so fine and costly that
he quite forgot that the stone would bring him in a moment a
thousand better and richer things, and be agreed to make the
bargain. Scarcely was the stone, however, out of his hands
before all his riches were gone and poor Fritz found himself sit-
ting in his box in the water, with his jug of water and loal of
bread by his side.
However, his grateful friends, the mouse, the ass, and the bear,
came quickly to help him; but the mouse found she could not
nibble off the lock this time, for it was a great deal stronger than
before. Then the bear said, "We must find the wonderful stone
again, or all we can do will be fruitless."
The merchants, meantime, had taken up their abode in the
palace; so away went the three friends, and when they came
near, the bear said: Mouse, go in and look through the key-
hole, and see where the stone is kept. You are small; nobody w-ill
see you." The mouse did as she was told, but soon came back
and said: "Bad news! I have looked in, and the stone hangs
I 27






GRIMM'S

under the looking-glass by a red silk string, and on each side
of it sits a great black cat with fSery eyes watching it."
Then the others took counsel together, and said: "Go back
again, and wait till the master of the palace is in bed asleep;
then nip his nose and pull his hair." Away went the mouse, and
did as they told her; and the master jumped up very angrily,
and rubbed his nose and cried: "Those rascally cats are good for
nothing at all; they let the mice bite my very nose and pull the
hair off my head." Then he hunted them out of the room; and
so the mouse had the best of the game.
Next night, as soon as the master wcas asleep,'the mouse crept
in again; and (the cats being gone) she nibbled at the red silken
string to which the stone hung, till down it dropped. Then she
rolled it along to the door; but when it got there the poor little
mouse was quite tired, and said to the ass, "Put in your foot, and
lift it over the threshold." This was soon done; and they took
up the stone and set off for the waterside. Then the ass said,
"H-ow shall we reach the box?" "That is easily managed, my
friend," said the bear. "I can swcim very well; and do you, don-
key, put your fore feet over my shoulders; mind and hold fast,
and take the stone in your mouth. As for you, mouse, you can
sit in my ear."
Thus all was settled, and away they swam. After a time
Bruin began to brag and boast. "We are brave fellows, are not
we?" said he. "What do you think, donkey?" But the ass held
his tongue and said not a word. "Why don't you answer me?'"
said the bear. "You must be an ill-mannered brute not to speak
when you are spoken to." When the ass heard this he could
hold no longer; so he opened his mouth and out dropped the
wonderful stone. "I could not speak," said he. "Did not ylou
know I had the stone in my mouth? Now it is lost, and that
is your fault." "Do but hold your tongue and be easy!" said
the bear; "and let us think what is to be done now."
Then another council was held; and at last they called to-
gether all the frogs, their wives and families, kindred and friends,
[78 ]







FAIRY TALES

and said, "A great foe of yours is coming to eat you all up; but
never mind, bring us up plenty of stones, and we will build a
strong wall to guard you." The frogs, hearing this, were dread-
fully frightened, and set to work, bringing up all the stones
they could find. At last came a large fat frog, pulling along the
wonderful stone by the silken string; and when the bear saw
it he jumped for joy, and said, "Now we have found what we
wanted." So he set the old frog free from his load, and told him
to tell his friends they might now go home to their dinners as
soon as they pleased.
Then the three friends swam off again for the box, and the
lid flew open, and they found they were but just in time, for the
bread was all eaten and the jug of water almost empty. But as
soon as honest Fritz had the stone in his hand, he wished him-
self safe in his palace again; and in a moment he was there, wit
his garden, and his stables, and his horses; and his three faith-
f~ul friends lived with him, and they all spent their time happily
and merrily together as long as they lived. And thus the good
man's kindness was rewarded; and so it ought, for one good meon
deserves another.






GRI1MM'S















THE ELFIN GROVE I:

AS an honest woodman was sitting one evening, after his
work was done, talking with his wife, he said: I hope
the children will not run into that grove by the side of
the river; it looks more gloomy than ever; the old oak-tree is
sadly blasted and torn, and some odd folks, I am sure, are lurking
about there, but who they are nobody knows." The woodman,
however, could not say thrit they brought ill-luck, whatever they
were; for every one said that the village had thriven more than
ever of late, that the fields looked gayer and greener, that even
the sky was of a deeper blue, and that the moon and stars shed
a brighter light. So, not knowing what to think, the good people
very wisely let the new-comers alone, and, in truth, seldom said
or thought anything at' all about them.
That very evening the woodman's daughter Rioseken, and her
playmate Martin, ran out to have a game of hide-and-seek in
the valley. "W~here can he be hidden?" said she, "he must
have gone toward the grove; perhaps he is behind the old oak-
tree"; and down she went to look. just then she spied a little
dog that jumped and frisked round her, and wagged his tail, and
( 80 1





FAIRY


"'AND SO, PRETTY' ROSEKEN, YOU ARE COMlE AT
LAST TO SEE US ?"


T ALEE S




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author Grimm's fairy tales
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Grimm's fairy tales
Grimm, Jacob, 1785-1863
role aut Grimm, Wilhelm, 1786-1859
pbl Books, Inc
extent 9 p. l., 443 [1] p. incl.front. (2 port.) illus. : plates. ; 23 cm.
publisher Harper & Bros.
pubPlace New York
London
type ALEPH 028979696
OCLC 01933349
LCCN 17031071
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note anchored true by the Brothers Grimm; with many illustrations and decorations by Louis Rhead.
Includes Biographical note
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div Front Cover
pb n 1 facs 00001.jpg
2 00002.jpg
Tbc Baldain Libry
9( mB pbi
Half Title
3 00007.jpg
.GRIIMM'~S FAIRY TALES
4 00008.jpg
Frontispiece
5 00010.jpg
. -I.
C
.k
Page
6 00011.jpg
FAIRY TALEiS
Stories and Tales
of ElvesGoblins
and Fairies.
The ~Brothers. Grimm
with many ilustrations
and decorations by
p 1~i L ZOUIS EIHIEAD
BOOKS, INC.
NEW YORK
7 00012.jpg
Ganma's PauryTALES
Cowyright, 1917. by Harper & Brothere
Printed in the Unhled States of America
Table of Contents
8 00013.jpg
PAGEB
BIOGRAPHIICAL NOTE .. .. .. .. .. .. ... Ki
: REACE .. .. .. .. .. .. X111
flmE RED RIDINGHOOD ................ I
Tee GOLDEN GOOSE ..... .... ......... 8
THE \ISHING-TABLE, THE GOLD ASS, AND THE CUDGEL .. .. 14
iHlE MOUSE, THE BIRD, AND THE SAUSAGE .. .. ... 28
STHE FOX'S RUSH . jI
TH~E FISHERMAN AND H1S WVIFE .. .. .. .. .. 41
fTHE TWELVE BROTHERS ..... ............ So
iSLEEPING BEAUTY..... ...... ......-- 59
.THE RAVEN ........ ... .......... 6)
SFRI-nAND HIS FRIENDS ... .............. 75
T~HE EzLIN GROVE ......... .......... 80
gBEARSKIN ................... ... 89
:.THE ADVENTURES OF CHArNTCLEER AND PARTLET 97
~OLD SuLTAN ro4
THEe IANIN THE BUSB .. I07
~THE ROBBER BRIDEGROOM .. .. .. .. .. ... II2
TASHPUTTEL ................... .. Ilf
THE THREE SPINNING FAIRIES ; ... .. .... 127
URLMPEL-STI LTS-KEN .................,. IS
MOHER HOLLE ................... ..I)7
THE NOSE-TREE ................... I41
THE GOOSE-GlRL ................... I5o
FAITHFUL JOHN ................... 159
TuE SEVEN RAVENS .................. I6
HE THREE SLUGGARDS .. .. .. .. 3
~1NaGRIZZLE-BEARD.. .. .. .. 17(
9 00014.jpg
CONTENT.S
PAGE
THE TOM-TIT ANrD THE BEAR .. .... .. .. .. 179
THE WONDERFUL hlUSICIAN .. .. .. .. .. .. .. I83
THE IUEEN BEE .............,......I87
THE DOG AND THE SPARROWY...............I19o
THE hAN INTHE BAG ..........,.......I94
THe FORBIDDEN ROOM .........,........198
1CRL TZ. ...........,.........203
FREDERICK AND CATHERINE .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 2iI
THE THREE CHILDREN OF FORTUNE .. ... .. .. 2If
hlRs.FOX ................... ...22I
THE CHANGELING ...........,........225
HANS IN LucK................... .227
THE BEAR AND THE SKRATTEL ..............236
TOMrTHUMBle....................,.248
SIYow-WHITE.................. ...257
THE FOUR CRAFT5MEN ..................266
CAT-SKIN... ................... 27I
JORINDA AND JORINDEL ................. 277
THUMBLING~ THE DW'ARF AND THUMBLING TBZ GIANT ... 28I
THE JUNIPER-TRCEE......... ......... 29o
Tue VATER OF LIFE .......... ........ 302
THE BLUE LIGHT ...... .............3I2
THE MATER :'AIRY ...... .. ......... 3ly
THE THREE CROWS ,......... ... ...... 328
TH.EFROG-PRINCE ,******..... ........ 332
THE ELVES AND THE COBBLER .. .. .. .., ]8
THE FROG-BRIDE .. .. .. .. j3 4
THE DANCING SHOES .. .. .. 349
THE VALIANT TAILOR .. .. . 355
GIANr GOLDEN-BEARD .... .............. 360
PEE-WI .. .. .. .368
HANSEL AND GRETHEL .. .. .. 373
LILY AND THE LION .. 384
RAPUNZEL ...,...................39I
DONICEY-WORT ..............,........397
THE KING OF THE GOLDEN MOUNTAIN *.. 40
THE BJREME-N TOWN MUSICIANS .. .. ... .. .. 413
BROTHER AND SISTER.. .. .. ** 419
THE FOX AND THE HORSE.. .. .. .* 424
HANS AND HIS WIFE GRETT~EL .. .. ... 426
THE FIVE SERVANTS .................. 438
List Illustrations
10 00015.jpg
WHATT A TERRIBLE LARGE MOUTH YOU HAVE GOTI)). .. Facing.
LAND SO THEY MADE SEVEN, ALL RUNNING TOGETHER AFTER
DUMMLING AND RJS GOOSEI .. ... .. sc
(LTHE LANDLORD CRIED OUT FOR MERCY) ... .. as
THEY TRAVELLED 11SO QUICKLY THAT TREIR HAIR WHISTLED IN
THE WIND1 ................. L 2
LDO GO BACK AND TELL THE FISH WE WANT A SNUG LITTLE COTTAGE) 4
TW7~~ELVE RAVENS CAME FLYING DOW\N1 ... L 54
IAND THERE SHE LAY FAST ASLEEP ON A COUCH) ... sc 6
THE RAVEN SAID, "I AMl BY BIRTH A KING S DAUGHTER" .. 1 6
(AND SO, PRETTY ROSEKEN, YOU ARE COME AT LAST TO SEE US?) as 8
ASBPUTTEL PUT ON THE GOLDEN SLIPPER .. .. .. 122
(WHAT WILL YOU GIVE MlE TO DO IT FOR YOUF) SAID THE BOB-
GOBLIN ................... -s I)2
SO THEY TRACED IT UP, TILL AT LAST THEY FOUND THEIR POOR
COMRADE .................. 44
THE GIRL WENT ON COMBING AND CURLING BER RAIR .. IS4
AS SOON AS HE SAWr THE LIKENESS OF THE LADY HE FELL DOWN
UPON THE FLOOR SENSELESS .I .... I
KARL THOUGHT HE NEVER TASTED ANYTHING HALF SO GOOP
BEFORE ................... s
BARK YEI MY WORTHY FRIEND, YOUR PIG MIAY GET YOU INTO
A SCRAPE) .................. 2O
THE BEAR GRINNED AT HIS ENEMY, WHO, SOMEWHAT ALARMED, RAN
BACK AFEW PACES. .............. as24
THE COOK GOT UP EARLY, BEFORE DAYBREAK, TO FEED THE COWS as 25o
THE SEVEN( DWARFS FIND SNOW-WHITE IN THEIR LTl"ILE BED 258
11 00016.jpg
ILLUSTRATIONS
THE GRANT PICKED UP MASTER TIlHUMBLING, TO LOOK AT AHIM AS HE
WOULD AT A BEETLE OR A COCKCEIAFER .. .. Facing 0. 2
TB1N SHE I.AID THEM IN THE GREEN GRASS UNDER THE JUNIPER-
TREE 292
I' WILL GIVE YOU AN 1RON W'AND AND TWO LITTLE LOAVES OF
BREAD .. .. .. .. ... .. 30
A LITTLE BLACK DWARF WAS SEEN MAKING R15 WAY THROUGH THE
MIDST OF THE BLUE LIGHT ......14
AT FIRST HE WAS STRUCK DUMBD, BUT HER KIND TONES REVIVED
HTS COURAGE.. .. 320
THE FROG DIVED DEEP AND CAMlE UP AGAIN WITH THE BALL IN
HIS MOUTH. 32
THE SHOEMIAKER AND HIS WIFE WATCHED FROMI BEHIND THE
CURTAIN .
AS SOON AS HE BEGAN TO SNORE SHE SElZED ONE OF TBE GOLDEN
HAIRS OF HIS BEARD AND PULLED IT OUT .L ..62
CCREEP IN, SAID THE WITCH, LAND SEE IF IT IS PROPERLY HOT) 1' 37
AND SBE LET DOW~N HER HAIR, AND THEL KCING S SON CLIMBED UP
BY IT c 392
THE LITTLE BLACK DWARF W'ALKED ROUND AND ROUND ABOUT TFIE
CIRCLE 0
THE ASS BRAYED, THE DOG BARKED, THE CAT MEWED, AND THE COCK
SCREAMED. se q
THE DOCS EAT UP ALL THE BACON AS RANS WALKS HOME ... 430
Section
head Biographical note
12 00017.jpg
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
J ACOB LUDWIG KARL GRIMM was born at Hanan in
was born, also at Hanan, leDruary 24, I786.
The elder brother, Jacob, studied at Marburg and at Paris,
and in 1808 he was appointed lIbrarian to Jerome Bonaparte,
King of Westphalia. In 1813-15 he served as secretary to the
Prince of Hesse at Paris and at the Congress of Vienna.
The brothers Grimm brought out the first volume of their
folk-lore in r812, the second volume following in 18141, and the
third in IS82. In 1828 the brothers removed to Gattingen, where
Jacob became professor and librarian, and Wilhelm under-
librarian. Both the Grimms were dismissed in 1837 for joining
in the protest against the abolition of the Constitution by the
King of Hanovrer. In r840 the Grimms were appointed to pro-
fessorships at the University of Berlin, and were elected mem-
bers of the Academy of Sciences. Wilhelm died December r6,
I859; and Jacob, September 20, I863-
Together with Wilhelm, Jacob edited many of the old German
classics, and he was the sole author of the Deutsche Grammatik
(r8I9), the greatest philological work of the age. Wilbelm was
also an eminent philologist, but the brothers Grimm may safely
rest their title to immortality upon these well-beloved tales from
the Teutonic folk-lore.
13 00018.jpg
Preface
14 00019.jpg
ST is more than one hundred years ago, to be exact, in the
y~ear r812, that a first selection of stories appeared in book
form under the title of Children's and HoZnslOchol Tales., chosen
from a large number obtained from the mouths of German
peasants byl the indefatigable exertions of the brothers Jacob and
Wilhelm Grimm. The first translation published in the English
language in 1823 was a selection made by M~r. Edgar Taylor,
accompanied with twelve wonderful etchings by George Cruik-
shank, which John Ruskin very eloquently describes in detail in
his Elemenlts of Drawing. A second collection of these stories
was issued three years later by the same translator, wTith ten
more etchings by the same great artist, whose power in depicting
fairyland has no equal. Mr. Taylor's interesting and valuable
notes at the end of the ~present volume are reprinted from the
original edition.
These world-famous stories are by no means of one nationality,
for wve find counterparts of them in the literature of Scandinavia,
Russia, England, and in other sources. The two brothers, both
learned in other branches of the literature of their owTn country,
gained enduring fame, mostly from these stories-ostensibly
written for the education of the young. Like the tales of the great
Danish story-teller, Hans Andersen, the stories have an equal
Fascination for boys and girls.
A wack of art is often more easily understood when a com-
15 00020.jpg
PREFACE
prison is made with some masterpiece of another age and coun-
try, and the difference between the Grimms and Andersen is that
the former, as it seems to me, have an advantage in their cheer-
ful humor and their many mirth-provoking situations. A
pathetic sadness runs through many stories of Andersen, and the
endings of some are very mournful, often tragic. It is not so
with the Grimms. However fearful a calamity may be, they
deftly develop dire situations into a most laughable and pleasing
climax. So true, so natural do they seem, that not only the
young, but those of graver years read "these gay creations of
the imagination with keenest pleasure.
Many of the comic situations are produced by the introduc-
tion of wild or domestic animals and birds. Even commonplace
objects about the house take the part of characters that talk
and move about in the most natural, and yet most ludicrous,
manner. Pins and needles, sausages, a cudgel, or a table--all are
made to do things by the magic of "make-believe," together
with the assistance of some kind goblin, fairy, or good-natured
elf, and this is done in such a way that the reader is fairly con-
vinced that the situation is real.
This sense of reality must have influenced one dear little girl
of nine, who was asked by her grandmother to mark the stories
which she preferred to have read to her. She gravely set to work
to cut sixtyr-seven pieces of paper in order to mark every story
in the book which she had read several times before. "But,
Marion," said Grandma, "which one shall we start with?"
"Oh!" said the child. Begin at the first and go right through.
Every one of them is the best, so I cannot make a choice."
It is to be regretted that some later translators of these inim-
itable stories have made numerous changes in the titles of various
tales, venerated through so many years of affectionate usage.
In some versions "Red Ridinghood" is called "Little Redcap,"
"LSnow-White") becomes "Snowdrop," "Sleeping Beauty" is
transformed into the Briar Rose," and many other changes in
titles have been made. The well-known story of "Hansel and
16 00021.jpg
PREFACE
Grethel," which in its original form found a worthy and apprecia-
tive place in opera and on the stage, has been altered by a modern
translator into a story far inferior to the original and unworthy
of the Grimms. The present edition has retained the favorite
old titles.
Louis RHEAD.
17 00022.jpg
18 00023.jpg
GRIMM'S FAIRY TALES
19 00024.jpg
Main
20 00025.jpg
18ea~tbs~s~is~
RIDINGHOOD
TPHERE was once a sweet little maid, much beloved by
Everybody, but most of all by her grandmorber, who never
knew how to make enough of her. Once she sent her a
little cap of red velvet, and as it was very becoming to her, and
she never wore anything else, people called her Little Red
Ridinghood. One day her mother said to her:
"Come, Little Red Ridinghood, here are some cakes and a
flask of wine for you to take to grandmother; she is weak
and ill, and they will do her good. Make haste and start
before it grows hot, and walk properly and nicely, and don't
run, or you might fall and break the flask of wine, and there
would be none left for grandmother. And when you go into
her room don't forget to say good morning, instead of staring
about you."
"I will be sure to take care," said Little Red Ridinghood to
her mother, and gave her hand upon it. Now the grandmother
lived away in the wood, half an hour's walk from the village;
and when Little Red Ridinghood had reached the wood she met
21 00026.jpg
GRIM M' S
thle wolf; but as she did not know what a bad sort of animal
he was, she did not feel frightened.
"Good day, Little Red Ridinghood," said he.
"Thank you kindly, Wolf," answered she.
"Where are you going so early, Little Red Ridinghood?"~
"To my grandmother's."
"What are you carrying under your apron?"
"Cakes and wine; we
c 1 baked yesterday; and my
1 .l .1- grandmother is very weak
and ill, so they will do her
good and strengthen her."
"W~here does your grand-
Smother live, Little Red Rid-
5~ "inghood ?"
pltP j "A quarter of an hour's
9 ~ walk from here; her house
stands beneath the three oak-
;I E Ytrees, and you may know it
.t by the hazel-bushes," said
Little Red Ridinghood.
.,r The wolf thought to him-
self: "That tender young
thing would be a delicious
~morsel, and would taste bet-
ter than the old one; I must
manage somehow to get both
of them."
Then he walked by Little Red Ridinghood a little while, and
said: "'Little Red Ridinghood, just look at the pretty flowers
that are growing all round you, and I don't think you are listen-
ing to the song of the birds; you are posting along just as if you
were going to school, and it is so delightful out here in the
wood.")
Little Red Ridinghood glanced round her, and when she saw
22 00027.jpg
FAIRY TALES
the sunbeams darting here and there through the trees, and
lovely flowers everywFhere, she thought to herself:
"If I were to take a fresh nosegay to my grandmother she
would be very pleased, and it is so early in the day that I shall
reach her in plenty of time." And so she ran about in the wood
looking for flowers. And as she picked one she saw a still pret-
tier one a little farther off, and so she went farther and farther
into the wood. But the wolf went straight to the grandmother's
house and knocked at the door.
"Who is there?" cried the grandmother.
"Little Red Ridinghood," he answered, "and I have brought
you some cake and wine. Please open the door."
"Lift the latch," cried the grandmother; "I am too feeble
to get up."
So the wolf lifted the latch and the door flew open, and he fell
on the grandmother and ate her up without saying one word.
Then he drew on her clothes, put on her cap, lay down in her
bed, and drew the curtains.
Little Red Ridinghood was all this time running about among
the flowers, and when she had gathered as many as she could
hold she remembered her grandmother, and set off to go to her.
She was surprised to tind the door standing open, and when she
came inside she felt very strange, and thought to herself:
"'Oh dear, how uncomfortable I feel, and I was so glad this
morning to go to my grandmother!"
And when she said, "Good morning," there was no answer.
Then she went up to the bed and drew back the curtain, there
lay the grandmother with her cap pulled over her eyes, so that
she looked very odd.
"Oh, grandmother, what large ears yrou have got!"
"The better to hear with."
"LOh, grandmother, what great eyes ylou have got!"
"LThe better to see with.")
"Oh, grandmother, what large hands you have got!"
"The better to take hold of you with."
[13
23 00028.jpg
GRIMM' S
But, grandmother, what a terrible large mouth you have got!"'
"The better to devour you!" And no sooner had the wolf
said it than he made one bound from the bed and swallowed
up poor Little Red Ridinghood.
Then the wolf, having satisfied his hunger, lay down again
in the bed, went to sleep, and began to snore loudly. The hunts-
man heard him as he was passing by the house, and thought:
How the old woman snores! I had better see if there is any-
thing the matter with her."
Then he went into the room and walked up to the bed and saw
the wolf lying there.
"At last I find you, you old sinner!" said he; "I have been
looking for you a long time." And he made up his mind that
the wolf had swallowed the grandmother whole, and that she
might yet be saved. So be did not fire, but took a pair of shears
and began to slit up the wolf's body. When he made a few
snips Little Red Ridinghood appeared, and after a few more
snips she jumped out and cried: "Oh dear, how frightened I
have been! It's so dark inside the wolf!" And then out came
the old grandmother, still living and breathing. But Little Red
Ridinghood went and quickly fetched some large stones, with
which she filled the wolf's body, so that when he waked up and
was going to rush away the stones were so heavy that he sank
down and fell dead.
They were all three very pleased. The huntsman took off
the wolf's skin and carried it home. The grandmother ate the
cakes and drank the wine and held up her head again, and Little
Red Ridinghood said to herself that she would never more stray
about in the wood alone, but would mind what her mother told
her.
It must also be related how a few days afterwards, when
Little Red Ridinghood was again taking cakes to her grand-
mother, another wolf spoke to her, and wanted to tempt her to
leave the path; but she was on her guard, and went straight on
her way, and told her grandmother how that the wolf had-met
24 00029.jpg
~r
rC
~i-~;5~ ~i~F-~C-s
u
/ ~C~_
I"'o~l ,i 51
-e 'V~e L~,`
"WHAT A TERRIBLE LARCE MOUrTH YOU HAVE GOTI"
FAIR Y
TALES
25 00030.jpg
26 00031.jpg
FAIRY TALES
her and wished her good day, but had looked so wicked about
the eyes that she thought if it had not been on the highroad he
would have devoured her.
"LCome,") said the grandmother, "we will shut the door so
that he may not get in."
Soon after came the wolf knocking at the door and calling out:
"Open the door, grandmother. I am Little Red Ridinghood,
bringing you cakes." But they remained still and did not open
the door. After that the wolf slunk by the house, and got at
last upon the roof to wait until Little Red Ridinghood should
return home in the evening; then he meant to spring down upon
her and devour her in the darkness. But the grandmother dis-
covered his plot. Now there stood before the house a great
stone trough, and the grandmother said to the child, "Little
Red Ridinghood, I was boiling sausages yesterday, so take the
bucket, and carry away the water they were boiled in, and pour
it into the trough."
And Little Red Ridinghood did so until the great trough was
quite full. When the smell of the sausages reached the nose of
the wolf he snuffed it up, and looked round, and stretched out
his neck so far that he lost his balance and began to slip, and
he slipped down off' the roof straight into the great trough, and
was drowned. Then Little Red Ridinghood went cheerfully
home, and came to no harm.
27 00032.jpg
THE GOLDEN GOOSE
THERE was a man who had three sons. The youngest was
called Dummling-wFhich is much the same as Dunder-
head, for all thought he was more than half a fool--and
he was at all times mocked and ill-treated by) the whole house-
hold.
It happened that the eldest son took it into his head one
day to go into the wood to cut fuel; and his mother gave
him a nice pasty and a bottle of wine to take with him, that
he might refresh himself at his work. As he went into the
wood, a little old man bid him good day, and said, "Give
me a little piece of meat from y.our plate, and a little wine
out of your bottle, for I am very hungry and thirsty." But
this clever young man said: "Give you my meat and wilne?
No, I thank yrou, I should not have enough left for myself";
and away he went. He soon began to cut down a tree; but
he had not worked long before he missed his stroke, and cut him-
self, and was forced to go home to have the wound dressed. Now
it was the little old man that sent him this mischief.
GRIMM'S
28 00033.jpg
FAIRY TALES
Next went out the second son to work: and his mother gave
him, too, a pasty and a bottle of wine. And the same little
old man met him also and asked him for something to eat and
drink. But he, too, thought himself very clever, and said,
"The more you eat the less there would be for me; so go your
way!" The little man took care that he, too, should have
his reward, and the second stroke that he aimed against a tree
hit him on the leg; so that he, too, was forced to go home.
Then Dummling said, Father, I should like to go and cut
wood, too." But his father said, "Y'our brothers have both
lamed themselves; you had better stay at home, for you know
nothing about the business of wood-cutting." But Dummling
was very pressing; and at last his father said, "Go your way!
you will be wiser when you have smarted for your folly." And
his mother gave him only some dry bread and a bottle of sour
beer. But when be went into the wood he met the little old
man, who said, Give me
some meat and drink, for
I am very hungry and
thirsty.") Dummling
said, "I have only dry i
that will suit you, we
will sit down and eat it,
such as it is, together."
So they sat down; and-
when the lad pulled out h~~~~~~
Shis bread, behold it was --
turned into a rich pasty,
and his sour beer, when they tasted it, was delightful wine. They
ate and drank heartily; and when they had done, the little
man said, "As you havre a kind heart, and have been willing
to share evrerytrhing with me, I willl send a blessing upon you.
There stands an old tree; cut it dowPn, and ylou will tind some-
thing at the root." Then he took his leave and went his way.
[91
29 00034.jpg
Dummling set to work, and cut down the tree; and when
it fell, he found, in a hollow under the roots, a goose with feathers
of pure gold. He took it up, and went on to a little inn by
the roadside, where he thought to sleep for the night on his
way home. Now the landlord had three daughters; and when
they saw the goose they were very eager to look what this won-
derful bird could be, and wished very much to pluck one of the
feathers out of its tail. At last the eldest said, "I must and
will have a feather."' So she waited till Dummling was gone to
bed, and then seized the goose by the wing; but to her great
wonder there she stuck, for neither hand nor finger could she
get away again. Then in came the second sister, and thought to
have a feather, too; but the moment she touched her sister, there
she too hung fast. At last came the third, and she also wanted
a feather; but the other two cried out: "Keep away! for Hea-
ven's sake, keep away!" However, she did not understand what
they meant. "If they are there," thought she, "I may as well
be there too." So she went up to them; but the moment she
touched her sisters she stuck fast, and hung to the goose as they
did. And so they kept company with the goose all night in
the cold.
The next morning Dummling got up and carried off the goose
under his arm. He took; no notice at all of the three girls, but
went out with them sticking fast behind. So wherever he
traveled, they too were forced to follow, whether they would or
no, as fast as their legs could carry them.
In the middle of a field the parson met them; and when he
saw the train he said: "Are you not ashamed of yourselves,
you bold girls, to run after a young man in that way over the
fields? Is that good behavior?" Then he took the youngest
by the hand to lead her away; but as soon as he touched her
he too hung fast, and followed in the train; though sorely against
his will, for he was not only in rather too good plight for running
fast, but just then he had a little touch of the gout in the great
toe of his right foot. By and by up came the clerk; and when he
[ zoJ
30 00035.jpg
~-~"
cl /
ir
r
~r!
~`\
"'AND SOT THEY MADE SEVEN, ALL RUNNING TOGETHER
AFTER DUMMLIN~G AND HIS GOOSE"
FAIRY
TI`A LES
31 00036.jpg
psyp
32 00037.jpg
FAIRY TALES
saw his master, the parson, running after the three girls, he won-
dered greatly and said: "Holla! holla! your reverence! whither
so fast? There is a christening to-day." Then he ran up and
took him by the gown; when, 10 and behold! he stuck fast too.
As the five were thus trudging along, one behind another, they
met two laborers with their mattocks coming from work; and
the parson cried out lustily to them to help him. But scarcely
had they laid hands on him when they too fell into the rank;
and so they made seven, all running together after Dummling
and his goose.
Now Dummling thought he would see a little of the world
before he went home; so he and his train journeyed on, till at
last they came to a city where there was a king who had an only
daughter. The princess was of so thoughtful and moody a
turn of mind that no one could make her laugh; and the king
had made known to all the world that whoever could make her
laugh should have her for his wife. When the young man heard
this, he went to her, with his goose and all its train; and as soon
as she saw the seven all hanging together, and running along,
treading on one another's heels, she could not help bursting into
a long and loud laugh. Then Dummling claimed her for his
wife, and married her; and he was heir to the kingdom, and
lived long and happily with his wife.
But what became of the goose and the goose's tail I never
could hear.
33 00038.jpg
UK 1 V1IV
THE WISHING-
TABLE, THE GOLD ASS, AND THE CUDGEL
ALONG time ago there lived a tailor who had three sons,
but only one goat. As the goat supplied the whole
family with milk, she had to be well fed and taken daily
to pasture. This the sons did in turn. One: day the eldest son
led her into the churchyard, where he knew there was Sine
herbage to be found, and there let her browse and skip about
till evening. It being then time to return home, he said to her,
"rGoat, have you had enough to eat?" and the goat answered:
"~I have eaten so much
Not a leaf can I touch, Nan, Nan."
"Come along home, then," said the boy, and he led her by
the.cord round her neck back to the stable and tied her up.
"'Well," said the old tailor, "has the goat had her properly
amount of food ?"
Why, she has eaten so much, not a leaf can she touch,"i
answered the son.
The father, however, thinking he should like to assure him-
self of this, went dow7n to the stable, patted the animal, and said,
caressingly, "Goat, have you really had enough to eat?" The
goat answered:
[ 414
34 00039.jpg
"How can my hunger oe allayed?
About the little gravets I played
And could not find a single blade, Nan, Nan."
"What is this I hear?"' cried the tailor, and running up-stairs
to his son, "You young lIar!" he exclaimed, to tell me thrie
goat had had enough to eat, and all the while she is starving."
And overcome with anger, he took his yard-measure down from
the wall and beat his son out of doors.
The next day it was the second son's turn, and he found a
place near the garden hedge, where there were the juiciest plants
for the goat to feed upon, and she enjoyed them so much that
she ate them all up. Before taking her home in the evening
he said to her, "Goat, have you had enough to eat?" and the
goat answered:
"(I have eaten so much
Not a leaf can I touch, Nan, Nan."
"~Come along home, then," said the boy, and he led her away
to the stable and tied her up.
"Well," said the old tailor, "has the goat had her proper
amount of food ?"
"Why, she has eaten so much, not a leal can she touch,"
answered the boy.
But the tailor was not satisfied with this, and went down to
the stable. "Goat, have you really had enough to eat?" he
asked, and the goat answered:
How can my hunger be allayed ?
About the little graves I played
And could not find a single blade, Nan, Nan."
"The shameless young rascal!" cried the tailor, "to let an
innocent animal like this starve!" and he ran up-stairs and drove
the boy from the house with the yard-measure.
It was nowv the third son's turn, who, hoping to make things
eter for himself, let the goat feed on the leaves of all the shrubs
2 [5
35 00040.jpg
UKIlMM'1'S
be could pick out that were covered with the richest foliage.
"Goat, have you had enough to eat?" he said, as the evening
fell, and the goat answered:
"IJ have eaten so much
Not a leaf can I touch, Nan, Nan."
"Come along home, then," said the boy, and he took her back
and tied her up.
'Well," said the old tailor, "has the goat had her proper
amount of food ?"
"W'hy, she has eaten so much not a leaf can she touch,"
answered the boy.
But the tailor felt mistrustful, and went down .and asked,
"Goat, have you really had enough to eat?" and the mischievous
animal answered:
"How can my hunger be allayed?
About the little graves I: played
And could not find a single blade, Nan, Nan."
"Oh, what a pack of liars!" cried the tailor. "One as wicked
and deceitful as the other, but they shall not make a fool of
me any longer.'" And beside himself with anger, he rushed
up-stairs and so belabored his son with the yard-measure that
the boy fled from the house.
The old tailor was now left alone with his goat. The fol-
lowing morning he went down to the stable and stroked and
caressed her. "Come along, my pet," he said. "I will take
you out myself to-day," and he led her by the green hedge-
rows and weed -grown banks, and wherever he knew that
goats love to feed. "Yrou shall eat to your heart's content
for once,"' he said to her, and so let her browse till evening.
"Goat, have you had enough to eat?") he asked her at h
close of the day, and she answered:
"LI have eaten so much
Not a leaf can I touch, Nan, Nan."
( 16 ]
36 00041.jpg
WAlK Y T1ALES
::"Come along home then," said the tailor, and he led her to
he stable and tied her up. He turned round, however, before
leaving her, and said once more, "You have really had enough
: to eat for once?" But the goat gave him no better answer than
her usual one, and replied:
"Howv can my hunger be allayed?
About the little graves I played
And could not 6nd a single blade, Nan, Nan."
On hearing this the tailor stood struck dumb with astonish-
ment. He saw now how unjust he had been in driving away his
sons. When he found his voice he cried: Wait, you ungrate-
ful creature! it is not
enough to drive you
away, but I wsill put such t
a~I mark upn o ta
you will not dare to show i :
your face again among 1
Honest tailors." And so
saying, he sprang up-
stairs, brought down his
razor, lathered the goat's
head all over, and shaved V
it till it was as smooth
as the back of his hand. /_;
Then he fetched the -
wRhip--his yard-measure
he considered was too
good for such work-and dealt the animal such blows that she
leaped into the air and away.
Sitting now quite alone in his house, the tailor fell into great
.melancholy, and would gladly have had his sons back again, but
no one knew what had become of them.
The eldest had apprenticed himself to a joiner, and had set
himself cheerfully and diligently to learn his trade. When the
37 00042.jpg
GRIMM' S
time came for him to start as a journeyman his master made
him a present of a table, which was of ordinary wood, and to all
outward appearance exactly like any other table. It had, how-
ever, one good quality, for if any one set it down and said,
"LTable, serve up a meal," it was immediately covered with a
nice fresh cloth, laid with a plate, knife and fork, and dishes
of boiled and baked meats, as many! as there was room for, and
a glass of red wine, which only to look at made the heart rejoice.
"'I have enough now to last me as long as I live," thought the
young man to himself, and accordingly he went about enjoying
himself, not minding whether the ;nns he stayed at were good or
bad, whether. there was food to be had there or not. Sometimes
it pleased him not to seek shelter within them at all, but to turn
into a' feld or a wood, or wherever else he fancied. WIhen there
he put down his table, and said, "Serve up a meal," and he was
at once supplied with everything he could desire in the way of
food.
After he had been going about like this for some time, he he-
thought him that he should like to go home again. His father's
anger would by this time have passed awvay, and now that he
had the wishing-table with him, he was sure of a readyl welcome.
He happened, on his homewiard way, to come one evening to
an inn full of guests. They bid him welcome and invited him
to sit down with them and share their supper, otherwise, they
added, he would have a difficulty in getting anything to eat.
But the joiner replied, "'I will not take from you what little
you have; I would rather that you should consent to be my
guests," whereupon they all laughed, thinking he was only jok-
ing with them. He no~w put-down his table in the middle of
the room, and said, "Table, serve up a meal," and in a moment
it was covered with a variety of food of better quality than any
the host could have supplied, and a fragrant steam rose from the
dishes and greeted the nostrils of the guests. "Now, friends,
fall to," said the young inan, and the guests, seeing that the
invitation was well intended, did not wait to be asked twice,
[r8 ]
38 00043.jpg
FAIRY TALES
but drew up their chairs and began vigorously to ply their knives
and forks. What astonished them most was the way in which,
as soon as a dish was empty, another full one appeared in its
place. Meanwhile the landlord was standing in the corner of
the room looking on; he did not know what to think of it all,
but said to himself, "I could make good use of a cook like that."
The joiner and his friends kept up their merriment late into
the night, but at last they retired to rest, the young journeyman
placing his table against the wall before going to bed.
The landlord, however, could not sleep for thinking of what
he had seen; at last it occurred to him that up in his lumber-
room he had an old table, which was just such another one to
all appearance as the wishing-cable; so be crept away softlyr to
fetch it, and put it against the wall in place of the other.
When the morning came the joiner paid for his night's lodging,
took up his table, and left, never suspecting that the one he was
carrying was not his own.
He reached home by midday, and was greeted with joy by
his father. "And now, dear son," said the old man, "what
trade have you learned ?"
"(I am a joiner, father."
"A capital business," responded the father; "and what
have you brought home with you from your travels?"
"iThe best thing I have brought with me, father, is that
table."
The tailor carefully examined the table on all sides. "Well,"
he said at last, "you have certainly not brought a masterpiece
back with you; it is a wretched, badly made old table."
"But it is a wishing-table," interrupted his son; "if I put it
'dowfn and order a meal, it is at once covered with the best of
food and wine. If you will only invite your relations and friends
they shall, for once in their lives, have a good meal, for no one
ever leaves this' table unsatisfied."
Wnhen the guests were all assembled, he put his table down as
uosual, and said, "Table, serve up a meal," but the table did not
[ 19 I
39 00044.jpg
GRIMM' S
stir, and remained as empty as any ordinary table at such a
command. Then the poor young man saw that his table had
been changed, and he was covered with shame at having to
stand there before them all like a liar. The guests made fun of
him, and had to return home without bite or sup. The tailor
took our his cloth and sat down once more to his tailoring, and
the son started work again under a master joiner.
The second son had apprenticed himself to a miller. When
his term of apprenticeship had expired, the miller said to him,
"As you have behaved so well, I will make you a present of an
ass; it is a curious animal; it will neither draw a cart nor carry
a sack."
"Of what use is he then?" asked the young apprentice.
"He gives gold," answered the miller; "if you stand him on a
cloth, and say,'Bricklebric,' gold pieces will fall from his mouth."
"'That is a handsome present," said the young miller, and he
thanked his master and departed.
After this, whenever he was in need of money, he had only to
say "Bricklebrit," and a shower of gold pieces fell on the ground,
and all he had to do was to pick them up. He ordered the best
of everything wherever he went; in short, the dearer the better,
for his purse was always full.
He had been going about the wJorld like this for some time,
when he began to think he should like to see his father again.
"'When. he sees my gold ass," he said to himself, "he will forget
his anger and be glad to have me back."
It came to pass that he arrived one evening at the same inn
in which his brother had had his table stolen from him. He was
leading his ass up to the door, when the landlord came out and
offered to take the animal, but the young miller refused his help.
"Do not trouble yourself," he said; "I will take myr old Grey-
coat myself to the stable and fasten her up, as I like to know
where she is."
The landlord was very much astonished at this; the man
cannot be very well off, he thought, to look after his own ass.
120]
40 00045.jpg
FAIRY TALES
When the stranger, therefore, pulled two gold pieces out of his
pocket, and ordered the best of everything that could be got
in the market, the landlord opened his eyes, but he ran off with
alacrity to do his bidding.
Having finished his meal, the stranger asked for his bill, and
the landlord, thinking he might safely overcharge such a rich
customer, asked for twro more gold pieces. The miller felt in his
pocket, but found he had spent all his gold. "WVair a minute,"
he said to the landlord. "I will go and fetch some more money."
Whereupon he went out, carrying the table-cloth with him.
This was more than the landlord's curiosity could stand, and
he followed his guest to the stable. As the latter bolted the door
after him, he wcent and peeped through a hole in the wall,
and there he saw the stranger spread the cloth under his ass,
and heard him say "Brickrlebrit," and immediately the floor was
covered with gold pieces, which fell from the animal's mouth.
"A good thousand, I declare," criedithe shot; "the gold
pieces do not take long to coin! it's not a bad thing to have a
money-bag like that."
The guest settled his account and went to bed. During the
night the landlord crept down to the stable, led away the gold-
coining ass, and fastened up another in its place.
Earlyr the next morning the young miller went off with his ass,
thinking all the time that he was leading his own. By noonday
he had reached home, where his father gave him a warm welcome.
What have you been doing with yourself, my son?" asked
the old rnan.
"LI am a miller, dear father," he answered.
"And what have you brought home with you from your
travels?"
"LNothing but an ass, father."
"LThere are asses eriough here," said the father. "I should
havre been better pleased if it had been a goat."
"Very likely," replied the son, "but this is no ordinary ass;
;t is an ass that coins money; 'if I say 'Bricklebrit' to it, a
[ 21 ]
41 00046.jpg
GRIM M' S
whole sackful of gold pours from its mouth. Call all your rela-
tions and friends together; I will turn you all into rich people."
"I shall like that well enough," said the tailor, "for then I
shall not have to go on plaguing myself with stitching." And
he ran out himself to invite his neighbors. As soon as they were all
assembled, the young miller asked then to clear a space, and he
then spread his cloth and brought the ass into the room. "Now
see," said he, and cried Bricklebrit," but not a single gold piece
appeared, and it was evident that the animal knew nothing of
the art of gold-coining, for it is not every ass that attains to
such a degree of excellence.
The poor young miller pulled a long face, for he saw that he
had been tricked; he begged forgiveness of the company, who
all returned home as poor as they came. There was nothing
to be done now but for the old man to go back to his needle, and
the young one to hire himself to a miller.
The third son had apprenticed himself to a turner, which,
being a trade requiring a great deal of skill, obliged him to serve
a longer time than his brothers. He had, however, heard from
them by letter, and knew how badly things had gone witrh them,
and that they had been robbed of their property by an inn-
keeper on the last evening before reaching home.
W'hen it was time for him to start as a journeyman, his master,
being pleased with his conduct, presented him with a bag, say-
ing as he did so, "You will find a cudgel inside."
"The bag I can carry over my shoulder, and it will no doubt
be of great service to me, but of what use is a cudgel inside?
It will only add to the weight."
"I will explain," said the master. "If any one at any time
should behave badly to yrou, you have only to say, Cudgel, out
of the bag,' and the stick will jump out and give him such a
cudgeling that he will not be able to move or stir for a week
afterwards, and it will not leave off till you say, 'Cudgel, into
the bag.'"
The young man thanked him, hung the bag on his back, and
122]
42 00047.jpg
FAIRY TALES
when any one threatened to attack him, or in anyr wvay to do
him harm, he called out, "Cudgel, out of the bag," and no
sooner were the words said than out jumped the stick, and beat
the offenders soundly on the back till their clothes were in rib-
bons, and it did it all so quickly that the turn had come round
to each of them before he was aware.
It was evening when the young turner reached the inn where
his brothers had been so badly treated. He laid his bag down
on the table and began giving an account of all the wonderful
things he had seen while going about the world.
"One may come across a wishing-table," he said, "or an ass
that gives gold, and such like; all very good things in their way,
but not all of them put together are worth the treasure of which
I have possession and which I carry~ with me in that bag."
The landlord pricked up his ears. "W!hat can it be?" he asked
himself; "'the bag must be filled with precious stones; I must
try and get hold of that cheaply, too, for there is luck in odd
numbers."
Bedtime came, and the guest stretched himself out on one of
the benches and placed his bag under his head for a pillow. As
soon as the landlord thought he was fast asleep he went up to
him and began gently and cautiously pulling and pushing at the
bag to see if he could get it away and put another in its place.
But the young turner had been waiting for this, and just as
the landlord was about to give a good last pull, he cried, "Cudgel,
out of the bag," and at the same moment the stick was out and
beginning its usual dance. It beat him with such a vengeance
that the landlord cried out for mercy, but the louder his cries
the more lustily did the stick beat time to them, until he fell
to the ground exhausted.
"If you do not give up the wishing-table and the gold ass,"
said the young turner, the game shall begin over again."
"No, no," cried the landlord in a feeble voice, "I will give
Everything back if only you will make that dreadful demon of
a stick return to the bag."
43 00048.jpg
GRIMM' S
"(This time," said the turner, "I will deal with you according
to mercy rather than justice, but beware of offending in like
manner again." Then he cried, "Cudgel, into the bag," and let
the man remain m peace.
The turner journeyed on next day to his father's house, taking
with him the wishing-table and the gold ass. The tailor was
delighted to see his son again, and asked him, as he had the
others, what trade he had learned since he left home.
"LI am a turner, dear father," he answered.
"A highly skilled trade," said the tailor, "and what have you
brought back with you from your travels?"
"An invaluable thing, dear father," replied the son; "a
cudgel."
"What! a cudgell" exclaimed the old man; that was certainly
well worth while, seeing that you can cut yourself one from the
first tree you come across."
But not such a one as this, dear father; for if I say to it,
'Cudgel, out of the bag,' out it jumps, and gives any one who has
evil intentions towards me such a bad time of it that he falls
down and cries for mercy. And know that it was with this
stick that I got back the wishing-table and the gold ass which
the dishonest innkeeper stole from my brothers. Now go and
call them both here, and invite all your relations and friends,
and I will feast them and fill their pockets with gold."
The old tailor was slow- to believe all this, but nevertheless he
went out and gathered his neighbors together. Then the turner
put down a cloth, and led in the gold ass, and said to his brother,
"Now, dear brother, speak to him." The miller said Brickle-
brit," and the cloth was immediately covered with gold pieces,
wcchich continued to pour from the ass's mouth until every one
had taken as many as he could carry. (I see by your faces that
you are all wishing you had been there.)
Then the turner brought in the wishing-table, and said, "Now,
dear brother, speak to it."l And scarcely had the joiner cried,
"Table, serve up a meal," than it wpas covered with a profusion
124]
44 00049.jpg
FAIRY TALES
"THE LANDLORD CRIED OUT FOR MERCY"
45 00050.jpg
4/ st
46 00051.jpg
FAIRY TALES
of daintily dressed meats. Then the tailor and his guests sat
down to a meal such as they had never enjoyed before in their
lives, and they all sat up late into the night, full of good cheer
and jol;ty.
The tailor put away his needle and thread, his yard-measure
and his goose, and he and his three sons lived together henceforth
in contentment and luxury.
Meanwhile, what had become of the goat, who had been the
guilty cause of the three sons being driven from their home?
I will tell you.
She was so ashamed of her shaven crown that she ran and
crept into a fox's hole. W~hen the fox came home, he was met
by two large: glittering eyes that gleamed at him out of the
darkness, and he was so frightened that he ran away. The bear
met him, and perceiving that he was in some distress, said:
"Wlhat is the matter. Brother Fox? W~hy are: you pulling such
a long face?" "A~h!"' answerred Redskin, "there is a dreadful
animal sitting in my hole, w-hich glared at me with tiery eyes."
"We w;ll soon drive him out," said the bear, and he trotted
back with his friend to the hole and looked in, but the sight of
the fiery ey~es was5 qulite enough for him, and he turned and took
to his heels.
The bee met him, and noticing that he was somewhat ill at
ease, said: "Bear, you look remarkably out of humor. Where
have you left your good spirits?" "It's easy for you to talk,"
replied the bear; "'a horrible animal with red goggle-eyes is
sitting in the fox's hole and we cannot drive it out."
The bee said: "I really am sorry for you, Bear; I am but a
poor weak little creature that: yo'u scarcely deign to look at in
passing, but, for all that, I think I shall be able to help you."'
With this the bee flew to the fox's hole, settled on the smooth-
shaven head of the goat, and stung her so violently that she
leaped high into the air, crying "Nan, nan!" and fled away like
a mad thing into the open country; but no one, to this hour,
has found out what became of her after that.
[ 27 )
47 00052.jpg
'S
THE MOUSE, THE BIRD, AND THE
SAUSAGE
ONCE upon a time, a mouse, a bird, and
a sausage entered into partnership and
set up house together. For a long time
all went well; they lived in great comfort, and
prospered so far as to be~ able to add consider-
ably to their scores. The bird's duty was to fly
daily into the wood and bring in the fuel; the
mouse fetched the water, and the sausage saw to
the cooking.
When people are too well off they always
begin to long for something new. And
so it came to pass ;r
[ 28
GRIMMI~C
48 00053.jpg
FAIRY TALES
that the bird, while out one day, met a fellow-bird, to whom he
boastfully expatiated on the excellence of his household arrange-
ments. But the other bird sneered at him for being a poor
simpleton, who did all the hard work, while the other two stayed
at home and had a good time of it. For, when the mouse had
made the fire and fetched in the water, she could retire into her
little room and rest until it was time to set the table. The
sausage had only to watch the pot to see that the food was
properly cooked, and when it was near dinner-time he just
threw himself into the broth, or rolled in and out among the
vegetables three or four times, and there they were, buttered
and salted, and ready to be served. Then, when the bird came
home and had laid aside his burden, they sat down to table,
and when they had finished their meal they could sleep their
fill till the following morning, and that was really a very de-
lightful life.
Influenced by these remarks, the bird next morning refused
to bring in the wood, telling the others that he had been their
servant long enough and had been a fool into the bargain, and
that it was now time to make a change and to try some other
way of arranging the work. Beg and pray as the mouse and the
sausage might, it was of no use; the bird remained master of
the situation, and the venture had to be made. They therefore
drew lots, and it fell to the sausage to bring in the wood, to the
mouse to cook, and to the bird to fetch the water.
And now what happened? The sausage started in search of
wood, the bird made the fire, and the mouse put on the pot, and
then these two waited till the sausage returned with the fuel for
the following day. But the sausage remained so long away, that
they became uneasy and the bird flew out to meet him. He
had not flown far, however, when he came across a dog who,
having met the sausage, had regarded him as his legitimate booty,
and so seized and swallowed him. The bird complained to the
dog of this barefaced robbery, but nothing he said was of any
avail, for the dog answered that he had found false credentials
1 29 1
49 00054.jpg
GRIMM' S
on the sausage, and that was the reason his life had been for-
fei ted.
The bird picked up the wood and flew sadly home, and told
the mouse all be had seen and heard. They were both very un-
happy, but agreed to make the best of things and to remain
with each other.
So now the bird set the table, and the mouse looked after
the food, and wishing to prepare it in the same way as the sau-
sage, by rolling in and out among the vegetables to salt and
butter them, she jumped into the pot; but she stopped short
long before she reached the bottom, having already parted not
only with her skin and hair, but also with life.
Presently the bird came in and wanted to serve up the dinner,
but he could nowhere see the cook. In his alarm and flurry,
he threw the wood here and there about the floor, called and
searched, but no cook; was to be found. Then some of the wood
that had been carelessly thrown down caught fire and began
to blaze. The bird hastened to fetch some water, but his pail
fell into the well, and he after it, and as he was unable to recover
himself he was drowned.
50 00055.jpg
FAIRY TALES
THE FOX BRUSH
T HE1 Kigo h atha euiu areadi h
angry at n this andt told threat gardenert ke watcnder the
tree all night.
The gardener set his eldest son to watch, but about twelve
o'clock: he fell asleep, and in the morning another of the apples
WaS mlSsimg.
Then the second son was set to watch, and at midnight he
trOo fell asleep, and in the morning another apple was gone.
Then the third son offered to keep watch; but the gardener
at first would not let him, for fear some harm should come to
him. However, at last he yielded, and the young man laid him-
self under the tree to watch. As the clock struck twelve he
heard a rustling noise in the air, and a bird came flying and sat.
upon the tree. This bird's feathers were all of pure gold; and
as it was snapping at one of the apples with its beak, the gar-
51 00056.jpg
GRIM M': S
dener's son jumped up and shot an arrow at It. The arrow, how-
ever, did the bird no harm, it only dropped a golden feather from
its tail and flew away. The golden feather was then brought
to the king in the morning, and all his court were called together.
Every one agreed that it was the most beautiful thing that had
ever been seen, and that it was worth more than all the wealth
of the kingdom; but the king said, "One feather is of no use to
me. I must and will have the whole bird."
Then the gardener's eldest son set out to find this golden bird
and thought to find it very easily; and when he had gone but a
little way he came to a wood, and by the side of the wood he
saw a fox sitting. The lad was fond of a little sporting, so he
took his bow and made ready to shoot at it. Then Mr. Rey-
nard, who saw what he was about, and did not like the thought
of being shot at, cried out: Softly, softly! do not shoot me. I
can give you good counsel. I know what your business is, and
that you want to find the golden bird. Y'ou will reach a village
in the evening, and when you get there you will see two inns,
built one on each side of the street. The right-hand one is very
pleasant and beautiful to look at, but go not in there. Rest for
the night in the other, though it may seem to you very poor and
mean." "What can such a beast as this know about the mat-
ter?" thought the silly lad to himself. So he shot his arrow at
the fox, but he missed it, and it only laughed at him, set up its
tail above its back, and ran into the wood.
The young man went his way, and in the evening came to
the village where the two inns were. In the right-hand one
were people singing, and dancing, and feasting, but the other one
looked very dirty and poor. "I should be very silly," said he,
"if I went to that shabby house and left this charming place";
so he went into the smart house and ate and drank at his ease;
and there he stayed, and forgot the bird and his country, too.
Time passed on, and as the eldest son did not come back, and
no tidings were heard of him, the second son set out, and the
same thing happened to him. He met with the fox sitting by
[32 I
52 00057.jpg
THEY TRAVELLED SO QUICKLY THAT THEIR HAIR
WHISTLED IN THE WIND"
FAIRY
TALES
53 00058.jpg
54 00059.jpg
FAIRY TALES
the roadside, who gave him the same good advice as he had
given his brother; but when he came to the two inns, his eldest
brother was standing at the window where the merry~making
was, and called to him to come in; and he could not withstand
the temptation, but went in, joined the merrymaking, and
there forgot the golden bird and his country~ in the same manner.
Time passed on again, and the youngest son too wished to
set out into the wide world, to seek for the golden bird; but
his father would not listen to him for a long while, for he was
very fond of his son and was afraid that some ill-luck might
happen to him also and hinder his coming back. However, at
last it was agreed he should go. For, to tell the truth, he would
not rest at home. As he came to the wood he met the fox, who
gave him the same good counsel that he had given the other
brothers. But he was thankful to the fox, and did not shoot at
him, as his brothers had done. Then the fox said, "Sit upon my
tail and you will travel faster."f So he sat down; and the fox
began to run, and away they went over stock and stone, so
quickly that their hair whistled in the wind.
W'hen they came to the village the young man was wvise
enough to follow the fox's counsel, and, without looking about
him, went straight to the shabby inn, and rested there all night
at his ease. In the morning came the fox again, and met him
as he was beginning his journey, and said, "Go straight forward
till you come to a castle, before which lie a whole troop of sol-
diers fast asleep and snoring; take no notice of them, but go
into the castle, and pass on and on till you come to a room
where the golden bird sits in a wooden cage; close by it stands
a beautiful golden cage; but do not try to take the-bird out of
the shabbyr cage and put it into the handsome one, otherwiise
you will be sorry for it." Then the fox stretched out his brush
again, and the young man sat himself down, and away they
went over stock, and stone till their hair whistled in the wind.
Before the castle gate all was as the fox had said; so the lad
went in, and found the chamber where the golden bird hung in
1351
55 00060.jpg
GRIMM' S
a wooden cage. Below stood the golden cage; and the three
golden apples that had been lost were lying close by its side.
Then he thought to himself, "It will be a very droll thing to
bring away such a fine bird in this shabby cage"; so he opened
the door and took; hold of the bird and put it into the golden
cage. But it set up at once such a loud scream that all the sol-
diers awoke; and they took him prisoner and carried him before
the king.
TIhe next morning the court sat to judge him; and when all
was heard, it doomed him to die unless he should bring the king
the golden horse that could run as swiftly as the wind. If he
did this he was to have the golden bird given him for his own.
So he set out once more on his journey, sighing, and in great
despair; when, on a sudden, he met his good friend the fox, taking
his morning's walk. "Heyday, young gentleman!" said Rey-
nard; "you see now what has happened from not listening to
my advice.' I will still, however, tell you how you may find the
golden horse, if you will do as I bid you. You must go straight
on till you come to the castle where the horse stands in his stall.
By his side will lie the groom fast asleep and snoring; take away
the horse softly; but be sure to. let the old leather saddle be
upon him, and do not put on the golden one that is close by."
Then the young man sat down on the fox's tail; and away they
went over stock and stone till their hair whistled in the wind.
All went right, and the groom lay snoring, with his hand
upon the golden saddle. But when the lad looked at the horse,
he thought it a great pity to keep the leather saddle upon it.
"I will give him the good one," said he; "I am sure he is wPorth
it." As he took up the golden saddle the groom awoke, and
cried out so loud that all the guards ran in and took him prisoner;
and in the morning he was brought before the king's court to
be judged, and was once more doomed to die. But it was agreed
that if he could bring thither the beautiful; princess, he should live
and have the horse given him for his own.
Then he went his way again, very sorrowful; but the old fox
[36 ]
56 00061.jpg
FAIRY TALES
once more met him on the road, and said: "Why did you not
listen to me? If you had, you would have carried away both
the bird and the horse. Yet I will once more give you counsel.
Go straight on, and in the evening you will come to a castle.
At twelve o'clocki every night the princess goes to the bath;
go up to her as she passes, and give her a kiss, and she will let
you lead her away; but take care you do not let her go and take
leave of her father and mother." Then the fox stretched out
his tail, and away they went over stock and stone till their hair
whistled again.
As they came to the castle all was as the fox had said; and
at twelve o'clock the young man met the princess going to t~he
bath, and gave her the kiss; and she agreed to run away with
him, but begged with many tears that he would let her take
leave of her father. At first he said, "No!" but she wept still
more and more, and fell at his feet, till at last he yielded; but
the moment she came to her father's door the guards awoke,
and he was taken prisoner again.
So he was brought at once before the king wcho lived in that
castle. And the king said, "You shall never have my daughter,
unless in eight days you dig away the hill that stops the view
from my window."! Now this hill was so big that all the men
in the whole world could not have taken it away; and when he
had worked for seven days, and had done very little, the fox
came and said: "Lie down and go to sleep!i I will work for you."
In the morning he aw7Coke, and the hill was gone; so he went
merrily to the king, and told him that now it was gone he must
give him the princess.
Then the king was obliged to keep his word, and away went
the young man and the princess. But the fox came and said
to him: "That will not do; we will have all three--the prin-
cess, the horse, and the bird." "Ah!" said the young man,
"that would be a great thing; but how can it be?"
If you wTill only listen," said the fox, "it can soon be done.
When you come to the king of the castle where the golden horse
1371
57 00062.jpg
GRIM M' S
is, and he asks for the beautiful princess, you must say, 'Here
she is!' Then he will be very glad to see her, and will run to
welcome her; and you wrill mount the golden horse that they
are to give you, and put out your hand to take leave of them;
but shake hands with the princess last. Then lift her quickly
on to the horse, behind you; clap your spurs to his side, and
gallop away as fast as you can."
All went right; then the fox said: "W~hen you come to the
castle where the bird is, I will stay with the princess at the door,
and you wdll ride in and speak to the king; and when he sees
that it is the right horse, he will bring out the bird; but you
must sit still, and say that you want to look at it, to see whether
it is the true golden bird or nor; and when you get it into your
hand ride away as fast as you can."
This, too, happened as the for said; they carried off the
bird; the princess mounted again, and off they rode till they
came to a great wood. On their way through it they met their
old friend Reynard again, and be said, "Pray kill me, and cut
off my head and my brush!" The young man would not do
anyr such thing to so good a friend; so the fox said: "I will
at any rate give you good counsel: beware of two things! ran-
som no one from the gallows, and sit down by the side of no
brook!"' Then away be went. "Well," thought the young
man, "it is no hard matter, at any rate, to follow that advice."
So be rode on with the princess till at last they came to the
village where he had left his two brothers. And there he heard
a great noise and uproar, and when he asked what was the
matter, the people said, "Two rogues are going to be hanged."
As he came nearer, he saw that the two men were his brothers,
who had turned robbers. At the sight of them, in this sad plight
his heart was very heavy, and he cried out, "Can nothing save
them from such a death?" but the people said "'No!" unless he
would bestow all his money upon the rascals, and buy their free-
dom, by repaying all they had stolen. Then he did not stay to
think about it, but paid whatever was asked; and his brothers
[181
58 00063.jpg
FAIRY TALES
were given up and went on with him towards their father's
home.
Now the weather was very hot; and as theyr came to the
wood where the fox: first met them, they found it so cool and
shady under the trees, by the side of a brook that ran close by
that the two brothers said, Let us sit down by the side of this
brook and rest a while, to eat and drink." "'Very well!" said he,
and forgot what the fox had said, and sat down on the side of
the brook; and while he thought of no harm coming to him
they crept behind him, and threw him down the bank, and took
the princess, the horse, and the bird, and went home to the
king their master, and said, "All these we have won by our own
skill and strength." Then there was great merriment made,
and the king held a feast, and the two brothers were welcomed
home; but the horse would not eat, the bird would not sing,
and the princess sat by herself in her chamber and wept bitterly.
The youngest son fell to the bottom of the bed of the stream.
Luckily, it was nearly dry, but his bones were almost broken,
and the bank was so steep that he could find no way to get out.
As he stood bewailing his fate, and thinking what he should do,
to his great joy he spied his old and faithful friend the fox, look-
ing down from the bank upon him. Then Reynard scolded him
for not following his advice, which would have saved him from
all the troubles that had befallen him. "Yet," said he, "silly
as you have been, I cannot bear to leave you here; so lay hold
of my brush, and hold fast!" Then he pulled him out of the
river, and said to him, as he got ulpon the bank, "Your brothers
have set a watch to kill you if they find you making your way
back." So be dressed himself as a poor piper, and came playing
on his pipe to the king'scourt. But he was scarcely within the
gate when the horse began to eat, and the bird to sing, and the
princess left off weeping. And when he got to the great hall,
where all the court sat feasting, he went straight up to the
king and told him all his brothers' roguery. Then it made the
king very angry to hear w~hat they had done, and they were seized
[ 39 ]
59 00064.jpg
GRIMM' S
and punished; and the youngest son had the princess given to
him again; and he married her; and after the king's death he
was chosen king in his stead.
After his marriage he went one day to walk in the wood, and
there the old fox: met him once more, and besought him, with
tears in his ey;es, to be so kind as to cut off his head and his
brush. At last he did so, though sorely against his will, and in
the same moment the fox was changed into a prince, and the
princess knew him to be her own brother, who had been lost a
great many years; for a spiteful fairy had enchanted him, with
a spell that could only be broken by some one getting the golden
bird, and by cutting off his head and his brush.
60 00065.jpg
THE FISHERMAN
AND HIS WIFE
THERE was once a fisherman who lived with his wife in a
pigsty, close by the seaside. The fisherman used to go
out all day long a-fishing; and one day, as he sat on the
shore with his rod, looking at the sparkling waves and watch-
ing his line, all on a sudden his float was dragged away deep
into the water; and in drawing it up he pulled out a great fish.
But the fish said: "Pray let me live! I am not a real fish; I
am an enchanted prince; put me in the water again, and let
me gol" "Oh! ho!" said the man, "you need not make so.
many words about the matter; I will have nothing to do with
a fish that can talk; so swim away, sir, as soon as you please!"
Then he put him back into the water, and the fish darted straight
down to the bottom, and left a long streak of blood behind him
on the wave.
When the fisherman went home to his wife in the pigsty, he
told her how he had caught a great fish, and how it had told
him it was an enchanted prince, and how, on hearing it speak,
he had let it go again. ~"Did not yrou ask it for anything?" said
[41 ]
FAIRY
TALES
61 00066.jpg
UK NI IV 1V
the wife. "No," said the man. "W7hat should I ask for!"'
"A~h!" said the wife, "we live very wretchedly here, in this
nasty. dirty pigsty; do go back and tell the fish we want a
snug -little cottage."
The fisherman did not much like the business; however, he
went to the seashore; and when he came back there the water
looked all yellow and green. And he stood at the water's edge
and said:
"LO man of the seal
Hearken to me!
Myv wife Ilsabill
W'ill have her own will,
A9nd hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!"
Then the fish came swimming to him, and said: "Well, what
is her will? What does your wife want?" "Ah!" said the
fisherman, "she says that when I had caught you, I ought to
have asked you for something before I let you go; she does not
like living any longer in the pigsty, and wants a snug little cot-
tage." "Go home, then," said the fish; "she is n the cottage
already!"' So the man went home, and saw his wife standing
at the door of a nice trim little cottage. "Come in, come in!"
said she; "is not this much better than the filthy pigsty we
had ?" And there was a parlor, and a bedchamber, and a kitchen;
and behind the cottage there was a little garden, planted with
all sorts of flowers and fruits; and there w~as a courtyard behind,
full of ducks and chickens. "A.lh!" said the fisherman, "how
happily we shall live now!" WVe will try to do so, at least,"
SalG h15 Wire.
Everything went right for a week or two, and then Dame
Ilsabill said: "Husband, there is not near room enough for us
in this cottage; the courtyard and the garden are a great deal
too small; I should like to have a large stone castle to live in;
go to the fish again and tell him to give us a castle." "Wife,"
said the fisherman, "I don't like to go to him again, for perhaps
he will be angry; we ought to be easy, with this pretty cottage
[42 ]
62 00067.jpg
"DO GO BACK: A]ND TELL THE FISH WE WANT A SNUG LITTLE COTTAGE"
~J-~ pc~t;
;r,
r
SL~-
sc~- c~c
~--iJ-=5~S-~S~j
\;W
I .
rll
.;r3
: -i
r~l~BI~I~i ':/L~~n~ul~: ~R~P~-eh-~- 2- ----~ccL
-c~--~"'C~--;C"L--
~'ly
,IL
Y;~f~ ": ,cu~
I i;- ~li~i~
E ~ =~--
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ri :
---
,e
i-
-F-
c ~---- "
~
_p~_CLl~ SZ*~F~-~i~=_
63 00068.jpg
64 00069.jpg
FAIRY TALES
to live in." "Nonsense!" said the wife; "he will do it very
willingly, I know; go along and tryr!"
The fisherman went, but his heart was very heavy; and when
he came to the sea it looked blue and gloomy, though it was
very calm; and he went close to the edge of the waves, and said:
"O man of the seat
Hearken to me!
My! wrife Ilsabill
Will have~ her or- will,
And hath sten me to beg a boon of thee!"
"Well, what does she want now?" said the fish. "Ah!" said
the man, dolefully, "my wife wants to live in a stone castle."
"Go home, then,"' said the fish; "she is standing at the gate
of it already." So away went the fisherman, and found his
wife standing before the gate of a great castle. "'See," said
she, "is not this grand?" W~ith that they: went into the castle
together, and found a great many servants there, and the rooms
all richly furnished, and full of golden chairs and tables, and
behind the castle was a garden, and around it was a park half a
mile long, full of sheep, and goats, and hares, and deer; and in
the courtyard were stables and cow-houses. "Well," said the
man, now wFpe will live cheerful and happy in this beautiful castle
for the rest of our lives." "Perhaps we may," said the wife;
"but let us sleep upon it before we make up our minds to that."
So they went to bed.
The next morning when Dame Ilsabill awoke it was broad day
light, and she jogged the fisherman with her elbowcp, and said,
"Get up, husband, and bestir yourself, for we must be king of
all the land." "Wife, wife," said the man, "why should we
wish to be king? I will not be king." "Then I will,") said she.
" But wife,"! said the fisherman, "how can you be king? The
fish cannot make you a king." "H-usband," said she, "say no
more about it, but go and try! I will be king." So the mnan
went away quite sorrowful to think that his wife should want to
145 1
65 00070.jpg
GRKIMM' S
be king. This time the sea looked a dark gray color, and was
overspread with curling waves and ridges of foam as he cried out:
"O man of the seal
Harken to mel
My wife ]lsabill
Will have her own will,
And hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!"
"Well, what would she have now?" said the fish. "Alas!"
said the poor man, "my wife wants to be king." "Go home,"
said the fish; "she is king already."
Then the fisherman went home; and as he came close to the
palace he saw a troop of soldiers, and heard the sound of drums
and trumpets. And when he went in he saw his wife sitting on
a high throne of gold and diamonds, with a golden crown upon
her head; and on each side of her stood six fair maidens, each
a head caller than the other. Well, wife," said the fisherman,
"~are you king?" "Yles," said she, "I am king." And when
he had looked at her for a long time, he said, "Ah, wvife!
what a fine thing it is to be king! now we shall never have
anything more to wish for as long as we live." "I don't
know how that may be," said she; "never is a long time. I
am king, it is true; but I begin to be tired of that, and I
think I should like to be emperor." "Ailas, wife! why should
you wish to be emperor?"' said the fisherman. "Husband,"
said she, "go to the fish! I say I will be emperor." "Ah,
wife!" replied the fisherman, "the fish cannot make an em-
peror, I am sure, and I should not like to ask him for such a
thing. "I am king," said Ilsabill, "and you are my slave; so
go at once!"
So the fisherman was forced to go; and be muttered as he
went along, "This will come to no good, it is too much to ask; the
fish will be tired at last, and then we shall be sorry for what we
havre done." He soon came to the seashore; and the water
was quite black and muddy, and a mighty whirlwind blew over
I 46 ]
66 00071.jpg
FAIRY TALES
the waves and rolled them about, but he went as neair as he
could to the water's brink, and said:
"O man of the seal
Harken to me!
1\1y w\ife 11sabill
Will have her own will,
And hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!"
"'What would she have now?" said the fish "Ah!" said the
fisherman, "she wants to be emperor." "(Go home," said the
fish; "she is emperor already."
So he went home again; and as he came near he saw his wife
Ilsabill sitting on a very lofty throne made of solid gold, with a
great crown on her head full two yards high; and on each side
of her stood her guards and attendants in a row, Cach one smaller
than the other, from the tallest giant down to a little dwarf no
bigger than, my finger.' And before her stood princes and dukes
and earls; and the fisherman went up to her and said, "Wife,
are you emperor?" "Yes," said she, "I am emperor." "Ah!i"
said the man, as he gazed upon her, "what a fine thing it is to
be emperor!" "Husband," said she, "why should we stop at
being emperor? I will be pope next." Oh wife, wife!" said he,
"Howr can you be pope? There is but one pope at a time in
Ch ristendom."' "Husband," said she, "I will be pope this very
day." But," replied the husband, "the fish cannot make you
pope." "What nonsense!" said she; "'if he can make an em-
peror, he can make a pope. Go and try him."
So the fisherman went. But when he came to the shore the
wind was raging and the sea was tossed up and down in boiling
waves, and the ships were in trouble and rolled fearfully upon
the tops of the billows. In the middle of the heavens there was
a little piece of blue sky, but towards the south all was red, as
if a dreadful storm was rising. At this sight the fisherman was
dreadfully frightened, and he trembled so that his knees knocked
together: but still he went down near to the shore, and said:
4 C A7 I
67 00072.jpg
GRIM M' S
"O man of the seat
Hearken to me!
My wife Ilsabhill
W;ill have her ow-n will,
And hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!"
"What does she want now?" said the fish. "Ah!" said the
fisherman, "my wife wants to be pope." "Go home," said the
fish; "she is pope already."
Then the fisherman went home, and found Ilsabill sitting on
a throne that was two miles high. And she had th ree great crowns
on her head, and around her stood all the pomp and power of
the church. And on each side of her were two rows of burning
lights, of all sizes, the greatest as large as the highest and biggest
tower in the world, and the least no larger than a small rush-
light. "Wiife," said the fisherman, as he looked at all this
greatness, "are you pope?" "Yes," said she, "I am pope."'
"Well, wife," replied he, "it is a grand thing to be pope; and
no~w you must be easy, for you can be nothing greater." "'I
will think. about that," said the wife. Then they went to bed;
but Dame Ilsabill could not sleep all night for thinking what she
should be next. At last, as she was dropping asleep, morning
broke, and the sun rose. "Hal" thought she, as she wnoke up
and looked at it through the window, "after all I cannot prevent
the sun rising." At this thought she was very angry, and
wakened her husband, and said, "'Husband, go to the fish and
tell him I must be lord of the sun and moon." The fisherman
was half asleep, but the thought frightened him so much that
he started and fell out of bed. "Alas, wife!" said he, cannott
you be easy with being pope?" "No," said she, "'I am very un-
easy as long as the sun and moon rise without my leave. Go
to the fish at once!"
Then the man went shivering with fear; and as he was going
down to the shore a dreadful storm arose, so that the~ trees and
the very rocks shook. And all the heavens became black with
stormy clouds, and the lightning played, and the thunders rolled;
I 48 I
68 00073.jpg
FAIRY TALES
and you might have seen in the sea great black waves, swelling
up like mountains with crowns of white foam upon their heads.
And the fisherman crept toward the sea, and cried out as well
as he could:
"O man of the seal
Hearkien to me!
1\ly w-ife Ilsaibill
WVill have her own will,
And hath sent me to beg a boon of thee!"
"(What does she want now?" said the fish. ";Ah!" said he,
"she wants to be lord of the sun and moon." "Go home," said
the fish, "to your pigstyr again."
And there they live to this very day.
69 00074.jpg
GRIM~M'S
THE TWELVE BROTHERS
THERE were once a king and queen
Swho had lived happily together for
many years. They had twelve
children, but it so happened that all these
children were boys. One day the king said to the queen, "If
our next child should be a girl, all the boys must die, for I
should like my daughter to be very ach and to inherit the
whole of my kingdom." Hereupon he ordered twelve coffins to
be made, and after a little pillow had been placed in each and
they had all been filled with shavings, they were locked up in
a room in the castle. Then the king gave the key to his wife,
and told her on no account to say a word of this matter to
any one.
But the poor mother could do nothing but sit-and griev~e the
whole day long, and, seeing her so sorrowful, her youngest boy,
whom she had named Banjamin after the little son in the Bible,
and who always liked to be near his mother, went to her and
said, "Dear mother, why are you so sad?"
"I may not tell you, dearest child," she answered.
150)
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FAIRY TALES
The boy, however, gave her no peace with his questioning,
until at last she rose and led him to the room in which the coffins
were kept.
"LDearest Benjamin," she said, "your father had these coffins
prepared for you and your brothers, for if ever I have a little
daughter you are all to be killed and buried in them." She wept
so bitterly as she told him this, that her son tried to comfort her,
and said,: "Do not weep, dear mother; we will go away from
here, and I am sure we shall be able to look after ourselves."
Then his mother bade him go with his brothers into the wood,
and there find the highest tree. "And let one of you," she con-
tinued, "be always at the top, watching, for you must keep your
eyes on the castle tower. If I have a little son, I will put up a
white flag, and then you will know that it is safe for you to
return home; if I have a little daughter, I will put up a red flag,
and then you must flee for your lives, and may God help and
protect you. Every night I shall rise and pray for you; in win-
,ter, that you may not be without a fire to warm yourselves by;
in summer, that you may be sheltered from the heat."
She then blessed them, and the boys went off to the wood,
and kept watch in turn on the top of the highest oak-tree. The
day came when it was Benjamin's turn to watch, and as he was
looking toward the tower he saw a flag put up. But alast it
was no white flag, but a blood-red flag, warning them that the
hour had come when their father's cruel sentence was to be
carried out.
When the others heard this, they ~flew into a great rage, and
exclaimed in their anger: "Are we to be put to death, just for
the sake of a girl! but we will have our revenge!" So they
swore one and all that they would take the life of any girl who
should cross their path. *
They now thought it safer to go farther into the wood, and
when they had made their way to where the trees were thickest
and the shade deepest, they suddenly came upon a little empty
house, that had been raised by the magic of some good or evil fairy.
151 ]
71 00076.jpg
GRIMM' S
"Oh!" they cried, "this is just the place for us to live in;
you, Benjamin, as you are the youngest and weakest, must stay
at home and keep house, while we go and look for provisions."
So the elder brothers went into the w~ood, and there they
found plenty of game to shoot: wild deer, hares, pigeons and other
birds, as well as many other things that were good for food.
When they had finished their day's sport, they went home, and
then it was Benjamin's turn to busy himself with preparing and
cooking the food, and glad enough they were of a meal, for by
this time they were all very hungry. In this way they lived on
in the little house for ten years, and the time passed so quickly
that the brothers never found it long.
Meanwhile, the little daughter who had been born at the
citstle was growing up. She was good at heart and beautiful in
face, and had a gold star on her forehead.
One day about this time she happened to catch sight of twelve
Eittle shirts which were lying among some of her mother's things.
"Mother," she said, "to whom do these shirts belong? for
they are too small for my father to wear."
It was with a heavy heart that the poor mother answered:
"Those shirts, dear child, belong to your twelve brothers."
"LMy twelve brothers," cried the girl. Why, I never even heard
of them! Where are they now?"
"God alone knows," replied her mother, "but they are wan-
dering somewhere about the world."
Then she took her little daughter to the room where the coffins
wiere hidden, anld, unlocking the door, showed them to her, and
said, "These were meant for your brothers, but they ran away
and escaped," and she related to her all that had happened be-
fore she was born.
"Dear mother," said the girl, "do not weep; I will go and try
to find my brothers."
So she took the twelve shirts and started through the wood
in search of them. On and on she went all through the day,
and as the evening fell she came to the little house. She stepped
152]
72 00077.jpg
FAIRY TALES
in, and there she found a young boy, who looked with astonish-
ment at this beautiful girl, who was dressed like a princess and
had gold star on her forehead. "Wiihence come yrou?" he
asked, "and w~hat are you seeking?"
"(I am a king's daughter," she answered, "and I am, seeking
my twelve brothers; and as far as the blue sky reaches overhead,
will I wander till I find them," and she showed him the twelve
`shirts. Then Benjamin knew that it was his sister. "I am
Benjamin," he cried, "your youngest brother," and at this they
were both so overcome with delight that they began to cry for
joy, and kissed and embraced each other.
At last Benjamin said: "There is one thing that troubles me;
my brothers and I were so angry at being driven out of our king-
dom on account of a girl, that we made a vow to kill every girl
whom we met."
"I would gladly die," said his sister, "if by so doing I could
restore my dear brothers to their home."
"No, no, you shall not die," cried Benjamin, "hide yourself
under this tub, and when the others return I will soon come to
an understanding with them."
The sister did as she was bid, and as soon as it was dark, in
came the brothers from hunting.
They sat down to their supper, and while eating and drinking
asked, "Well, Benjamin, what news have you to tell us?"
"Have you yourselves heard nothing?" said Benjamin.
"Nothing," they replied.
"That is strange," continued Benjamin, "for you have been
out all day, and I have only been in the house, and yet I know
more than you."
"What is it?" they all cried at once; "tell us what it is."
"Only on condition," said Benjamin, "that you promise me
not to kill the first girl you see."
We promise, we promise; she shall find mercy at our hands,"
they all cried again, "only let us hear your news."
Benjamin went to the tub and, lifting it up, said, "Our sister
1531
73 00078.jpg
GRIMM' S
is here," and the king's daughter stepped forth in her royal
attire, with the gold star on her forehead, and stood before them
full of tenderness, grace, and beautyv. When the brothers saw
her they: greatly loved her, and came about her and kissed her,
and there was great rejoicing among them.
So now the sister stayed at home wvith Benjamin and helped
him in the house, while the others continued to hunt in the
wood for game. Among other things, she gathered the wood for
cooking, and herbs for vegetables, and put the pots and kettles
on the fire, so that there might always be food ready for her
brothers when they came in. She kept the house in beautiful
order, and made the little beds look sweet and clean with pretty
white covers, and altogether it was no wonder that the brothers
were very happy and comfortable, and that they all lived together
in great peace anld contentment.
One day, the two who stayed at home had prepared a dainty
meal, and as soon as they were all assembled they sat down
to the table, happy and in good spirits. Now there was a little
garden belonging to the house, in which grew twelve tall lily
plants. The sister went out to pick the lilies, for she thought
it would please her brothers to give them each a flower as they
sat at table. But scarcely was the last one gathered when her
brothers were suddenly changed into twleve ravens, that flew
right away over the trees, and in the same moment both the
house and garden entirely disappeared. There was the poor
girl, left alone in the wild wood; turning, however, to look arouIld
her, she saw an old woman standing near, who said, My child,
what is this that you have done? Why did you not leave -those
twelve white lilies untouched ? Those were your brothers, who
are now from this time forth turned into ravens." The girl
asked, weeping, "Is there nothing that I can do to set them fre?"
"Nothing," replied the old woman; "there is one way only
in all the world by which they might be saved, but that would
be far too hard a task for you to perform, for you would have
to remain dumb for severe years, never either speaking or laugh-
1s4 I
74 00079.jpg
r:~~~-~ ~
~~i~c~i
.'~~roc~ ~?~~u~ x~.-
... .:.
1111
"~:~-7iB~`
~
j'
1. ,:
TWELVEE RAVENLS CAMlE FLYING DOWN"
TAL E
FAIRY
75 00080.jpg
76 00081.jpg
FAIRY TALES
ing, and if, when there were only a few minutes wanting to com-
plete the seven years, you were to utter a single word, all your
past endeavor would be in vain, and with that one word you
would have killed your brothers."
The girl was silent, but in her heart she said, "I will set my
dear brothers free, I know that I shall be able to do it."
Then she went and chose out a high tree, and there among its
topmost branches she sat and span, and neither spoke nor
laughed.
Now it happened, one day, that a king was out hunting in the
wood. He had a large greyhound with him, and the dog ran
up to the tree whereon the girl was sitting and began leaping
about and looking up at her and barking. Then the king came
along, and he too looked up and saw the beautiful princess with
the gold star on her forehead, and he was so enchanted with
her beauty that he called to her to ask if she would be his wife.
She did not speak a word, but gave a little nod with her head.
Then the king climbed up into the tree himself and carried her
down, and, lifting her on to his own horse, bore her away to his
home.
The marriage was celebrated with great pomp and amid great
rejoicings, but the bride neither spoke nor laughed.
They had been living happily together for some years, when the
king's mother, who was a bad-hearted woman, began to say
wicked things about the young queen. "That woman you
brought home with you," she said to the king, "is nothing but
a common beggar-maid; who knows what evil tricks she may
be up to in secret. Even if she is dumb and cannot speak, at
least she must be able to laugh, and you know it is said that those
who never laugh have a bad conscience." At first the king would
not believe any of the things that were said against his wife;
but the old mother gave him no peace, accusing the queen first
of one wicked thing and then another, until he allowed himself
at last to be persuaded of her guilt, and condemned her to death.
But the king still dearly loved his wife, and he stood looking
[57 I
77 00082.jpg
GRIM M' S
out of his window and weeping while the fire was being kindled
in the courtyard where the young queen was to be burned.
The queen had been tied to the stake; and now the last mo-
ment of the seven years came just as the angry tongues of the
fire were beginning to play~ about her dress. Then there was heard
in the air above a rushing sound as of wings, and twelve ravens
came flying down~, and no sooner had they alighted on the
ground, than behold! there were her twelve brothers whom she
had set free. They scattered the fire and trampled on the
fRames, and showered kisses and loving words upon their sister
as they untied her fr-om the stake.
And now that she might speak, she was able to tell the kring
wvhy she had been dumb and had never laughed. And he was
rejoiced when he heard her tale and knew that she was guiltless,
and they all lived happily together forever after.
But the wicked old mother-in-law was taken before the judge
and tried, and he condemned her to be put in a vat of boiling
oil, in which there were poisonous snakes, and so she died a
miserable death.
78 00083.jpg
SKING and queen once. upon a time reigned in a country
a great way off, where there were in those days fairies.
Now this king and queen had plenty of money, and plenty
of fine clothes to wear and plenty of good things to eat and drink,
and a coach to ride out in every day; but though they had been
married many years, they had no children, and this grieved them
very much indeed. But one day as the queen was walking by
the side of the river, at the bottom of the garden, she saw a poor
little fish that had thrown itself out of the water, and lay gasp-
ing and nearly dead on the bank. Then the queen took pity on
the little fish, and threw it back again into the river; and before
it swam away it lifted its head out of the water and said, "I
knowc what your wc~ish is, and it shall be fulfilled, in return for
your kindness to me--you will soon have a daughter."' What the
little fish had foretold soon came to pass; and the queen had a.
little girl, so very beautiful that the king could not cease looking
on it for joy, and said he would hold a great feast and make
merry, and show the child to all the land. So he asked his kinE-
1s9I
FAIRY
TALES
79 00084.jpg
GRIMM' S
men, and nobles, and friends, and neighbors. But the queen
said, "I will have the fairies also, that they might be kind and
good to our little daughter." Now there were thirteen fairies in
the kingdom; but as the king and queen had only twelve golden
dishes for them to eat out of, they were forced to leave one of
the fairies without asking her. So twelve fairies came, each with
a high red cap on her head, and red shoes with high heels on her
feet, and a long white wand in her hand: and after the feast was
over they gathered round in a ring and gave all their best gifts to
the little princess. One gave her goodness, another beauty, an
other riches, and so on till she had all that was good in the world.
Just as eleven of them had done blessing her, a great noise was
heard in the courtyard, an~d word was brought that the thirteenth
fairy was come, with a black cap on her head, and black shoes
on her feet, and a brooms:ick in her hand; and presently up she
came into the dining-room. Now: aC she had not been asked
to the feast she was very angry, and scolded the king and queen
very much, and set to work to take he'r revenge. So she cried
out, "The king's daughter shall, in her fifteen year, be wounded
by a spindle and fall down dead." Then the twelfth of the
friendly fairies, who had* not yet given her gift, came forward,
and said that the evil wish must be fulfilled, but that she could
soften its mischief; so her gift was that the king's daughter,
when the spindle wounded her, should not really die, but should
only fall asleep for a hundred years.
However, the king hoped still to save his dear child altogether
from the threatened evil; so he ordered that all the spindles in
the kingdom should be bought up and burnt. But all the gifts
of the first eleven fairies were in the meantime fulfilled; for the
princess was so beautiful, and well-behaved, and good, and
wise, that every one who knew her loved her.
It happened that, on the very day she was fifteen years old,
the king and queen were not at home, and she was left alone in
the palace. So she roved about by herself, and looked at all the
rooms and chambers, till at last she came to an old tower, to
160]
80 00085.jpg
" AND THERE SHE LAY FAST ASLEEP ON A COUCH "
TA LES
FAIRY
81 00086.jpg
82 00087.jpg
FAIRY TALES
which there was a narrow staircase ending with a little door.
In the door there was a golden key, and when she turned it the
door sprang open, and there sat an old lady spinning away very
busily. "W'hy, how now, good mother," said the princess;
"wvhat are you doing there?" Spin ning,"' said the old lady, and
nodded her head, humming a tune, while buzz! went the wheel.
"How prettily that little thing turns round!"' said the princess,
and took the spindle and began to try and spin. But scarcely
had she touched it, before the fairy's prophecy was fulfilled;
the spindle -wounded her, and she fell down lifeless on the
ground.
However, she was not dead, but had only fallen into a deep
sleep; and the king and the queen, who had just come home, and
all their court, fell asleep too; and the horses slept in the stables,
and the dogs in the court, the pigeons on the house-top, and the
very flies slept upon the walls. Even the fire on the hearth left
off blazing and went to sleep; the jack stopped, and the spit
that was turning about with a goose upon it for the king's
dinner stood still; and the cook, who was at that moment
pulling the kitchen-boy by the hair to give him a box on the
ear for something he had done amiss, let him go, and both
fell asleep; the butler, who was slyly tasting the ale, fell asleep
with the jug at his lips; and thus everything stood still and
slept soundly.
A large hedge of thorns soon grew round the palace, and every
year it became higher and thicker; till at last the old palace
was surrounded and hidden, so that not even the roof or the
c~himney~s could be seen. But there went a report through all the
land of the beautiful Sleeping Beauty (for so the king's daughter
was called): so that, from time to time, several kings' sons came
and tried to break through the thicket into the palace. This:
however, nore of them could ever do; for the thorns and bushes
laid hold of them, as it were with hands; and there they stuck
fast and died wretchedly.
After many, many years there came a king's son into that
5 [63]
83 00088.jpg
GRIMM' S
land; and an old man told him the story of the thicket of thorns,
and how a beautiful palace stood behind it, and how a wonder-
ful princess, called Sleeping Beauty, lay in it asleep, with all
her court. He told, too, how he had heard from his grandfather
that many, many princes had come, and had tried to break
through the thicket, but that they had all stuck fast in it, and
died. Then the young prince said, "All this shall not frightren
me; I will go and see this Sleeping Beauty." The old man tried
to hinder him, but he was bent upon going.
Now that very day the hundred years were ended; and as
the prince came to the thicket he saw nothing but beautiful
flowering shrubs, through which he went with ease, and they
shut in after him as thick as ever. Then he came at last to
the palace, and there in the court lay the dogs asleep; and the
horses were standing in the stables, and on the roof sat the
pigeons fast asleep, with their heads under their wings. And
when he came into the palace, the flies were sleeping on the
walls; the spit was standing still; the butler had the jug of ale
to his lips, going to drink a draught; the maid sat with a fowl in
her lap ready to be plucked; and the cook in the kitchen was
still holding up her hand, as if she was going to beat the boy.
Then he went on still farther, and all was so still that he could
hear every breath he drew; till at last he came to the old tower,
and opened the door of the little room in which Sleeping Beauty
was; and there she lay, fast asleep in a couch by the window.
She looked so beautiful that he could not take his eyes off her,
so he stooped down and gave her a kiss. But the moment he
kissed her she opened her eyes and awoke, and smiled upon him;
and they went out together; and soon the king and queen also
awoke, and all the court, and gazed on one another with great
wonder. And the horses shook themselves, and the dogs jumped
up and barked; the pigeons took their heads from under their
wings and looked about and flew into the fields; the flies on the
walls buzzed again; the fire inl the kitchen blazed up; round
went the jack, and round went the spit, with the goose for the
[ 64 1
84 00089.jpg
king's dinner upon it; the butler Sinished his draught of ale;
the maid went on plucking the fowl; and the cook gave the boy
the box on his ear.
And then the prince and Sleeping Beauty were married, and
the wedding feast was given; and they lived happily together
all their hives long.
FAIRY
TALES
85 00090.jpg
GRIMM' S
I
THE RAVEN
T HERE: was once a queen who had a little daughter, still
too young to run alone. One day the child was very
troublesome, and the mother could not quiet it, do wvhat
she would. She grew impatient, and, seeing the ravens flying
round the castle, she opened the window, and said, "I wish
you were a raven and would fly away; then I should have a
little peace." Scarcely were the words out of her mouth, when
the child in her arms was turned into a raven and flewF away
from her through the open window. The bird took its flight to
a dark wood and remained there for a long time, and meanwhile
the parents could hear nothing of their child.
Long after this, a man was making his way through the wood
when he heard a raven calling, and he followed the sound of the
voice. As he drew near, the raven said, "I am by birth a king's
daughter, but am now under the spell of some enchantment,
you can, however, set me free." "What am I to do?," he asked.
"Go farther into the wcood until you come to a house wherein
lives an old woman; she will offer you food and drink, but you
must not take of either; if you do you will fall into a deep sleep,
and will not be able to help me. In the garden behind the house
166 ]
86 00091.jpg
FAIRY TALES
is a large tan-heap, and on that you must stand and watch for
me. I shall drive there in my carriage at two o'clock in the
afternoon for three successive days; the farst day it will be drawn
by four white, the second by four chestnut, and the last by four
black horses; but if you fail to keep awake and I f6nd y~ou sleep-
ing, I shall not be sec free."
The man promised to do all that she wished, but: the raven
said: "Alas! I know even now that you will take something
from the wcpoman and be unable to save me." The man assured
her again that he would on on account touch a thing to eat or
drink.
When he came to the house and went inside, the old woman
met him, and said: "Poor man! how tired you are! Come in
and rest and let me give you something to eat and drink."
"No," answered the man, "I will neither eat nor drink."
But she would not leave him alone, and urged him, saying:
"If you will not eat anything, at least you might take a draught
of wine; one drink counts for nothing," and at last he allowed
himself to be persuaded, and drank.
As it drew toward the appointed hour, he went outside into
the garden and mounted the tan-heap to await the raven. Sud-
denly a feeling of fatigue came over him, and, unable to resist it,
he lay down for a little while, fully determined, however, to keep
awvake; but in another minute his eyes closed of their own ac-
cord and he fell into such a deep sleep that all the noises in the
world would not have awakened him. At two o'clock the raven
came driving along, drawn by her four white horses; but even
before she reached the spot, she said to herself, sighing, "I
know he has fallen asleep." WT~1hen she entered the garden,
there she found him, as she had feared, lying on the tan*
heap, fast asleep. She got out of her carriage and went to
him; she called him and shook him, but it was all in vain, he
still continued sleeping.
The next day at noon, the old woman came to him again with
food and drink, which he at first refused. At last, overcome by
[ 67 1
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GRIMM':' S
her persistent entreaties that he would tak~e something, he lifted
the glass and drank again.
Toward ntwo o'clock he went into the garden and on to the
tan-heap to watch for the raven. He had not, been there long
before he began to feel so tired that his limbs seemed hardly able
to support him and he could not stand upright any longer; so
again he lay down and fell fast asleep. As the raven drove along
with her four chestnut horses, she said, sorrowfully, to herself, "I
know he has fallen, asleep." She went as before to look for him,
but he slept, and it was impossible to awaken him.
The following day the old woman said to him: "WVhat is this?
You are not eating or drinking anything. Do you want to kill
yourself?"
He answered, "'I may not and will not either eat or drink."'
But she put down the dish of food and the glass of wine in
front of him, and when he smelt the wine he was unable to
resist the temptation, and took a deep draught.
WShen the hour came round again he went as usual on to the
tan-heap in the garden to await the king's daughter, but he felt
even more overcome with weariness than on the two previous
days, and, throwing himself down, he slept like a log. At two
o'clock the raven could be seen approaching, and this time her
coachman and everything about her, as well as her horses, were
black.
She was sadder than ever as she drove along, and said, mourn-
fully, "I know he has fallen asleep andl will not be able to set
me free." She found him sleeping heavily, and all her efforts
to awaken him were of no avail. Then she placed beside him
a loaf, some meat, and a flask of wine, of such a kind that how-
ever much he took of them, they would never grow less. After
that she drew a gold ring, on which her name was engraved, off
her finger, and put it upon one of his. Finally, she laid a letter
near him, in which, after giving him particulars of the food and
drink she had left~for him, she finished with the following words:
"I see that as long as you remain here you will never be able to
168)
88 00093.jpg
THE RAVEN SAID, "I AM BY BIRTH A KING'S
DAUGHTER "
FAIRY TALES
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FAIRY TALES
set me free; if, however, you still wish to do so, come to the
golden castle of Stromberg; this is well within your power to
accomplish." She then returned to her carriage and drove to
the golden castle of Stromberg.
When the man awoke and found that he had been sleeping,
he was grieved at hs art, and said, "She has no doubt been here
and driven away again, and it is now too late for me to save
her." Then his eyes fell on the things which were lying beside
him; he read the letter, and knew from it all that had happened.
He rose up without delay, eager to start on his way and to reach
the castle of Stromberg, but he had no idea in which direction
he ought to go. He traveled about a long time in search of it
and came at last to a dark forest, through which he went on walk-
ing for fourteen days and still could not find a way out. Once
more night came on, and, worn out, he lay down under a bush
and fell asleep. Again the next day he pursued his way through
the forest, and that evening, thinking to rest again, he lay down
as before, but he heard such a howling and wailing that he found
it impossible to sleep. He waited till it was darker and people
had begun to light up their houses, and then seeing a little glim-
mer ahead of him, he went toward it.
He found that the light came from a house which looked smaller
than it really was, from the contrast of its height with that of
an immense giant who stood in front of it. He thought to him-
self, If the giant sees me going in, my life will not be worth
much." However, after a wcphile he summoned up courage and
went forward. When the giant saw him, he called out: "It is
lucky for me that you have come, for I have not had anything to
eat for a long time. I can have you nowci for my supper." "I
would rather you let that alone," said the man, "for I do not
willingly give myself up to be eaten; if you are wanting food I
have enough to satisfy your hunger." "If that is so," replied the
giant, "I will leave you in peace; I only thought of eating you
because I had nothing else.
So they went indoors together and sat down, and the man
S7: ]
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GRIM M' S
brought out the bread, meat, and wine, which, although he had
eaten and drunk of them, were still unconsumed. The giant was
pleased with the good cheer, and are and drank to his heart's
content. When he had finished his supper the man asked him
:f he could direct him to the castle of Stromberg. The giant
said: "I will look on my map; on it are marked all the towns,
villages, and houses." So he fetched his map, and looked for the
castle, but could not find it. "Never mind," he said, "I have
larger maps up-stairs in the cupboard, we will look on those,"
but they searched in vain, for the castle was not marked even on
these. The man now thought he should like to continue his
journey, but the giant begged him to remain for a day or two
longer until the return of his brother, who was away in search
of provisions. When the brother came home, they asked him
about the castle of Stromberg, and he told them he would look
on his own maps as soon as he had eaten and appeased his hunger.
Accordingly, when he had finished his supper, they all went up
together to his room and looked through his maps, but the castle
was not to be found. Then he fetched other maps, and they
went on looking for the castle until at last they found it, but
it was many thousand miles away. "How shall I be able to
get there?" asked the man. "I have two hours to spare," said
the giant, "and I will carry you into the neighborhood of the
castle; I must then return to look after the child who is in our
care."
'The giant thereupon carried the man to within about a
hundred leagues of the castle, where he left him, saying, "You
will be able to walk the remainder of the way yourself." The
man journeyed on day and night till he reached the golden castle
of Stromberg. He found it situated, however, on a glass moun-
tain, and looking up from the foot he saw the enchanted maiden
drive round her castle and then go inside. He was overjoyed
to see her, and longed to get to the top of the mountain, but the
sides were so slippery that every time he attempted to climb he
fell back again. When he saw that it was impossible to reach
172 ]
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FAIRY TALES
her, he was greatly grieved, and said to himself, "I will remain
here and wait for her," and so he built himself a little hut, and
there he sat and watched her for a whole year, and every day
he saw the King's daughter driving round her castle, but still
was unable to get nearer to her.
Looking out from his but one day he saw three robbers fight-
ing, and he called out to them, "God be with you." They
stopped when they heard the call, but, looking round and seeing
nobody, they went on again with their fighting, which now
became more furious. "God be with you," he cried again, and
again they paused and looked about, but, seeing no one, went
back to their fighting. A third time he called out, "God be
with you," and then thinking he should like to know the cause
of dispute between the three men, he went out and asked them
why they were fighting so angrily with one another. One of
them said that he had found a stick, and that he had but to
strike it against a door through which he wished to pass, and
it immediately flew open. Another told him that he had found
a cloak which rendered its wearer invisible; and the third had
caught a horse which would carry its rider over any obstacle
and even up the glass mountain. They had been unable to de-
cide whether they would keep together and have the things in
common, or whether they would separate. On hearing this,
the man said, "I will give you something in exchange for those
three things; not money, for that I have not got, but something
that is of far more value. I must first, however, prove whether
all you have told me about your three things is true." The rob-
bers, therefore, made him get on the horse, and handed him the
stick and the cloak, and when he had put this round him he was
no longer visible. Then he fell upon them with the stick and
beat them one after another, crying, "There, you idle vagabonds,
you have got what you deserve; are y-ou satisfied now!"
After this he rode up the glass mountain. When he reached
the gate of the castle, he found it closed, but he gave it a blow
with his stick, and it flew wide open at once and he passed
[73 ]
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GRIMM' S
through. He mounted the steps and entered the room where
the maiden was sitting, with a golden goblet full of wine in front
of her. She could not see him, for he still wore his cloak. He
took the ring which she had given him off his finger, and threw
it into the goblet, so that it rang as it couched the bottom.
"That is my own ring," she exclaimed, "and if that is so the
man must also be here who is coming to set me free."
She sought for him about the castle, but could find him no-
where. Meanwhile he had gone outside again and mounted his
horse and thrown off the cloak. When, therefore, she came to
the castle gate she saw him, and cried aloud for joy. Then. he
dismounted and took her in his arms; and she kissed him, and
said, "No~w you have indeed set me free, and to-morrow we will
celebrate our marriage."
94 00099.jpg
FRITZ AND HIS FRIENDS
HONEST Fritz had worked hard all his
life, but ill-luck befell him; his cattle
died, his barns were burned, and he lost
almost all his money. So at last he said, "'Be-
fore it is all gone I will buy goods, and go out
4-:? into the world, and see whether I shall have $'
the luck to mend my fortune."
The first place he came to- was a village,
where the boys were running about, crying and
shouting. "What is the matter?" asked he.
"See here!" said they, "wpe have got a mouse
that we make dance to please us. Do look at
him; what a droll sight it is! How he jumps
about!" But the man pitied the poor little thing, and said, "'Let
the poor mouse go, and I will give you money." So he gave
them some money, and took the mouse and let it run; and it soon
jumped into a hole that was close by, and was out of their reach.
1751
FAI RY
TAL E S
95 00100.jpg
GRIMM' S
Then he traveled on and came to 'another village; and there
the boys had got an ass that they made stand on its hind legs
and tumble and cut capers. Then they laughed and shouted,
and gave the poor beast no rest. So the good man gave them,
too, some of his money, to let the poor thing go away in peace.
At the next village he came to, the young people were leading
a bear that had been taught to dance, and were plaguing the
poor thing sadly;. Then he gave them, too, some money, to let
the beast go; and Master Bruin was very glad to get on his four
feet and seemed quiet at his ease and happy again.
But now our traveler-found that he had given way all the
money he had in the world, and had not; a shilling in his pocket.
Then said he to himself: "The king has heaps of gold in his
strong box that he never uses; I cannot die of hunger; so I hope
I shall be forgiveri if I borrow a little from him, and when I get
rich again I will repay it all."
So he managed to get at the king's strong box, and took a
very little money; but as he came out the guards saw him, and
said he was a thief, and took, him to the judge. The poor man
told his story; but the judge said that sort of borrowing could
not be suffered and that those who took other people's money
must be punished; so the end of his trial was that Frita was
found guilty, and doomed to be thrown into the lake, shut up in
a box. The lid of the box was full of holes to let in air; and one
jug of water and one loaf of bread were given him.
When he was swimming along in the water very sorrowfully,
he heard something nibbling and biting at the lock. All of a
sudden it fell off, the lid flew open, and there stood his old friend
the little mouse, who had done him this good turn. Then came
the ass and the bear, too, and pulled the box ashore; and all
helped him because he had been kind to them.
But now they did not know what to do next, and began to
lay their heads together; when on a sudden a wave threw on
the shore a pretty white stone that looked like an egg. Then the
bear said, "That's a lucky thing This is the wonderful stone;
[76 ]
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FAIRY TALES
whoever has it needs only to wish, and everything he wishes for
comes to him at once." So Fritz went and picked up the stone,
and wished for a palace and a garden and a stud of horses; and
his wish was fulfilled as soon as he had made it. And there he
lived in his castle and garden, with fine stables and horses;
and all was so grand and beautiful that he never could wonder
and gaze at it enough.
After some time some merchants passed by that way. "See,"
said they, "what a princely palace! The last time we were here
it was nothing but a desert waste." They were very eager to
know how all this had happened, and went in and asked the
master of the palace how it had been so quickly raised. "I
have done nothing myself," said he; "it is the wonderful
stone that did all." "What a strange stone that must be!"
said they. Then he asked them to walk in, and showed it to
them.
They asked him whether he would sell it, and offered him all
their goods for it; and the goods seemed so fine and costly that
he quite forgot that the stone would bring him in a moment a
thousand better and richer things, and be agreed to make the
bargain. Scarcely was the stone, however, out of his hands
before all his riches were gone and poor Fritz found himself sit-
ting in his box in the water, with his jug of water and loal of
bread by his side.
However, his grateful friends, the mouse, the ass, and the bear,
came quickly to help him; but the mouse found she could not
nibble off the lock this time, for it was a great deal stronger than
before. Then the bear said, "We must find the wonderful stone
again, or all we can do will be fruitless."
The merchants, meantime, had taken up their abode in the
palace; so away went the three friends, and when they came
near, the bear said: Mouse, go in and look through the key-
hole, and see where the stone is kept. You are small; nobody w-ill
see you." The mouse did as she was told, but soon came back
and said: "Bad news! I have looked in, and the stone hangs
I 27
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GRIMM'S
under the looking-glass by a red silk string, and on each side
of it sits a great black cat with fSery eyes watching it."
Then the others took counsel together, and said: "Go back
again, and wait till the master of the palace is in bed asleep;
then nip his nose and pull his hair." Away went the mouse, and
did as they told her; and the master jumped up very angrily,
and rubbed his nose and cried: "Those rascally cats are good for
nothing at all; they let the mice bite my very nose and pull the
hair off my head." Then he hunted them out of the room; and
so the mouse had the best of the game.
Next night, as soon as the master wcas asleep,'the mouse crept
in again; and (the cats being gone) she nibbled at the red silken
string to which the stone hung, till down it dropped. Then she
rolled it along to the door; but when it got there the poor little
mouse was quite tired, and said to the ass, "Put in your foot, and
lift it over the threshold." This was soon done; and they took
up the stone and set off for the waterside. Then the ass said,
"H-ow shall we reach the box?" "That is easily managed, my
friend," said the bear. "I can swcim very well; and do you, don-
key, put your fore feet over my shoulders; mind and hold fast,
and take the stone in your mouth. As for you, mouse, you can
sit in my ear."
Thus all was settled, and away they swam. After a time
Bruin began to brag and boast. "We are brave fellows, are not
we?" said he. "What do you think, donkey?" But the ass held
his tongue and said not a word. "Why don't you answer me?'"
said the bear. "You must be an ill-mannered brute not to speak
when you are spoken to." When the ass heard this he could
hold no longer; so he opened his mouth and out dropped the
wonderful stone. "I could not speak," said he. "Did not ylou
know I had the stone in my mouth? Now it is lost, and that
is your fault." "Do but hold your tongue and be easy!" said
the bear; "and let us think what is to be done now."
Then another council was held; and at last they called to-
gether all the frogs, their wives and families, kindred and friends,
[78 ]
98 00103.jpg
FAIRY TALES
and said, "A great foe of yours is coming to eat you all up; but
never mind, bring us up plenty of stones, and we will build a
strong wall to guard you." The frogs, hearing this, were dread-
fully frightened, and set to work, bringing up all the stones
they could find. At last came a large fat frog, pulling along the
wonderful stone by the silken string; and when the bear saw
it he jumped for joy, and said, "Now we have found what we
wanted." So he set the old frog free from his load, and told him
to tell his friends they might now go home to their dinners as
soon as they pleased.
Then the three friends swam off again for the box, and the
lid flew open, and they found they were but just in time, for the
bread was all eaten and the jug of water almost empty. But as
soon as honest Fritz had the stone in his hand, he wished him-
self safe in his palace again; and in a moment he was there, wit
his garden, and his stables, and his horses; and his three faith-
f~ul friends lived with him, and they all spent their time happily
and merrily together as long as they lived. And thus the good
man's kindness was rewarded; and so it ought, for one good meon
deserves another.
99 00104.jpg
GRI1MM'S
THE ELFIN GROVE I:
AS an honest woodman was sitting one evening, after his
work was done, talking with his wife, he said: I hope
the children will not run into that grove by the side of
the river; it looks more gloomy than ever; the old oak-tree is
sadly blasted and torn, and some odd folks, I am sure, are lurking
about there, but who they are nobody knows." The woodman,
however, could not say thrit they brought ill-luck, whatever they
were; for every one said that the village had thriven more than
ever of late, that the fields looked gayer and greener, that even
the sky was of a deeper blue, and that the moon and stars shed
a brighter light. So, not knowing what to think, the good people
very wisely let the new-comers alone, and, in truth, seldom said
or thought anything at' all about them.
That very evening the woodman's daughter Rioseken, and her
playmate Martin, ran out to have a game of hide-and-seek in
the valley. "W~here can he be hidden?" said she, "he must
have gone toward the grove; perhaps he is behind the old oak-
tree"; and down she went to look. just then she spied a little
dog that jumped and frisked round her, and wagged his tail, and
( 80 1
100 00105.jpg
FAIRY
"'AND SO, PRETTY' ROSEKEN, YOU ARE COMlE AT
LAST TO SEE US ?"
T ALEE S
101 00106.jpg
102 00107.jpg
FAIRY TALES
led her on toward the grove. Then he ran into it, and she soon
jumped up the bank by the side of the old oak-tree to look for
him; but was ovrerjoyed to see a1 beautiful meadow where flow-
ers and shrubs of every kind grew upon turf of the softest green;
gay butterflies flew about; the birds sang sweetly; and, what
was strangest, the prettiest little children sported about like
fairies on all sides; some twining the flowers, and others dancing
in rings upon a smooth turf beneath the trees. In the midst of
the grove, instead of the hovels of which Roseken had heard, she
could see a palace that dazzled her eyes with its brightness.
For a while she gazed on the fairy scene, till at last one of the
little dancers ran up to her and said: "'And so, pretty Roseken,
you are come at last to see us? We have often seen you play
about, and wished to have you with us." Then she plucked
some of the fruit that grew near, and Roseken at the first taste
forgot her home and wished only to see and know more of her
fairy friends. So she jumped down from the bank and joined
the merry dance.
Then they led her about with them and showed her all their
sports. One while they danced by moonlight on the primrose
banks, at another time they skipped from bough to bough among
the trees that hung over the cooling streams, for they moved as
lightly and easily through the air as on the ground; and Roseken
went with them everywhere, for they bore her in their arms
wherever they wished to go. Sometimes they would throw seeds
on the turf, and little trees would spring up; and then they
would set their feet upon the branches, and rise as the trees grew
under them, till they danced upon the boughs in the air, wher-
ever the breezes carried them, singing merry songs.
At other times they would go and visit the palace of their
queen; and there the richest food was spread before them, and
the softest music was heard; and all around grew flowers, which
were always changing their hues, from scarlet to purple, and
yellow, and emerald. Sometimes they went to look at the heaps
of treasure which were piled up in the royal stores, for little
I 83 1
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GRIMM' S
dwarfs were always employed in searching the earth for gold.
Small as this fair land looked from without, it seemed within
to have no end; a mist hung around it to shield it from the
eyes of men; and some of the little elves sat perched upon the
outermost trees, to keep watch lest the step of man should break
in and spoil the charm.
"And who are you?" said Roseken one day. "We are what
are called elves in the world," said one whose name was Gossa-
mer and who had become her dearest friend; "we are told you
talk a great deal about us. Some of our tribes like to work you
mischief, but we who live here seek only to be happy; we meddle
little with mankind, and when we do come among them it is to
do them good." "And where is your queen?" said Roseken.
" Hush! hush! you cannot see or know her; you must leave us
before she comes back, which will be now very soon, for mortal
step cannot come where she is. But you will know that she is
here when you see the meadows gayer, the rivers more sparkling,
and the sun brighter.
Soon afterward Gossamer told Roseken the time was come to
bid her farewell; and she gave her a ring in token of their friend-
ship, and led her to the edge of the grove. "Think of me," said
she, but beware how you tell what you have seen, or try to visit
any of us again; for if you do we shall quit this grove and come
back no more." Turning back, Roseken saw nothing but the
old oak and the gloomy grove she had known before. "How
frightened my father and mother will be!" thought she, as she
looked at the sun, which had risen some time. "(They will
wonder where I have been all night, and yet I must not tell them
what I have seen."
Then she hastened homeward, wondering, however, as she
went, to see that the leaves, which were yesterday so fresh and
green, were now falling dry and yellow around her. The cottage,
too, seemed changed; and when she went in, there sat her father,
looking some years older than when she saw him last, and her
mother, whom she hardly knew, was by his side. Close by was
184 I
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FAIRY TALES
a young man. "Father," said Roseken, "who is this?" "Who
are you that call me father?" said he. "Are you--no you cannot
b --ur long-lost Roseken ?" But they soon saw that it was
their Roseken; and the young man, who was her old friend and
playlellow Mlartin, said: "No wonder you had forgotten me in
seven years. Do not you remember how we parted, seven years
ago, while playing in the field ? Wie thought you were quite lost;
but I am glad to see that some one has taken care of you and
brought you home at last." Roseken said nothing, for she could
not tell all; but she wondered at the strange tale, and felt gloomy
at the change from fairyland to her father's cottage.
Little by little she came to herself, thought of her story as a
mere dream, and soon became Martin's bride. Everything
seemed to thrive around them, and Roseken thought of her
friends, and so called her first little girl Elfie. The little thing
was loved by every one. It was pretty and very good-tempered.
Roseken thought that it was very like a little elf; and all, with-
out knowing why, called it the fairy-child.
One day, while Roseken was dressing her little Elfie, she
found a piece of gold hanging round her neck by a silken thread;
and knew it to be of the same sort as she had seen in the hands
of the fairy dwarfs. Ellie seemed sorry at its being seen, and
said that she had found it in the garden. But Roseken watched
her, and soon found that she went every afternoon to sit by her-
self in a shady place behind the house. So one day she hid her-
self to see what the child did there, and to her great wonder
Gossamer was sitting by her side. "Dear Elfie," she was saying,
"your mother and I used to sit thus when she was young and
lived among us. Oh, if you could but come and do so tool
But since our queen came to us it cannot be; yet I will come
and see you and talk to you whilst you are a child; when you
grow up we must part forever." Then she plucked one of the
roses that grew around them, and breathed gently upon it, and
said: "T'ake this for my sak~el it will now keep fresh for a whole
year."
(85 I
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GRIM M' S
Then Roseken loved her little Ellie more than ever; and when
she found that she spent some hours of almost every day with
the elf, she used to hide herself and watch them without being
seen; till one day, when Gossamer was bearing her little friend
through the air from tree to tree, her mother was so frightened
lest her child should fall, that she could not help screaming out;
and Gossamer see her gently on the ground, and seemed angry,
and fe~lew a~way. But still she used sometimes to come and~play
with her little friend; and would soon, perhaps, have done so -the
same as before, had not Roseken one day told her husband the
whole story; for she could not bear to hear himn always won-
dering and laughing at their little child's odd ways, and saying
he was sure there was something in the grove that brought them
no good. So, to show him that all she said was true, she took
him to see Elfie and the fairy; but no sooner did Gossamer
know that he was there (which she did in an instant), than she
changed herself into a raven and flew off into the grove.
Roseken burst into tears, and so did Elfie, for she knew she
should see her dear friend no more; but Martin was restless and
bent upon following up his search after the fairies, so when night
came he stole away toward the grove. When he came to it
nothing was to be seen but the old oak, and the gloomy grove,
and the hovels; and the thunder rolled and the wind whistled.
It seemed that all about him was angry, so he turned homeward,
frightened at what he had done.
In the morning all the neighbors flocked around, asking one
another what the noise and bustle of the last night could mean;
and when they looked about them their trees seemed blighted
and the meadows parched, the streams were dried up, and
everything seemed troublesome and sorrowful.
But yet they all thought that, somehow or 6ther, the grove
had not near so forbidding a look as it used to have. Strange
stories were told; how one had heard flutterings in the air, an-
other had seen the grove as it were alive with little beings that
flew away from it. Each neighbor told his tale, and all won-
[ 86 ]
106 00111.jpg
FAIRY TALES
dered what could have happened. But Roseken and her hus-
band knew what was the matter, and bewailed their folly; for
they foresaw that their kind neighbors, to whom they owed all
their luck, were gone forever.
Among the bystanders none told a wilder story than the old
ferryman who plied across the river at the foot of the grove.
He told how at midnight his boat: was carried away, and how
hundreds of little beings seemed to load it with treasures; how
a strange piece of gold was left for him in the boat as his fare,
how the air seemed full of fairy forms fluttering around, and
how at last a great train passed over, that seemed to be guarding
their leader to the meadows on the other side; how he heard soft
music floating around, and how sweet voices sang as they hov-
ered overhead:
Fairy Queent
Fairy Queenl
Mortal steps are on the green;
Corne away!
Haste away!
Fairies, guard your Queent
Hither, hither, Fairy Queenl
Lest thy silvery wing be seen;
O'er the ky.
Fly, fly, fly!
Fairies, guard your lady Queent
O'er the sky,
Fly, fly, fly!
Fairies guard your Queent
Fairy Queent
Fairy Queent
Mortal steps no raore are seen;
Now we may
Down and play
O'er the daisied Green.
Lightly, lightly, Fairy Queent
Trip it gently o'er the green
Fairies gay,
Trip away,
[ 87 ]
107 00112.jpg
GRIMM' S
Round about your lady Queent
Fairies gay,
Trip away,
Round about your Queen!
Poor Elfie mourned their loss the most, and would spend whole
hours in looking upon the rose that her playfellowv had given
her, and singing over it the pretty airs she had taught her; till
at length, when the year's charm had passed away, and it began
to fade, she planted the stalk in her garden, and there it grew
till she could sit under the shade of it and think of her friend
Gossamer.
108 00113.jpg
FAIRY TALES
BEARSKI
HEE a oc r yoth wh n
.~~ lite asa olie. e or hms
bravlyandwasalwas sen o b
foremost~~ whe th bules er fllng
Evrthn wen well wih imwhleth
war~~~'-~ latd u a ona eaewspo
went toR hi~s bothers an beggedtha th ey-kr~r
woul give hi foot d a n oder sheltoer unil war
boroe out afresh u the brothers were aln
wan wierthin you? You are ofh no serice toear7.
us;youmust go ancid fig ishtorg ownd way
asl bes you capan. Thet soder sh~ouldre
his ife, worhichws palltha w ase left to him
I 89
109 00114.jpg
GRIMM' S
and went forth into the world. In time he came to a wide
heath, on which there was nothing to be seen but a circle of
trees. Full of sorrowful thoughts, he sat down under one of
these and began meditating on the sadness of his lot. "LI
have no money," he said to himself, "and I have learned
no trade but that of fighting, and for this I am no longer
wanted since peace was declared; I see nothing left for me
to do but to starve." All at once he heard a sound as of the
wind blowing, and, looking up, he saw a stranger standing in
front of him dressed in a green coat. He was of stately appear-
ance, but had a nasty cloven foot. "Ylou have no need to tell
me of what you are in w an t," said the strange r. I know already.
Both money and property I am prepared to give you, as much
as you can make use of, spend what you will, but I must be f6rst
assured that you are a man without fear, for I do not wish to
waste my monev on a coward."
"'A soldier and fear!" he answered, "when were they ever
found together? Y'ou can put me to the proof."' "Good," re-
plied the stranger. "Turn and look behind you." The soldier
turned, and saw, trotting toward him, a great bear, growling as
it came along. "Ho! ho!" cried he. "I will tickle your nose for
you in such a way that you will not want to growl any more,"
and so saying he aimed at the bear and shot it through the
muzzle, and the animal fell over and did not move again. "I
see that you are not wanting in courage," said the stranger,
"but there is yet another condition that you will have to fulfil."'
"I will consent to anything that does not endanger my sal-
vation," answered the soldier, who was perfectly aware with
whom he had to deal. "Otherwise I will have nothing to do
with it."
"You shall judge for yourself," continued Greencoat; "during
the next seven years you must neither wash, shave, comb your
hair, nor cut your nails, nor say a paternoster. I will give you a
coat and cloak which you must wear the whole time. Should
you die before the end of the seven years, you will be mine; but
1 90 ]
110 00115.jpg
FAIRY
if you survive you will
be a free man, and a
rich one, as long as you
live." The sold ie r
thought of the great
poverty and distress in
which he now found
himself, and of how
often he had before
faced death, and he
made up his mind to
brave it once again,
and so gave his consent
to the proposed co~ndi-
tions. The Devil then
drew off his coa t,
handed it to the sol-
dier, and said, "When
you are wearing this
coat, you have only to
thrust your hand intoL
the pocket and you
will tind it full of gold."
He then wJent and
cut off the bear's skin.
" This," he said, "is to
be your cloak and your
bed; on this must you
sleep and on no other
bed must you lie, and
on account of your ap-
parel you shall be called
Bearskin." And with
tiapae~hese words the Devil
[91]
TALES
111 00116.jpg
GRIMM' S
The soldier put on the green coat, thrust his hand at once
into the pocket, and found he had not been deceived. Then he
threw the bearskin over his shoulders and started again on his
travels, but he now enjoyed himself, and denied himself nothing
that did him good and his money harm.
In the first year his appearance was tolerable, but in the
second year he already looked more like a monster than a man.
His face was nearly covered with hair, his beard was like a piece
of coarse felt, there were claws at the ends of his fingers, and
cress might have been grown in the dirt that had collected on
his face. Every one who saw him fled before him; he was still,
however, able to find shelter for himself, for, in whatever place
he strayed, he always gave largely to the poor, begging them in
return to pray for him, that he might not die before the close of
the seven years, and he always paid handsomely for everything
he~ordered.
It was in the course of the fourth year that he came to an
inn, the landlord of which refused to take him in or even to allow
him a place in the stables, for he was afraid that even the horses
would take fright.
But when Bearskin put his hand in his pocket and then held
it out to him full of gold pieces, the landlord thought better of
it, and gave him a room in one of the back parts of the house,
making him promise, however, not to let himself be seen, as it
would give his house a bad name.
As Bearskin sat alone that evening, wishing with all his heart
that the seven years were over, he heard sounds of lamentation
in the adjoining room. He was a man of a kind and sympathiz-
ing heart, and he therefore went to the door and opened it, and
there he saw an old man flinging up his arms in despair and
weeping bitterly.
Bearskin stepped nearer, but at first sight of him the old man
sprang up and was about to escape from the room. He paused,
however, when he heard a human voice, and finally, so per-
suasively did Bearskin speak to him, he was induced to disclose
112 00117.jpg
FAIRY TALES
the cause of his distress. It seemed that his wealth had dimin-
ished more and more, until he and his daughters were now in
a state of starvation; he was too poor even to pay the landlord
what he owed him, and was threatened with imprisonment.
"If that is the extent of your trouble," said Bearskin, "I have
money and to spare," and he thereupon sent for the landlord,
settled his account, and put a laige purse of gold besides into the
poor old man's pocket.
W'hen the old man saw himself so wronderfully delivered from
his trouble he did not know how to express his gratitude. "Come
home with me," he said to Bearksin. "I have three daughters,
all miracles of beauty; choose one of them for your wife. When
she hears what you have done for me, she will not refuse you.
Your appearance is just a little peculiar, I must confess, but she
she will soon put all that right for you."
Bearskin was delighted with this proposal and went home
with him.
At the first sight of his face the eldest daughter was so hor-
rified that she screamed and rushed from the room. The sec-
ond daughter did not, indeed, run away, but she looked at him
from head to foot; then she spoke and said: "How can I marry
a man who has no longer even the semblance of a human being?
I would rather have the shaven bear that was on show here once
and gave himself out for a man; he had at least a good soldier's
coat and a pair of white gloves. If it were only a matter of ugli-
ness, I might grow accustomed to him." Then the youngest
rose and said, "Dear father, the man who has helped you out of
your trouble must be a good man, and- if you have promised
one of us to him as a wife, your word must not be broken." It
was a pity that B~earskin's face was just then so covered with
dirt and hair, or those present might have seen how the heart
within him laughed for joy when he heard those words. He took
a ring from his finger, broke it in two, and gave one half to the
girl, and kept the other himself. Then he wrote her name in
his half, and his own name in hers, begging her at the same time
193 I
113 00118.jpg
GRIMM' S
to keep it safely.
After this he took
his leave. "I must
continue my travels
;2, 1~ Zfor three more
,, ~years,") he said to
his betrothed. "If
: at the end of that
r'' Stime I do not return,
you may. know that
*' ,1,F~ cI am dead and that
you are free; but
-pray to God for me
; that my life may be
spared ."
The poor young
II S girl clad herself all
,in black, and when-
\~ ever she thought of
d*her betrothed hus-
band her eyes filled
with tears. Her sis-
c ters treated her to
nothing but scorn
and derision." Take
care how you offer
him your hand, "the
eldest would say,
"~for he will gi ve you
a blow wvith his
pawe." "You must
.. be careful," said the
/IZ,~?other," for bears are
fond ofsweet things,
and if he finds you
[ 94 1
114 00119.jpg
FAIRY TALES
to his taste he will eat you up." "You must never do any-
thing to irritate him;" the eldest would start again, "or he will
begin to growsl." "But the wedding will be very lively," con-
tinued the second, "bears dance so well." The youngest made
no answer, and would not allow herself to be put out by these
taunts.
Meanwhile Bearskin wandered about from place to place, doing
all the good he could, and giving freely to the poor in order that
they might pray for him. The last day of the seven years dawned
at last. Bearskin went to the heath again, and sat down under
the trees. Before long there came a sudden rush of wind, and
the same figure stood looking at him as before, but this time it
was evident that he was in a very bad humor. He threw his
old coat back to Bearskin and asked for his green one.
"We have not come to that part of the business yet," said
Bearskin; "you must first make me clean." And whether he
liked it or not, the Devil was now obliged to fetch water and
wash him, comb his hair, and cut his nails. Bearskin now looked
once more like a brave soldier, and was handsomer than he had
ever been before.
Having at last said good-by to the Devil, Bearskin felt like a
free man again. Joyful and light-hearted, he went into the town,
put on a magnificent garment of velvet, ordered a carriage and
four horses, and drove to the house of his betrothed. No one
of course, recognized him; the father took him for some dis-
tinguished military officer, and led him into the house and in-
troduced him to his daughters. He was invited to sit down
between the eldest two, and they poured him out wine, and
offered him the daintiest food, thinking all the while that they
had never before seen such a splendid-looking man. His be-
trothed sat opposite to him, with her eyes cast down and not
speaking a word. When finally he asked the father if he would
give him one of his daughters for wife, the eldest two sprang up
and ran to their rooms to put on their richest attire, for each
felt certain in her own mind that she was the chosen one. A
7 I r95
115 00120.jpg
GRIMM' S
soon as the stranger found himself alone with his betrothed, he
drew out his half of the ring and threw it into a goblet of wine
which he then handed across to her. She took it from him and
drank, but her heart gave a great throb as she saw the half-ring
at the bottom. She took; her own half, which was hung round
her neck by a ribbon, placed it against the other, and saw that
die ntwo pieces fitted exactly. Then he spoke and said, "I am
your betrothed husband, whom you only saw as Bearskin, but,
by the grace of God, my human form is returned to me and I
am clean once more." And saying this, he went up to her and
embraced and kissed her. At this moment the sisters returned,
clad in gorgeous apparel, but when they saw that it was their
youngest sister whom the handsome man had chosen, and were
told that he was Bearskin, they were so overcome with rage
and envy that they both rushed out of the house, and one of
them drowned herself in the well, the other hung herself on a
tree.
116 00121.jpg
197 1
FAIRY
TALES
117 00122.jpg
GRIMM' S
so mlany nuts that they could not walk, or whether they were
lazy and would not, I do not know; however, they took it
into their heads that it did not become them to go home
on foot. So Chanticleer began to build a little carriage of nut-
shells; and when it was finished Partlet jumped into it and sat
down, and bid Chanticleer harness himself to it and draw her
home. "That's a good joke!" said Chanticleer; "no, that will
never do; I had rather by half walk home; I'll sit on the box
and be coachman, if you like, but I'll not draw."' While this was
passing, a duck came quacking up and cried out, "Y'oul hieving
vagabonds, what business have you in my grounds? I'll give
it you well for your insolence!" and upon that she fell upon
Chanticleer most lustily. But Chanticleer was no coward, and
returned the duck's blows with his sharp spurs so fiercely that
she soon began to cry out for mercy; which was only granted
her upon condition that she would draw the carriage home for
them. This she agreed to do; and Chanticleer got upon the box
and drove, crying, "Now, duck, get on as fast as you can."
And away they went at a pretty good pace.
After they had traveled along a little way they met a needle
and a pin walking together along the road; and the needle cried
out, "(Stop, stop!") and said it was so dark that they could hardly
find their way, and such dirty walking they could not get on at
all; he told him that he and his friend, the pin, had been at a
public house a few miles off, and had sat drinking till they had
forgotten how late it was; he begged, therefore, that the travelers
would be so kind as to give them a lift in their carriage. Chanti-
cleer, observing that they were but thin fellows, and not likely
to take up much room, told them they might ride, but made
them promise not to dirty the wheels of the carriage in getting
in, nor to tread on Partlet's toes.
Late at night they arrived at an inn; and as it was bad travel-
ing in the dark, and the duck seemed much tired, and waddled
about a good deal from one side to the other, they made up
their minds to fix their quarters there; but the landlord at first
J 98 ]
118 00123.jpg
FAIRY TALES
was unwilling, and said his house was full, thinking they might
not be very respectable company; however, they spoke civilly
to him and gave him the egg which Partlet had laid by the way,
and said they: would givIe him the duck, who was in the habit
of laying one every day; so at last he let them come in, and they
bespoke a handsome supper and spent the evening very jollily.
Early in the morning, before it was quite light, and when
nobody was stirring in the inn, Chanticleer awakened his wife,
and, fetching the egg, they pecked a hole in it, ate it up, and
threw the shells into the fireplace; they then went to the pin
and needle, who were last asleep, and, seizing them by the
heads, stuck one into the landlord's easy-chair and the other into
his handkerchief; and, having done this, they crept away as
softly as possible. However, the duck, who slept in the open
air in the yard, heard them coming, and jumping into the brook
which ran close by the inn, soon swam out of their reach.
An hour or two afterward the landlord got up and took his
h andkle chief to wipe his face, but the pin ran into him and pricked
him; then he walked into the kitchen to light his pipe at the
fire, but when he stirred it up the egg-shells flew into his eyes
and almost blinded him. "Bless me!" said he, "all the world
seems to have a design against my head this morning," and so
saying, he threw himself sulkily into his easy-chair; but, oh dear!
the needle ran into him; and this time the pain was not in his
head. He now flew into a very great passion, and, suspecting
the company who had come in the night before, he went to
look after them, but they were all off; so he swore that he never
again would take in such a troop of vagabonds, who ate a great
deal, paid no reckoning, and gave hiin nothing for his trouble
but their apish tricks.
119 00124.jpg
GRIM M' S
HOW CHANTIrLEE N
PARTLE WENT TO VISIT
,:; ~ MR KORBESa~r--~~~ -~$5~~;'i5-. -j~V~w.
cleer, relid
ToMr. Korbes, h ot-a
Thn there cat ad Tk ewt o. Chanticleer said:lt ihd orieou o
"With all my Cheart. Getu behind, and bme surrae youh dou notfl
got into "Take carra e, of aa this hadsome ac Sof minewr
cat met th Nor adsirty my prett red wheel ofinel ndCani
Nowr mice e eady
"Al nd whelru stedy
Fo eargona visit to pay
To Mr. Korbes, the fox, to-day."
Soon ater came upd "ak mi-soe, ant egg," auckandile sapin;
and Chanile ete all leav tort get int thid ndb ue carriageo fand
go wihtem
"Take~~~ zoeo hi adom ] oc f i
120 00125.jpg
FAIRY TALES
When they arrived at M~r. Korbes's house he was not at home;
so the mice drew the carriage into the coach-house, Chanticleer
and Partlet flew upon a beam, the cat sat down in the Gre-
place, the duck got into the washing-cistern, the pin stuck him
self into the bed pillow, the mill-stone laid himself over the house
door, and the egg rolled himself up in the towel.
When Mr. Korbes came home he went to the Fireplace to
make a fire; but the cat threw all the ashes in his eyes; so be
ran to the kitchen to wash himself, but there the duck splashed
all the water in his face; and when he tried to wipe himself
the egg broke to pieces in the towel all over his face and eyes.
Then he was very angry, and went without his supper to bed;
but when he laid his head on the pillow, the pin ran into his
cheek; at this he became quite furious, and, jumping up, would
have run out of the house; but when he came to the door thle
mill-stone fell down on his head and killed him on the spot.
121 00126.jpg
GR IM M' S
III~
HOW~~~~~~~ PATE IDAD SBRIED
AND HO NICERDEDO RE
Another da hntcer n arlta ree og aan
th munais o atnts ad t assetedtht llth nt
whchthy oudshul b saedeqaly ewen he. o
Partlet~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~JY fon eylre ubtsesidntigaot
chokhe d." Chanticleer rand as fat as he ud to the rgiver nd
said "Rntiver giv mea some; water, fr Partlet lies onl the moun-
tainh andy will behoked by sagreat nqut."y Thwen river. s"Rno
first to the a brier andakfrg a silken cord to dra uthen waoter"
toChanticleer rand eti to th rie adsaid, "Brieve, youa mst givem
a siken od," fonicr then a ata ecud the riverwl iem a er, andthwae
sId wRicary toem sm atr o Partlet, h lies on the mountanad ilb
tanadwl choked by a great nut." Bu he bride said, Runfrsad
bring mote myid grand tatk ishagngo a willordtodrw in the gatr-"
de. hnChanticleer ran to the garden and tad Bie ook the gar- m
land from the bough where it hung, and brought it to the bride;
and then the bride gave him the silken cord, and he took the
[ zos]
122 00127.jpg
FAIRY TALES
silken cord to the river, and the river gave him water, and he
carried the water to Partlet; but in the mean time she was choked
by the great nut, and lay quite dead, and never moved any more.
Then Chanticleer was v~eryl sorry~ and cried bitterly; and all
the beasts came anid wept with him over poor Partlet. And six
mice built a little hearse to carry; her to her grave, and when it
was ready they harnessed themselves before it, and Chanticleer
drove them. On the way they met the fox. "W~here are you
going, Chanticleer!" said he. "To bury my Partlet," said the
other. "Mlay I go with you?" said the fox. "Y'es; but you
must get up behind, or my horses will not be able to draw you."
Then the fox got up behind; and presently the wolf, the bear, the
goat, and all the beasts of the wood came and climbed upon
the hearse.
So on they went till they came to a rapid stream. How
shall we get over?" said Chanticleer. Then said a straw, "I
will lay myself across, and you may pass over upon me." But as
the mice were going over, the straw slipped away and fell into
the water, and the six mice all fell in and were drowned. What
was to be done? Then a large log of wood came and said, "I
am big enough; I w~ill lay myself across the stream, and you shall
pass over upon me." So he laid himself down; but they man-
aged so clumsily, that the log of wood fell in and was carried
away by the stream. Then a stone, who saw what had happened,
came up and kindly offered to help poor Chanticleer by laying
himself across the stream; and this time he got safely to the
other side with the hearse, and managed to get Partlet out of it;
but the fox and the other mourners, who were sitting behind,
were too heavy, and fell back into the water and were all car-
ried away by the stream and drowned.
Thus Chanticleer ivras left alone with his dead Partlet; and
having dug a grave for her, he laid her in it, and made a little
hillock over it. Then he sat down by the grave, and wept and
mourned till at last he died too; and so all were dead.
123 00128.jpg
GRIMM' S
1 o4 ]
124 00129.jpg
"FAIRY TALES
Poor Sultan, who was lying close by them, heard all that the
shepherd and his wife said to each other, and was very much
frightened to think to-morrow would be his last day; so in the
evening he went to his good friend the wvolf, who lived in the
wood, and told him all his sorrows and how his master meant
to kill him in the morning. MLake yourself easy,"' said the wolf.
"I will give you some good adv~ice. Your master, y-ou know, goes
out every morning very early with his wife into the held; and
they: take their little child with them, and lay it down behind
the hedge in the shade while they are at work. Now do you
lie down close by the child, and pretend to be watching it, and
I will come out of the wood and run away with it; you must
run after me as last as you can, and I will let it drop; then y~ou
may carryr it back, and they will think you have saved their
child, and will be so thankful to you that they will take care
of you as long as you live." The dog liked this plan very well;
and accordingly so it was managed. The wolf ran with the child
a little way; the shepherd and his wife screamed out; but Sultan
soon overtook him and carried the poor little thing back to his
mnaster and mistress. Then the shepherd patted him on the
head, and said: "Old Sultan has saved our child from the wolf,
and therefore he shall live and be well taken care of and have
plenty to eat. Wife, go home and give him a good dinner, and
let him have my old cushion to sleep on as long as he lives."
So from this time forward Sultan had all that he could wish for.
Soon afterward the wolf came and wished him joy, and said,
"'Now, my good fellow, you must tell no tales, but turn y~our
head the other way when I w5ant to taste one of the old shep-
herd's fine fat sheep." "No," said Sultan; "I will be true to
my master." HowTev~er, the wolf thought he was in joke, and
came one night to get a dainty morsel. But Sultan hadl rold his
master what the wolf meant to do; so be laid in wa3it for him
behind the barn door, and when the wolf was busy looking out
for a good fat sheep he had a stout cudgel laid about his back
that combed his locks for him finely.
[ zog
125 00130.jpg
GRIMM' S
Then the wolf was very angry, and called Sultan "an old
rogue," and swore he would have his revenge. So the next
morning the wolf sent the boar to challenge Sultan to come into
the wood to fight the matter out. Now Sultair had nobody he
could ask to be his second but the shepherd's old three-legged
cat; so he took her with him, and as the poor thing limped along
with some trouble, she stuck up her tail straight in the air.
The wolf and the wild boar were first on the ground; and
when they espied their enemies coming, and saw the cat's long
tail standing straight in the air, they thought she was carrying a
sword for Sultan to fight with; and every time she limped they
thought she was picking up a stone to throw at them; so they
said they should not like this way of fighting, and the boar lay
down behind a bush, and the wolf jumped up into a tree. Sul-
tan and the cat soon came up, and looked about and wondered
that no one was there. The boar, however, had not quite hid-
den himself, for his ears stuck out of the bush; and when he
shook one of them a little, the cat, seeing something move, and
thinking it was a mouse, sprang for it, and bit and scratched it,
so upon that the boar jumped up and grunted, and ran away,
roaring out, Look up in the tree; there sits the one who is to
blame." So they looked up and espied the wolf sitting among the
branches; and they called him a cowardly rascal, and would not
suffer him to come down till he was heartily ashamed of himself
and had promised to be good friends again with old Sultan.
126 00131.jpg
~l~it~ii~
[ x 7 ]
~FAIRY
TALES
127 00132.jpg
GRIMM' S
have for my trouble; but something I must have, and then I
must take a holiday."
The farmer was a sad miser, and knew that his man was
simple-hearted; so he cook out three crowns, and thus gave him
a crow-n for each year's service. The poor fellow thought it was
a great deal of money to have, and said to himself: "WVhy should
I work hard and live here on bad fare any longer? Now that
I am rich I can travel into the wide world and make myself
merry~." W~ith that he put his money into his purse and set
out, roaming over hill and valley.
As he jogged along over the fields, singing and dancing, a
Little dwarf met him and asked him what made him so merry.
"Why, what should make me down-hearted?" said he. "I am
sound in health and rich in purse. What should I care for ? I
have saved up my three years' earnings, and have it all safe in
my pocket." "How much may it come to?" said the manikin.
"'Three while crowns," replied the countryman. "I wish you
would give them to me," said the other. "I am v'ery poor."
Then the good man pitied him; and gave him all he had; and
the little dwarf said, "As you have such a kind heart, I will
grant three wishes--one for each crown; so choose whatever
you like." Then the countryman rejoiced at his good luck,
and said: "I like many things better than money: first, I will
have a bow that will bring down everything I shoot at; secondly,
a fiddle that will set every one dancing that hears me play upon
it; .and thiydly, I should like to be able to make every one grant
me whatever I ask." The dwarf said he should have his three
wishes; so he gave him the bow and fiddle, and went his way.
Our honest friend journeyed on his way', too; and if he was
merry before, he was now ten times more so. He had not gone
far before he met an old man. Close by them stood a tree, and
on the topmost twig sat a thrush, singing aw~ay most joyfully.
"Oh, what a pretty bird!" said the man. "I would give a great
deal of my money to have such a one." "If that's all," said the
countryman, "I will soon bring it down." Then he took up his
[ zo8 ]
128 00133.jpg
FAIRY TALES
bow--off went his arrow-and down fell the thrush into a bush
that grew at the foot of the tree. The man, when he saw he
could have the bird, thought he would cheat the man; so he
put his money into his pocket again and crept into the bush
to find the prize. But as soon as he had got into the middle,
his companion took up his
fiddle and played away; and
the man began to dance and
spring about, capering higher
and higher in the air. The ..
thorns soon began to tear his --
clothes, till they all hung in ~ i-.
rags about him, and he him-
self was all scratched and ; c
wounded so that the blood f
ran dowfn. "Oh, for Heaven's ~
sake1" cried the man, "mercy, ~~
mercy, master I Pray stop the-
fiddle1 W hat have I done to .
be treated in this way?" '-
"WVhat hast thou done? Why <~ '-'
thou hast shaved many a ~, '
poor soul close enough," said : "t
the other; "trhou art only ,cr
meeting thy rewardd" So be
played up another tune yet~ij
merrier than the first. Then
the man began to beg and pray; and at last he said he would
give plenty of his money to be set free. But he did not come
up to the musician's price for some time, and he danced him
along brisker and brisker. The higher the man danced, the
higher he bid; till at last he offered a round hundred crowns,
that he had in his purse and had just gained by cheating some
poor fellow. When the countryman saw so much money, he
said, "I will agree to the bargain." So he took the purse, put
[ 209 ]
129 00134.jpg
GRIM M' S
up his fiddle, and traveled on, very well pleased with his
bargain.
Meanwhile, the man crept out of the bush, hall naked and in a
piteous plight, and began to ponder how he should take his re-
venge and serve his late companion some trick. At last he went
to the judge and said that a rascal had robbed him of his money
and beaten him soundly into the bargain, and that the fellow
who did it carried a bow at his back and had a fiddle hanging
round his neck. Then the judge sent out his bailitis to bring
up the man, wherever they should find him; and so the poor
countryman was soon caught and brought up to be tried.
The man began to tell his tale, and said he had been robbed
of his money. "Robbed, indeed I" said the countryman. "Why
you gave it me for playing you a tune and teaching you to dance I"
But the judge told him that was not likely, and that the man,
he was sure, knew better what to do with his money. So he cut
the matter short by sending him off to the gallows.
And away he was taken; but as he stood at the foot of the
ladder he said, "My Lord Judge, may it please your worship to
grant me but one boon?" "Anything but thy life," replied the
other. "No," said he, "I do not ask my life; only let me play
one tune upon my fiddle for the last time." The man cried
out: "'Oh nol no t no! for Heaven's sake don't listen to himl
Don't listen to himl" But the judge said: "It is only for this
once, poor man! He will soon have done." The fact was, he
could not say no, because the dwarf's third gift enabled him to
make every one grant whatever he asked, whether they liked it
or not.
Then the man said, "Bind me fast, bind me fast, for pityr's
sake !" But the countryman seized his fiddle and struck up a
merry tune; and at the first note, judge, clerks, and gaolers,
were set a-going; all began capering, and no one could hold the
man. At the second note the hangman let his prisoner go and
danced also; and by the time he had played the first bar of the
tune all were dancing together--judge, court, man, and all the
[ Ilo]
130 00135.jpg
FAIRY TALES
people who had followed to look on. At first the thing was merry
and joyous enough; but when it had gone on awhile and there
seemed to be no end of either playing or dancing, all began to
cry out and beg him to leave off; but he stopped not a whit
the more for their begging, till the judge not only gave him his
life, but paid him back the hundred crowns.
Then he called to the man, and said, "Tell us now, you rogue,
where you got that gold, or I shall play on for your amusement
only."l "I stole it,"' said the man, before all the people; "I
acknowledge that I stole it and that you earned it fairly." Then
the countryIman stopped his fiddle, and left the man to take his
place at the gallows.
131 00136.jpg
GRIMM' S
[nz2]
132 00137.jpg
FAIRY TALES
the man as a girl ought to care for her betrothed husband.
She did not feel that she could trust him, and she could not'
look at him nor think of him without an inward shudder.
One day he said to her, "You have not yet paid me a visit,
although we have been betrothed for some time." "I do not
know where your house is," she answered. My house is out
there in the dark forest," he said. She tried to excuse herself by
saying that she would not be able to find the way thither. Her
betrothed only replied: "You must come and see me next Sun-
day. I have already invited guests for that day, and that you
may not mistake the way, I will screw ashes along the path."
When Sunday came, and it was time for the girl to start, a
feeling of dread came over her which she could not explain, and
that she might be able to find her path again she filled her
pockets with peas and lentils to sprinkle on the ground as she
went along. On reaching the entrance to the forest she found
the path strewed with ashes, and these she followed, throwing
down some peas on either side of her at every step she took.
She walked the whole day until she came to the deepest, darkest
part of the forest. There she saw a lonely house, looking so grim
and mysterious that it did not please her at all. She stepped
inside, but not a soul was to be seen, and a great silence reigned
throughout. Suddenly a voice cried:
"Turn back, turn back, young maiden fair,
Linger not in this murderer's lair."
The girl looked up and saw that the voice came from a bird
changing in a cage on the wall. Again it cried:
"Turn back, turn back, young maiden fair,
Linger not in this murderer's lair."
The girl passed on, going from room to room of the house,
but they were all empty, and still she saw no one. At last she
came to the cellar, and there sat a very, very old woman, who
[ II31
133 00138.jpg
GRIMM' S
could not keep her head from shaking. "Can you tell me,"
asked the girl, "if my betrothed husband lives here?"
"Ah, you poor child," answered the old woman, "'what a
place for you to come to! This is a murderer's den. You think
yourself a promised bride, and that your marriage will soon
take place, but it is with death that you will keep your mar-
riage-feast. Look, do you see that large caldron of water
which I am obliged to keep on the fire! As soon as they have
you in their power they will kill you without mercy and cook
and eat you, for they are eaters of men. If I did not take pity
on you and save you, you would be lost."
Thereupon the old woman led her behind a large cask which
quite hid her from view. Keep as still as a mouse," she
said, "do not move or speak, or it will be all over with
you. To-night, when the robbers are all asleep, we will flee
together. I have long been waiting for an opportunity to
escape.",
The words were hardly out of her mouth when the godless
crew returned, dragging another young girl along with them.
They were all drunk, and paid no heed to her cries and lamenta-
tions. They gave her wine to drink, three glasses full, one of
white wine, one, of red, and one of yellow, and with that her
heart gave way and she died. Then they tore off her dainty
clothing, laid her on a table, and cut her beautiful body into
pieces, and sprinkled salt upon it.
The poor betrothed girl crouched trembling and shuddering
behind the cask, for she saw what a terrible fate had been in-
tended for her by the robbers. One of them now noticed a gold
ring still remaining on the little finger of the murdered girl,
and as he could not draw it off easily he took a hatchet and
cut off the finger, but the finger sprang into the air and fell
behind the cask into the lap of the girl who was hiding there.
The robber took a light and began looking for it, but he could
not find it. "Have you looked behind the large cask," said one
of the others. But the old woman called out, "Come and eat
1Ir4 1
134 00139.jpg
FAIRY TALES
your suppers, and let the thing be till to-morrow; the finger
won't run away."
"The old woman is right," said the robbers, and they ceased
looking for the finger and sat down.
The old woman then mixed a sleeping draught with their wine,
and before long they were all lying on the floor of the cellar,
fast asleep and snoring. As soon as the girl was assured of this
she came from behind the cask. She was obliged to step over the
bodies of the sleepers, who were lying close together, and every
moment she was filled with renewed dread lest she should
awaken them. But God helped her, so that she passed safely
over them, and then she and the old woman went up-stairs,
opened the door, and hastened as last as they could from the
murderer's den. They found the ashes scattered by the wind,
but the peas and lentils had sprouted and grown sufficiently
above the ground to guide them in the moonlight along the path.
All night long they walked, and it was morning before they
reached the mill. Then the girl told her father all that had
happened.
The day came that had been fixed for the marriage. The
bridegroom arrived and also a large company of guests, for the
miller had taken care to invite all his friends and relations. As
they sat at the feast, each guest in turn was asked to tell a tale;
the bride sat still and did not say a word.
"And you, my love," said the bridegroom, turning to her, "is
there no tale you know? Tell us something."
"I will tell you a dream, then," said the bride. "I went alone
through a forest and came at last to a house; not a soul could I
find within, but a bird that was hanging in a cage on the wall cried:
"'Turn back, turn back, young maiden fair,
Linger not in this murderer's lair.'
and again a second time it said these words."
"My darling, this is only a dream."'
"I went on through the house from room to room, but they
[ us1
135 00140.jpg
GRIMM' S
were all empty, and everything was so grim and mysterious. At
last I went down to the cellar, and there sat a very, very old
woman, who could not keep her head still. I asked her if my
betrothed lived here, and she answered: 'Ah, you poor child,
you are come to a murderer's den; your betrothed does indeed
live here, but he will kill you without mercy and afterward cook
and eat you.'"
"M~y darling, this is only a dream."
"The old woman hid me behind a large cask, and scarcely had
she done this when the robbers returned home, dragging a young
girl along with them. They gave her three kinds of wine to
drink, white, red, and yellow, and with that she died."
My darling, this is only a dream."
"Then they tore off her dainty clothing, and cut her beautiful
body into pieces and sprinkled salt upon it."
"Mly darling, this is only a dream."
"And one of the robbers saw that there was a gold ring still
left on her finger, and as it was difficult to draw off, he took a
hatchet and cut off her finger, but the finger sprang into the
air and fell behind the great cask into my lap. And here is the
Einger with the ring," and with these words the bride drew forth
the finger and showed it to the assembled guests.
The bridegroom, who during this recital had grown deadly
pale, jumped up and tried to escape, but the guests seized him
and held him fast. They delivered him up to justice, and he
and all his murderous band were condemned to death for their
wicked deeds.
136 00141.jpg
[:=7]
FAIRY
TAL E S
137 00142.jpg
GRIMMPV'S
grave; but by the time the spring came and the sun had melted
it away again, her father had married another wife. This new
wife had two daughters of her own, that she brought home with
her; they were fair in face but foul at heart, and it was now a
sorry time for the poor little girl. What does the good-for-
nothing thing want in the parlor?" said they. "They who would
eat bread should first earn it; away with the kitchen-maid!"
Then they took away her fine clothes, and gave her an old gray
frock to put on, and laughed at her, and turned her into the
kitchen.
There she was forced to do hard work: to rise early before
daylight, to bring the water, to make the fire, to cook, and to
wash. Besides that, the sisters plagued her in all sorts of ways,
and laughed at her. In the evening when she was tired she had
no bed to lie down on, but was made to lie by the hearth among
the ashes; and as this, of course, made her always dusty and
dirty, they called her Ashputtel.
It happened once that the father was going to the fair, and
asked his wife's daughters what he should bring them. "Fine
clothes," said the first. "Pearls and diamonds," cried the second
" Now, child," said he to his own daugh ter, what will you have ?"
"The first twig, dear father, that brushes against your hat when
you turn your face to come homeward," said she. Then he
bought for the first two the fine clothes and pearls and diamonds
they had asked for; and on his way home, as he rode through
a green copse, a hazel twig brushed against him and almost
pushed off his hat; so be broke it off and brought it away; and
when he got home he gave it to his daughter. Then she took
it and went to her mother's grave and planted it there; and
cried so much that it was watered with her tears; and there it
grew and became a fine tree. Three times every day she went
to it and cried; and soon a little bird came and built its nest
upon the tree, and talked with her, and watched over her, and
brought her whatever she wished for.
Now it happened that the king of that land held a feast, which
I:28 ]
138 00143.jpg
FAIRY TALES
was to last three days; and out of those who came to it his son
was to choose a bride for himself. Ashputtel's two sisters were
asked to come; so they called her up and said, "Now comb our
hair, brush our shoes, and tie our sashes for us, for we are going
to dance at the king's feast." Then she did as she was told,
but when all was done she could not help crying, for she thought
to herself she should so have liked to have gone with them to
the ball; and at last she begged her mother very hard to let her
go. "You, Ashputtel!" said she; "you who have nothing to
wear, no clothes at all, and who cannot even dance--you want
to go to the ball?" And when she kept on begging, she said at
last, to get rid of her, I will throw this dishful of peas into the
ash-heap, and if in two hours' time you have picked them all out,
you shall go to the feast, too."
Then she threw the peas down among the ashes, but the little
maiden ran out at the back door into the garden, and cried out:
"Hither, hither, through the sky,
Turtle-doves and linnets, fly!
Blackbird, thrush, and chaffinch gay,
Hither, hither, haste awayl
One and all come help me, quick!
Haste ye, haste yel--pick, pick, pickl"
Then first came two white doves, flying an at the kitchen win-
dow; next came two turtle-doves; and after them came all the
little birds under heaven, chirping and fluttering in; and they
flew down into the ashes; and the little doves stooped their heads
down and set to work, pick, pick, pick; and then the others
began to pick, pick, pick; and among them all they soon picked
out all the good grain and put it into a dish, but left the ashes.
Long before the end of the hour the work was quite done, and
all flew out again at the windows.
Then Ashputtel brought the dish to her mother, overjoyed at
the thought that now she should go to the ball. But the mother
said: "No, not you slut, you have no clothes and cannot dance;
l Is9
139 00144.jpg
GRIM M' S
you shall not go." And when Ashputtel begged very hard to
go, she said, "If you can in one hour's time pick two of those
dishes of peas out of the ashes, you shall go, too." So she shook
two dishes of peas into the ashes.
But the little maiden went out into the garden at the back of
the house, and cried out as before:
"Hither, hither, through the sky,
Turtle-doves and linnets, fyly
Blackbird, thrush, and chaffinch gay,
Hither, hither, haste awfay!
One and all come help me, quickly
Haste ye, haste yel-pick, pick, pickle"
Then first came two white doves in at the kitchen window;
next came two turtle-doves; and after them came all the little
birds under heaven, chirping and hopping about. And they
flew down into the ashes; and the little doves put their heads
down and set to work, pick, pick, pick; and then the others be-
gan, pick, pick, pick; and they put all the good grain into the
dishes, and left all the ashes. Before half an hour's time all was
done, and out they flew again. And then Ashputtel took the
dishes to her mother, rejoicing to think that she should now
go to the ball. But her mother said: "It is all of no use, you
cannot go; you have no clothes and cannot dance, and you would
only put us to shame"; apd off she went with her two daughters
to the ball.
Now when all were gone, and nobody left at home, Ashputtel
went sorrowfully and sat down under the hamel-tree, and cried
out:
"Shake, shake, hazel-tree,
Gold and silver over me!"
Then her friend the bird flew out of the tree, and brought a
gold and silver dress for her, and slippers of spangled silk; and
she put them on, and followed her sisters to the feast. But they
did not know her, and thought it must be some strange princess,
[ zzo]
140 00145.jpg
FAIRY TALES
she looked so fine and beautiful in her rich clothes; and they
never once thought of Ashputtel, taking it for granted that she
was safe in the dirt.
The king's son soon came up to her, and took her by the hand
and danced with her and no one else, and he never left her hand;
but when any one else came to ask her to dance, he said, "This
lady is dancing with me."
Thus they danced till a late hour of the night; and then she
wanted to go home; and the king's son said, "I shall go and take
care of you to your home," for he wanted to see where the beau-
tiful maiden lived. But she slipped away from him, unawares,
and ran off toward home; and as the prince followed her she
jumped up into the pigeon-house and shut the door. Then he
waited till her father came home, and told him that the un-
known maiden who had been at the feast had hid herself in the
pigeon-house. But when they had broken open the door they
found no one within; and as they came back into the house,
Ashputtel was lying, as she always did, in her dirty frock by the
ashes, and her dim little lamp was burning in the chimney.
For she had run as quickly as she could through the pigeon-
house and on to the hazel-tree, and had there taken off her beau-
tiful clothes, and put them beneath the tree, that the bird might
carry them away, and had lain down again amid the ashes
in her little gray frock.
The next day when the feast was again held, and her father,
mother, and sisters were gone, Ashputtel went to the hazel-
tree, and said:
"Shake, shake, hazel-tree,
Gold and silver over me!"
And the bird came and brought a still liner dress than the
one she had worn the day before. And when she came in it to
the ball every one wondered at her beauty; but the king's son,
who was waiting for her, took her by the hand and danced with
her; and when any one asked her to dance, he said as before,
"This lady is dancing with me."
112! ]
141 00146.jpg
GRIMM' S
When night came she wanted to go home; and the king's son
followed her as before, that he might see into what house she
went; but she sprang away from him all at once into the garden
behind her father's house. In this garden stood a fine large
pear-tree full of ripe fruit; and Ashputtel, not knowing where to
hide herself, jumped up into it without being seen. Then the
king's son lost sight of her, and could not find out where she was
gone, but waited till her father came home, and said to him,
"The unknown lady who danced with me has slipped away, and
I think she must have sprung into the pear-tree." The father
thought to himself, "Can it be Ashputtel?" So he had an ax
.brought; and they cut down the tree, but found no one upon it.
And when they came back into the kitchen, there lay Ashputtel
among the ashes; for she had slipped down on the other side of
the tree, and carried her beautiful clothes back to the bird at
the hamel-tree, and then put on her little gray frock.
The third day, when her father and mother and sisters were
gone, she went again into the garden, and said:
"Shake, shake, hazel-tree,
Cold and silver over me!"
Then her kind friend the bird brought a dress still liner than
the former one, and slippers which were all of gold; so that
when she came to the feast no one knew what to say, for wonder
at her beauty; and the king's son danced with nobody but her;
and when any one else asked her to dance, he said, "This lady is
mpy partner, sir."
When night came she wanted to go home; and the king's son
would go with her, and said to himself, I will not lose her this
time"; but, however, she again slipped away from him, though
in such a hurry that she dropped her left golden slipper upon the
stairs.
The prince took the shoe, and went the next day to the king,
his father, and said, "I will take for my wife the lady that this
golden slipper fits." Then both the sisters were overjoyed to
11221
142 00147.jpg
TAL E S
/;~a~a
i-,
i~ =I
ASHIPUTTEL PUTON THE GOLDEN SLIPPER
FAIRY
143 00148.jpg
144 00149.jpg
FAIRY TALES
hear it; for they had beautiful feet, and had no doubt that they
could wear the golden slipper. The eldest went first into the
roomn where the slipper was, and wanted to try it on, and the
mother stood by. But her great toe could not go into it, and the
shoe was altogether much too small for her. Then the mother
gave her a knife, and said: "Never mind, cut it off; when you
are queen you will not care about toes; you will not want to
walk." So the silly girl cut off her great toe, and thus squeezed
on the shoe, and went to the king's son. Then he took her for
his bride, and set her beside him on his horse, and rode away
with her homeward.
But on their wayr home they had to pass by the hazel-tree that
Ashputtel had planted; and on the branch sat a little dove
smngmg:
"Back again back again! look to the shoe
The shoe is too small, and not made for youth
Princel prince! look again for thy bride,
For she's not the true one that sits by thy side."
Then the prince got down and looked at her foot; and he saw,
by the blood that streamed from it, what a trick she had played
him. So he turned his horse round and brought the false bride
back to her home, and said: "This is not the right bride; let
the other sister try and put on the slipper." Then she went
into the room and got her foot into the shoe, all but the heel,
which was too large. But her mother squeezed it in till the
blood came, and took her to the king's son; and he set her as
his bride by his side on his horse and rode away with her.
But when they came to the hamel-tree the little dove sat there
still, and sang:
"Back again! back again look to the shoe
The shoe is too small, and not made for youth
Princel princel look again for thy bride,
For she's not the true one that sits by thy side."
Then he looked down and saw that the blood streamed so
[ 125 1
145 00150.jpg
GRIMM' S
much from the shoe that her white stockings -were quite red.
So he turned his~horse and brought her also back again. 'This
is not the true bride," said he to the father. Have you no other
daughters?" "No," said he; "there is only a little dirty Ashput-
tel here, the child of my first wife; I am sure she cannot be the
bride." The prince told him to send her. But the mother said:
"No, no, she is much too dirty; she will not dare show herself."
However, the prince would have her come; and she first washed
her face and hands, and then went in and courtesied to him, and
he reached her the golden slipper. Then she took her clumsy
shoe off her left foot, and put on the golden slipper; and it fitted
her as if it had been made for her. And when he drew near and
looked at her face he knew her, and said, "This is the right
bride." But the mother and both the sisters were frightened and
turned pale with anger as he took Ashputtel on his horse and
rode away with her. And when they came to the hamel-tree, the
white dove sang:
"Home! homer look at the shoee
Princess! the shoe was made for youtl
Princely princely take home thy bride,
For she is the true one that sits by thy side"
And when the dove had done its song, it came flying and
perched upon her right shoulder, and so went home with her.
146 00151.jpg
[r271
FAIRY
TALES
147 00152.jpg
GRIMM' S
She went into the house and asked the mother why she was
beating her daughter like that. "Her screams," she said, "can
be heard outside in the street."
The mother was ashamed to confess the truth about her
daughter's laziness, and so she answered:
"I cannot get her to leave off spinning; she is forever at her
wheel, and I am too poor to keep on buying her fresh flax."
"If that is all," said the queen, "there is nothing I like so much
as the sound of spinning, and I am never happier than when I
can hear the humming of the wheels; let me have your daughter,
and I will take her home with me to the castle. I have plenty
of flax, and she can go on spinning there to her heart's content."
The mother was heartily pleased at this proposal, and so the
queen left, taking the girl with her. On their arrival at the
castle, she took her up-stairs and showed her three rooms, filled
from floor to ceiling with the most beautiful flax.
"Spin me all this," said the queen, "and when it is finished
you shall have my eldest son for your husband; your poverty is
not a matter of any consequence to me, for I consider that your
unremitting industry is an all-suffcient dowry."
The girl dared not say anything, but she inwardly trembled
with fear, for she knew that she could never spin all that flax,
were she to sit at her spinning-wheel from morning till night for
three hundred years. As soon as she was alone she began to
weep, and she sat like that for three days without doing a stroke
of work.
When the queen came again on the third day, she was sur-
prised to find that the flax had not been touched. The girl ex-
cused herself by saying that she felt so lonely and homesick
that she had not been able to begin her spinning. The queen
was satisfied with this excuse, but as she was leaving she said,
"To-morrow, mind, I shall expect you to begin your work."
Alone once more, the girl was at her wits' end to know what
to do, and in her distress of mind went and looked out of the
window. There she saw three funny-looking women coming
[ us ]
148 00153.jpg
FAIRY TALES
toward her; one had a big flat foot, another a large under-lip
that hung over her chin; and the third a vrery. broad thumb.
They stood still under the window, and, looking up, asked the
girl what was the matter. She told them her trouble, and they
offered to help her. "If you will invite us to your wedding,"
they said, "and will not be ashamed of us, but introduce us as
your cousins, and let us sit at your table, we will soon spin all
that flax for you."
"That I will gladly promise,"' said the girl, "if you will but
come in and begin working for me at once."
So she let in the three women, and queer little figures they
looked, and cleared a space for them in the first room. They
sat down and began their spinning; the first drew out the thread
and turned the wheel, the second moistened the thread, and the
third twisted it, striking with her fingers on the table, and every
time she did this a beautiful skein of the finest spun yarn fell on
to the ground.
H7lenever the queen came the girl hid the three women, and
then showed her skein upon skein of spun yarn, till the queen
did not know how to find words enough to praise her.
As soon as the first room was empty the spinners went on to
the second, and finally to the third, which, like the others, was
very quickly cleared of the flax. Then the three women took leave
of the girl, saying to her as they parted, "Do not forget the prom-
ise you made us, for it will bring you good fortune." When the
queen w~as shown the empty rooms and the great piles of yarn,
she began at once to make preparations for the wedding. The
bridegroom was delighted to think he should have such a clever
and industrious wife, and showered his praises upon her.
"I have three cousins," said the girl, "and they have shown
me such great kindness in the past that I should not like to for-
get them, now that I am happy and prosperous. Will you give
me permission to invite them to the wedding and allow them
to sit at our table?" The queen and the bridegroom both will-
ingly consented to this request.
[Ix29 1
149 00154.jpg
GRIMM' S
The wedding-feast was beginning when in walked the three
women, attired in the most wonderful dresses. The bride greeted
them and said, "Welcome, dear cousins"; but the bridegradm
could not help exclaiming, "]How camne you to have such ugly
friends"
Then he went up to the first and asked her what had given
her such a broad foot.
"Turning the wheel," she answered.
Then he went to the second and asked what had caused her
to have such a large lip.
"Moistening the thread," she answered.
Then he ~went to the third and asked what made her thumb.
so broad.
"Twisting the thread," she answered.
"Then," cried the prince, horrified at these answers, "my
beautiful wife shall never go near a spinning-wheel again as long
as she lives." And so henceforth she was rid of the hated task
of spinning.
150 00155.jpg
FAIRY TALES
~RUMPEL-STILTS-KEN
stream of water; and upon the stream there stood a mill.
The miller's house was close by, and the miller, you must
know, had a very beautiful daughter. She was, moreover, very
shrewd and clever; and the miller was so proud of her that he one
day told the king of the land, who used to come and hunt in the
wood, that his daughter could spin gold out of straw. Now this
king was very fond of money; and when he heard the miller's
boast his greediness was raised, and he sent for the girl tot be
brought before him. Then he led her to a chamber in his palace
where there was a great heap of straw, and gave her a spinning-
wheel, and said, "All this must be spun into gold before morning,
as you love your life." It was in vain that the poor maiden said
that it was only a silly boast of her father's, for that she could
do no such thing as spin straw into gold. The chamber door was
locked, and she was left alone.
She sat down in one corner of the room and began to bewrail
her hard fate, when on a sudden the door opened and a droll-
looking little man hobbled in and said: "Good morning to you,
my good lass. What are you weeping for?~" "Alas!" said she,
[ 231]
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GRIMM' S
"I must spin this straw into gold, and I know not how." "What
will you give me," said the hobgoblin, to do it for you?" My
necklace," replied the maiden. He took her at her word, and
sat himself down to the wheel, and whistled and sang:
Round about, round about,
Lo and behold!
Reel away, reel away,
Straw into gold!"
And round about the wheel went merrily; the work was quickly
done, and the straw was all spun into gold.
When the king came and saw this, he was greatly astonished
and pleased; but his heart grew still more greedy of gain, and
he shut up the poor miller's daughter again with a fresh task.
Then she knew not what to do, and sat down once more to weep;
but the dwarf soon opened the door and said, What will you
give me to do y-our task?" "The ring on my finger," said she.
So her little friend took the ring, and began to work at the wheel
again, and whistled and sang:
"LRound about, round about,
Lo and behold!
Reel away, reel away,
Straw into gold!"
till, long before morning, all was done again.
The king was greatly deligh ted to see all this glittering treasure;
but still he had not enough; so be took the miller's daughter to
a yet larger heap, and said: "All this must be spun to-night; and
if it is you shall be my queen."' As soon as she was alone the
dwarf came in and said, "WYhat will you give me to spin gold
for you this third time I have nothing left," said she. "Then
say you will give me," said the little man, "the first little child
that you may have when you are queen." "That may never
be," thought the miller's daughter; and as she knew no other way
to get her task done, she said she would do what be asked.
152 00157.jpg
11
"WHAT WILL YOU GIVE ME TO DO IT FOR Y.OU ?" SAID THE HOBGOBLIN f
153 00158.jpg
154 00159.jpg
FAIRY TALES
Round went the w\he~el again to the old song, and the manikin
once more spun the heap into gold. The kring came in the
morning, and, finding all he wanted, was forced to keep his
word; so be married the miller's daughter and she really became
queen.
At the birth of her first little child she was very glad, and
forgot the dwarf and what she had said. But one day he came
into her room, where she was sitting playing with her baby, and
put her in mind of it. Then she grieved sorely at her misfort-
une, and said she would give him all the wealth of the kingdom
if' he would let her off, but in vain, till at last her tears softened
him and he said, "I will give you three days' grace, and if during
that time you tell me my name you shall keep your child."
Now the queen lay awake all night, thinking of all the odd
names that she had ever heard; and she sent messengers all over
the land to find out new ones. The next day the little man came,
and she began with Timothy, Ichabod, Benjamin, Jeremiah, and
all the names she could remember; but to all and each of them
he said, Madam, that is not my name."
The second day she began with all the comical names she
could hear of: Bandy-legs, Hunchback, Crook-shanks, and so
on; but the little gentleman still said to every one of them,
"LMadam, that is not my name."
The third day one of the messengers caime back and said: I
traveled two days without hearing of any other names; but
yesterday, as I was climbing a high bill, among the trees of the
forest where the fox and the hare bid each other good night, I
saw a little but; and before the but burnt a tGre; and round about
the fire a funny little dwrarf wvas dancing upon one leg and
smngmg :
"'M~errily the feast I'll make.
To-day I'll brew, to-morrow bake;
Merrily I'll dance and sing,
For next day wrill a stranger bring.
Little does my lady dream
Rumpel-stilts-ken is my name"'"
11351
155 00160.jpg
G~RIMM M S
When the queen heard this she jumped for joy, and as soon
as her little friend came she sat down upon her throne and called
all her court round to enjoy the fun; and the nurse stood by her
side with the baby in her arms, as if it was quite ready to be
given up. Then the little man began to chuckle at the thought
of having the poor child, to take home with him to his but in
the woods, and he cried out, "Now, lady, what is my name?"
"Is it John?"' asked she. "No, madam!"' "Is it Tom?" "No,
madam!" "Is it Jemmy?" "It is not." "Can your name be
Rumpel-stilts-ken?" said the lady, slyly. "Some witch told you
that! some witch told you that!" cried the little man, and dashed
his right foot in a rage so deep into the floor that he was forced
to lay hold of it with both hands to pull it out.
Then he made the best of his way off, while the nurse laughed
and the baby crowded, and all the court jeered at him for having
had so much trouble for nothing, and said, "WVe wish you a very
good morning, and a merryl least, Mr. Rumpel-stilts-ken!"
156 00161.jpg
[137 ]
TA LES
FAIRY
157 00162.jpg
GRIM M'S
that some blood fell on to the spindle, and as the girl stooped
over the well to wash it off, the spindle suddenly sprang out of
her hand and fell into the well. She ran home crying to tell
of her misfortune, but her stepmother spoke harshly to her, and
after giving her a violent scolding, said, unkindly, "As you have
let the spindle fall into the well, you may go yourself and fetch it
out.")
The girl went back to the weUl, not knowing what to do, and
at last in her distress she jumped into the water after the spindle.
She remembered nothing more until she awoke and found her-
self in a beautiful meadow, full of sunshine, and with countless
flowers blooming in every direction.
She walked over the meadow, and presently she came upon a
baker's oven full of bread, and the loaves cried out to her: "Take
us out, take us out, or, alas! we shall be burned to a cinder; we
were baked through long ago." So she took the bread-shovel
and drew them all out.
She went on a little farther, till she came to a tree full of apples.
"Shake me, shake me, I pray," cried the tree; "my apples, one
and all, are ripe." So she shook the tree, and the apples cante
falling down upon her like rain; but she continued shaking until
there was not a single apple left upon it. Then she carefully
gathered the apples together in a heap and wIalked on again.
The next thing she came to was a little house, and there she
saw an old woman looking out, with such large teeth that she
was terrified and turned to run away. But the old woman
called after her: "What are you afraid of, dear child ? Stay with
me; if you will. do the wopork of my house properly for me I will
make you very happy. You must be very careful, however, to
make my bed in the right way, for I wish you always to shake it
thoroughly, so that the feathers fly about; then they say, down
there in the wPorld, that it is snowing; for I am Mother Holle."
The old woman spoke so kindly that the girl summoned up cour-
age and agreed to enter into her service.
She took care to do everything according to the old woman's
[138 ]
158 00163.jpg
FAIRY TALES
bidding, and every time she made the bed she shook it with all
her might, so that the feathers flew about like so many snow-
flakes. The old woman was as good as her word; she never spoke
angrily to her, and gave her roast and boiled meats every day.
So she stayed on with Mother Holle for some time, and then
she began to grow unhappy. She could not at first tell why she
felt sad, but she became conscious at last of great longing to go
home; then she knew she was homesick, although she was a
thousand times better off with Mother Holle than with her
mother and sister. After waiting awhile she went to Mother
Holle and said, "I am so homesick that I cannot stay wocith you
any longer, for although I am so happy here, I must return to
my own people."
Then Mother Holle said, "I am pleased that you should want
to go back to your own people, and as you have served me so
well and faithfully I will take you home myself."
Thereupon she led the girl by the hand up to a broad gateway.
The gate was opened, and as the girl passed through, a shower of
gold fell upon her, and the gold clung tidl to her, so that she was
covered with it from, head to foot.
"That is a reward for your industry,"'said Mother Holle,
and as she spoke she handed her the spindle which she had dropped
into the well.
The gate was then closed, and the girl found herself back in
the old world close to her mother's house. As she entered the
courtyard the cock, who was perched on the well, called ouit:
Cock-a-doodledoo!
Your golden daughter's come back to you."
Then she went in to her mother and sister, and as she was so
richly covered with gold they gave her a warm welcome. She
related to them all that had happened, and when the mother
heard how she had come by her great riches she thought she
should like her ugly, lazy daughter to go and try her fortune.
So she made the sister go and sit by the well and spin, and the
girl pricked her finger and thrust her hand into a thorn-bush
159 00164.jpg
GRIM M' S
so that she might drop some blood on to the spindle; then she
threw it into the well, and jumped in herself.
Like her sister, she awoke in the beautiful meadow, and walked
ovei- it till she came to the oven. ''Take us out, take us out, or,
alas t we shall be burned to a cinder; we were baked through long
ago," cried the loaves, as before. But the lazy girl answered, "Do
you think I am going to dirty my hands for you?" and walked on.
Presently she came to the apple-tree. "Shake me, shake me,
I pray; my apples, one and all, are ripe," it cried. But she only
answ7pered, "A nice thing to ask me to do; one of the apples might
fall on my head," and passed on.
At last she came to Mother Holle's house, and as she had heard
all about the large teeth from her sister, she' was not afraid of
them, and engaged herself without delay to the old woman.
The first day she was very: obedient and industrious, and
exerted herself to please Mother Holle, for she thought of the
gold she should get in return. The next day, however, she began
to dawdle over her work, and the third day she wcas -more idle
still; then she began to lie in bed in the mornings and refused
to get up. Worse still, she neglected to make the old woman's
bed properly, and forgot to shake it so that the feathers might
fly about. So Mother Holle very soon got tired of her and told
her she might go. The lazy girl was delighted at this, and
thought to herself, "The gold will soon be mine." Mother Holle
led her, as she had her sister, to the broad gateway; but as she
was passing through, instead of the shower of gold, a great
bucketful of pitch came -pouring over her.
"!That is in return for your services," said the old woman,
and she shut the gate.
So the lazy girl had to go home covered with pitch, and the
cock on the well called out as he saw her:
Cock-a`-doodle-doo l
Your dirty daughter's come back to you."
But, try what she would, she could not get the pitch off, and
it stuck to her as long as she lived.
1 z40 ]
160 00165.jpg
FAIRY TALES
THE NOSE-TREE
DID you ever hear the story of the three poor soldiers who,
after having fought hard in the wars, set out on their
road home, begging their way as they went?
They had journeyed on a long way, sick at heart with their bad
luck at thus being turned loose on the world in their old days, when
one evening they reached a deep, gloomy wood, through which
lay their road. Night came fast upon them, and they found
that they must, however unwillingly, sleep in this wood; so, to
make all as safe as they could, it wras agreed that two should lie
down and sleep, while a third sat up and watched, lest wild
beasts should break in and tear them to pieces. When he was
tired he was to wake one of the others, and sleep in his turn;
and so on with the third, so as to share the work fairly among
them.
The two who were to rest first soon lay down and fell fast
asleep; and the other made himself a good fire under the trees,
and sat down by its side to keep watch. He had not sat long
before, all on a sudden, up came a little dwarf in a red jacket.
"W'ho is there?" said he. "A friend," said the soldier. "What
sort of a friend ?" "An old broken soldier," said the other, "with
his two comrades, who have nothing left to live on. Come, sit
[ 141]
161 00166.jpg
GRIM M' S
down and warm yourself." "Well, my worthy fellow," said the
little man, "I will do what I can for you, take this and show it
to your comrades in the morning." So he took out an old cloak
and gave it to the soldier, telling him that whenever he put it
over his shoulders anything that he wished for would be done
for him. Then the little man made a bow and walked away.
The second soldier's time to watch soon came, and the first
laid him dowPn to sleep; but the second man had not sat by him-
self long before up came the dwarf in the red jacket again. The
soldier treated him in as friendly a way as his comrade had done,
and the little man gave him a purse, which he told him would be
always full of gold, let him draw as much as he would out of it.
Then the third soldier's turn to watch came, and he also hid
little Red-jacket for his guest, who gave him a wonderful horn,
that drewcc crowds around it whenever it was played, and made
every one forget his business to come and dance to its beautiful
THus1C.
In the morning each told his story and showed the gift he had
got from the elf, and as they all liked one another very much, and
were old friends, they agreed to travel together to see the world,
and, for a while, only to make use of the wonderful purse. And
thus they spent their time very joyously, till at last they began
to be tired of this roving life, and thought they should like to
'have a home of their own. So the first soldier put his old cloak
on, and wished for a fine castle. In a moment it stood before
their eyes: fine gardens and green lawns spread round it, and
flocks of sheep, and goats, and herds of oxen were grazing about;
and out of the gate came a grand coach with three dapple-gray
horses, to meet them and bring them home.
All this was very well for a time, but they found it would not
do to stay at home always; so they got together all their rich
clothes and jewels and money and ordered their coach with
three dapple-gray horses, and set out on a journey to see a
neighboring king. Now this king had an only daughter, and as
he sa~w the three soldiers traveling in such grand style, he took
[142 ]
162 00167.jpg
FAIRY TALES
them for kings'. sons, and so gave them a kind welcome. One
day, as the second soldier was walking with the princess, she
saw that he had the wonderful purse in his hand. Then she asked
him what it was, and he was foolish enough to tell her--though,
indeed, it did not much signify what he said, for she was a fairy
and knew all the wonderful things that the three soldiers brought.
Now this princess: was very cunning and artful; so she set to
work and made a purse, so like the soldier's that no one would
know one from the other; and then she asked him to come and
see her, and made him drink some wine that she had got ready
for him, and which soon made him fall fast asleep. Then she
felt in his pocket: and took; away the wonderful purse and left
the one she had made in its place.
The next morning the soldiers set out home; and soon after
they reached their castle, happening to want some money, they
went to their purse for it, and found something indeed in it;
but to their great sorrow, when they had emptied it, none came
in the place of what they~ took. Then the cheat was soon found
out, for the second soldier knew where he had been and how he
had told the story to the princess, and he guessed that she had
played him a trick. "Alas!" cried he, "poor wretches that we
are, what shall we do?" "Oh!" said the tGrst soldier, "let no
gray) hairs grow for thiss mishap; I will soon get the purse back."
So be threw his cloak across his shoulders anch wished himself in
che princess's chamber.
There he found her sitting alone, telling up her gold that fell
around her in a shower from the wonderful purse.
But the soldier stood looking at her too long; for she turned
round, and the moment she saw him she started up and cried
out with all her force: "Thieves! thieves!" so that the whole
court came running in and tried to seize on hnim. The poor sol-
dier now began to be dreadfully frightened in his turn, and thought
it was high time to make the best of his way off; so, without
thinking of the ready way of traveling that his cloak gave him,
he ran to the window, opened it, and jumped out; and, un-
io I I43 1
163 00168.jpg
GRIMclI MS
luckily in his hasce, his cloak caught and was left hanging, to
the great joy of the princess, who knew its worth.
The poor soldier made the best of his way home to his com-
rades on foot, and in a very downcast mood; but the third sol-
dier told him to keep up his heart and took his born and blew a
merry tune. At the first blast a1 countless troop of foot and horse
come rushing to their aid, and they set out to make war against
their enemy;. Then the king's palace was besieged, and he was
told that he must give up the purse and cloak, or that not one
stone should be left upon another. And the king went into his
daughter's chamber and talked with her; but she said, "Let me
tryr first if I cannot beat them some way or another." So she
thought of a cunning scheme to overreach them; and dressing
herself out as a poor girl, with a basket on her arm, she set out
by night with her maid and went into the enemy's camp, as if
she wanted to sell trinkets.
In the morning she began to ramble about singing ballads so
beautifully that all the tents were left empty, and the soldiers
ran round in crowds, and thought of nothing but hearing her sing.
Among the rest came the soldier to whom the horn belonged,
and as soon as she saw him she winked to her maid, who slipped
slyly through the crowd and went into his tent where it hung,
and stole it awray. This done, they both got safely back to the
palace, the besieging army went away, the three wonderful gifts
were all left in the hands of the princess, and the three soldiers
were as penniless and forlorn as when little Red-jackec found
them in the wood.
Poor fellows! they' began to think what was now to be done.
"Comrades," at last said the second soldier, who had had the
purse, "we had better part; we cannot live together. Let each
seek; his bread as well as he can." So be turned to the right,
and the other two went to the left, for they said they would
rather travel together. Then on the second soldier strayed till
he came to a wood (now this was the same wood where they had
met with so much good luck before), and he walked on a long
164 00169.jpg
CJ
Ls
CC i:i
;:i4
t
c3 _~
~ i?
.%
:::
r .i
,,
:a
SO TH~EY TRACED IT UP, TILL AT LAST THEY FOUND THEIR POOR COMRAI~DE
165 00170.jpg
0 1 1%
166 00171.jpg
FAIRY TALES
time till evening began to fall, when he sat down tired beneath
a tree, and soon fell asleep.
Morning dawned, and he was greatly delighted, at opening
his eyes, to see that the tree was laden with the most beautiful
apples. He was hungry enough, so be soon plucked and ate
first one, then a second, then a third apple. A strange feeling
came over his nose; when he put the apple to his mouth some-
thing was in the way. He felt it--it was his nose, that grew and
grew till it hung down to his breast. It did not stop there--still
it grew and grew. "Heavens!" thought he, "when will it have
done growing?" And well might he ask, for by this time it
reached the ground as he sat on the grass--and thus it kept
creeping on, till he could not bear its weight or raise himself up;
and it seemed as if it would never end, for already it stretched
its enormous length all through the wood, over hill and dale.
Meanwhile his comrades were journeying on, till on a sudden
one of them stumbled against something. "What can that be?"
said the other. They looked and could think of nothing that it
was like but a nose. "We wicill follow it and find its owner, how-
ever," said they. So they traced it up, till at last they found
their poor comrade, lying stretched along under the apple-tree.
What was to be done? They tried to carry him, but in vain,
They caught an ass that was passing, and raised him upon its
back; but it was soon tired of carrying such a load. So they sat
down in despair, when before long up came their old friend the
dwarf with the red jacket. "Why, ho~w now, friend?" said he,
laughing. "Well, I must find a cure for you, I see." So he told
them to gather a pear from another tree that grew7 close by, and
the nose wPould come right again. No time was lost; and the
nose was soon brought to its proper size, to the poor soldier's
30y~.
I will do something more for you yet,"' said the dwarf. "Take
some of those pears and apples with you; whoever eats one
of the apples will have his nose grodr like yours just now; but
if you give him a pear, all will come right again. Go to the prin--
[I47 1
167 00172.jpg
GRIMMPv'S
cess and get her to eat some of your apples; her nose will grow
tw~entyr times as long as y-ours did; then look sharp, and you will
get what y-ou wvant from her."
Then the!- thanked their old friend ve~ry heartily for all his
kindness; and it wvas agreed that the poor soldier w\ho had al-
ready tried the power of the apple should undertake the task.
So he dressed himself up as a gardener's boy, and w'ent to the
king's palace, and said he had apples to sell, so I~ne and so beau-
tiful as were never seen there before. Every one that saw them
was delighted and wanted to taste; but he said they; were only
for the princess; and she soon sent her maid to buy his stock.
They were so ripe and rosy that she soon began eating; and had
not eaten above a dozen before she too began to w~onde~r what
ailed her nose, for it grew aind grew down to the ground, out at
the window, and over the garden, and away, nobody knows where.
Then the king made known to all his kingdom, that whoever
would heal her of this dreadful disease should be richly- rewarded.
Many tried, but the princess got no relief. And now the old sol-
dier dressed himself up very sprucely as a doctor, and said he
could cure her. So be chopped up some of the apple, and, to
punish her a little more, gave her a dose, saying he would call
to-morrow and see her again. The morrow came, and, of course,
instead of being better, the nose hald been growing on all night
as before, and the poor princess was in a dreadful fright. So
the doctor then chopped up a very little of the pear and gave
her, and said he was sure that would do good, and he would call
again the next day. Next day came, and the nose was, to be
sure, a little smaller, but yet it was bigger than when the doctor
first began to meddle with it.
Then he thought to himself, "IT must frighten this cunning
princess a little more before I shall get what I want from her";
so he gave her another dose of the apple and said he would call
on the~ morrow. The morrow came and the nose was ten times
as bad as before. "1\ly good lady,") said the doctor, "something
works against my medicine and is too strong for it; but I know
168 00173.jpg
FAIRY TALE S`
by the force of my art what it is: you hav;e scolen goods about
you, I am sure; and if you do not give them back, I can do nothing
for you." But the princess denied very stoutly that she had
anything of the kind. "Y \ery well,"' said the doctor, "y!ou may
do as you please, but I am sure I am right, and !-ou will die if
y'ou do not own it."' Then he w~ent to the king and told him how
the matter stood. "Daughter," said he, "send back the cloak,
the purse, and the horn that y-ou stole from the right owners."
Then she ordered her maid to fetch all three, and gave them
to the doctor, and begged him to give them back to the soldiers;
and the moment he had them safe he gave her a whole pear to
eat, and the nose came right. And as for the doctor, he put on
the cloak, wished the king and all his court a good day, and
was soon with his two brothers, who lIved from that time hap-
pily at home in their palace, except when they took an airing to
see the world in their coach with the three dapple-gray horses.
169 00174.jpg
GRIMM' S
THE GOSE-GIR
T HE kng ofa gret lad die and eft is. quent tk
care of thi nycid hschl a agtr h
wa vrybauifl;ad ermohr ovd e dary n
wa vrykid o er Ad hee asa oo fir, oo wo a
fodofte rnes ndhledhr ohr o athoerhr.W e
she rewup he as errohedto prncewho ive a rea wa
of;an s h tm de na frhe o emaredse o
e ch ad f hoire forl~ the oune. Nows the ricsssho was agtr h
t he fairy' gif, a rand itwa cledFld, and Ircohs uld speak.
When ther tiecame for; a h them tostout, ther fairy went n
she re bedchamer ;an erd too a itl krnie andh cut of a lockt of he
hair, and gaeitt the pie riwnesando hrt said "Taked cae go t,
dearcld; for it isf n charmjur t hat ma be of usen toe ou on th
roh ad" The hrey all th ooke~ a orrwu laeo the princessshrs a
the~~~~~~~~~ 150~' ]it n twscle Fldadcudse
170 00175.jpg
FAIRY TALES
and she put the lock of hair into her bosom, got upon her horse,
and set off on her journey to her bridegroom's kingdom.
One day, as they were riding along by a brook, the princess
began to feel very thirsty, and she said to her maid, "Pray get
down and fetch me some water in my golden cup out of yonder
brook, for I w\ant to drink." "Nay," said the maid, "'if you are
thirsty, get off yourself and stoop down by the water and drink;
I shall not be your waiting-maid any longer." Then she was so
thirsty that she got down and knelt over the little brook, and
drank; for she w~as frightened and dared not bring out her golden
cup, and she wept and said: "Alas! what will become of me?"
And the lock answered her, and said:
"Alas! alas! if thy mother knew it,
Sadly, sadly would she rue it."
But the princess was very gentle and meek, so she said nothing
to her maid's ill behavior, but got upon her horse again.
Then all rode farther on their journey, till the day grew so
warm and the sun so scorching that the bride began to feel
very thirsty again; and at last, when they came to a river she
forgot her maid's rude speech, and said, "Pray get down and
fetch me some water to drink in my golden cup." But the maid
answered her, and even spoke more haughtily than before,
" Drink if you will, but I shall not be your waiting-maid." Then
the princess was so thirstyl that she got off her horse and lay
down and held her head ov-er the running stream, and cried and
said, What will become of mei" And the lock of hair answered
her again:
"Alast alast if thy mother knew it,
Sadly, sadly would she rue it "
And as she leaned down to drink the lock of hair fell from her
bosom and floated away with the water. Now she was so fright-
ened that she did not see it; but her maid saw it and was very
glad, for she knew the charm; and she saw that the poor bride
171 00176.jpg
GRIM M' S
would be in her power, now that she had lost the hair. So when
the bride had done drinking, and would have got upon Falada
again, the maid said, "I shall ride upon Faladal, and you may
have my~ horse instead"; so she was forced to give up her horse,
and soon afterward to take off her royal clothes and put on her
maid's shabby ones.
At last, as they drew near the end of their journey, this treach-
erous servant threatened to kill her mistress if she ever cold any
one what had happened. But Falada saw it all and marked
it well.
Then the waiting-maid got upon Falada, and the real bride
rode upon the other horse, and they went on in this wayl till at
last they came to the royal court. There was great joy at their
coming, and the prince flew to meet them and lifted the maid
from her horse, thinking she was the one who wars to be his
wife, and she was led up-stairs to the royal chamber; but the
true princess was told to stay in the court below\.
Now the old king happened just then to have nothing else
to do, so he amused himself by sitting at his kitchen wrindow,
looking at what was going on; and he saw her in th~e courtyard.
As she looked very pretty, and too delicate for a wvaiting-maid,
he went up into the royal chamber to ask the bride who it was
she had brought with her, that was thus left standing in the
court below. "I brought 'her with me for the sake of her com-
pany on the road," said she; "pray give the girl some work to
do, that she may not be idle." The old king could nor for some
time think of any work for her to do; but at last he said: "I
have a lad who takes care of my geese; she may- go and help
him." Nowi the name of this lad, that the real bride wras to help
in watching the king's geese, was Curdken.
But the false bride said to the prince, "Dear husband, pray
do me one piece of kindness." "That I will,"' said the prince.
"Then tell one of your slaughterers to cut off the head of the
horse I rode upon, for it was very unruly and plagued me sadly
oin the road"; but the truth was, she was very much afraid lest
[I52]
172 00177.jpg
"FAIRY TALES
Falada should some day or other speak and tell all she had done
to the princess. She carried her point, and the faithful Falada
was killed; but wrhen the true princess heard of it she wept and
begged the man to nail up Falada's head against a large dark
gate of the city, through which she had to pass every morning
and evening, that there she might still see him sometimes. Then
the slaughterer said he w-ould do as she wished, and cut off the
head and nailed it up under the dark gate.
Early the next morning, as she and C'urdken went out through
the gate, she said, sorrowfully:
Falada, Falada, there thou hangest!"
.and the head answered:
Bride, bride, there thou gangest!
Alas5! alas! if thy mother knew it,
Sadly, sadly would she rue it."
Then they w~ent our of the city and drove the geese on. And
when she came to the meadow~ she sat down upon a bank
there and let dowvn her weaving locks of hair, wThich w~ere all of
pure silver; and w'hen Curdken sawv it glitter in the sun he ran
up and would have pulled some of the locks out, but she cried:
"' Blow, breezes, blow|
Let Curdken's hat go!
Blowr, breezes, blow!
Let him after it gol
O'er hills, dales, and rocks,
Awa~ry be it w-hirl'd
Till the silvery locks
Are all comb'd aind curl'd!"
Then there came a wind, so strong that it blew-~off Curdken's
hat, and away it flew over the hills; and he was forced to turn
and run after it, till, by the time he came back, she had done
1 as3
173 00178.jpg
GRIMM' S
combing and curling her hair and had put it up again safe. Then
he was very angry and sulky, and would not speak to her at all;
but they watched the geese until it grew dark in the evening,
and then drove them homeward.
The next morning, as they were going through the dark gate,
the poor girl looked up at Falada's head and cried:
Falada, Falada, there thou hangesdl"
and it answered:
"Bride, bride, there thou gangest!
Alas! alas! it' thy mother knew it,
Sadly, sadly would she rue it."
Then she drove on the geese, and sat down again in the meadow
and began to comb out her hair as before; and Curdken ran up
to her and wanted to take hold of it; but she cried out, quickly:
"Blow, breezes, blow
Let Curdken's hat gol
Blow, breezes, blowl
Let him after it go!
O'er hills, dales, and rocks,
Aw-ay be it whirl'd
Till the silVery locks
Are all comb'd and curl'dl"
Then the wind came and blewP away his hat; and off it flew a
great wcPay over the hills and far away, so that he had to run
after it; and when he came back she had bound up her hair
again, and all was safe. So they watched the geese till it grew
dark.
In the evening, after they came home, Curdken went to the
old king and said, "I cannot have that stritnge girl to help me
wrj keep the geese any longer." "Why?" said the king. "Be-
cause, instead of doing any good, she does nothing but tease
[ 154 1
174 00179.jpg
~T~V~r~llrc5~
~-~U~S
~+ '-~-~3~/~"
Q
L~--~L~i
THE GIRL WENT ON CORIBING AND CURLING HER HAIR
FAIRY
TALES
175 00180.jpg
176 00181.jpg
FAIRY TALES
me all day long." Then the king made himt tell him what had
happened. And Curdken said, "W'hen w-e go in the morning
through the dark gate with our flock of geese, she cries and talks
with the head of a horse that hangs upon the wall, and says:
'Faladal, Falada, there thou hangest!'
and the head answers:
Brid, bride, there thou gangest!
Alas! alas' if thy mother knew it,
Sadly,. 5adly wTould she rue it."'
And Curdken went on telling the king w~hat had happened upon
the meadow where the geese fed; how his hat was blown away,
and how he was forced to run after it and to leave his flock of
geese to themselves. But the old king told the boy to go out
again the next day; and when morning came he placed himself
behind the dark gate and heard how she spoke to Falada and
how~ Falada answered. Then he went into the field and hid
himself in a bush by the meadow's side; and he soon saw with
his own eyes howP they drove the flock of geese, and how, after
a little time, she let down her hair that glittered in the sun. And
then he heard her say:
"Blow, breezes, blow
Let Curdken's hat gol
Blow, breezes, blow!
Let him after it gol
O'er hills, dales, and rocks,
Away be it whirl'd
Till the silvery locks
Are all comb'd and curl'd!"
And soon came a gale of wind and carried away Curdken's hat,
and away went Curdken after it, while the girl went on combing
and curling her hair. All this the old king saw; so he went home
1IsI
177 00182.jpg
GRIMM'S
without being seen, and when the littlF goose-girl came back in
the evening he called her aside and asked her why she did so;
but she burst into tears and said, "That I must not tell you or
any man, or I shall lose my~life."
But the old king begged so hard that she had no peace till
she had told him all the tale, from beginning to end, word for
word. And it was very lucky for her that she did so, for when
she had done the king ordered royal clothes to be put upon her
and gazed on her with wonder, she was so beautiful. Then he
called his son and told him that he had only the false bride, for
that she was merely a waiting-maid, while the true bride stood
by. And the young king rejoiced when he saw her beauty and
heard how meek and patient she had been; and without saying
anything to the false bride the king ordered a great feast to be
got ready for all his court. The bridegroom sat at the top, with
the false princess on one side and the true one on the other;
but nobody knew her again, for her beauty was quite dazzling
to their eyes; and she did not seem at all like the little goose-
girl, now that she had her brilliant dress on.
When they had eaten and drank and were very merry, the
old king said he would tell them a tale. So he began and told
all the story of the princess, as if it was one that he had once
heard; and he asked the true waiting-maid what she thought
ought to be done to any one who would behave thus. "Nothing
better," said this false bride, "than that she should be thrown
into a cask stuck round with sharp nails, and that two white
horses should be put to it, and should drag it from, street to
street till she was dead." "Thou art she!" said the old king;
"and as thou hast judged thyself, so shall it be done to thee."
And the young king was then married to his true wife, and they
reigned over che kingdom in peace and happiness all their lives;
and the good fairy camne to see them and restored the faithful
Falada to life again.
178 00183.jpg
"FAIRY TALES
FAITHFUL JOHN
AN old king fell sick; and when he found his end drawing
linear, he said, "Let faithful John come to me." Now
Faithful John was the servant that he was fondest of, and,
was. so called because he had been true to his master all his life
long. Then when he came to the bedside, the king said: "M~y
Faithful John, I feel that my end draws nigh, anid I have now
no cares save for my son, who is still young and stands in need
of good counsel. I have no friend to leave him but you; .if
you do not pledge yourself to teach him, all he should know, and
to be a father to him, I shall not shut my eyes in peace." Then
John said, "I will never leave him, but wpill serve him faithfullyi,
even though it should cost me my life." And the king said: "I
shall nowp die in peace; after my death showp him the whole
palace; all the rooms and vaults, and all the treasures and
stores which lie there; but take care how you show him one
room--I mean the one where hangs the picture of the daughter
of the king of the golden roof. If he sees it he will fall deeply
in love with her, and will thaen be plunged into great dangers on
her account; guard him in this peril." And when Faithful John
I159]
179 00184.jpg
GRIMM' S
had once more pledged his word to the old king, he laid his head
on his pillowv and died in peace.
Now when the old king had been carried to his grave, Faithful
John told the young king wrhat had passed upon his death-bed,
and said, "I will keep my~ word truly, and be faithful to you as
I wa3s always to your father, though it should cost me: my' life."
And the young king wept, and said, "Neither wvill I ever forget
your faithfulness."
The day-s of mourning passed aw~ay, and then Faithful John
said to his master: "It is now time that you should see your
heritage; I will show you your father's palace." Then he led
him about e~verywhere, up and dow~n, and let him see all the
riches and all the costly rooms; only one room, where the picture
stood, he did not open. Now the picture wa~s so placed that the
moment the door opened you could see it, and it was so beauti-
fully done that one would think it breathed and had life, and
that there was nothing more lovely in the whole world. W'hen
the young king saw that Faithful John always went by; this door,
he said, "W~hy do y~ou not open that room.>" "iThere is some-
thing inside," he answered, whichh would frighten you."' But
the king said, "I have seen the whole palace, and I must also
see what is in there"; and he we;nt and began to force the door;
but Faithful John held him back and said, "I gave my wrord to
your father, before his death, that I would take heed hiow I
showed you what stands in that room, lest it should lead yiou
and me into great trouble."' "The greatest trouble to me," said
the king, "will be not to go in and see the room; I shall have no
peace by day or by night until I do; so I shall not go hence until
youl operi it."
Then Faithful John saw that with all he could do or say the
young king would have his way~; so, witch a hleavy\ heart and
many foreboding sighs, he sollght for the key! out of his great
bunch, and he opened the door of the room, and entered in
first, so as to stand between the kin; and the picture, hoping he
might not see it; but he raised himself upon tiptoes and looked
( 260 ]
180 00185.jpg
I~
AS SOON AS HE SAWV THE LIKENESS OF THE LADY
HE FELL DOWN UPON THE: FLOOR SENSELESS
FA I R Y
T A LE:
181 00186.jpg
i'
'j
182 00187.jpg
FAIR Y TALES
over John's shoulders; and as soon as he saw the likeness of the
lady, so beautiful and shining with gold, he fell down upon the
floor senseless. Then Faithful John lifted him up in his arms
and carried him to his bed, and was full of care, and thought to
himself: "This trouble has come upon us. O Heav~en! what will
come of it?"
At last the king came to himself again; but the first thing that
he said was, "Whose is that beautiful picture?" "'It is the
picture of the daughter of the king of the golden roof," said
Faithful John. But the king went on, saying: My~ love toward
her is so great that if all the leaves on the trees were tongues,
they could not speak it. I care not to risk my life to win her;
you are my faithful friend, you must aid me."
Then John thought for a long time what was now to be done;
and at last said to the king: "All that she has about her is of
gold; the tables, stools, cups, dishes, and all the things in her
house are of gold; and she is alwPays seeking new treasures. Now
in your stores there is much gold; let it be worked up into every
kind of vessel, and into all sorts of birds, wild beasts, and won-
derful animals; then we will take it and try our fortunes." So
the king ordered all the goldsmiths to be sought for; and they
worked day and night until at last the most beautiful things
were made; and Faithful John had a ship loaded with them,
and put on a merchant's dress, and the king did the same, that
they might not be known.
When all was ready they put out to sea, and sailed till they
came to the coast of the land where the king of the golden roof
reigned. Faithful John told the king to stay in the ship and
waic for him. "For perhaps," said he, "I may be able to bring
away the king's daughter with me; therefore take care that
everything be in order; let the golden vessels and ornaments
be brought forth and the whole ship be decked out with them."
And he chose out something of each of the golden things to put
into his basket, and got ashore and went toward the king's palace.
And when he came to the castle yard there stood by the wellside
( z63 ]
183 00188.jpg
GRIM M' S
a beautiful maiden, who had two golden pails in her hand, draw.
ing water. And as she drew up the water, which was glittering
with gold, she turned herself round and saw the stranger, and
asked him who he was. Then he drew near and said, "I am a
merchant," and opened his basket and let her look into it; and
she cried out: "Oh! what beautiful things!"' and set down her
pails and looked at one after the other. Then she said: "The
king's daughter must see all these; she is so fond of such things
that she will buy all of you." So she took him by the hand and
led him in, for she was one of the waiting-maids of the daughter
of the king.
When the princess saw the wares she was greatly pleased,
and said, "They are so beautiful that I will buy them all." But
Faithful John said: "I am only the servant of a rich merchant;
what I have here is nothing to w~hat he has lIng in yonder ship;
there he has the finest and most cosjtly things that ever were
:~made in gold." The princess wanted to have them all brought
ashore, but he said: "That would take up many days, there are
such a number; and much more rooms would be wranted to place
them in than are in the greatest house." But her wish to see
them grew still greater, and at last she said, "Take me to the
ship; I will go myself and look at your master's wares."
Then Faithful John led her joyfully to the ship, and the king,
when he saw her, thought that his heart would leap out of his
breast; and it was with the greateste trouble that he kept himself
still. So she got into the ship and the king led her down; but
Faithful John stayed behind wc3ith the steersman and ordered the
ship to put off. "Spread all your sail," cried he, "that she may
fly over the waves like a bird~ through the air."
And the king showed the princess the golden wares, each one
singly: the dishes, cups, basins, and the wild and wonderful
beasts; so that many hours flew awfay, and she looked at every
thing with delight, and was not aware that the ship was sailing
away. And after she had looked at the last she thanked the
merchant and said she would go home; but when she came
rI 16
184 00189.jpg
FAIRY TALES
upon the deck she saw that the ship was sailing far away from
land upon the deep sea, and that it flew along at full sail. "Alas!"
she cried out in her fright, "I am betrayed; I am carried off, and
have fallen into the power of a rovi;ng trader; I would sooner
have died."' Bu*- then the king took her by the hand and said:
"'I am not a me. nant, I am a king, and of as noble birth as
you. I have taken you away by stealth, but I did so because of
the very great love I have for y-ou; for the first time that I
saw your face I fell on the ground in a swoon."' W~hen the
daughter of the king of the golden roof heard all, she was com-
forted, and her heart soon turned toward him and she was will-
ing to become his w~ife~.
But it so happened that while they were sailing on the deep
sea, Faithful John, as he sat on the pro~w of the ship playing on
his Bute, saw three ravens flying in the air toward him. Then
he left off playing and listened to what they said to one another,
for he understood their tongu'e. The first said: "There he goes!
he is bearing away the daughter of the king of the golden roof.
Let him go!" "Nay," said the second, "there he goes, but he
.has not got her yet." And the third said: "There he goes; he
surely has her, for she is sitting by his side in the ship." Then
the first began again, and cried out: "What boots it to him?
See you not that when they come to land, a horse of a foxy-red
color will spring toward him; and then, he will try to get upon
it, and if he does, it will spring awpay with him into the air, so
that he wi-ll never see his love again." "True! true!" said the
second, "but is there no help?" "Oh yes, yes!" said the first;
"if he w~ho sits upon the horse takes the dagger which is stuck
in the saddle and strikes him dead, the young king is saved; but
who knows that? and who will tell him, that he who thus saves
the king's life will turn to stone from the toes of his feet to his
knee?"' Th~en the second said: "True! true but I know more
-till; though the horse be dead, the king loses his bride; when
the go together into the palace there lies the bridal dress on
the couch, and looks as if it were woven of gold and silver, but
1 165 I
185 00190.jpg
GRIMM' S
it is all brimstone and pitch; and if he puts it on, it will burn
him, marrow and bones." "Alas! alas! is there no help?"
said the third. "Oh yes, yes!" said the second, "if some one
draws near and throws it into the fire the young king will be
saved. But what boots that? WYho knows nd will1 tell him
-that, if he does, his body from the knee to b~e heart will be
turned to stone?" More! more! I know more," said the third;
"were the dress burned, still the king loses his bride. After the
wedding, when the dance begins, and the young queen dances on,
she will turn pale, and fall as though she were dead; and if some
one does not draw near and lift her up and take from her right
breast three drops of blood, she will surely die. But if any one
knew this, he would tell him that if he does do so his body will
turn to stone from the crown of his head to the tip of his toe."
Then the ravens flapped their wings and flew on; but Faithful
John, who had understood it all, from that time was sorrowful,
and did not tell his master what he had heard; for he saw if he
told him he must himself lay down his life to save him; at last
he said to himself, "I will be faithful to my word and save my
master, if it costs me my life."
Now when they came to land it happened just as the ravens
had foretold; for there sprang out a fine foxy-red horse. See,"
said the king, ~"he shall bear me to my palace"; and he tried to
mount, but Faithful John leaped before him and swung himself
quickly upon it, drew the dagger, and smote the horse dead.
Then the other servants of the king, who were jealous of Faith-
ful John, cried out, "What a shame to kill the fine beast that
wPas to take the king to his palace!" But the king said: "Let
him alone, it is my Faithful John; who knows but he did it for
some good end ?"
Then they went on to the castle, and there stood a couch in
one room, and a fine dress lay upon it, that shone with gold
and silver; an~d the young king went up to it to take hold of it,
but Faithful John cast it on the fire and burned it. And the other
servants began again to grumble, and said, "See, now he is burn-
[ z66 ]
186 00191.jpg
FAIRY TALES
ing the wedding-dress." But the king said: "Who knows what
he does it for? L~et him alone! He is my faithful servant
Joh n."'
Then the wedding-feast was held, and the dance began, and
the bride also came in; but Faithful John took good heed and
looked in her face; and on a sudden she turned pale and fell
as though she were dead upon the ground. But he sprang tow-
ard her quickly, lifted her up, and took; her and laid her upon
a couch and drew three drops of blood from her right breast.
And she breathed again and came to herself. But the young
king had seen all, and did not know7 why Faithful John had done
it; so he was angry at his boldness, and said, "Throw him into
prSnson.
The next morning Faithful John was led forth and stood upon
the gallows, and said, "May I speak out before I die?" and
when the king answered, "It shall be granted thee," he said, "I
am wrongly judged, for I have always been faithful and true";
and then he told what he heard the ravens say upon the sea, and
how he meant to save his master and had therefore done all
these things.
When he had told all the king called out: "'Oh, my most faith-
ful John! pardon! pardon! take him down!" But Faithful
John had fallen down lifeless at the last word he spoke, and
lay as a stone; and the king and queen mourned over him;
and the king said, "Oh, how ill have I rewarded thy truth!"
And he ordered the stone figure to be taken up and placed in
his own room near to his bed; and as often as he locked at it
he wPept and said, "Oh, that I could bring thee back to life again,
my Faithful John!"
After a time the queen had two little sons, who grewP up and
were her great joy. One day, when she was at church, the two
children stayed with her father; and as they played about he
looked at the stone figure and sighed, and cried out, "Oh, that
I could bring thee back to life, my~ Faithful Jolml" Then the
stone began to speak, and said: "O kingl thou canst bring me
[ 167 ]
187 00192.jpg
G~RIM MI' S
back to life if thou wilt give up for my sake what is dearest to
thee." But the king said, "All that I have in the world would
I give up for thee."' "Then,"' said the stone, "cut off the heads
of thy children, sprinkle their blood ov;er me, and I shall live
again." Then the king was greatly shocked; but he thought
how Faithful John had died for his sake and because of his
great truth toward him; and rose up and drew his sword to cut:
off his children's heads and sprinkle the stone with their blood;
but the moment he drew his sw~ord Faithful John was alive again,
and stood before his face and said, "Your truth is rewarded."
And the children sprang about and played as if nothing had
happened.
Then the king was full of joy; and when he saw the queen
coming, to try her, he put Faithful John and the two children
in a large closet; and when she came in he said to her, "Have
you been at church?"' "Y'es," said she, "buc I could not help
thinking of Faithful John, who was so true to us.''" "Dear wife,"
said the king, "wT~e can bring him back to life again, but it will
cost us both our little sons, and we must giv~e them up for his
sake." W'hen the queen heard this she turned pale and was
frightened in her heart; but she said: "Let it be so; we owe him
all, for his great faith and truth." Then he rejoiced because she
thought as he had thought, and went in and opened the closer,
and brought out the children and Faithful John, and said:
"Heaven be praised! he is ours again, and we have our sons
safe, too." So he told her the whole story; and all lived happily
together the rest of their hves.
188 00193.jpg
FAIRY TALES
THE SVEN AVEN
T HER was oneamnwohdsvn os n to l
SoER h athrsen one mwof his sons n hstes tn atof thespi
to get some water, but the other six ran with him. Each wanted
to be first at drawing the ~water, and so they were in such
a hurry that all let their pitchers fall into the well, and they
stood very foolishly looking at one another, and did not know
what to do, for none dared go home. In the mean time the
father was uneasy and could not tell what made the young
men stay so long. "Surely," said he, "the whole seven must
have forgotten themselves over some game of play." And
when he had waited still longer and they yet did not~come, he
flew into a rage and wished them all turned into ravens. Scarcely
had he spoken these words when he heard a croaking over his
head, and looked up and saw seven ravens as black as coals
flying round and round. Sorry as he was to see his wish so ful-
filled, he did not know how what was done could be undone, and
comforted himself as well as he could for the loss of his seven
sons with his dear little daughter, who soon became stronger
and every day more beautiful.
For a long time she did not know that she had ever had any
brothers, for her father and mother took care not to speak of
I 169
189 00194.jpg
GRIMM' S
them before her; but one day by chance she heard the people
about her speak of them. "Yes," said they, "she is beautiful
indeed, but still 'tis a pity that her brothers should have been
lost for her sake." Then she was much grieved, and went to
her father and mother and asked if she had any brothers, and
what had become of them. So they dared no longer hide the
truth from her, but said it was the will of heaven, and that her
birth was only the innocent cause of it; but the little girl mourned
sadly about it every day, and thought herself bound to do all
she could to bring her brothers back; and she had neither rest
nor ease till at length one day she stole away and set out into
the wide world to find her brothers, wherever they might be,
and free them, whatever it might cost her.
She took nothing with her but a little ring which her father
and mother had given her, a loaf of bread in case she should be
hungry, a little pitcher of water in case she should be thirsty,
and a little stool to rest upon when she should be weary. Thus
she went on and on, and journeyed till she came to the world's
end; then she came to the sun, but the sun kjoked much too
hot and fiery; so she ran away quickly to the moon, but the
moon was cold and chilly, and said, "I smell flesh and blood this
way!" so she took herself away in a hurry and came to the stars,
and the stars were friendly and kind to her, and each star sat
upon his own little stool; but the morning star rose up and gave
her a little piece of wood, and said, "If you have not this little
piece of wood you cannot unlock the castle that stands on the
glass mountain, and there your brothers live." The little girl
took the piece of wood, rolled it up in a little cloth, and went on
again until she came to the glass mountain, and found the door
shut. Then she felt for the little piece of wood; but when she
unwrapped the cloth it was not there, and she saw she had lost
the gift of the good stars. What was to be done? She wanted
to save her brothers, and had no key of the castle of the glass
mountain; so this faithful little sister took a knife out of her
pocket and cut off her little finger, that was just the size of the
[ z70)
190 00195.jpg
FAIRY TALES
piece of wood she had lost, and put it in the door and
opened it.
As she went in a little dwarf came up to her and said, "What
are you seeking for?" "I seek for my brothers, the seven
ravens," answered she. Then aI
the dwarf said: MIy mas- I
ters are not at home; but if I.
you will wait till they come,
pray step in." Now the little
dwarf was getting their din-
ner ready, and he brought I I
their food upon seven little
plates, and their drink in
seven little glasses, and set
them upon the table, and out I~
of each little plate their sis-
ter ate a small piece, and P
out of each little glass she ;"",
drank a small drop; but she CL
let the ring that she had
brought with her fall into ,
the last glass. /
On a sudden she heard a /r
iluttering and croaking in the ./
air, and the dwarf said, "'Here comes my masters." When they
came in they wanted to eat and drink, and looked for their
little plates and glasses. Then said one after the other: "W(ho
has eaten from my little plate? And who has been drinking out
of my little glass?
"Cawl Ca~wl well Iween
Mortal lips have this way been."
When the seventh came to the bottom of his glass, and found
there the ring, he looked at it and knew~ that it was his father's
and mother's, and said: "Oh, that our little sister would but
[ 171]
191 00196.jpg
GRIMM' S
come! then wTe should be free." W~hen the little girl heard this
(for she stood behind the door all the time and listened), she
ran forward, and in an instant all the ravens took their right
form again; and all hugged and kissed each other and wrent
merrily home.
192 00197.jpg
THE THREE SLUGGARDS
liked one as well as another, and did not know which to
leave his kingdom to after his death; so when he was
dying he called them all to him. and said, "Dear children, the
laziest sluggard of the three shall be king after me." "Then," said
the eldest, "the kingdom is mine; for I am so lazy that when I
lie down to sleep, if anything were to fall into my eyes so that
I could not shut them, I should still go on sleeping." The sec-
ond said: "Father, the kingdom belongs to me; for I am so
lazy that when I sit by the fire to warm myself, I would sooner
have my toes burnt than take the trouble to draw my legs back."
The third said: "Father, the kingdom is mine; for I am so lazy
that if I were going to be hanged, with the rope round my neck,
and somebody were to put a sharp knife into my hands to cut
it, I had rather be hanged than raise my hand to do it." When
the father heard this he said: "You shall be the king; for you
are the fittest mark"
TALES
FAIRY
193 00198.jpg
GRIMM' S
~I711
194 00199.jpg
FAIRY TALES
ranged according to their rank--kings and princes and dukes
and earls and counts and barons and knights. Then the princess
came in, and as she passed by them she had something spiteful
to say to every one. The first was too fat. He's as round as a
tub," said she. The next was too tall. "What a maypole!"' said
she. The next was too short. "What a dumpling!" said she.
The fourth w~as too pale, and she called him Wallface." The
fifth was too red, so she called him "Coxcomb." The sixth was
not straight enough, so she said he w~as like a green stick that
had been laid to dry over a baker's oven. And thus she had
some joke to crack upon every one; but she laughed more than
all at a good king who was there. "Look at him," said she;
"his beard is like an old mop; he shall be called Grizzle-beard."'
So the king got the nickname of Grizzle-beard.
But the old king was very angry when he saw how his daughter
behaved and how she ill-treated all his guests; and he vowed
that, willing or unwilling, she should marry the first man, be he
prince or beggar, that came to the door.
Two days after there came by a traveling fiddler, who began
to play under the window and beg alms; and when the king
heard him he said, "Let him come in." So they brought in. a
dirty-looking fellow; and when he had sung before the king and
the princess, he begged a boon. Then the king said, "You have
sung so well that I will give you my daughter for your wife."
The princess begged and prayed; but the king said, "I have
sworn to give you to the first comer, and I will keep my word."
So words and tears were of no avail; the parson was sent for,
and she was married to the fiddler. When this was over the
king said, "'Now get ready to go--you must not stay here--you
must travel on with your husband."
Then the fiddler went his way and took her withl him, and
they soon came to a great wood. "Pray," said she, "whose is
this wood "It belongs to King Grizzle-beard," answered he;
"hadst thou taken him all had been thine." "Ah! unlucky
wretch that I aml" sighed she; wouldd that I had married King.
195 00200.jpg
GRIclM' MS
Grizzle-beard!i" Next they came to some fine meadows. "Whose
are these beautiful green meadows?" said she. "They belong to
King Grizzle-beard; hadst thou taken him, they had all been
thine." "Ah! unlucky wretch that I am!" said she; "would
that I had married King Grizzle-beard l"
Then they came to a great city. "Whose is this noble cirty"
said she. "It belongs to KIng Grizzle-beard; hadst thou taken
him, it had all been thine."
? "Ah! wretch that I aml"
i ., sighed she; "why did I not
~marry King Gri2.zle-beard ?
1"That is no business of mine,"
said the fiddler. "Why should
you wish for another husband;
am not I good, enough for
you ?"
At last they came to a
small cottage. "What a paltry
a" n place!" said she. "To whom
does that little dirty hole be-
5ilong?" Then the fiddler said,
"That is your and my house,
where we are to live." Where
are your servants?" cried she.
"What do we want with ser-
vants?" said he. "You must do for yourself whatever is to
be done. Now make the fire and put on water and cook my
supper, for I am very tired." But the princess knew nothing
of~making fires and cooking, and the fiddler was forced to
help her. When they had eaten a very scanty meal they went
to bed; but the fiddler called her up very early in the morn-
ing to clean the house. Thus they lived for two days; and
when they had eaten up all there wc~as in the cottage, the man
said: "Wife, we can't go on thus, spending money and earning
nothing. You must learn to weave baskets." Then he went out
1 176 3
196 00201.jpg
FAIRY TALES
and cut willows, and brought them home, and she began to
weavre; but it made her fingers very sore. "I see this work
won't do," said he; try and spin; perhaps you will do that
better." So she sat down and tried to spin; but the threads cut
her tender fingers till the blood ran. "See now," said the fiddler,
"you are good for nothing; you can do no workr. What a bargain
I have gotta However, I'll try and set up a trade in pots and
pans, and you shall stand in the market and sell them." "Alas!i"
sighed she, "if any of my father's court should pass by and see
me standing in the market, how they will laugh at me!"
But her husband did not care for that, and said she must
work, if she did not wish to die of hunger. At first the trade
went well; for many people, seeing such a beautiful woman,
went to buy her wares and paid their money without thinking
of taking away the goods. They lived on this as long as it lasted;
and then her husband bought a fresh lot of ware, and she sat
herself down with it in the corner of the market; but a drunken
soldier soon came by and rode his horse against her stall, and
broke all her goods into a thousand pieces. Then she began to
cry, and knewc? not wphat to do. "Ah! ~what wpll become of me?"
said she; "what will my husband say?" So she ran home and
told him all. "Who would have thought you would have been
so silly," said he, "as to put an earthenware stall in the corner
of the market where everybody passes? But let us have no
more crying; I see you are not fit for this sort of wpork, so I
have been to the king's palace, and asked if they did not want a
kitchen-maid; and they say theyr wIlill take you, and there you
will have plenty to eat."
Thus the princess became a kitchen-maid, and helped the
cook; to do all the dirtiest work; but she was allowed to carry
home some of the meat that was left, and on this they lived.
She had not been there long before she heard that the king's
eldest son was passing by, going to be married; and she went to
-one of the windows and looked out. Everything was ready, and
all the pomp and brightness of the court was there. Then she
197 00202.jpg
G R IM M 'S
bitterly grieved for the pride and folly which had brought her
so low. And the servants gave her some of the rich meats, which
she put into her basket to take home.
All on a sudden, as she was going out, in came the king's son
in golden clothes; and when he saw a beautiful woman at the
door, he took her by the hand and said she should be his partner
in the dance; but she trembled for fear, for she saw that it was
King Grizzle-beard who was making sport of her. Hoowever, he
kept last hold and led her in; and the cover of the basket came
off, so that the meats in it fell all about. Then everybody laughed
and jeered at her; and she was so abashed that she wished her-
self a thousand feet deep in the earth. She sprang to the door
to run away; bitt on, the steps King Grizzle-beard overtook her
and brought her back and said: "Fear me not! I am the fiddler
wh~to has lived with you in the hut. I brought you there because
I really loved you. I am also the soldier that overset your
stall. I have done all this only to cure you of your silly pride
and to show you the folly of your ill-treatm~ent of me. Now
all is over; you have learnt wisdom, and it is time to hold our
marriage feast." i
Then the chamberlains came and brought her the ~most beau-
tiful robes; and her father and his whole court were there al-
ready, and welcomed her home on her marriage. Joy was in
every face and every heart. The feast was grand; they danced
and sang; all were merry; and I only wish that you and I had
been of the party.
198 00203.jpg
1 179 1
FAIRY
TAL E S
199 00204.jpg
GRI MM' S
me." "Gently, my friend," said the wolf, "we cannot see it just
yet; we must wait till the queen comes home."
Soon afterward the queen came with food in her beak, and
she and the king began to feed their young ones. "Now for it!"
said the bear; and weas about to follow them to see what was
to be seen. "Stop a little, master Bruin," said the wolf, "we
must wait now till their majesties are gone again." So they
marked the hole where they had seen the nest, and went away.
But the bear, being very eager to see the royal palace, soon
came back again, and, peeping into the new nest, saw five or six
young birds lying at the bottom of it. "WChat nonsense!" said
Bruin, "this is not a royal palace; I never saw such a filthy place
in my life; and you are no royal children, you little base-born
brats !" As soon as the young tom-tits heard this they were very
angry, and screamed out: "We are not base-born, you stupid
bear! our father and mother are honest, good sort of people;
and depend upon it you shall suffer for your insolence!" At
this the wolf and the bear grew frightened and ran away to their
dens. But the young tom-tits kept crying and screaming; and
when their father and mother came home and offered them food,
they all said: "We will not touch a bit; no, not the leg of a fly,
though we should die of hunger, till that rascal Bruin has been
punished for calling us base-born brats." "Make yourselves
easy, my darlings," said the old king, "you mnay be sure he shall
meet with his deserts."
So he went out and stood before the bear's den, and cried out
with a loud voice: "Bruin the bear thou hast shamefully in-
sulted our lawful children; we therefore hereby declare war
against thee and thine, which shall never cease until thou hast
been punished as thou so richly deservest" Now when the
bear heard this, he gathered together the ox, the ass, the stag,
and all the beasts of the earth, in order to consult about the
means of his defense. And the tom-tit also enlisted on his side
all the birds of the air, both great and small, and a very large
army of hornets, gnats, bees, and flies, and other insects.
[I80]
200 00205.jpg
FAIRY TALES
As the time approached when the war was to begin the tom-tit
sent out spies to see who was the commander-in-chief of the
enemy's forces; and the gnat, who was by far the cleverest spy
of them all, flew backward and forward in the wood where the
enemy's troops were, and at last hid himself under a leaf on a
tree close by which the orders of the day were, given out. And
the~ bear, who was standing so near the tree that the gnat could
hear all he said, called to the fox and said: "Reynard, you are
the cleverest of all the beasts; therefore you shall be our general
and lead us to battle; but we must first agree upon some signal
by which we may know wthat you want us to do." "Behold,"
said the fox, "I have a fine, long, bushy tail, which is very like
a plumne of red feathers and gives me a very war-like air; now
remember, when you see me raise up my tail, you may be sure
that the battle is wpon, and you have then nothing to do but to
rush down upon the enemy with all your, force. On the other
hand, if I drop my tail, the day is lost, and you must run away
as fast as you can." Now when the gnat had heard all this, she
flew back to the tom-tit and told him everything that had passed..
At length the day came when the battle was to be fought;
and as soon as it was light, behold! the army of beasts came
rushing forward with such a fearful sound that the earth shook.
And his majesty, the tom-tit, with his troops, came flying along
in war-like array, flapping and fluttering, and beating the air,
so that it was quite frightful to hear; and both armies set them-
selves in order of battle upon the field. Now the tom-tit gave
orders to a troop of hornets that at the first onset they should
march straight toward Captain Reynard, and, fixing themselves
about his tail, should sting him with all their might and main.
The hornets did as they were told; and when Reynard felt the
first sting he started aside and shook one of his legs, but still
held up his tail with wonderful bravery; at the second sting he
was forced to drop his tail for a moment; but when the third
hornet had fixed itself he could bear it no longer, but clapped his
tail between his legs and scampered away as fast as he could.
[ 181
201 00206.jpg
GRIM M' S
As soon as the beasts saw this they thought, of course, all was
lost, and scoured across the country in the greatest dismay,
leaving the birds masters of the field.
And now the king and queen flew back in triumph to their
children, and said, "Now, children, eat, drink, and be merry,
for the victory is ours!" But the young birds said: "No; not
till Bruin has humbly begged our pardon for calling us base-
born." So the king flew back to the bear's den and cried out:
"Thou villain bear! come forthwith to my abode, and humbly
beseech my children to forgive chee the insult thou hast offered
them; for if thou wilt not do this, every bone in thy wretched
body shall be broken to pieces." So the bear was forced to crawl
out of his den very sulkily and do what the king bade him;
and after that the young birds sat down together and ate and
drank and made merry till midnight.
202 00207.jpg
I~
[ 183
FAIR Y
TALES
203 00208.jpg
GRIM M':'S
you play! I wish you would teach me." "That is easily
done," said the musician, "if you will only do what I bid
you." ( "Yes,") replied the wolf, "I shall be a very apt scholar."
So they went on a little wray together, and came at last to
an old oak tree that was hollow within and had a large
crack in the middle of the trunk. "Look there," said the
musician, "if you wish to learn to fiddle, put your fore feet
into that crack."' The wolf did as he was bid; but the musi-
cian picked up a large stone and wedged both his fore feet
fast into the .crack, so as to make him a .prisoner. "Now
be so good as to wait there till I come back," said he, and
jogged on.
After a while he said' again to himself, "Time goes very heavily;
I must find another companion." So he took his fiddle and
fiddled away again in the wcyood. Presently up came a fox that
was wandering close by. "Ah! there is a fox," said he. The
fox came up and said, "You delightful musician, how prettily
you play! I must and will learn to play as you do." "That
you may soon do," said the musician, "if you do as I tell you."
"That I will," said the fox. So they traveled on together till
they~came to a narrow footpath with high bushes on each side.
Then the musician bent a stout hazel stem down to the ground
from one side of the path, and set his foot on the top and held
it fast; and bent another from the other side, and said to the
fox, "'Now, pretty fox, if you want to fiddle, give me hold of
your left paw." So the fox gave him his paw; and he tied it
fast to the top of one of the hazel stems. "Now give me your
right," said he; and the fox did as he was told; then the musician
tied that paw to the other hazel, and took off his foot, and
away up flew the bushes, and the fox, too, and hung sprawling
and swinging in the air. "Now be so kind as to stay there till
I] come back," said the musician, and jogged on.
But he soon said to himself, "Time begins to hang heavy;
I must find a companion." So he took up his fiddle and fiddled
away divinely. Then up came a hare running along. "Ah!
[I841
204 00209.jpg
FAIRY TALES
there is a hare," said the musician. And the hare said to him:
"Y'ou fine fiddler, how beautifully you play~! Will you teach me?"
"IYes,") said the musician," I will soon do that, if you will follow
my orders." Yes," said the hare,' "I shall make: a good scholar."
Then they went on together very well for a long while till they
came to an open space in the wood. The musician tied a string
round the hare's neck and fastened the other end to the tree.
"INow,") said he, "pretty hare, quick, jump about, run round
the tree twenty timIes." So the silly hare did as she was bid;
and when she had run twenty times round the tree she
had twisted the string twenty times round the trunk, and
was fast prisoner; and she might pull and pull awpay as
long as she pleased and only pulled the string faster about
her neck. "Now wait there till I come back," said the
muSiClan.
But the wolf had pulled and bitten and scratched at the stone
a long while, till at last he had got his feet out and was at liberty.
Then he said in a great passion, "I will run after that rascally
musician and tear him in pieces." As the fox saw him run by,
he said, "Ah, brother wolf, pray let me down; the musician has
played tricks with me." So the wolf set to work at the bottom
of the hazel stem. and bit it in two; and away went both together
to tind the musician; and as they came to the hare, she cried
out, too, for help. So they went and set her free, and all followed
the enemy together.
lRleantim~e the musician had been fiddling away, and found
another companion; for a poor woodcutter had been pleased
with the music, and could not help following him with his ax
under his arm. The musician was pleased to get a man for his
companion, and behaved very civilly to him and played him no
tricks, but stopped and played his prettiest tunes till his heart
overflowed for joy. While the wcoodcutter was standing listen-
ing, he saw the wolf, the fox, and the hare coming, and knew by
their Faces that they were in a great rage and coming to do some
mischief. So he stood before the musician with his great ax,
~Ias1
205 00210.jpg
GRIM/M' S
as much as to say, No one shall hurt him as long as I have this
ax. Acnd when the beasts saw this, they were so frightened that
they ran back into the wood. Then the musician played the
woodcutter one of his best tunes for his pains, aird went on
with his 30urney.
206 00211.jpg
FAIRY TALES
/ THE ~QUEEN BEE
if rl~E king's sons once upon
atune went out into the
world to seek their fortunes; --
but they soon fell into a wasteful, foolish
Sway of living, so that they could not
return home again. Then their young
brother, w~ho was a little insignificant-
,J 7 dwFIarf, went out to seek for his brothers;
but when he had found them they only
-laughed at him to think that he, who ;
was so young and simple, should tryt~=
I to travel through the world, when they,
who wpere so much wiser, had been un-
1' ~able to get on. However, they all set \
out on their journey together, and came
z)c; at last to an ant-hill. The two elder
brothers would have pulled it down, in
II 717
207 00212.jpg
GRIM M'S
order to see how the poor ants in their fright would run about
and carry off their eggs. But the.little dwcarf said, "Let the poor
things enjoy themselves; I will not suffer you to trouble them."
So on they went, and came to a lake where many, many ducks
were swimming about. The two brothers wanted to catch two,
and roast them. But the dwarf said, "Let the poor things enjoy
themselves; you shall not kill them." Next they came to a bees'
nest in a hollow tree, and there was so much honey that it ran
down the trunk,- and the two brothers wanted to light a fire
under the tree and kill the bees, so as to get their honey. But
the dwarf held them back, and said, "Let the pretty insects en-
joy themselves; I cannot let you burn them."
At length the three brothers came to a castle; and as they
passed by the stables they saw fine horses standing there, but
all were of marble, and no man was to be seen. Then they
went through all the rooms till they came to a door on which
wipere three locks; but in the middle of the door was a wicket,
so that they could look into the next room. There they saw a
little gray old man sitting at a table; and they called to him
once or twice, but he did not hear; however, they called a third
time, and then he rose and came out to them.
He said nothing, but took hold of them and led them to a
beautiful table covered with all sorts of good things; and when
they had ezten and drunk he showed each of them to a bed-
chamber.
The next morning he came to the eldest and took him to a
marble table, where were three tablets, containing an account
of the means by which the castle might be disenchanted. The
first tablet said: "In the wood, under the moss, lie the thousand
pearls belonging to the king's daughter; they must all be found,
and if one be missing -by set of sun, he who seeks them will be
turned into marble."
The eldest brother set out and sought for the pearls the whole
day; but the evening came, and he had not found the first hun-
dred; so he was turned into stone as the tablet had foretold.
[ x88 ]
208 00213.jpg
"FAIRY TALES
The next day the second brother undertook the task; but he
succeeded no better than the first; for he could only find the
second hundred of the pearls, and therefore he, too, was turned
into stone.
At last came the little dwarf's turn; and he looked in the
moss; but it was so hard to find the pearls, and the job was so
tireesome!-so be sat down upon a stone and cried. And as he
sat there the king of the ants (whose life he had saved) came
to help him with five thousand ants; and it was not long before
they had found all the pearls and laid them in a heap.
The second tablet said: "The key of the princess's bed-
chamber must be fished up out of the lake." And as the dwarf
came to the brink of it, he saw the ducks whose lives he had
saved swimming about; and they dived down and soon brought
up the key from the bottom.
The third task was the hardest. It was to choose out the
youngest and the best of the king's three daughters. Now they
were all beautiful and all exactly alike; but he was told that the
eldest had eaten a piece of sugar, the next some sweet syrup,
and the youngest a spoonful of honey; so he was to guess which
it was that had eaten the honey.
Then came the queen of the` bees, who had been saved by the
little dwr~arf from the fire, and she tried the lips of all three; but
at last she sat upon the lips of the one that had eaten the honey;
and so the dwcParf knew which was the youngest. Thus the spell
was broken, and all who had been turned into stones awoke
and took their proper forms. And the dwarf married the young-
est and the best of the princesses, and was king after her father's
death; but his two brothers married the other two sisters.
209 00214.jpg
GRIMM' S
THE DOG AND THE SPARROWi
SSHEPHERD'S dog had a master
w~ hotooknocare of him, butoften ~ \
let him suffer the greatest hunger.
At last he could bear it no longer; so
/ l~i~she took to his heels and off he ran in
"Ia very sad and sorrowful mood. On
the road he met a sparrow that said
-~v to him, Whyi are you so sad, my
~ u friend ?"' Because," said the dog,
S"I am v'ery, very hungry, and have
/ nothing to eat." "If that be all,"
answered the spro,"om wth
o ~'Ime into the next town and I will soon 1
find you plenty of food." So on they
went together into the town; and as
they passed by a1 butcher's shop, the
1190 1,41
210 00215.jpg
FAIRY TALES
sparrow said to the dog, "Stand there a little while till I peck
you down a piece of mear." So the sparrow perched upon
the edge of the shelf; and having first looked carefully about
her to see if any one was watching her, she pecked and
scratched at a steak that lay upon the edge of the shelf,
till at last down it fell. Then the dog snapped it up and
scrambled away with it into a corner, where he soon are it
all up. "Weall,"" said the sparrow, "you shall have some more
if you will; so come with me to the next shop, and I will peck
you down another steak;." When the dog had eaten this, too,
the sparrow said to him, "W!ell, my good friend, have you had
enough now?" "'I have had plenty of meait," answered he, "but
Should like to have a piece of bread to eat after it." "Come
wvith me then," said the sparrow, "and you shall soon have that,
too." So she took himn to a baker's shop, and pecked at two
rolls that lay in the window till they fell down; and as the dog
still wished for more, she took him to another shop and pecked
dow-n some more for him. When that was eaten the sparrow
asked him whether he had had enough now. "Yes," said he;
"and now let us take a walk a little wocay out of the town." So
they both went out upon the highroad, but as the weather was
w~arm, they had not gone far before the dog said, "I am very
much tired-I should like to take a nap." "Very well," answ7pered
the sparrow, "do so, and in the mean time I will perch upon
that bush." So the dog stretched himself out on the road and
fell fast asleep. While he slept there came by a carter with a
cart drawn by three horses and loaded with two casks of wine..
The sparrIow, seeing that the carter did- not turn out of the ~way,
but would go on in the track in which the dog lay, so as to drive
over him, called out: "Stop! stop! Mr. Carter, or it shall be
the worse for you." But the carter, grumbling to himself:
"Y'ou make it worse for me, indeed! What can you do?" cracked
his whip and drove his cart over the poor dog, so that the wheels
crushed him to death. "There," cried the sparrow, "thou cruel
villain, thou hast killed my friend the dog. NowP mind Iwhat I
la 1 191
211 00216.jpg
GRIMM' S
say. This deed of thine shall cost thee all thou art worthh"
(Do y'our worst, and welcome," said the brute; "w\hat harm
can you do me?" and passed on. But the sparrow crept under
the tilt of the cart and pecked at thle bung of one of the casks
till she loosened it; and then all the wrine ran out without thle
carter seeing it. At last he looked round and saw that the cant
was dripping, aind the cask quite empty-. "W~hatr an unlucky
wretch I am!" cried he. "Not wretch enough yet!" said the
sparrow, as she alighted upon the head of one of the horses and
pecked at him till he reared up and kicked. When the carter
saw this, he drew out his hatchet and aimed a blow7p at the spar-
ro-wmeaning to kill her; but she flew away, and the blow fell
upon the poor horse's head with such force that he fell downn
dead. "Unlucky wretch that I aml" cried he. "N\Ior wretch
enough yet!" said the sparrow. And as the carter went on with
the other two horses, she again crept under the tilt of the cart
and pecked out the' bung. of the second cask, so that all the
wine ran out. When the carter saw this he again cried our,
"Miserable wretch that I aml" But the sparrow answ~eredi,
"Not wretch enough y~et!" and perched on the head of the sec-
ond horse, and pecked at hi~m too. The carter ran up and
struck at her again with his hatchet; but away she flewr, and the
blow fell upon the second horse and killed him on the spot.
"Unlucky wretch that I am!" said he. "Not wretch enough
yet!" said the sparrow; and perching upon the third horse, she
began to peck him, too. The carrier was mad with fury; and
without looking about him, or caring what he was about, struck
again at the sparrow; but killed his third horse as he had done
the other two. "Alas! miserable wretch that I am!" cried he.
"Not wretch enough yet!" answered the sparrow, as she Alew
away; "now will I plague and punish thee at thy ow\~n house."
The carter was forced at last to leave his cart behind him, and
to go home overflowFing with rage and vexation. "Alas!" said
he to his wife, "what ill luck has befallen mtel-mry wine is all
spilt, and my horses all three dead." "Alas! husband," replied
[I921
212 00217.jpg
FAIRY TALES
she, "and a wicked bird has come into the house and has brought
with her all the birds in the world, I am sure, and they have
fallen upon our corn in the loft, and are eating it up at such a
rate!"' Away ran the husband up-stairs and sawr thousands of
birds sitting upon the floor eating up his corn, wit;h the sparrow
in the midst of them. "Unlucky wretch that I am!" cried the
carter; for he saw that the corn was' almost: all gone. "Not
wretch enough yet!" said the sparrow; "thy cruelty shall cost
thee thy life yet!" and away she flew.
The carter, seeing that he had thus lost all that he had, went
dow~n into his kitchen; and was still not sorry for w~hat he had
done, but sat himself angrily and sulkily in the chimney corner.
But the sparrow sat on the outside of the window and cried,
"Carter! thy cruelty shall cost thee thy life!" With that he
jumped up in a rage, seized his hatchet, and threw it at the spar-
row; but it missed her and only broke the window. The sparrow
now hopped in, perched upon the windo~w-seat, and cried:
"Calrterl. it shall cost thee thy life!" Then he became mad
and blind with rage, and struck the window-seat with such force
thlat he cleft it in two; and as the sparrow flew from place to
place, the carter and his wife were so furious that they broke
all their furniture, glasses, chairs, benches, the table, and at
last the walls, without touching the bird at all. In the end,
however, they caught her; and the w7Pife said, "Shall I kill her
at once?" "No," cried he, "that is letting her off too easily;
she shall die a much more cruel death; I will eat her." But the
sparrrow~ began to flutter about, and stretched out her neck and
cried: "Carted! it ~shall cost thee thy life yet!" W~ith that he
could w\ait no longer; so he gave his wife the hatchet and cried,
" W\ife~, strike at the bird and kill her in my hand." And the
wifet struck; but she missed her aim and hit her husband on the
head, so that he fell down dead and the sparrow flew quietly
hom~e to her nest.
213 00218.jpg
GRIMM' S
THE MAN IN THE BAG
were both soldiers; the one had
grown rich, but the other had had
no luck and was very~ poor. The poor
man thought he would try to better
himself; so pulling off his red ccat, he
became a gardner, and dug his ground
wiell and sowed turnips.
W'hen the crop came up there was
one plant bigger than all the rest, and
it kept getting larger anid larger, and
seemed as if it would never cease grow-
ing, so that it might have been called
the prince of turnips, for there never
was such a one seen before and never
will again. At last it was so big that
it 611led a cart, and two oxen could
hardly draw it; but the gardener did
not know what in the world to do with
it, nor whether it would be a blessing
[ 194 1
214 00219.jpg
"FAIRY TALES
or a curse to him. One day he said to himself: "Wh~at shall
I do with it? If I sell ic, it will bring no more than another
would; and as fo~r eating, the little turnips I am sure are better
than this great one; the best thing perhaps that I can do w~ill be
to giv'e it to the king as a mark of my respect."
Then he yoked his oxen and drewT the turnip to the court and
gave it to the king. "W'hat a w~onderful thing!" said the king.
"I have seen many strange things in my life, but such a monster
as this I never sawT before. WVhere did you get the seed, or is
it only y~our good luck? IF so, you are a true child of fortune."
"Aih, no!" answered the gardener, "I am no child of fortune;
I am a poor soldier, who never yet could get enough to live upon,
so I set to work tilling the ground. I have a brother who is
rich, and your majesty knows him well, and all the world knows
him; but as I am poor everybody forgets me."
Then the king took pity on him and said: L'You shall be poor
no longer., I will give you so much that you shall be even richer
than your brother." SJ he gave him money and lands and flocks
and herds; and made him so rich that his brother's wealth could
not at all be compared with his.
W'hen the brother heard of all this and how a turnip had made
the gardener so rich, he envied him sorely, and bethought him-
sell how he could please the king and get the same good luck
for himself. However, he thought he would manage more
clevecrly than his brother, so he got together a rich gift of jewels
and line horses for the king, thinking that he must have a much
larger gift in return; for if his brother had so much given him
for a turnip, what must his gift be worth?
The king took the gift very graciously and said he knew not
what he could give in return more costly and wonderful than -the
great turnip; so the soldier was forced to put it into a cart and
drag it home with him. When he reached home he knew not
upon whom to vent his rage and envy; and at length wicked
thoughts came into his head, and he sought to kill his brother.
So be hired some villains to murder him; and having shown
[ 195 1
215 00220.jpg
G R IMM'a S
them where to lie in ambush, he went to his brother and said:
"Dear brother, I have found a hidden treasure; let us go and dig
it up and share it between us." The other had no thought or
fear of his brother's roguery, so they went out together; and as
they were traveling along the murderers rushed out upon him,
bound him, and were going to hang him on a tree.
But while they were getting all ready they heard the tramp-
ling of a horse afar off, which so frightened them that they
pushed their prisoner neck and shoulders together into a sack,
and swung him up by a cord to the tree, where they left him
dangling and ran away, meaning to come back and despatch
him in the evening.
Meantime, however, he worked and worked away, till he had
.made a hole large enough to put out his head. When the horse-
man came up he proved to be a student, a merry fellow, wTho
was journeying along on his nag, and singing as he went. As
soon as the man in the bag saw him passing under the tree, he
cried out: "Good morning! good morning to thee, my friend!"
The student looked about and, seeing no one, and not knowing
wi~here the voice came from, cried out, "WI~ho calls me?")
Then the man in the bag cried out: "Lift up thine eyes, for
behold here I sit in the sack of wisdom! Here have I, in a short
time, learned great and wondrous things. Compared to what is
taught in this seat, all the learning of the schools is as emptyl
air. A little longer and I shall know all that man can know~,
and shall come forth wiser than the wisest of mankind. Here I
discern the signs and motions of the heavens and the stars; the-
laws that control the wi~nds; the number of the sands on thle
seashore; the healing of the sick; the virtues of all simples, of
birds, and of precious stones. Wert thou but once here, my
friend, thou wouldst soon feel the power of knowledge."
The student listened to all this and wondered much. At last i
he said: "Blessed be the day and hour when I found you!i Can-
not you let me into the sack for a little while?" Then the other
answered, as if very unwillingly: "A little space I may~ allow
[ 196 ]
216 00221.jpg
FAIRY TALES
thee to sit here, if thou wilt reward me well and treat me kindly;
but thou must tarry' yet anl hour below, till I have learnt some
little matters that are yet unknown to me."'
So the student sat himself down and w~aited awhile; but the
time hung heavy! upon him, and he begged hard that he might
ascend fo~rthw~ith, for his thirst of know~ledge w~as \ery great.
Then the other began to give way and said: "~Thou must let
the bag of wisdom descend, by untying yonder cord, and then
thou shalt enter." So the student let him down, opened the
bag, and set him free. "'Now then,"' cried h~e, "let me mount
quick! A4s he began to put himself into the sack heels frst,
"Wai;3t a while!" said the gardener; "t hat is not the w~ay."' Then
he pushed him in head first, ried up the bag's mouth, and soon
swung up the searcher after wisdom, dangling in the air. "'How
is it with thee, friend ?" said he; "dost thou not feel that wis-
dom cometh unto th~ee? Rest there in peace till thou art a
wiser man than thou wer~-t.")
So saying, he borrowed the student's nag to ride home upon,
and trotted off as Fast: as he toolld, for fear the villains should
return; and he lefte the poor studl nt to gather wisdom, till some-
body should come and let him down, when he had found out
in which posture he was wisest--on his head or his heels.
217 00222.jpg
I=98]
GRTIM~:~ MS
218 00223.jpg
I:FAIRY TALES
out and handed him a piece of bread, and as she did so he
gaVe her one little touch, and she was at once obliged to jump
into his basket.
He then hurried off' wth long strides and carried her to his
house in the middle of a dark wood. Everytrhing in the house
was ma~gnificent, and she had but to express a wish for any-
thiing and he gaver it her at once. "You are haippy here with me,
dearest one, are you not?" he said; "ifor y'ou hlave everyrhing
that \our heart can wish for." This went: on fo~r some da\-s, and
then he told her that he must go away~ and leave her alone for a
little while.
";Here are the house-keys~," he said. "Yrou can go where you
I~ke, and look at what y;ou like; there is onl one room into
which I forbid you to enter on pain of death; this little key
belongs to it."
He also gave her an egg, and begged her to take great care
of it. "Always carry it about wvith y'ou, if possible," he added,
"for ifc it wre to be lost a great misfortune would happen."
She took the keys and the egg and promised to carry out
his w~ishes.
As soon as hie had left she went over the house, looking at
everything from top to bottom. The rooms shone with silver
and gold, and she thought she had never before seen anything
so splendid. At last she found herself close to the forbidden
room, and w\as going to pass it, when her curiosity became too
much for her and she paused. First she looked at the key-it
did not seem to her to be in any~ w~ay different from the others;
then she put it in the lock and gave it a little turn, and--the
door Hlew open. But what a sight met her eyes as she stepped
inside! There in the middle of the room stood a block, and on
it lay. a glittering ax, and all around there was blood upon the
floor and the bodies of those who had been seized and cruelly
murdered. She was so terrified that she let the egg she held in
her hand fall to the ground. She picked it up and saw that
there was blood upon it, she tried to wipe it off, but in vain,
[ '99 1
219 00224.jpg
GRIMM' S
for, rub and scrape as she would, the mark of the blood still re-
mained.
Not long after this the man returned, and the first things he
asked for were the key and the egg. Trembling with fear, she
gave them to him, but he knew at once, when he saw the mark on
the egg, that she had been into
the forbidden room. "Since
'you have been into that
room," he cried, "against my
~T~~lj E~lYII will, you shall now go there
against your own. Your life
-rl is ended." With these words
L.~I\,he threw her to the ground,
and dragging her by her hair
cut off her head and her limbs,
so that her blood flowed over
the floor, and there he left
her with the bodies of his
other victims.
"I will now go and fetch
~the second one," he said; and
Same house, begging like a
r poor old man. The second
\9 daughter brought him a piece
of bread, and he caught her
and carried her away as he
had the eldest one.
\ She did not meet with any
better fate than her sister; for
she was also overcome by her curiosity and looked into the for-
bidden room, and had to pay for it with her life on the man's
return.
He next went and carried away the third sister. Now this
[2oo]
220 00225.jpg
FAIRY TALES
sister was wiser and more cunning than the others, and after
the wizard had given her the keys and the egg. and had left her,
the first thing she did was to put the egg safely away. Then
she looked over the house, and, finally, went into the forbidden
room. Alas! what did she see? her two dear sisters flying mur-
dered and cut to pieces. But she took the head and the body,
and the arms and the legs of each and put them carefully to-
gether, and she had no sooner done this than the limbs began to
move, and the different par ts became joined to one another, and
both sisters opened their eyes and were alive again. Then they
kissed and embraced one another in their great joy.
As soon as the wizard returned he asked for the key and the
egg, and when he sa~w that there was no trace of blood upon this,
he said, "You have stood the test; you shall be my wife."
He had nowoc lost all power over her, and was obliged in his
turn to do whatever she wished.
"'eryT! well," she answered, "but you must first take a basket-
ful of gold to my father and mother, and carry it to them your-
self, meanwhile I will prepare for our marriage."
Then she ran to the little room where she had hidden her
sisters, and cried: "The moment has come for me to save you;
the villain shall carry you home himself; but be sure you send
some one to help me as soon, as you' get there." She put them
both in a basket and covered them with gold, so that nothing
of them could be seen. Then she called the wizard, and said
to him, "Now carry away this basket, and mind you do not
stop on the way to rest, for I shall be watching you from my little
window." The wizard slung the basket over his shoulder and
wren off, but he found it such a weight to carry that the per-
spiration ran down his face, and he felt ready to die of exhaus-
tion. He longed so to rest that he stopped and sat down, but
immediately a voice called out from the basket: "I am watching
from my~ little window; I can see you stopping to rest. Will you
please go on!" Hle thought it was his bride calling after him, so
he got up and went on. Presently he sat down again, but the
( zox ]
221 00226.jpg
G R IM~M' S
same voice called out: "I am watching y'ou from my little win-
dow; I can see y;ou stopping to rest. WVill you please to go on at
once?" And as often as he stopped to rest he heard the same
voice, so that he was obliged to go on till, gasping for breath,
he had carried the girls and the gold into the parent's house.
At home, meanwhile, the bride was preparing for the ~ed Jing
festivities. She took one of his victim's heads, put a smart headl-
dress and~wreath of flowers upon it, and placed it looking out of
the garret window. She then invited all the wedding guests,
and when that was done she got into a barrel of honey, and then
cut open a bed and rolled herself in the feathers, so that: shte
looked like some wonderful bird, and no one had known who she
was. Then she left the house, and as she went along she met
some of the wedding guests, who said:
"Fitcher's bird, whence come you, I pray?~
I come from Fitcher's house to-day.
And what is the young bride doing now?
She has swept the house, all round and about,
And sits at her window, looking out."
By and by she met the bridegroom returning, and he also said:
"Fitcher's bird, whence come you, I pray?
I come from Fitcher's house to-day.
And what is the young bride doing now?
She has swept the house, all 'round and about,
And sits at her window, looking out."
The bridegroom looked up and saw the head at the window,
and thinking it was his bride, he nodded and smiled at it. B~ut
no sooner were he and his guests assembled in the house than
the friends arrived who had been sent by the sisters. Theyl
locked all the doors, so that no one might escape, and then set
fire to the house, ard th~e wizard and all his companions were
burned to deathL.
222 00227.jpg
FAIRY TALES
IL4RL K4TZ
I N the midst of the Hartz forests there is a high mountain,
of` which the neighbors tell all sorts of stories: how the gob-
lins and fairies dance on it by night, and how the old Emperor
Re~dbeard holds his court there, and sits on his marble throne,
w-ith his long beard sweeping on the ground.
A great many years ago there lived in a village at the foot of
this mountain one Karl Katz. Now K~arl was a goatherd, and
every-! morning he drove his flock to feed upon the green spots
thac are here and there found on the mountain's side. In the
evecning he sometimes thought it too late to drive his charge
home; so he used in such cases to shut it up in a spot among
the woods, where the old ruined walls of some castle that had
long ago been deserted were left standing, and were high enough
to form a fold, in which he could count his goats and let them
rest for the night. One evening he found that the prettiest goat
of his flock had vanished, soon after they were driven into this
fold. He searched everywhere for it in vain; but, to his sur-
prise and delight, when he counted his flock in the morning,
what should he see, the first of the flock, but his lost goat! Again
and again the same thing happened. At last he thought he
would watch still more narrowly; and, having looked carefully
Iso3]
223 00228.jpg
GRIM M' S
over the old walls, he found a narrow doorway through which it
seemed that his favorite made her way. Karl followed and
found a path leading downward through a cleft in the rocks.
On he went, scrambling as well as he could down the side of
the rock, and at last came to the mouth of a cave, where he lost
sight of his goat. Just then he saw that his faithful dog was not
with him. He whistled, but no dog was there; and he was there-
fore forced to go into the cave and try to find his goat by~ himself.
He groped his way for a while, and at last caime to a place
where a little light found its way in; and there he wondered
not a little to find his goat employing itself, very much at its
ease in -the cavern, in eating corn, which kept dropping from
some place over its head. He went up and looked about him,
to see where all this corn that rattled about his ears like a hail,
storm could come from; but all overhead was dark, and he could
find no clue to this strange business.
At last, as he stood listening, he thought he heard the neighing
and stamping of horses. He listened again; it was plainly so;
and after a while he was sure that horses were feeding above
him, and that the corn fell from their mangers. WVChat could these
horses be, which were thus kept in the clefts of rocks, where none
but the goat's foot ever trodt There must be people of some sort
or other living here; and who could they be? And was it safe
to trust himself in such company? Karl pondered awichile; but
his wonder only grew greater and greater, when on a sudden he
heard his own name, "Karl K~atz!" echo through the cavern.
He turned round, but could see~nothing. "Karl Katz!" again
sounded sharply in his ears; and soon out came a little dwarfish
page, with a high-peaked hat and a scarlet cloak, from a dark
corner at one end of the cave.
TThe dwarf nodded, and beckoned him to follow. K~arl thought
he should first like to know a little about who it was that thus
sought his company. He asked; but the dwarf shook his head,
answering not a word, and again beckoned him to follow. He
did so; and, winding his way through ruins, he soon heard rolling
[ zo4 ]
224 00229.jpg
:"t~
:3
t ;
5;6
li~h'l ~C ;;
r
"
i
i:r
;7
aB r ,re
~5; k 'd
.5v!
~x
~E;ARL TI--IOUGHT HE NEVER TASTED A~PIJYTHING HALF SO GOOD BEFORE
225 00230.jpg
.i
I
I
I
I
I
226 00231.jpg
FAIRY TALES
overhead what sounded like peals of thunder echoing among
the rocks; the noise grew louder and louder as he went on, and
at last he came to a courtylard surrounded by old ivy-grown
walls. The spot seemed to be the bosom of a little valley; above
rose on every hand high masses of rock; wide-branching trees
threw their arms overhead, so that nothing but a glimmering
twilight made its w-ay through; and here, on the cool, smooth-
shaven turf, Karl saw twelve strange old figures amusing them-
selves very sedately with a game of ninepins.
Their dress did not seem altogether strange to Karl, for in the
church of the town whither he went every week to market there
was an old monument, with figures of queer old knights upon it,
dressed in the very same fashion. Not a word fell from any of
their lips. They moved about soberly and gravely, each taking
his turn at the game; but the oldest of them ordered Karl Katz,
by dumb signs, to busy himself in setting up the pins as they
knocked them down. At first his knees trembled, as he hardly
dared snatch a stolen sidelong glance at the long beards and old-
fashioned dresses of the worthy knights; but he soon saw that
as each knight played out his game he went to his seat, and
there took a hearty draught at a flagon, which the dwarf kept
filled, and which sent up the smell of the richest old winc9-
Little by little Karl got bolder; and at last he plucked up his
heart so far as to beg the dwarf, by signs, to let him, too, take
his turn at the flagon. The dwarf gave it him with a grave bow~,
and K~arl thought he never tasted anything half so good before.
This gave him new strength for his w7Cork; and as often as he
flagged at all he turned to the same kind friend for help in his
need.
Which was tired first, he or the knights, Karl never could
tell, or whether the wine got the better of his head; but what he
knew was that sleep at last overpowitered him, and that when he
awoke he found himself stretched out upon the old spot within
the walls where he had folded his flock, and saw that the bright
sun was high up in the heavens. The same green turf was spread
II [ 207 ]
227 00232.jpg
GRIM M' S
beneath, and the same tottering ivy-clad walls surrounded him.
He rubbed his eyes and called his dog; but neither dog nor goat
was to be seen; and w~hen he looked about him again the grass
seemed to be longer under his feet than it w~as yesterday; and
trees hung over his head which he had either never seen before
or had quite forgotten. Shaking his head, and hardlyr knowing
whether he wras in his right mind, he got up and stretched him-
self; somehow or other his joints felt stif-fer than they w~ere. "It
serves me right," said he; "this comes of sleeping out of one's
own7 bed."' Little byl little he recollected his evening's sport, and
lick~ed his lips as he thought of the charming wine he had taken
so much of. ."'But who," thought: he, "can those people be that
come to this odd place to play at niepins?" "
His first step was to look for the doorway through which he
had followed his goat; but to his astonishment, not the least trace
of an opening of any sort was to be seen. There stood the w~all,
without chink or crack big enough for a rat to pass through.
Again he paused and scratched his head. His hat was full of holes.
"Wihy, it was new last Shrovetide!" said he. By chance his eye
fell next on his shoes, which were almost new when he last left
home; but now they looked so old that they were likely to fall
to pieces before he could get home. All his clothes seemed in
the same sad plight. The more he looked, the more he pondered,
the more he was at a loss to know what could have happened to
him.
At length he turned round and left the old wall to look for
his flock. Slow and out of heart he wound his way among the
mountain steeps, through paths where his flocks were w~onc to
wander; still not a goat wras to be seen. Again he whistled and
called his dog, but no dog came. Below him in the plain lay the
vilage where his home was; so at length he took the downward
path, and set out with a heavy heart and a faltering step in search
of his flock.
"Surely," said he, "I shall soon meet some neighbor w\ho can
tell me where my goats are." But the people wrho met him, as
[208]
228 00233.jpg
FAIRY TALES
he drew near to the village, were all unknown to him. They
were not even dressed as his neighbors were, and they seemed
as if they hardly spoke the same tongue. W'hen he eagerly
asked each, as he came up, after his goats, they only stated at
him and stroked their chins. At last he did the same, too; and
what was his wonder to find that his beard was grown at least
a foot long! "The world," said he to himself, "is surely turned
upside down, or, if not, I must be bewitched"; and yet he
knew the mountain, as he turned round again and looked back
on its woody heights; and he knewc the houses and cottages, also,
with their little gardens, as he entered the village. All were in
the places he had always known them in; and he heard some
children, too (as a traveler that passed by was asking his way),
call the village by the very same name he had always known it
to bear.
Again he shook his head, and went straight through the village
to his own cottage. Alas! it looked sadly out of repair; the
windows were broken, the door off its hinges, and in the court-
yard lay an unknown child, in a ragged dress, playing with a
rough, toothless old dog, whom he thought he ought to know,
but who snarled and barked in his face when he called to him.
He w~ent in at the open doorway; but he found all so dreary and
empty that he staggered out again like a drunken man, and
called his wife and children loudly by their names; but no one
-heard; at least no one answered him.
A crowd of women and children soon flocked around the strange-
looking man with the long gray beard; and all broke upon him
at once with the questions, "Who are you?" "Who is it that
you want ?" It seemed to him so odd to ask other people, at
his owrn door, after his wife and children, that, in order to get rid
of the crowd, he named the first man that'came into his head.
"Hans the blacksmith?" said he. Most held their tongues and
stared; but at last an old woman said, "He went these seven years
ago to a place that you will not reach to-day." "Fritz the
tailor, then?" "Heaven rest his soul!" said an old beldam upon
[209]
229 00234.jpg
GRIMM' S
crutches; "he has lain these ten years in a house that he'll never
leave."
Karl Katz looked at the old woman again, and shuddered, as
he knew her to be one of his old gossips; but saw she had a
strangely altered face. All wish to ask further questions was gone;
but at last a y-oung woman made her way through the gaping
throng, with a baby in her arms, and a little girl of about three
years old clinging to her other hand. All three looked the very
image of his own wife. "What is thy name?" asked he, wildly.
"]Liese!" said she. "And your father's?" "Karl Katz! Heaven
bless him!" said she; "but, poor man! he is lost and gone. It
is now full twenty years since we sought for him day and night
on the mountain. His dog and his flock came back, but he never
was heard of any more. I was then seven years old."
Poor Karl could hold no longer. "I am Karl Katz, and no
other!" said he, as he took the child from his daughter's arms
and kissed it over and over again.
All stood gaping, and hardly knowing what to say~ or think,
when old Stropken the schoolmaster hobbled by and took a
long and close look at him. "K~arl Katz! Karl Katz!" said he,
slowly. "Why, it izr Karl Kats, sure enough! There is my owfn
mark upon him; there is the scar over his right eye that I gave
him myself one day with my oak stick." Then several others
also cried out: "Yes, it is! it is Karl Katal Welcome, neighbor!
welcome home!" "But where," said or thought all, "can an
honest, steady fellow like you have been these twenty' years?"'
And now the whole village had flocked around; the children
laughed, the dogs barked, and all were glad to see neighbor K~arl
home alive and well. As to where he had been for the twenty
years, that wcas a part of the story at which Karl shrugged up
his shoulders; for he never could very well explain it, and seemed
to think the less that was said about it the better. But it was
plain enough that what dwelt most on his memory was the noble
wine that had tickled his mouth while the knights played their
game of mne-pmns.
230 00235.jpg
[2II]
TALES
FAIRY
231 00236.jpg
GRIM M' S
and put it on the fire to fry. The steak soon began to
look brown and to crackle in the pan; and Catherine stood
by with a fork and turned it. Then she said to herself, "The
steak is almost ready; I may as well go to the cellar for the ale."
So she left the pan on the fire and took a large jug and went
into the cellar and tapped the ale-cask. The beer ran into the jug
and Catherine stood looking on. At last it popped into her head,
"The dog is not shut up--he may be running away with the
steak; that's well thought of."' So up she ran from the cellar;
and, sure enough, the rascally cur had got the steak; in his mouth
and was making oH' w'ith it.
Away ran Catherine, and away ran the dog across the field;
but he ran faster than she, and stuck close to the steak. "It's
all gone, and 'what can't be cured must be endured,'" said
Catherine. So she turned round; and as she had run a good way
and was tired, she walked home leisurely to cool herself.
Now all this time the ale was running, too, for Catherine had
not turned the cock; and when the jug was full the Liquor ran
upon the floor till the cask was empty. When she got to the cellar
stairs she saw what had happened. "lIly stars!" said she.
"'What shall I do to keep Frederick from seeing all this slopping
about?"' So she thought awhile; and at last remembered that
there was a sack of fine meal bought at the last fair, and that if
she sprinkled this over the floor it would suck up the ale nicely.
"What a lucky thing," said she, "that we kept that meal! \Ve
have now a good use for it." So away she went for it; but she
managed to set it down just upon the great jug full of beer,
and upset it; and thus all the ale that had been saved was set
swimming on the floor also. "Ah, wtell!" said she, "'when one
goes another may as well follow." Then she strewed the meal
all about the cellar, and was quite pleased with her cleverness,
and said, "How very neat and clean it looks!"
At noon Frederick came home. "Now, wife," cried he, "wFhat
have you for dinner?" "Oh, Frederickl" answered she, "I was
cooking you a steak; but while I went down to draw _the ale the
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FAIRY TALES
dog ran away with it; and while I ran after him the ale ran out;
and when I went to dry up the ale with the sack of meal that we
got at the fair, I upset the jug; but the cellar is now quite dryr,
and looks so clean!" Kate, Kate,"' said he, "how could you
do all chis? W'hy did you leave the steak to fry, and the ale to
run, and then spoil all the meal?" Why, Frederick," said she,
"I did not know I was doing wrong. You should have told me
before."
The husband thought to himself, "If my wife manages matters
thus, I must look sharp myself." Now he had a good deal of
gold in the house, so be said to Catherine, "W~hat pretty yellow
buttons these are! I shall put them into a box and bury them in
the garden; but take care that you never go near or meddle with
them." "No, Frederick," said she, "that I never will." A~s
soon as he was gone there came by some peddlers writh earthen-
ware plates and dishes, and they asked her whether she would
buy. "Oh, dear me, I should like to buy very much, but I have.
no money; if you had any use for yellow buttons, I might deal
with you." "Yellow buttons!" said they; "let us have a look
at them." "Go into the garden and dig where I tell you, and you
wrill fmnd the yellow buttons; I dare not go myself." So the rogues
went; and when they found ~what these yellowP buttons were,
they took them all away, and left her plenty of plates and dishes.
Then she set them all about the house for a show; and when
Frederick came back, he cried out, "Kate, what have you been
doing?" "See," said she, "I have bought all these with your
yellow buttons, but I did not touch them myself; the peddlers
went themselves and dug them up." "Wife, wife," said Fred-
erick, "'what a pretty piece of work you have made! those
yellow buttons were all my money. How came you to do such
a thing?" "Why," answered she, "I did not knowF there was any
harm in it; ~you should have told me."
Catherine stood musing for a while, and at last said to her
husband, "Hark ye, Frederick, we will soon get the gold back;
let us run after the thieves." "WVell, we will try," answered he;;
233 00238.jpg
GR IMM'S
"but take some butter and cheese with you, that we may have
something to eat by the way." "Veryr well," said she; and they
set out; and as Frederick walked the Fastest he left his wife
scmer way behind. "It does not matter," thought she; "wfhen we
turn back I shall be so much nearer home than he."'
Presently she came to the top of a hill dow~n the side of which
there was a road so narrow that the cart-wheels always chaled
the trees on each side as they passed. "Ah, see nowv," said she,
"how they have bruised and wounded those poor trees; they
will never get well." So she took pity on them, and made use of
the butter to grease them all, so that the wheels might not hurt
them. so muc~h. While she wJas doing this kind office one of her
cheeses fell out of the basket and rolled dow\n the hill. Catherine
looked, biut could not see where it had gone, so she said, Well,
I suppose the other will go the same wray and fSnd you; he has
younger legs than I have." Then she rolled the other cheese
after it; and away it went, nobody knows where, dow~n the hill.
But she said she supposed that they knew the road, and would
follow her, and she could not stay there all day awaiting for them.
At last she overtook Frederick, who desired her to give him
something to eat. Then she gave him the dry bread. "WVhere
are the butter and cheese?" said he. "Oh!"' answetred she, "I
used the butter to grease those poor trees that the wheels chafed
so, and one of the cheeses ran away, so I sent the other after it
to find it, and I suppose they are both on the road together some-
where." "What a goose you are to do such silly things!" said
the husband. "How can you say so?" said she. "I aim sure you
never told me not."
They ate the dry bread together; and Frederick said, Kate.
I hope you locked the door safe when you caime aw~ay." "No,"'
answered she, "you did not tell me." "Then go home and do
it now before we go any farther," said Frederick, "and bring
with you something to eat."
Catherine did as he told her, and thought to herself by the
way, "Frederick wants something to eat, but I don't think he is
[2z4]
234 00239.jpg
FAIRY TALES
very fond of butter and cheese; I'll bring him a bag of fine
nuts, and the vinegar, for I have often seen him take some."'
WYhen she reached home, she bolted the back door, but the
front door she took off the hinges, and said, "Frederick told
me to lock the door, but surely it can nowhere be so safe as if
I take it with me." So she took her time by the way~ and when
she ov~ertook her husband she cried out, "~There, Frederick; there
is the door ijtself. Nowt you can w\atch it as carefurlly as y'ou
please."' "Alas1! alas!" said he, "what a clev~er wife I have!
I sent you to make the house fast, and you cake the door away
so that everybhody may go in and out as they please. Howvever,
as you have brought the door, you shall carry it about with you
forr your pains." "1 'ery well," a nswered she, I'll carry' the door;
but I'll not carry the nuts and vinegar-bottle also-chat would
be too much of a load; so, if you please, I'll fasten them to the
door."
Frederick, of course, made no objection to that plan, and they
set off into the w\ood to look for the chieve~s; but they could
not find them, and wvhen it grew dark they climbed up into a tree
to spend the night there. Scarcely were they up than7 w\ho should
come by but the very rogues they wetre looking for. They were
in truthi great rascals, and belonged to that class of people wrho
find things before they are lost. They were tired, so they sat
down and made a fBre under the very tree where Frederick and
Catherine wrere. Frederick slipped down on the other side and
picked up some stones. Then he climbed up again and tried to
hit the thieves on the head wi;th them; but they only said, "It
must be near morning, for the wind shakes the tir-apples down."
Catherine, wvho had the door on her shoulder, began to be very
tired, but: she thought it wras the nuts upon it that werer so heavy,
so she said, softly,' "Frederick, I must let the nuts go." "No,"
answered he, "not now; they will discover us." "'I can't help
that; they must go." "l'ellc1, then, make haste and throw them
down, if you will." Then awray rattled the nuts dow\n among the
boughs, and one of the chiev~es cried, Bless me! It is hailing!"
1 215 1
235 00240.jpg
G R IM M' S
A little while after, Catherine thought the door was still very
heavy~, so she whispered to Frederick, "I must throw the vinegar
down." "'Pray' don't,"' answered he, "it will discover us."' "I
can't help that," said she, "go it must." So she poured all the
v~inegar down; and the thieves said, W~halt a1 heavy! dew there is!"
At last it popped into Catherine's head that it wa-s the door it-
self that wvas So: heavy.! all the time. So shie w\hispered, "'Frerderick,
I must throw the door down soon." But he begged and prayed
her not to do so, for he was sure it would betray them. "Here
goes, however," said she: and down went the door wi~th such a
clatter upon the thieves, that they cried out "Murder!" and not
knowing what was coming, ran away as fast as they could, and
left all the gold. So when Frederick and Catherine came down,
there they found all their money safe and sound.
236 00241.jpg
"FAIRY TALES
/71 TH-E THREE CHIL-
DREN OF FORTUNE I/
NC pnatm
father sent for his
three sons, and gave
to the eldest a cock, to the
I! r hid acse second a scythe, and to the
od"said he; "my end is
~~\\ \\\approaching, and I would
fain provide for you before
I die. Money I have none,
i T~~i and wihat I give you seems r~~~~~i
.li of but little worth; y~et itli~rrI
..., ~rests with yourselves alone.
to turn my gifts to good ac-
count. Only seek out for a .
land where what you have
is as yet unknown, and your
'' I fortune is made."
ii ~After the death of the ''/
r~l Ifather, the oldest set out
'I with his cock; but wherever
I ;1 II he went, in every town he l~
saw from afar off, a cock
[2I71
237 00242.jpg
GRIMM' S
sitting upon the church steeple and turning round with the wind.
In the villages he always heard plenty of them crowing, and his
bird was therefore nothing new; so there did not seem much
chanct of his making his fortune. At length it happened that
he came to an island where the people who lived there had never
heard of a cock and knew not even how to reckon the time.
They knew, indeed, if it were morning or evening; but at night,
if they lay awake, they had no means of knowing how time
went. "( Behold," said he to them, "what a noble animal this is!
how like a knight he is! he carries a bright red crest upon his
head, and spurs upon his heels; he crows three times every night
at stated hours, and at the third time the sun is about to rise.
But this is not all; sometimes he screams in broad daylight,
and then you must take warning, for the weather is surely about
to change." This pleased the natives mightily; they kept awake
one whole night, and heard, to their great joy, how gloriously
the cock called the hour, at two, four, and six o'clock. Then they
asked him whether the bird was to be sold, and how much he
would sell it for. "About as much gold as an ass can carry," said
he. "A very fair price for such an animal," cried they with one;
voice; and agreed to give him what he asked.
When he returned home with his wealth his brothers won-
dered greatly; and the second said, "I will nowc set forth 1like-
wise, and see if I can turn my scythe to as good an account."
There did not seem, however, much likelihood of this; for go
where he would he was mnet by peasants who had as good a scy~the
on their shoulders as he had. But at last, as good luck would
have it, he came to an island where the people had never heard
of a scythe; there, as soon as the corn was ripe, they went into
the fields and pulled it up; but this was very hard work, and a
great deal of it was lost. The man then set to work with his
scythe and mow9ced down their whole ci-op so quickly that the
people stood staring open-mouthed with wonder. They were
willing to give him what he asked for such a marvelous thing;
but he only took a horse laden with as much gold as it could carry.
[ 2I8
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FAIRY TALES
Now the third brother had a great longing to go aind see what
he could make of his cat. So he set out; and at f-irst it happened
to him as it had to the others, so long as he kept upon the main-
land he met with no success. There w~ere plenty- of cats every-
where, indeed too many, so that the young ones were for the
most part. aS soon as they came into the world, drow\ned in the
water. At last he passed over to an island, w-here, as it chanced
most luckily for him, nobody had ever seen a cat, and they were
overrun with mice to such a degree that: the little w~retches danced
upon the tables and chairs, whether the master of the house were
at home or not. The people complained loudly of thi~s griev-
ance; the king himself knew not how to rid himself of them in
his palace; in every corner mice were squeaking, and they gnawed
everything that their teeth could lay hold of. Here was a fine
field for Puss--she soon began her chase, and had cleared two
rooms in the twinkling of an eye, when the people besought
their king to buy the wonderful animal, for the good of the
public, at any price. The king willingly gave what was asked--
a mule laden with gold and jewels; and thus the third brother
returned home with a richer prize than each of the others.
lnleantime the cat feasted away upon the mice in the royal
palace, and devoured so many that they were no longer in any
great numbers. -At length, quite spent and tired with her work,
she became extremely thirsty; so she stood still, drew up her
head and cried, "Miau, Miaul" The king gathered together
all his subjects when they heard this strange cry, and many ran
shrieking in a great fright out of the palace. But the king held
a council belowcu as to what was best to be done; and it was at
length fixed to send a herald to the cat to warn her to leave the
castle forthwi~rth, or that force would be used to remove her.
" For," said the counselors, "we would far more willingly put
up with the mice (since we are used to that evil), than get rid
of them at the risk of our lives." A page accordingly went and
asked the cat whetherr she wr~ere willing to quit the castle?"
But Puss, whose thirst became every moment more and more
239 00244.jpg
GRIMM' S
pressing, answered nothing but MI~au! MIiau!"' which the page
interpreted to mean, "No! No!"' and therefore carried this
answer to the king. "Well," said the counselors, then we must
try what force will do." So the guns were planted, and the
palace was fired upon frorn all sides. WVhen the fire reached
the room where the cat was she sprang out of the window and
;ran awFay; but the besiegers did not see her, and went on firing
until the whole palace was burned to the ground.
240 00245.jpg
[12211
TAL E S
FAIRY
241 00246.jpg
GRIMM' S
"No, I thank you," said the fo:<, "but how is poor Mrs. Fox?"
Then the cat answered:
"She sits all alone in her chamber up-stairs
And bewails her misfortunes w~ith floods of tears;
She weeps till her beautiful eyes are red;
For alas! alas! Mlr. Fox is dead."
"Go to he~r," said the other, "and say that there is a young
fox come who wishes to malrry her."
Then up went the cat--trippety trap,
And knocked at the door---tippety tap;
"Is good Mrs. Fox within?" said she.
"Alas! my dear, what want you with me?"
"'There waits a suitor belowt at the gate."
Then said Mrs. Fox:
"How looks he, my dear?) Is he tall and straight?
Has he nine good tails? There must be nine
Or he never shall be a suitor of mine."
"Ah!" said the cat, "he has but one." "Then I will never
have him," answered Mrs. Fox.
So the cat went down and sent this suitor about his business.
Soon after some one else knocked at the door; it was another
fox, that had two tails, but he was not better welcomed than
the first. After this came several others, till at last one came
that had really nine tails just like the old fox.
'When the widow heard this she jumped up and said:
"'Now, Pussy, my dear, open windows and doors,
And bid all our friends at our wedding to meet;
And as for that nasty old master of yours
Throw him out of the window, Puss, into the street.''
But when the wedding-feast was all ready up sprang the okI
gentleman on a sudden, and, taking a club, drove the whole com-
pany, together with Mrs. Fox, out of doors.
242 00247.jpg
F A IR Y TALES
After some time, however, the old fox really died; and soon
afterward a wolf came to pay his respects and knocked at the
door.
Wtolf. Good day, hlrs. Cat, with your whiskers so trim;
How comes it you're; sitting alone so prim?
What's that you are cooking so nicely', I pray?
Cai. O that's bread and milk for my dinner to-day.
Wil our worship be pleased to stay and dine,
Or shall 1 rrtch you a glass of wine,
"No, I thank you. M~rs. Fox is not at home, I suppose?"
Clat. She sits all alone,
Her griefs to bemoan;
For, alas! alas! Mr. Fox is gone.
Wol0f. Ah! dear Mrs. Puss! that's a loss indeed;
D'ye think she'd take me for a husband instead?
Cat. Indeed, Mr. Wolf, I don't know but she may.
If you'll sit down a moment, I'll step up and see.
So she gave him a chair, and shaking her ears,
She very obligingly tripped it up-stairs.
She knocked at the door with the rings of her toes,
And said, "Mrs. Fox, you're within, I suppose?"
"Oh yes," said the widow, "pray come in, my dear,
And tell me whose voice in the kitchen I hear."
"(It's a wolf," said the cat, "with a nice smooth skin,
Who was passing this way and just stepped in
To see (as old Mr. Fox is dead)
If you'd like to take him for a husband instead."
But," said Mrs. Fox, "has he red feet and a sharp snout ?"
"LNo," said the cat. "Then he wPon't do for me." Soon after
the wolf wuPas sent about his business there came a dog, then a
goat, and after that a bear, a lion, and all the beasts, one after
another. But they all wanted something that old Mr. .Fox
had, and the cat was ordered to send them all away. At last
came a young fox, and Mrs. Fox said, "Has he four red feet and
a sharp snout?" "Yes," said the cat.
15 [ 223 ]
243 00248.jpg
GRIMM'S
"Then, Puss, make the parlor look clean and near,
And throw the old gentleman into the street;
A stupid old rascal! I'm glad that he's dead,
Now I've got such a charming young fosx instead."
So the wedding was held and the merry bells rung,
A4nd the friends and relations they danced and they sung
A~nd feasted and drank, I can't tell how long.
244 00249.jpg
I-51
~FA
R Y
TAL E S
245 00250.jpg
GRI MM'S
lowed out all these directions. As she put the egg-shells with
water in them on the fire the little gnome-child said:
"I1 am old as the w-oods,
But from ages of yore
I never saw shells
Used for boiling before,"
and with that he began to laugh. While he was laughing a com-
pany of elves came crowding into the kitchen, bringing with
them the woman's own child, which they laid down on the hearth.
Then they took up the changeling and disappeared `with him.
246 00251.jpg
( 227j
FAIRY
TAL E S
247 00252.jpg
GRIMM'S
One of these luckyr beings was neighbor Hans. Seven long
years he had worked hard for his master. At last he said,
Alaster, my time is up; I must go home and see my poor
mother once more; so pray pay me my wages and let me go."
And the master said, "You have been a faithful and good servant,
Hans, so your pay shall be handsome." Then he gave him a
lump of silver as big as his head.
Hans took out his pocket-handkerchief, put the piece of silver
into it, threw it over his shoulder, and jogged off on his road
homeward. As he went lazily on, dragging one foot after
another, a man came in sight, trotting gaily along on a capital
horse. "iAh!" said Hans, aloud, "what a fine thing it is to ride on
horseback! There he sits as easy and happy as if he was at
home, in the chair by his fireside; he trips against no stones,
slaves shoe leather, and gets on he hardly knows how." Hans
'did not speak so softly but that the horseman heard it all, and
said, "Well, friend, wrhy do you go on foot then?" "Ah!" said
he. "I have this load to carry. To be sure it is silver, but it is
so heavy that I can't hold up my head, and you must know it
hurts my shoulder sadly." W\hat do you say of making an
exchange?" said the horseman. "I will give y'ou my' horse, and
you shall give me the silver, which will save you a great deal of
trouble in carrying such a heavy load about with you." With
all my heart," said Hans: "but as you are so kind to me I must
tell you one thing: you will have a weary task to draw that silver
about with you." However, the horseman got off, took the
silver, helped Hans up, gave him the bridle into one hand and
the whip into the other, and said, When y-ou want to go very
fast, smack your lips loudly together and cry 'Jip!'"I
Hans was delighted as he sat on the horse, drew himself up,
squared his elbows, turned out his toes, cracked his w~hip, and rode
merrily off, one minute w~histling a merry tune, and another singing:
''No care and no sorrow,
A f6g fiar the morrow!
\\'e'll laugh and be mery
Sing heigh dowrn berry"
[ 2S ]
248 00253.jpg
F A IRY T A LE S
After a time he thought he should like to go a little faster,
so he smacked his lips and cried, "Jip!" Away went the horse
full gallop, and before Hans knew w~hat he was about he was
thrown off and lay' on his back by the roadside. His horse
would have run off if a shepherd w~ho w~as coming by, driving
a cow, had not stopped it. Hans soon came to himself, and
got upon his legs again, sadly vexed, and said to the shepherd:
"This riding is no joke, when a man has the luck to get upon a
beast like this that stumbles and Rings him off as if it would break
his neck. However. I'm off now once for all. I like your cow
now a great deal better than this smart beast that played me this
trick and hasspoiled my best coat, you see, in this puddle,
which, by the by, smells not very like a nosegay. One can walk
along at one's leisure behind that cow-keep good company,
and hav;e milk, butter, and cheese, every day, into the bargain.
What would I give to have such a prize! "ll'ell,"' said the
shepherd, "if you are so fond of her I will change my cow for
your horse; I like to do good to my neighbors, even though I
lose by it myselff" "Done!"' said Hans, merrily. "What a
noble heart that good man has!" thought he. Then the shepherd
jumped upon the horse, wished Hans and the cow good morning,
and away he rode.
Hans brushed his coat, wi~ped his face and hands, rested awhile,
and then drove off his cow quietly, and thought his bargain a
very lucky one. "If I have only a piece of bread Iland I cer-
tainly shall always be able to get that) I can, whenever I like,
eat my butter and cheese with it, and wPhen I am thirsty I can
milk my cow and drink the milk: and what can I wish for more."'
H'hen he came to an inn he halted, are up all his bread, and
gave away his last penny for a glass of beer. \\'hen he had
rested himself he set off again, driving his cowr toward his mother's
village. But the heat grew greater as noon came on, till at last,
as he found hiimself on a w-ide heath that wvould take him more
than an hour to cross, he began to be so hot and parched that his
tongue clave to the roof of his mouth. "iI can find a cure for
[ 229 I
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GRIMM' S
this," thought he; "now I will milk my cow and quench my
thirst." So he tied her to the stump of a tree and hleld his
leather cap to milk into; but not a drop was to be had. WYho
would have thought that this cow, which was to bring him milk
and butter and cheese, was all the time utterly dryr? Hans
had not thought of looking to that.
While he was trying his luck in milking, and managing the
matter very clumsily, the uneasy beast began to think him very
troublesome; isnd at last gave him such a kick on the head as
kznocked him down; and there he lay a long ~while senseless.
Luckily a butcher soon came by, driving a pig in a wrheelbarrow.
"What is the matter with you, my man?" said the butcher, as
he helped him up. Hans told him what had happened, how he
.was dry, and wanted to milk his cow,; but found the cow wFas
dry, too. Then the butcher gave him a flask of ale, saying:
"There, drink and refresh yourself; your cow will give you no
milk. Don't you see she is an old beast, good for nothing but the
slaughter-house "Alas, alas!" said Hans, "who would have
thought it? What a shame to take my horse and give me only a
dry cow! If I kill her, what will she be good for? I hate cowv
beef; it is not tender enough for me. If it were a pig, noF--
like that fat gentleman you are driving along at his ease--one
could do something with it; it would at any rate make sausages."
:"WCell," said the butcher, "I don't like to say no when one is
asked to do a kind, neighborly thing. T~o please you I w-ill
change, and give you my fine fat pig for the cow." Heaven
reward you for your kindness and self-denial!" said Hans, as
he gave the butcher the cow; and, taking the pig off the wheel-
barrow, drove it away, holding it by the string that was tied to its
leg.
So on he jogged, and all seemed now ~to go right with him.
H-e had met with some misfortunes, to be sure, but he was now
well repaid for all. How could it be otherwise with such a
traveling companion as he had at last got?
The next man he met was a countryman carrying a fine white
1 230 J
250 00255.jpg
FAIRY TALES
lu
''3
1~ ,5,
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c.
~-~
ith~
-8lr;anr~u~-~
r n
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~;* ~- .. ~L '
~"
"
~Y~Y.~.Ih.b
~\ ~:
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"HARK: YIEI MY WiORTH-Y FRIEND. YOUR PIG MAY
GET YOU INTO A. SCRAPE"
251 00256.jpg
v gy = ps n a
252 00257.jpg
FAIRY TALES
goose. The countryman stopped to ask what was o'clock;
this led to further chat; and Hans told him all his luck, how he
had made so many good bargains, and how all the world went gay
and smiling wi-th him. The countryman then began to tell his
tale, and said he was going to take the goose to a christening.
"LFeel,") said he, "'how heavy it is, and yet it is only eight weeks
old. Wh~oever roasts and eats it will find plenty of lat upon it,
it has lved so well!" "You're right," said Hans, as he weighed
it in his hand; "but if you talk of fat, my pig is no trifle." M~ean-
time the countryman began to look grave, and shook his head.
"LHark ye!" said he, "my worthy friend, you seem a good sort
of fellow, so I can't help doing you a kind turn. Your pig may
get you into a scrape. In the village I just came from the
squire has had a pig stolen out of his sty. I was dreadfully
afraid when I saw you that you had got the squire's pig. If
you have, and they, catch you, it will be a bad job for you. The
least they will1 do will be to throw y~ou into the horse-pond.
Can you swim?"
Poor Hans was sadly frightened. "Good man," cried he,
"pray get me out of this scrape. I know nothing of where the
pig was either bred or born; but he may have been the squire's
for aught I can tell. Y'ou know this country better than I do;
take my pig and give me the goose." I ought to have something
into the bargain," said the countryman. "Give a far goose for
a pig, indeed! 'Tis not ev~ery one would do so much for you as
that. However, I wIll not bear hard upon you, as you are in
trouble." Then he took the string in his hand, and drove off
the pig by a side path, while Hans went on the way homeward
free from care. "' After all," thought he, "that chap is pretty
well taken in. I don't care whose pig it is, but wherever it
came from it has been a very. good friend to me. I have much
the best of the bargain. FifsE there will be a capital roast;
then the fat will fmnd me in goose-grease for six months; and
then there are all the beautiful white feathers. I will put them
into my pillow, and then I am sure I shall sleep soundly without
[ 233 i
253 00258.jpg
GRIMM' S
rocking. How happy my mother will be! Talk; of a pig, indeed!i
Give me a fine fat goose."
As he came to the next village he saw a scissors-grinder with
his wheel, working and singing:
"O'er hill and o'er date
So happy I roam,
Work light and live well,
All the world is my home;
Then who so blithe, so merry as I?"
Hans stood looking on for a while, and at last said: "Y'ou must
be well off, master grinder, you seem so happy at your work."
"Yes," said the other, "mine is a golden trade; a good grinder
never puts his hand into his pocket without ending money in it.
But where did you get that beautiful goose?" "I did not buy it.
I gave a pig for it." "A4nd where did you get the pig?" "I
gave a cow for it." "And the cow?" ";I ga\e a horse for it."
"And the horse?" "I gave a lump of silver as big as my head
for it." "And the silver?" "Oh, I worked hard for that seven
long yearss" "Yrou have thriven well in the world hitherto,"
said the grinder; "now if you could find money in your pocket
whenever you put your hand in it, your fortune would be made."
"Very true: but how is that to be managed?" "Ho? WThy,
you must turn grinder like myself," said the other. "Y'ou only
want a grindstone; the rest will come of itself. Here is one that
is but little the worse for wear. I would not ask more than the
value of your goose for it. Will you buy ?" How can you ask ?"
said H~ans. "I should be the happiest man in the world if I
could have money whenever I put my hand in my pocket. What
could I want more? There's the goose." "'Now," said the
grinder, as he gave him a common rough stone that lay by his
side, "this is a most capital stone; do but work it well enough,
and you can make an old nail cut with it."
Hans took the stone, and went his way with a light heart;
his eyes sparkled for joy, and he said to himself: Surely I must
[ 234 ]
254 00259.jpg
";FAIRY TALES
have been born in a lucky~ hour; everything I could want or wish
for comes of itself. People are so kind; they seem really to
think I do them a fav~or in letting them make me rich and giving
me good bargains."
Meantime he began to be tired, and hungry, too, for he had
given awvay his last penny in his joy at getting the cow.
At last he could go no farther, for the stone tired him sadly,
and he dragged himself to the side of a riv-er, that he might take
a drink of water and rest awhile. So be laid the stone carefully
by his side on the bank, but, as he stooped down to drink, he
forgot it, pushed it a little, and down it rolled, plump into the
stream.
For a while he watched it sinking in the deep, clear water;
then sprang up and danced for joy, and again fell upon his
knees and thanked Heaven, with tears in his eyes, for its kindness
in taking away his only plague, the ugly, heavy! stone.
"How happy am I!"' cried he. "Nobody was ever so lucky
as 1." Then up he got with a light heart, free from all his
troubles, and walked on till he reached his mother's house, and
told her how very easy the road to good luck was.
255 00260.jpg
GRI M M' S
THE EAR ND TE SKATTE
O NE Chista Dyth ing ofc Noraysa inth ge
Majesty,"staidDa the Noemng Guner ho wa sati the king's
cifhunsa n, "o n i ae, hof orine wht beast Hrs, t at his legeme
elsaid h, Gute or" criether t king; bu how shnall we fin
howeto behav e hiselft our worthy brother wh pen he reaches
hm"PlaeyorMajesty," said teNrea Gunter, "Io wahve a ngloios
cifeow hnsas,"n forfn white as sno, that Icuhwenhe ws a cub; he
will folow me heir itevoer Ia got pl withn my children itand o
hills hindlg, aundl behaed thimel ag well'a any gentllemain og
to dor tHe wis tate you series a und I willigy n myself tke hi
hwheee you ehooehse."t u otybote hnh ece
Sthem kin wa released, and border" sad Gunter, to saet a toiu
flonea with maste Bun*w Sthat I atwihe the monigs dawn," h
hsahid heg, "and maethae best of you wela ay." nlma uh
The Nrsema wenthometo hi husn the foremst dand erl
[ 236 ]
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FAIRY TALES
next morning he waked master Bruin, put the king's collar round
his neck, and away they went over rocks and valleys, lakes and
seas, the nearest road to the court of the King of Denmarki.
When they arrived there the king was away on a journey, and
Gunter and his fellow-traveler set out to follow. Ic was bright
weather, the sun shone, and the birds sang, as they journeyed
merrily on, day after day, over hill and over dale, till they came
within a day's journey of where the king was.
All that afternoon they traveled through a gloomy dark forest,
but toward evening the wind began to whistle through the trees,
and the clouds began to gather and threaten a stormy night.
The road, too, was very rough, and it was not easy to tell which
was most tired, Bruin or his master. What made the matter
worse was, that they had found no inn that day by the road-
side, and their provisions had fallen short, so that they had
no very pleasant prospect before them for the night. "A pretty
affair this!" said Gunter. "I am likely to be charmingly off
here in the woods, with an empty stomach, a damp bed, and a
bear for my bedfellow."
While the Norseman was turning this over in his mind the
wind blew harder and harder and the clouds grew darker and
darker: the bear shook his ears, and his master looked at his
wits' end, when to his great joy a woodman came whistling along
out of the woods, by the side of his horse dragging a load of
fagots. As soon as he came up, Gunter stopped him, and begged
hard for a night's lodging for himself and his countryman.
The woodman seemed hearty and good-natured enough, and
was quite ready to find shelter for the huntsman, but as to the
bear, he had never seen such a beast before in his life, and would
have nothing to do with him on any term~s. The huntsman
begged hard for his friend, and told how he was bringing him as a
present to the King of Denmark; and how he was the most good-
natured, best-behaved animal in the world, though he must allow
that he was by no means one of the handsomest.
The woodman, however, was not to be moved. His wife, he
[ 237]
257 00262.jpg
GRIM M' S
was sure, would not like such a guest, and who could say what
he might take into his head to do? Besides, he should lose his
dog and his car, his ducks and his geese; for they would all run
away for fright, whether the bear was disposed to be friends with
them or not.
"LGood night, master huntsman!" said he; "if you and old
shaggy-back; there cannot part, I am afraid you must e'en stay
where you are, though you will have a sad night of it, no doubt."
Then he cracked his whip, whistled up his horse, and set off once
more on his wTay homeward.
The huntsman grumbled, and Bruin grunted, as they followed
slowly after; when to their great joy they saw the woodman,
before he had gone many yards, pull up his horse once more and
turn round. "Stay, stay!" said he; "I think I can tell you of a
plan better than sleeping in a ditch. I know where you may find
shelter, if you will run the risk of a little trouble from an unlucky
imp that has taken up its abode in my old house down the hill
yonder. You must know, friend, that till last whiter I lived in
yon snug little house that you will see at the foot of the hill if
you come this way. Everything went smoothly on wth;l us till
one unlucky night, when the storm blew as it seems lIkely to do
to-night, some spiteful guest took it into his head to pay us a visit;
and there have ever since been such noises, clattering, and
scampering up stairs and down, from midnight till the cock
crows in the morning, that at last we were fairly driven out of
house and home. What he is like no one knows; for we never
saw him or anything belonging to him, except a little crooked
high-heeled shoe, that he left one night in the pantry. But
though we have not seen him, we know he has a hand or a paw
as heavy as lead; for when it pleases him to lay it upon any one,
down he goes as if the blacksmith's hammer had hit him. There
is no end of his monkey tricks. If the linen is hung out to dry,
he cuts the line. If he wants a cup of ale, he leaves the tap
running. If the fowls are shut up, he lets them loose. He puts
the pig into the garden, rides upon the cows, and turns the
[ 238 ]
258 00263.jpg
FAIRY TALES
horses into the hay-yard; and several times he nearly burned
the house down by leaving a candle alight among the fagots.
And then he is sometimes so nimble and active that when he is
once in motion nothing stands still around him. Dishes and
plates, pots and pans, dance about, clattering, making the most
horrible music, and breaking each other to pieces: and some-
times, when the whim rakes him, the chairs and tables seem as if
they were alive, and dancing a hornpipe or playing battledore
and shuttlecock together. Even the stones and beams of the
house seem rattling against one another; and it is of no use putting
things in order, for the first freak the imp took would turn every-
thing upside down again.
"lIly wife and I bore such a lodger as long as we could, but
at length we were fairly beaten; and as he seemed to have taken
up his abode in the house, w~e thought it best to give up to him
what he wanted: and the little rascal knew w\hat we were about
when w'e w~ere moving, and seemed afraid we should not go soon
enough. So he helped us off: for on the morning we were to
start, as wVe w~ere going to put our goods upon the wagon, there
it stood before the door ready loaded: and wvhen we started we
heard a loud laugh; and a little sharp voice cried out of the
window, 'Good-by, neighbors!' So now he has our old house
all to himself to play his gambols in, whenever he likes to sleep
within-doors; and we have built ourselves a snug cottage on the
other side of the hill, where we live as well as we can, though we
have no great room to make merry in. Now if y-ou and your
ugly friend there like to run the hazard of taking up your quarters
in the elf's house, pray do! Yonder is the road. He may not
be at home to-night."
"We will try our luck," said Gunter; "anything is better to
my mind than sleeping out of doors such a night as this. Your
troublesome neighbor will perhaps think so, too, and we may
havre to fight for our lodging: but never mind, Bruin is rather
an awkward hand to quarrel witrh; and the goblin may perhaps
find a worse welcome from him than your house-dog could give
16 [ 239 I
259 00264.jpg
GRIM M' S
him. He will at any rate let him know what a bear's hug is;
for I dare say he has not been far enough north to know much
about it yet."
Then the woodman gave Gunter a fagot to make his fire
with, and wished him a good night. He and the bear soon
found their way to the deserted house; and no one being
at home, they walked into the kitchen and made a capital
fire.
"Lack-a-day!" said the Norseman. "I forgot one thing-1I
ought to have asked that good man for some supper; I have
nothing left but some dry bread. However, this is better than
sleeping in the woods: we must make the most of what we have,
keep ourselves warm, and get to bed as soon as we can." So
after eating up all their crusts, and drinking some water from
the well close by, the huntsman wrapped himself up close in his
cloak and lay down in the snuggest corner he could find. Bruin
rolled himself up in the corner of the wide fireplace; and both
were fast asleep, the fire out, and evenryhing quiet within-doors
long before midnight.
Just as the clock struck twelve the storm began to get louder--
the wind blew--a slight noise within the room awakened the
huntsman, and all on a sudden in popped a little ugly skirattel,
scarce three spans high, with a hump on his back, a face like a
dried pippin, a nose like a ripe mulberry, and an eye that had
lost its neighbor. He had high-heeled shoes and a pointed red
cap, and came dragging after him a nice fat kid, ready skinned
and fit for roasting. "'A rough night this,"' grumbled the goblin
to himself; "but, thanks to that booby woodman, I've a house
to myself: and nowcP for a hot supper and a glass of good ale till
the cock crows."
No sooner said than done: the skrattel busied himself about,
here and there; presently the fire blazed up, the kid was put on
the spit and turned merrily round. A keg of ale made its ap-
pearance from a closet: the cloth was laid, and the kid was soon
dished up for eating. Then the little imp, in the joy of his heart,
I 240 ]
260 00265.jpg
FAIRY TALES
rubbed his hands, tossed up his red cap, danced before the
hearth, and sang his song:
"Oh! 'tis weary enough abroad to bide,
In the shivery midnight blast,
And 'tis dreary enough alone to ride,
Hungry and cold,
On the wintry wold,
Where the drifting snow falls fast.
'But 'tis cheery enough to revel by night,
In the crackling fagot's light:
'Tis rnerry enough to have and to hold
The savory roast,
And the nut-brown toast,
With jolly good ale and old."
The huntsman lay snug all this time; sometimes quaking, in
dread of getting into trouble, and sometimes licking his lips at
the savory supper before him, and half in the mind to fight for it
with the imp. However, he kept himself quiet in his corner, till
all of a sudden the little man's eye wandered from his cheering
ale-cup to Bruin's carcass as he lay rolled up like a ball, fast
asleep in the chimneyl-corner.
The imp turned round sharp in an instant, and crept softly
nearer and nearer to where Bruin lay, looking at him very closely,
and not able to make out what in the world he was. "One of
the family, I suppose!" said he to himself. But just then Bruin
gave his ears a shake, and showed a little of his shaggy muzzle.
"Oh ho!" said the imp, "that's all, is it? But what a large onel
Where could he come from? and how came he here? What shall
I do? Shall I let him alone or drive him out? Perhaps he may
do me some mischief, and I am not afraid of mice or rats.
So here goes!i I have driven all the rest of the live stock out of the
house, and why should I be afraid of sending this brute after
them ?"
With that the elf walked softly to the corner of the room and,
taking up the spit, stole back on tiptoe till he got quite close to
[ 24x ]
261 00266.jpg
GRIMM' S
the bear; then raising up histr~eapon,'down came a rattling thump
across Bruin's mazard, that sounded as hollow as a drum. The
bear raised himself slowly up, snorted, shook his head, then
scratched it, opened first one eye, then the other, took a turn
across the room, and grinned at his enemy, who, somew\hat
alarmed, ran back a few paces, and stood with the spit in his
hand, foreseeing a rough attack. And it soon came, for the
bear, rearing himself up, walked leisurely forward, and putting
out one of his paws caught hold of the spit, jerked it out of the
goblin's hand, and sent it spinning to the other end of the kitchen.
And now began a fierce battle. This way and that way flew
tables and chairs, pots and pans. The elf was one moment on
the bear's back, lugging his ears and pommeling him with blows
that might have felled an ox. In the next, the bear would throw
him up in the air, and treat him, as he came down, with a hug
that would make the little imp squall. Then up he would jump
upon one of the beams out of Bruin's reach; and soon, watching
his chance, would be down astride upon his back.
Meantime Gunter had become sadly frightened and, seeing
the oven door open, crept in for shelter from the fray, and lay
there quaking for fear. The struggle went on thus a long time,
without its seeming at all clear who would get the better-biting,
scratching, hugging, clawing, roaring, and growling, till the
whole house rang. The elf, however, seemed to growv weaker
and weaker: the rivals stood for a moment as if to get breath,
and the bear was getting ready for a fierce attack, when all in a
moment the skrattel dashed his red cap right in his eye, and
while Bruin was smarting with the blow and trying to recover
his sight, darted to the door, and was out of sight in a moment,
though the wind blew, the rain pattered, and the storm raged,
in a merciless manner.
"Well done! Bravo, Bruin!" cried the huntsman, as he crawled
out of the oven and ran and bolted the door; "thou hast combed
his locks rarely; and as for thine own ears, they are rather the
worse for pulling. But come, let us make the best of the good
[242]
262 00267.jpg
FAIRY TALES
\ \
/ ~ ~s~
\~~u'`
` .t'~
~i~
:.r/l
I''' :
I,
.e
r
I~ii
r'
j
s '.:,~
THE BEAR GRINNED AT HIS ENEMY, WHO, SOMLE-
WHAT ALARMED, RAN BACK A FEW PACES
263 00268.jpg
Cyt > T
264 00269.jpg
FAIRY TALES
cheer our friend has left us!" So saying, they fell to and are a
hearty supper. The huntsman, wishing the skrattel a good night
and pleasant dreams in a cup of sparkling ale, laid himself down
and slept till morning; and Bruin tried to do the same, as well
as his aching bones would let him.
In the morning the huntsman made ready to set out on his
way', and had not got far from the door before he met the wood-
man, who was eager to hear how he had passed the night. Then
Gunter told him how he had been awakened, what sort of a
creature the elf was, and how he and Bruin had fought it out.
"Let us hope," said he, "you will now be well rid of that gentle-
man: I suspect he will not come where he is likely to get any
more of Bruin's hugs; and thus you will be well paid for your
entertainment of us, which, to tell the truth, was none of the
best: for if your ugly little tenant had not brought his supper witch
him we should have had but empty stomachs this morning."
The huntsman and his fellow-traveler journeyed on: and let
us hope they reached the King of Denmark safe and sound,
but, to tell the truth, I know nothing more of that part of the
story.
The woodman, meantime, went to his work; and did not fail
to watch at night to see whether the skrattel came or whether he
was thoroughly frightened out of his old haunt by the bear or
whatever he might take the beast to be that had handled him as
he never was handled before. But three nights passed over, and
no traces being seen or heard of him, the woodman began to
think of moving back to his old house.
On the fourth day he was out at his work in the forest, and
as he was taking shelter under a tree from a cold storm of sleet
and rain that passed over he heard a little cracked voice singing,
or rather croaking in a mournful tone. So he crept along quietly
and peeped over some bushes, and there sat the very same figure
that the huntsman had described to him. The goblin was
sitting withoutt any hat or cap on his head, with a woebegone
face, and wilth his jacket torn into shreds, and his leg scratched
[ 245 J
265 00270.jpg
GRIM M' S
and smeared with blood, as if he had been creeping through a
bramble-bush. The woodman listened quietly to his song, and
it ran as before:
"Oh! 'tis weary enough abroad to bide,
In the shivery midnight blast;
And 'tis dreary enough alone to ride,
Hungry and cold,
On the wintry wold,
Where the drifting snow falls fast."
"Sing us the other verse, man!" cried the woodman: for he
could not help cracking a joke on his old enemy, who be saw
was sadly in the dumps at the loss of his good cheer and the
shelter against the bad weather. But the instant his voice was
heard the little imp jumped up, stamped with rage, and was out of
sight in the twinkling of an eye.
The woPoodman finished his work and wpas going home in the
evening, whistling by his horse's side, when, all of a sudden, he
saw, standing on a high bank by the wayside, the very same
little imp, looking as grim and sulky as before. Hark yle,
bumpkin!" cried the skrattel; "canst thou hear, fellow? Is
thy great cat alive, and at home still?" "IVy cat?)" said the
woodman. "Thy great white cat, man!" thundered out the
little imp. "Oh, my cat!"' said the woodman, at last recollecting
himself. "Oh, yes, to be sure! Alive and well, I thank y~ou:
very happy, I'm sure, to see you and all friends whenever you
will do us the favor to call. And hark ye, friend! as you seem
to be so fond of my great cat, you may like to know that she had
five kittens last night." "Five kittens?" muttered the elf.
"Yes," replied the woodman, "five of the most beautiful white
kits you ever saw--so like the old cat it would do your heart
good to see the whole family--such soft, gentle paws--such deli-
cate whiskers--such pretty little mouths!" "Five kittens?"'
muttered or rather shrieked out the imp again. "Yes, to be
sure!" said the woodman; "five kittens Do look in to-night,
about twelve o'clock--the time, you know, that you used to
[ s46`1
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FAIRY TALES
come and see us. The old cat will be so glad to show them to
you, and we shall be so happy to see you once more. But where
can you have been all this time?"
"I come? Not I, indeed!" shrieked the skrattel. "Wl~hat do
I wrant with the little wretches?? Did not I see the mother once?
Keep ylour kittens to yourself: I must be off--this is no place for
me. Five kittens! So there are six of them now! Good-by to
you, you'll see me no more; so bad luck to your ugly cat and your
beggarly house!" "And bad luck to you, M~r. Crookback!"
cried the wToodman, as he threw him the red cap he had left
behind in his little battle wi;th Bruin. Keep clear of my car,
and let us hear no more of your pranks, and be hanged to you!"
So, now that he knew his troublesome guest had taken his
leave, the woodman soon moved back all his goods, and his wife
and children, into their snug old house. And there they lived
happily, for the elf never came to see them any more; and the
woodman every day after dinner drank, "Long life to the King
of Nonrway for sending the cat that cleared his house of vermin.
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GRIMM''S
TOMT THUMB
A POOR woodman sat in his cottage one night, smoking his
pipe by the fireside, while his wife sat by his side spinning.
How lonely it is, wife," said he, as he puffed out a long
curl of smoke, "for you and me to sit here by ourselves, without
any children to play about and amuse us, while other people seem
so happy and merry with their children!" "What you say is
very true," said the wife, sighing, and turning round her wheel.
"How happy should I be if I had but one child! If it wecre ever
so smaall-nay, if it were no bigger than my thumb-i should be
very happy, and love it dearly." Now--odd as you may~ thinki
it--it came to pass that his good woman's wish was fult~lied,
just in the very way she had wished it; for, not long afterwvard,
she had a little boy, who was quite healthy and strong, but was'
not much bigger than my thumb. So they said, "W(ell, we can-
not say we have not got what we wished for, and, little as he is,
wre will love him dearly." And they called him Thomas Thumb.
They gave him plenty of food, yet for all they could do he
never grew bigger, but kept just the same size as he had been
when he was born. Still his eyes were sharp and sparkling, and
he soon showed himself to be a clever little fellow, who always
knew well what he was about.
One day, as the woodman was getting ready to go into the wood
[248 ]
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'FAIRY TALES
to cut fuel, he said, "I wish I had some one to bring the cant
after me, for I w~ant to make haste." "Oh, father," cried Tom,
"I will take care of that; the cart shall be in the wood by the
time you want it."' Then the woodman laughed, and said,
"'How can that be? you cannot reach up to the horse's bridle."
"Never mind that, father," said Tom; "if my mother will only
harness the horse, I will get into his ear and tell him which way
to go.") "Well,"l said the father, "we will try for once."
When the time came the mother harnessed the horse to
the cant and put Tom into his ear; and as he sat there the
little man told the beast: how to go, crying out, "Go on!"' and
"Stop!" as he wanted: and thus the horse went on just as well
as if the woodman had driven it himself into the wood. It
happened that as the horse was going a little too fast, and Tom
was calling out, "Gently! gently!" two strangers came up.
"W'hat an odd thing that is!" said one; theree is a cart going
along, and I hear a carter talking to the horse, but yet I can
see no one." "'That is queer, indeed," said the other: "let
us follow the cart and see where it goes."' So they went on into
the wood, till at last they came to the place where the woodman
was. Then Tom Thumb, seeing his father, cried out: "See,
father, here I am with the cart, all right and safe! Now take me
do\\n!i" So his father took hold of the horse with one hand,
and with the other took his son out of the horse's ear, and put
him down upon a straw, where he sat as merry~ as you please.
The two strangers were all this time looking on, and did
not know what to say' for wonder. At last one took the other
aside and said, "That little urchin w~ill make our fortune, if
we can get him and carry him about from towrn to town as a show;
we must bu! him."' So they went up to the woodman and asked
him wvhat he would take for the little man. "' He wi~ll be better
off," said they, "witih us than with you." "'I won't sell him
at all," said the father; "'my own Aesh and blood is dearer to
me than all the silver and gold in the world." But Tom, hearing
of the bargain they wanted to make, crept up his father's coat
i 249 i
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GRIMM' S
to his shoulder, and whispered in his ear, "Take the money,
father, and let them have me; I'll soon come back to y'ou."
So the woodman at last said he would sell Tom to the strangers
for a la rge piece of gold, and they paid the price. W~here would
you like to sit?" said one of them. ";Oh, put me on the rim of
your hat; that will be a nice gallery~ for me; I can walk about
there, and see the country as w;e go along." So they did as he
wished; and when Tom, had taken leave of his father they took
him away with them.
They .journeyed on till it began to be dusky, and then the
little man said, "Let me get down, I'm tired." So the man
took off his hat, and put him down on a clod of earth in a plowed
field by the side of the road. But Tom ran about among the
furrows, and at last slipped into an old mouse-hole. "Good
night, my masters!" said he; I'm off! Alind and look sharp
after me the next time." Then they ran at once to the place,
and poked the ends of their sticks into the mouse-hole, but all
in vain; Tom only crawled farther and farther in; and at last
it became quite dark, so that they were forced to go their way
without their prize, as sulky as could be.
When Tom found they were gone he came out of his hiding-
place. "What dangerous walking it is," said he, "in this plowed
field! If I were to fall from one of these great clods I should
undoubtedly break my neck." At last, by good luck, he found
a large empty snail-shell. "This is lucky," said he. "I can
sleep here very well," and in he crept.
Just as he was falling asleep he heard two men passing by,
chatting together, and one said to the other, Hows can we rob
that rich parson's house of his silver and gold ?" 'lltl o,
cried Tom. "What noise was that?" said the thief, frightened;
"(I'm sure I heard some one speak." They stood still, listening,
and Tom said, "Take me with you and I'll soon show you
how to get the parson's money" "But where are you?" said
they. "Look about on the ground," answered he, "and listen
where the sound comes from." At last the thieves found hirn
[ 230]
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'FAIRY TALES
THE COOK GOT UP EARLY', BEFORE DAYBREAK, TO
FEED THE COWS
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a
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'FAIRY TALES
out, and lifted him up in their hands. "You little urchin!"
they said. "W!hat can you do for us3" "W~hy, I can get between
the iron window-bars of the parson's house, and throw you out
whatever you want." "That's a good thought," said the thieves;
"come along, we shall see what you can do."
When they came to the parson's house Tom slipped through
the window-bars into the room, and then called out as loud as he
could bawl," "Will ?ou have all that is here?"' At this the thieves
were frightened, and said: ";Softly, softly!! Speak low, that
y;ou may not awa~ken anybody." But Tom seemed as if hie did
not understand them, and baw-led out again: "H-ow much will
you have? Shall I throw it all out?" Now the cook lay in the
next room, and, hearing a noise, she raised herself up in her bed
and listened. lhleantime the thieves were frightened and ran
off a little wsay; but at last they plucked up their hearts an~d
said, "The little urchin is only trying to make fools of us."
So they came back and whispered softly to him, say-ing, "'Now
let us have no more oF your roguish jokes, but throw us out some
of the money-." Then Tom called out as loud as he could,
"Ve~ry well! hold your hands! here it comes."
The cook heard this quite plain, so she sprang out of bed and
ran to open the door. The thieves ran off as if a wolf was at their
rails, and the maid having groped about and found nothing,
went ~away for a light. By the time she came back Tom had
slipped 06 into the barn; and when she had looked about and
searched every hole and corner, and found nobody, she went to
bed, thinking she must have been dreaming wi;th her eyes open.
The little man craw\led about in the hay-lofc, and at last
found a snug place to finish his night's rest in; so be laid himself
down, meaning to sleep till daylight, and then 6nd his w~ay
home to his fatherr and mother. B3ut alas! how- woefully he
was undone! what crosses and sorrow\s happen to us all in this
world! The cook got up early, before daybreak, to feed the
cows, and going straight to the hay-loft, carried awray a large
bundle of bay, w-ith the little man in the middle of it, fast asleep.
[ 253 ]
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GRIMM' S
He still, however, slept on, and did not awake till he found himself
in the mouth of the cow, for the cook had put the hay into the
cow's rick, and the cow had taken Tom up in a mouthful of it.
"Good lack-a-day!" said he, "how came I to tumble into the
mill?" But he soon found out where he really was; and was
forced to have all his wits about him, that he might not get be-
tween the cow's teeth and so be crushed to death. At last down
he went into her stomach. "It is rather dark here," said he;
"they forgot to build windows in this room to let the sun in;
a candle would be no bad thing."
Though he made the best of his bad luck, he did not like his
quarters at all; and the worst of it was, that more and more hay
was always coming down, and the space left for him became
smaller and smaller. At last he cried out as loud as he could:
"D ion't bring me any more hay! Don't bring me any more hay!"
The maid happened to be just then milking the cow, and
hearing some one speak, but seeing nobody, and yet being quite
sure it was the same voice that she had heard in the night, she
was so frightened that she fell off her stool and overser the
milk-pail. As soon as she could pick herself up out of the dirt
she ran off as fast as she could to her master, the parson, and
said, "Sir, sir, the cow is talking!" But the parson said, WVoman,
thou art surely mad!i" However, he went with her into the cow-
house to try and see what was the matter.
Scarcely had they set their foot on the threshold when Tom
called out, "Don't bring me any more hay!" Then the parson
himself was frightened, and thinking the cow was surely be-
witched, told his man to kill her on the spot. So the cow was
killed and cut up, and the stomach, in which Tom lay~, was
thrown out upon a dunghill.
Tom soon set himself to work to get out, which was not a veryr
easy task; but at last, just as he had made room to get his head
out, fresh ill-luck befell him. A hungry wolf sprang out and
swallowed up the whole stomach, with Tom In it, at one gulp,
and ran away.
12541
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'FAIRY TALES
Tom, however, was still not disheartened; and thinking the
wolf would not dislike having some chat with him as he was
going along, he called out, "My good friend, I can show you a
famous treat." "W~here's that?" said the wolf. "In such and
such a house," said Tom, describing his own father's house,
"you can crawl through the drain into the kitchen, and then into
the pantry, and there you will find cakes, ham, beef, cold chicken,
roast. pig, apple dumplings, and everything that your heart can
wish."
The wolf did not want to be asked twice; so that very night
he went to the house and crawled through the drain into the
kitchen, and then into the pantry, and are and drank there to
his heart's content. As soon as he had had enough he wanted
to get away; but he had eaten so much that he could not go out
by the same way that he came in.
This was just what Tom had reckoned upon; and now he
began to set up a great shout, making all the noise he could.
"Will you be easy?" said the wolf. "You'll awaken everybody
in the house if you make such a clatter." "WVhat's that to me?"
said the little man. "Y'ou have had your frolic; now I've a mind
to be merry myselff" and he began again, singing and shouting
as loud as he could.
The woodman and his wife, being awakened by the noise,
peeped through a crack in the door; but when they saw a wolf
was there you may well suppose that they were sadly~ frightened;
and the woodman ran for his ax, and gav~e his wife a scythe.
"Do you stay behind," said the woodman, "and when I have
knocked him on the head you must rip him up with the scythe."
Tom heard all this, and cried out: Fathler, farther! I am here.
The wvolf has swallowed me."' And his father said, "Heaven be
praised! we have found our dear child again"; and he told his
wife not to use the scythe for fear she should hurt him. Then
he aimed a great blow, and struck the wolf on the head, and
killed him on the spot, and when he was dead they cut open his
body and set Tommyl free. "Ah!'. said the father, "what fears
17 1 255 1
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GRIMM'S
we have had for you!" Yes, father," answered he, "I have
traveled all over the world, I think, in one wray or other, since
we parted; and nowip I am very glad to come home and get fresh.
air again." "Wihyi, where have yrou been ?" said his Father.
"I have been in a mouse-hole, and in a snail-shell, and down a
cow's throat, and in the wolf's belly, and yet here I am again,
safe and sound."
"Well," said they, "y~ou are come back, and we will not sell
you again for all the riches in the world."
Then they hugged and kissed their dear little son, and gave
him plenty to eat and drink, for he was very hungry; and then
they fetched new clothes for him, for his old ones had been quite
spoiled on his journey. So M~aster Thumb stayed at home with
his father and mother, in peace; for though he had been so great
a traveler, and had done and seen so many fine things, and was
fond enough of telling the whole story, he always agreed that,
after all--there's no place like HOMlE
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FAIRY TALES
SNOW-WHIT
IT ~ wa h ideo itr he h ra ae fso
were faln arun, ha te uenofa outr m
thousand mie f'stwriga hrwno.Tefaeo
the ~ I widwwa aeoffn lac bnada h a okn
ou upons the snow se pr ickd e fner, ahnd the ree dros of blood
fell upon it. Then she gazed thoughtfully upon the red drops
that sprinkled the white snow, and said, "Would that my little
daughter may be as white as that snowr, as red as that blood,
and as black as this ebony wvindow-frame!"' And so the little
girl really did grow up; her skin was as w~hite as snow;, her
cheeks as rosy as the blood, and her hair as black as ebony;
and she was called Snow-W'hire.
But this queen died; and the king soon married another wife,
who became queen, and was very beautiful, but so vain that she
could not bear to think that any one could be handsomer than
she was. She had a fairy looking-glass, to which she used to go,
and then she would gaze upon herself in it, and say':
"'Tell me, glass, aell me true!
Of all the ladies in the land,
WVho is fairest? tell me, who?"
And the glass had always answered:
"Thou, queen, art the fairest in all the land."
l =57 1
277 00282.jpg
GRIMM' S
But Snow-White grew more and more beautiful'; and when she
was seven years old she was as bright as the day, and fairer
than the queen herself. Then the glass one day answered the
queen, when she went to look in it as usual:
"Thou, queen, art fair, and beauteous to see,
But Snow-White is lovelier far than thee!"
When she heard this she turned pale with rage and envy, and
called ~to one of her servants and said, "Take Snow-Wlhite awayl
into the wide w7iood, that I may never see her any more." Then
the servant led her away; but his heart melted when Snow-White
begged him to spare her life, and he said, "I will not hurt you,
thou pretty child." So he left her by herself; and though he
thought it most likely that the wild beasts would tear her in
pieces, he felt as if a great weight were taken off his heart when
he had made up his mind not to kill her, but leave her to her fate,
with the chance of some one finding and saving her.
Then poor Snow-White wandered along through the wood in
great fear; and the wild beasts roared about her, but none did
her any harm. In the evening she came to a cottage among
the hills, and went in to rest, for her little feet would carry her
no farther. Everything was spruce and neat in the cottage:
on the table was spread a white cloth, and there were seven little
plates, with seven little loaves, and seven little glasses with wine
in them; and seven knives and forks laid in order; and by the
wall stood seven little beds. As she was very hungry, she
picked a little piece of each loaf and drank a very little wine out
of each glass; and after that she thought she would lie down and
rest. So she tried all the little beds; but one was too long, and
another was too short, till at last the seventh suited her: and
there she laid herself down and went to sleep.
By and by in came the masters of the cottage. Nowv they were
seven little dwccarfs, that lived among the mountains and dug and
searched for gold. They lighted up their seven lamps, and
saw at once that all was not right. The first said, Who has
278 00283.jpg
I ,
THE SEVEN DWiARFS FIND SNOW-WHITE IN THEIR LITTLE BED
279 00284.jpg
280 00285.jpg
I~
FAIRY TALES
been sitting on my stool?" The second, "WVho has been eating
off my plate?" The third, "W~ho has been picking my bread?"
The fourth, "W'ho has been meddling with my spoon?" The
fifth, "Who has been handling my fork?"' The sixth, "W'ho has
been cutting with my knife?" The seventh, "W~ho has been
drinking my wine?" Then the first looked round and said,
"W'ho has been lying on my bed ?" And the rest came running
to him, and every one cried out that somebody had been upon
his bed. But the seventh saw Snow-White, and called all his
brethren to come and see her; and they cried out with wonder
and astonishment and brought their lamps to look at her, and
said, "Good Heavens! what a lovely child she is!" And they
were very glad to see her, and took care not to wake her; and
the seventh dwarf slept an hour with each of the other dwarfs
in turn, till the night was gone.
In the morning Snow-Wh~ite told them all her story; and they
pitied her, and said if she would keep all things in order, and
cook and wash and knit and spin for them, she might stay where
she was, and they would take good care of her. Then they
went out all day long to their work, seeking for gold and silver
in the mountains; but Snow-White was left at home, and they
warned her, and said, "The queen will soon find out where you
are, so take care and let no one in."
But the queen, now that she thought Snow-White was dead,
believed that she must be the handsomest lady in the land;
and she went to her glass and said:
"Tell me, glass, tell me true!
Of all the ladies in the land,
Who is fairest? tell me, who?"
And the glass answered:
"Thou, queen, are the fairest in all this land:
But over the hills, in the greenwood shade,
Where the seven dwarfs their dwelling have made,
There Snow-White is hiding her head; and she
Is lovelier far, O queen! than thee."
[ 26I ]
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GRIMM' S
Then the queen was very much frightened; for she knew
that the glass always spoke the truth, and was sure that
the servant had betrayed her. And she could not bear to
think that any one lived who was more beautiful than she
was; so she dressed herself up as an old peddler, and went
her way over the hills, to the place where the dwarfs
dwelt. Then she knocked at the door and cried, Fine
wares to sell!" Snow-White looked out at the window and
said: "'Good day, good woman What have you to sell?"
"Good wares, fine wares," said she; "laces and bobbins of
all colors." "I will let the old lady in; she seems to be a very
good sort of body," thought Snow-White, as she ran down and
unbolted the door. "Bless me!" said the old woman, "how
badly your stays are lacedl Let me lace them up with one of
my nice new laces." Snow-White did not dream of any mischief;
so she stood up before the old woman; but she set to work so
nimbly, and pulled the lace so tight, that Snow-White's breath
was stopped, and she fell down as if she were dead. "There's
an end to all thy beauty," said the spiteful queen, and went
away home.
In the evening the seven dwarfs came home; and I need not
say -how grieved they wFPere to see their faithful Snow-White
stretched out upon the ground as if she were quite dead. How-
ever, they lifted her up, and when they found what ailed her
they cut the lace; and in a little time she began to breathe, and
very soon came to life again. Then they said, "The old woman
was the queen herself; take care another time, and let no one
in when w~e are away."
When the queen got home she went straight to her glass and
spoke to it as before, but to he!r great grief it still said:
"Thou, queen, art the fairest in all this land:
But over the hills, in the greenwood shade,
Where the seven dwarfs their dwelling have made,
There Snow-White is hiding her head; and she
Is lovelier far, O queent than thee."
I 262)
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`:FAIRY TALES
Then the blood ran cold in her heart with spite and malice,
to see that Snow-White still lived; and she dressed herself up
again, but in quite another dress from the one she wore before,
and took with her a poisoned comb. When she reached the
dwarfs' cottage she knocked at the door and cried, Fine wares
to sell!" But Snow'-White said, "I dare not let any one in."
Then the queen said, "Only look at my beautiful combs!" and
gav~e her the poisoned one. And it looked so pretty that she
took it up and put it into her hair to try it, but the moment it
touched her head the poison was so powerful that she fell down
senseless. "There you may lie," said the queen, and went her
way!. But by~ good luck the dwarfs came in very early that
evening, and when they saw5 Snowv-W~hite lIng on the ground
they thought what had happened, and soon found the poisoned
comb. And when they took it away she got well, and told
them all that had passed; and they warned her once more not
to open the door to any one.
M\Ieantime the queen went home to her glass, and shook with
rage when she read the very same answer as before; and she said,
"Snow-White shall die if it cost: me my life." So she went by
herself into her chamber, and got ready a poisoned apple: the
outside looked very rosy and tempting, but whoever tasted it was
sure to die. Then she dressed herself up as a peasant's wife,
and traveled over the hills to the dwarfs' cottage, and knocked
at the door; but Snow-White put her head out of the window and
said, "I dare not let any one in, for the dwarfs have told me not."
"Do as you please," said the old woman, "but at any rate take
this pretty apple; I will give it you." "No," said Snow-Wllhite,
"(I dare not take it." "Y'ou silly girl!" answered the other.
"What are you afraid of? Do you think it is poisoned ? Come !
do you eat one part, and I will eat the other." N~ow the apple
was so made up that one side was good, though the other side
was poisoned. Then Snow-FWhite was much tempted to taste,
for the apple looked so very nice; and when she saw the old
woman eat she could wait no longer. But she had scarcely
[263 ]
283 00288.jpg
GRIMM' S
put the piece into her mouth when she fell down dead upon the
ground. "LThis time nothing will save thee," said the queen;
and she went home to her glass, and at last it said:
"Thou, queen, art the fairest of all the fair."
And then her wicked heart was glad, and as happy as such a heart
could be.
When evening came, and the dwarfs had gone home, they
found Snow-White lying on the ground: no breath came from
her lips, and they were afraid that she was quite dead. They
lifted her up, and combed her hair, and washed her face wFith
wine and water; but all was in vain, for the little girl seemed
quite dead. So they laid her down upon a bier, and all seven
watched and bewailed her three whole days; and then they
thought they would bury her: but her cheeks were still rosy, and
her face looked just as it did while she wcpas alive; so they said,
"We will never bury her in the cold ground." And they made
a coffin of glass, so that they might still look at her, and wrote
upon it in golden letters what her name was, and that she was a
king's daughter. And the coffin was set among the hills, and one
of the dwarfs always sat by it and watched. And the birds of
the air came, too, and bemoaned Snow-White; and first of all
came an owl, and then a raven, and at last a dove, and sat by her
side.
And thus Snow-White lay for a long, long time, and still only
looked as though she were asleep; for she was even now as
white as snow, and as red as blood, and as black as ebony. At
last a prince came and called at the dwarfs' house; and he saw
Snow-White and read what was written in golden letters. Then
he offered the dwarfs money, and prayed and besought them
to let him take her away; but they said, "We will not part with
her for all the gold in the world." At last, however, theyr had
pity on him, and gave him the coffin; but the moment he lifted
it up to carry it home with him the piece of apple fell from
I 264 ]
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FAIRY TALES
between her lips, and Snow-White awoke and said, Where am
SI?" And the prince said, "Thou art quite sale with me."
Then he told her all that had happened, and said, "I love
you far better than all the world; so come with me to my father's
palace, and you shall be my wife." And SnowT-WVhite consented,
and went home with the prince; and everyching was got ready
with great pomp and splendor for their wedding.
To the feast was asked, among the rest, Snow-WThite's old
enemy, the queen; and as she was dressing herself in line rich
clothes she looked in the glass and said:
"Tell me, glass, tell me true
Of all the ladies in the land,
W~ho is fairest? tell me, who?"
And the glass answered:
"Thou, lady, art loveliest here, I ween;
But lovelier far is the newr-made queen."
When she heard this she started with rage; but her envy
and curiosity were so great that she could not help setting out to
see the bride. And when she got there and saw that it was no
other than Snow-White, who, as she thought, had been dead a
long while, she choked with rage, and fell down and died: but
Snow-White and the prince lived and reigned happily over that
land many, many years; and sometimes they went up into the
mountains and paid a visit to the little dwarfs who had been
so kind to Snow-White in her time of need.
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GRIMI11 MS
TH FU CATSE
C EAR chlde,"s id apoo
how yo ca g ret n." Soi th four
broher too their walk sngstik "I
her hands andtheirt litte b ounde
thei fsthe go od-byoth wiet aoll ut
th ate tt ogether. Whegn thy headn
go y c gt on. soe a they aet four
crosswaysto teah leading sto a difrnt
out ry. T he n tg there eldes the s "Here
we must part; but this day four
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FAIRY TALES
years we will come back to this spot, and in the mean time each
must try what he can do for himself."
So each brother went his way; and as the eldest was hastening
on a man met him, and asked him where he was going and
what he wanted. "I am going to try my luck in the world, and
should like to begin by learning some art or trade," answered he.
"LThen,") said the man, "go with me, and I will teach you to
become the cunningest thief that ever was." "No," said the
other, "that is not an honest calling, and what can one look
to earn by it in the end but the gallows?" "Oh!" said the man,
"you need not fear the gallows; for I will only teach you to steal
what will be fair game: I meddle with nothing but what no one
else can get or care anything about, and where no one can find
y~ou out." So the young man agreed to follow his trade, and he
soon showed himself so clever that nothing could escape him
that he had once set his mind upon.
The second brother also met a man, who, when he found
out what he was setting out upon, asked him what craft he meant
to follow. "'I do not know yet," said he. "Then come with
me and be a star-gazer. It is a noble art, for nothing can be
hidden from you when once you understand the stars." The
plan pleased him much, and he soon became such a skilful star-
gazer that when he had served out his time and wanted to leave
his master he gave him a glass and said, With this you can see
all that is passing in the sky and on earth, and nothing can be
hidden from you."
The third brother met a huntsman, who took him with him,
and taught him so well all that belonged to hunting that he
became very clever in the craft of the woods; and when he left
his master he gav~e him a bow and said, "Whatever you shoot
at with his bow you will be sure to hit."
The youngest brother likewise met a man who asked him
what he wished to do. "Would not you like," said he, "to be a-
tailor?" "Oh no!" said the young man; "sitting cross-legged
from morning to night, working backward and forward with a
[ 267 ]
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GRIM M' S
needle and goose, will never suit me." "Oh!" answered the
man, "that is not my sort of tailoring; come with me, and you
will learn quite another kind of craft from that." Not knowing
what better to do, he came into the plan, and learned tailoring
from the beginning; and wThen he left: his master he gave him a
needle and said, "You can sew anything with this, he it as soft
as an egg or as hard as steel; and the joint will be so fine that no
seam will be seen."
After the space of four years, at the time agreed upon, the
four brothers met at the four crossroads; and having welcomed
one another, set off toward their father's home, where they told
him all that had happened to them, and how each had learned
some craft.
Then, one day as they were sitting before the house under a
very high tree, the father said, "I should like to try what each
of you can do in this way.") So he looked up and said to the
second son, "At the top of this tree there is a chaffinch's nest;
tell me how many eggs there are in it." The star-gazer took his
glass, looked up, and said, "Five." "Now," said the father to
the eldest son, "take away the eggs without letting the bird
that is sitting upon them and hatching them know anything of
what you are doing." So the cunning thief climbed up the tree
and brought away to his father the five eggs from under the bird;
and it never saw or felt what he was doing, but kept sitting on
at its ease. Then the father took the eggs, and put one on
each corner of the table, and the fifth in the middle, and said to
the huntsman, "Cut all the eggs in two pieces at one shot."
The huntsman took up his bow, and at one shot struck all the
five eggs as his father wished.
"LNow comes your turn," said he to the young tailor; "'sew
the eggs and the young birds in them together again so neatly
that the shot shall have done them no harm." Then the tailor
took his needle, and sewed the eggs as he was told; and when he
had done the thief was sent to take them back to the nest, and
put them under the bird without its knowing it. Then she went
[ z68 ]
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FAIRY TALES
on sitting, and hatched chem: and in a few days they crawled out,
and had only a little red streak across their necks, where the
tailor had sewn them together.
"W'ell done, sons!"' said the old man: "you have made good
use of your time and learned something worth the knowing;
but I am sure I do not know which ought to have the prize. Oh!i
that a time might soon come for y~ou to turn your skill to some
accounting"
Not long after this there was a great bustle in the country;
for the king's daughter had been carried off by a mightyr dragon,
and the king mourned over his loss day and night, and made it
known that whoever brought her back to him should have her for
a wife. Then the four brothers said to one another, "Here is a
chance for us: let us try what we can do." And they agreed
to see whether they could not set the princess free. "I will soon
find out where she is, however," said the star-gazer, as he looked
through his glass: and he soon cried out, "'I see her alar off, sitting
upon a rock in the sea, and I can spy~ the dragon close by, guarding
her." Then he went to the king and asked for a ship for himself
and his brothers; and they sailed together over the sea, till they
came to the right place. There they found the princess sitting,
as the star-gazer had said, on the rock; and the dragon was
lying asleep, with his head upon her lap. ";I dare not shoot
at him," said the huntsman, "for I should kill1 the beautiful
young lady also." "Then I will try my' skill," said the thief:
and went and stole her away from under the dragon, so quietly;
and gently that the beast did not know it, but went on snoring.
Then away they hastened with her full of joy in their boat
toward the ship; but soon came the dragon roaring behind them
through the air; for he awoke and missed the princess. But
w~hen he got over the boat, and wanted to pounce upon them
and carry off the princess, the huntsman took up his bow and
shot him straight through the heart so that he fell down dead.
'They were still not safe; for he was such a great beast that in
his fall be overset the boat, and they: had to swim in the open sea
( 269
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GRIM MVI'S
upon a few planks. So the tailor took; his needle, and with a few
large stitches put some of the planks together; and he sat down
upon these, and sailed about and gathered up all the pieces of the
boat; and then tacked them together so quickly that the boat
was soon ready, and they then reached the ship and got home
safe.
When they had brought home the princess to her father there
was great rejoicing, and he said to the four brothers, "One of
you shall marry her, but you must settle among ourselves which
it is to be." Then there arose a quarrel between them; and the
star-gazer said, "If I had not found the princess out all your skill
wo- 'd have been of no use; therefore she ought to be mine."
"EYour seeing her would have been of no use," said the thief,
"if I had not taken her away from the dragon; therefore she
ought to be mine." "No, she is mine," said the huntsman;
"for if I had not killed the dragon he would, after all, have torn
you and the princess into pieces."' "And if I had not sewn the
boat together again," said the tailor, "you would all have been
drowned, therefore she is mine." Then the king put in a word
and said, "Each of you is right; and as all cannot have the young
lady, the best way is for neither of you to have her: for the truth
is, there is somebody she likes a great deal better. But to
make up for your loss, I will give each of you, as a reward for
his skill, half a kingdom." So the brothers agreed that this plan
would be much better than either quarreling or marrying a lady
who had no mind to have them. And the king then gave to each
half a kingdom, as he had said; and they~ lived very~ happily the
rest of their days, and took good care of their father, and some-
body took better care of the young lady than to let either the
dragon or one of the craftsmen have her again.
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F$"a~
[ 27< ]
FAIRY
'i i i i
'' i
: :
TAL E S
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G R IM1M'S
of taking another wife. At last, however, his wise men said,
"This will not do; the king must marry again, that we may
have a queen." So messengers were sent far and wide to seek
for a bride as beautiful as the late queen. But there was no
princess in the world so beautiful; and if there had been, still
there: was not one to be found who had golden hair. So the
messengers came home, and had had all their trouble for nothing.
Now the king had a daughter who was just as beautiful as her
mother, and had the same golden hair. And when she was
grown up the king looked at her and saw that she was just like
his late queen: then he said to his courtiers: "M~ay I not marry
my daughter? She is the very image of my dead wife. Unless
I have her I shall not find any bride upon the whole earth,
and you say there must be a queen." When the courtiers heard
this they were shocked and said, "Heaven forbid that a father
should marry his daughter! Out of so great a sin no good can
come."' And his daughter was also shocked, but hoped the king
would soon give up such thoughts, so~she said to him, Before
I marry any one I must have three dresses: one must be of gold,
like the sun; another must be of shining silver, like the moon;
and a third must be dazzling as the stars: besides this, I want a
mantle of a thousand different kinds of fur put together, to which
every beast in the kingdom must give a part of his skin." And
thus she thought he would think of the matter no more. But
the king made the most skilful workmen in his kingdom weave
the three dresses: one golden, like the sun; another silvery, like
the moon; and a third sparkling, like the stars: and his hunters
were told to hunt out all the beasts in his kingdom, and to take
the finest fur out of their skins: and thus a mantle of a thousand
furs was made.
.When all were ready the king sent them to her; but she got
up in the night when all were asleep and took three of her trinkets,
a' golden ring, a golden necklace, and a golden brooch, and
packed the three dresses--of the sun, the moon, and the stars--
up in a nutshell, and wrapped herself up in the mantle made of
1 272 1
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FAIRY TALE S
all sorts of fur, and besmeared her face and hands with soot.
Then she threw herself upon Heaven for help in her need, and
went away, and journeyed on the whole night, till at last she
came to a large wood. As she was very tired. she sat herself
down in the hollow of a tree and soon fell asleep: and there
she slept on till it was midday~.
Now as the king to whom the wood belonged was hunting in it
his dogs came to the tree, and began to snutT about, and run
round and round, and bark. "Look sharp!"' said the king to the
huntsmen, "and see what sort of game lies there." And the
huntsmen went up to the tree, and when they came back again
said, "In the hollow tree there lies a most wonderful beast, such
as we never saw before; its skin seems to be of a thousand kinds of
fur, but there it lies fast asleep." "See," said the king, "if you
can catch it alive, and we will take it with us." So the huntsmen
took it up, and the maiden awoke and was greatly frightened, and
said, "I am a poor child that has neither father nor mother left;
have pity on me and take me with you." Then they said, "Y'es,
Miss Cat-skin, you will do for the kitchen; you can sweep up the
ashes, and do things of that sort." So they put her into the coach,
and took her home to the king's palace. Then they showed her a
little corner under the staircase, where no light of day ever peeped
in, and said, "Cat-skin, you may lie and sleep there." And she
was sent into the kitchen, and made to fetch wood and water,
to blow the fire, pluck the poultryI, pick the herbs, sift the ashes,
and do all the dirty work.
Thus Cat-skin Lived for a long time very sorrowfully.~ "Ah,
pretty princess," thought she, "what will now become of thee?"
But it happened one day that a feast was to be held in the king's
castle; so she said to the cook: "1\fay I go up a little while and
see what is going on ? I will take care and stand behind the door."
And the cook said, "Yes, you may go, but be back again in half
an hour's time, to rake out the ashes." Then she took her little
lamp, and went into her cabin, and took off the fur skin, and
washed the soot from off her face and hands, so that her beauty
I 2"] 1
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GRIM M' S
shone forth like the sun from behind the clouds. She next
opened her nutshell, and brought out of it the dress that shone
like the sun, and so went to the feast. Every one made way for
her, for nobody knew her, and they thought she could be no less
than a king's daughter. But the king came up to her, and held
out his hand and danced with her; and he thought in his heart,
"I never saw any one half so beautiful."
When the dance was at an end she courtesied; and when the
king looked round for her she was gone, no one knew whither.
The guards that stood at the castle gate were called in, but they
had seen no one. The truth was, that she had run into her little
cabin, pulled off her dress, blackened her face and hands, put on
the fur-skin cloak, and was Cat-skin again. WVihen she went into
the kitchen to her work, and began to rake the ashes, the cook said,
"Let that alone till the morning, and heat the king's soup; I
should like to run up now and give a peep; but take care you
don't let a hair fall into it, or you will run a chance of never eating
again "
As soon as the cook went away Cat-skin heated the king's
soup, and toasted a slice of bread first, as nicely as ever she
could; and when it was ready she went and looked in the cabin
for her little golden ring, and put it into the dish in which the
soup was. When the dance was over the king ordered his scup
to be brought in; and it pleased him so well that he thought he
had never tasted any so good before. At the bottom he saw
a gold ring lying, and as he could not make out how it had got
there, he ordered the cook to be sent for. The cook was frightened
when he heard the order, and said to Cat-skin, "You must have
let a hair fall into the soup; if it be so, you will have a good
beating." Then he went before the king, and he asked him who
had cooked the soup. "I did," answPered the cook. But the king
said, "That is not true; it was better done than you could do
it."' Then he answered, "To tell the truth, I did not cook it,
but Cat-skin did." "Then let Cat-skin come up," said the king;
and when she came he said to her, "WVho are you?" "I am a
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'FAIRY TALES
poor child," said she, "that has lost both father and mother."
"How came you in my palace?" asked he. "I am good for noth-
ing," said she, "but to be scullion-girl, and to have boots and
shoes thrown at my head." "But how did you get the ring
that was in the soup ?" asked the king. Then she would not owvn
that she knew anything about the ring, so the king sent her away
again about her business.
After a time there was another feast, and Cat-skin asked the
cook to let her go up and see it as before. "Yes," said he, "but
come back again in half an hour and cook the king the soup that
he likes so much." Then she ran to her little cabin, washed her-
self quickly, and took her dress out which was silvery as the moon,
and put it on; and when she went in, looking like a king's daugh-
ter, the king went up to her, and rejoiced at seeing her again,
and when the danc began he danced with her. After the dance
was at an end she managed to slip out, so slyly that the king did
not see where she was gone, but she sprang into her little cabin
and made herself into Cat-skin again, and went into the kitchen
to cook the soup. While the cook was above stairs she got the
golden necklace and dropped it into the soup; then it was brought
to the king, who ate it, and it pleased him as well as before;
so he sent for the cook, who was again forced to tell him that
Cat-skin had cooked it. Cat-skin was brought again before the
king, but she still told him that she was only fit to have boots
and shoes thrown at her head.
But when the king had ordered a feast to be got ready for the
third time it happened just the same as before. "You must
be a witch, Cat-skin," said the cook, "for you always put some-
thing into your soup so that it pleases the king better than mine."
However, he let her go up as before. Then she put on her dress
which sparkled like the stars and went into the ballroom in it;
and the king danced with her again and thought she had never
looked so beautiful as she did then. So while he was dancing
with her he put a gold ring on her finger without her seeing it
and ordered that the dance should be kept up a long time. When
1275
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GRIMM' S
it was at an end he would have held her fast by the hand, but she
slipped away and sprang so quickly through the crowd that he
lost sight of her; and she ran as fast as she could into her little
cabin under the stairs. But this time she kept awopay too long,
and stayed beyond the half-hour; so she had not time to take
off her fine dress, but threw her fur mantle over it, and in her
haste did not blacken herself all over with soot, but left one of
her fingers white.
Then she ran into the kitchen and cooked the king's soup; .
and as soon as the cook was gone she put the golden brooch into
the dish. When the king got to the bottom he ordered Cat-sk~in
to be called once more, and soon saw the white finger and the ring
that he had put on it while they were dancing; so he seized her
hand and kept fast hold of it, and when she wanted to loose
herself and spring away the fur cloak fell ofl a little on one side
and the starry dress sparkled underneath it.
Then he got hold of the fur and tore it off, and her golden hair
and beautiful form were seen, and she could no longer hide her-
self; so she washed the soot and ashes from off her face and showed
herself to be the most beautiful princess upon the face of the
earth. But- the king said, "You are my beloved bride, and we
will never more be parted from each other." And the wedding
feast was held, and a merry day it was as ever wJas heard of or
seen in that country, or indeed in any other.
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IE'
[ 2771
FAIRY
TALES
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GRIMM'I'S
word never to come there again; but when any pretty maiden
came within that space she was changed into a-bird, and the
fairy. put her into a cage, and hung her up in a chamber in the
castle. There were seven hundred of these cages hanging in the
castle, and all with beautiful birds in them.
Now there -was once a maiden whose name was Jorinda. She
was prettier than sill the pretty girls that ever were seen before,
and a shepherd lad, whose name was Jorindel, was very fond of
her, and they were soon to be married. One day they went to
walk in the w~ood, that they might be alone; and Jerindel said,
"We must take care that we don't go too near to the fairly's
castle." It was a beautiful evening; the last rays of the setting
sun shone bright through the long sterns of the trees upon the
green underwood beneath, and the turtle-doves sang from the
tall birches.
Jorinda sat down to gaze upon the sun; Jorindel sat by her
side; and both felt sad, they knew not why; but it seemed as if
they were to be parted from each other forever. They had wan-
dered a long way, and when they looked to see w7phich way they
should go home they found themselves at a loss to know what
path to take.
The sun was setting fast, and already half of its circle had
sunk behind the hill; Jorindel on a sudden looked behind him
and saw through the bushes that they had, without knowing it,
sat down close under the old walls of the castle. Then he shrank;
for fear, turned pale, and trembled. Jorinda was just singing:
"The ring-dove sang from the willowcP spray,
Well-a-day! Well-a-day!
He mourn'd for the fate of his darling mate,
Well-a-day!"
when her song stopped suddenly. Jorindel turned to see the
reason, and beheld his Jorinda changed into a nightingale, so
that her song ended with a mournful jug, jug. An owl with fiery
eyes le~w three times round them, and three times screamed:
"Tu whut Tu whul Tu whul"
[278 ]
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TALES
I~
Jorindel could not move; he stood fixed as a stone, and could
neither weep nor speak nor stir hand or foot. And now the sun
went quite down; the gloomy night came; the owl flew into a
bush; and a moment after the old fairy came forth pale and
meager, with staring eyes, and a nose and chin that almost met
each other.
She mumbled something to herself, seized the nightingale, and
went away with it in her hand. Poor Jorindel saw the nightin-
gale was gone--but what could he do? He cculd not speak; he
could not move from the spot where he stood. At last the fairy
came back and sang with a hoarse voice:
"Till the prisoner is fast,
And her doom is cast,
There stay-oh, stay
When the charm is around her,
And the spell has bound her,
Hie awray! awfay!"
On a sudden Jorindel found himself free. Then he fell on
his knees before the fairy and prayed her to give him back his
dear Jorinda; but she laughed at him, and said he should never
see her again; then she went her way.
He prayed, he wept, he sorrowed, but all in vain. "Alas!"
he said, "what will become of me?" He could not go back to
his own home, so he went to a strange village and employed him-
self in keeping sheep. Mlany a time did he walk round and round
as near to the hated castle as he dared go, but all in vain; he
heard or saw nothing of Jorinda.
At last he dreamed one night that he found a beautiful purple
ofloer, and that in the middle of it lay a costly pearl; and he
dreamed that he plucked the flower, and went with it in his
hand into the castle, and that everything he touched with it
was disenchanted, and that there he found his Jorinda again.
In the morning when he awoke he began to search over hill
and dale for this pretty flower, and eight long days he sought for
[ 279 I
PF AIRY
I
299 00304.jpg
GRIMM' S
it in vain; but on the ninth day, early in the morning, he found
the beautiful purple flowTer, and in the middle of it was a large dewf-
drop as big as a costly pearl. Then he plucked the flower, and
set out and traveled day and night till be came again to the castle.
He walked nearer than a hundred paces to it, and yet he did
not become 6xed as before, but found that he could go quite
close up to the door. Jorindel was Very glad indeed to see this.
Then he touched the door with the Row~er, and it sprang open,
so that he went in through the court and listened when he heard
so many birds singing. At last he came to the chamber where
the fairy sat, with the seven hundred birds singing in the seven
hundred cages. When she saw Jorindel she was very angry and
screamed with rage; but she could not come within two yards
of him, for the flower he held in his hand was his safeguard. He
looked around at the birds, but alas! there were many, many
nightingales, and how then should he find out which was his
Jorinda? While he was thinking what to do he saw the fairy:
had taken down one of the cages and was making the best of
her way off through the door. He ran or flew after her, touched
the cage with the flower, and Jorinda stood before him and threw
her arms round his neck, looking as beautiful as evrer, as beautiful
as when they walked together in the wood.
Then he touched all the other birds with the flower, so that they
all took their old forms again; and he took Jorinda home, where
they were married and lived happily together many years;
and so did a good many other lads whose maidens had been forced
to sing in the old fairy's cages by themselves much longer than
they liked.
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'FAIRY TALES
THUlRlBLING THE DWA'.RF
AND THUMBING THE
GIANT
AN honest husbandman had once upon a time a son born to
~ihim who was no bigger than my thumb, and who for
many years did not grow one hair's-breadth taller. One
day, as the father was going to plow in his field, the little
fellow said, "Father, let me go, too." "No," said his father,
"'stay where you are; you can do no good out of doors, and if
you go perhaps I may lose you." Then little Thumbling fell
a-crying; and his father, to quiet him, at last said he might
go. So be put him in his pocket, and when he was in the field
pulled him, out and set him upon the top of a newly made
furrow, that he might be able to look about him.
While he was sitting there a great giant came striding over
the hill. "D~o you see that steeple-man?" said the father. "'If
y~ou don't take care he will run away with you." Now he only
said this to frighten the little boy and keep him, from straying
away. But the giant had long legs, and ~with two or three strides
he really came close to the furrow and picked up M~aster Thumn-
bling, to look at him as he wciould at a beetle or a cockchafer.
Then he let him run about his broad hand, and, taking a liking
[28x ]
301 00306.jpg
GRIMM' S
to the little chap, went off with him. The father stood by all
the time, but could not say a word for fright, for he thought his
child w'as really lost and that he should never see him again.
But the giant took care of him at his house in the woods, and
laid him in his bosom, and fed him with the same food that he
lived upon himself. So Thumbling, instead of being a little
dwarf, became like the giant--tall and stout and strong--so
that at the end of two years, when the old giant took him into
the woods to try him and said, "Pull up that birch-tree for
yourself to walk with," the lad was so strong that he tore it up
by the root. The giant thought he would make him a still stronger
man than this; so, after taking care of him two years more, he
took' him into the wood to try his strength again. This time he
took hold of one of the thickest oaks, and pulled it up as if it were
mnere sport to him. Then the old giant said: "Well done, my
man! You will do now." So he carried him back to the field
where he first found him.
SHis father happened to be just then plowing his field again, as
he was when he lost his son. The young giant went up to him
and said: "Look here, father; see who I am! Don't you know
your ow7n son?") But the husbandman was frightened and cried
out: "No, no, you are not my son. Begone about your business!"
"Indeed I am your son; let me plow a little. I can plow as well
as you." "No; go your way," said the father; but as he was
afraid of the tall man he at last let go the plow and sat down
on the ground beside it. Then the youth laid hold of the plow-
share, and though he only pushed with one hand, he drove it
deep into the earth. The plowman cried out, "If you must plow,
pray do not push so hard; you are doing more harm than good."
But his son took off the horses and said, "Father, go home and
tell my mother to get ready a good dinner; I'll go round the field
meanwhilee" So he went on driving the plow without any horses
till he had done two mornings' work by himself. Then he har-
rowed it; and when all was over took up plow, harrow, horses
and all, and carried them, home like a bundle of strawP.
I 282 ]
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I~
F
FAIRY
~I
/ /
\I ~znl
THE GIANT PICKED UP MASTER THUMBLING, TO LOOK AT
HIM AS HE WOULD AT A BEETLE OR A COCK(CHAFER
TALE
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304 00309.jpg
FAIRY TALES
WVhen he reached the house he sat himself down on the bench,
saying, "Now, mother, is dinner ready?") "Yes,") said she, for
she dared not deny him anything, so she brought two large dishes
full, enough to have lasted herself and her husband eight days;
however, he soon ate it all up and said that was but a taste.
"I see very~ well, father, that I shall not get enough to eat at
your house, so if you will give me an iron walking-stick, so strong
that I cannot break it against my knees, I will go away again."
The husbandman vetry gladly put his two horses to the cart and
drove them to the forge and brought back a bar of iron as long
and as thick as his two horses could draw, but the lad laid it
against his knee, and snap it went, like a beanstalk. "I see,
father," said he, "you can get no stick that will do for me, so
I'll go and try my luck by myself."
Then away he went, and turned blacksmith, and traveled till
he came to a village where lived a miserly smith, who earned
a good deal of money, but kept all be got to himself and gavle
nothing away to anybody. The first thing he did was to step
into the smithy and ask if the smith did not want a journeyman.
"Ay," said the cunning fellow, as he looked at him and thought
what a stout chap he was, and how lustily he would work and earn
his bread. "What wages do yrou ask?" "LI want no pay," said
he; "but every fortnight when the other workmen are paid you
shall let me give y~ou two strokes over the shoulders, just to
amuse myself." The old smith thought to himself he could bear
this very. well, and reckoned on saving a great deal of money,
so the bargain was soon struck.
The next morning the new workman was about to begin to
work, but at the first stroke that he hit, when his master brought
him the iron red-hot, he shivered it in pieces, and the anvil sank
so deep into the earth that he could not get it out again. This
made the old fellow very angry. "Holla!" cried he. "I can't
have you for a workman; you are too clumsy; we must put an
end to our bargain." "Very well," said the other, "but you
must pay for what I have done, so let me give you only one little
I 285 i
305 00310.jpg
GRIM M' S
stroke and then the bargain is all over." So saying, he gave him
a thump that tossed him over a load of hay that stood near.
Then he took the thickest bar of iron in the forge for a walking-
stick and went on his way.
When he had journeyed some way he came to a farm-house
and asked the farmer if he wanted a foreman. The farmer
said, "Yres," and the same wages wtere agreed for as before with
the blacksmith. The next morning the workmen were all to go
into the ~wood; but the giant was found to be fast asleep in his
bed when the rest were all up and ready to start. "Come, get
up," said one of them to him; "it is high time to be stirring.
You must go with us." "Go your way," muttered he, sulkily;
"I shall have done my work and got home long before you."
So he lay in bed two hours longer, and at last got up and cooked
and ate his breakfast, and then at his leisure harnessed his
horses to go to the wood.
Just before the wood was a hollowo way through which all
must pass, so he drove the cart on first and built up behind him
such a mound of fagots and briers that no horse could pass.
This done, he drove on, and as he was going into the wood met
others coming out on their road home. "' Drivre away~," said he;
"I shall be home before you still." However, he only went a
very little way into the wood, and, tearing up one of the largest
timber trees, put it into his cart and turned about homeward.
When he came to the pile of fagots he found all the others stand-
ing there, not being able to pass by. "'So," said he, "you see if
you had stayed with me you would have been home just as
soon, and might have slept an hour or tw~o longer." Then he
took his tree on one shoulder, and his cart on the other, and
pushed through as easily as though he were laden with feathers;
and when he reached the yard he showed the tree to the farmer
and asked if it was not a famous walking-stick. Wlife," said the
farmer, "this man is worth something; if he sleeps longer, still
he works better than the rest."
Time rolled on, and he had worked for the farmer his whole
1286 ]
306 00311.jpg
"FAIRY TALES
year; so when his fellow-laborers were paid he said he also had
a right to take his wages. But great dread came upon the farmer
at the thought of the blows he was to have, so he begged him
to give up the old bargain and take his whole farm and stock
instead. "Not I," said he. "I will be no farmer; I am foreman,
and so I mean to keep, and to be paid as we agreed." Finding
he could do nothing with him, the farmer only begged one fort-
night's respite, and called together all his friends to ask their
advice in the matter. They bethought themselves for a long
time, and at last agreed that the shortest waY was to kill this
troublesome foreman. The next thing was to settle how it was
to be done; and it was agreed that he should be ordered to carry
into the yard some great millstones and to put them on the
edge of the well; that then he should be sent down to clean it
out, and when he was at the bottom the millstones should be
pushed down upon his head.
Everything went right, and when the foreman was safe in
the well the stones were rolled in. As they struck the bottom
the water splashed to the very top. Of course they thought his
head must be crushed to pieces, but he only cried out, Drive
away the chickens from the well; they are scratching about in
the sand above, and they throw it into my eyes, so that I cannot
see." When his job was done up he sprang from the well, say-
ing, "Look here! see what a fine neckcloth I have!"' as he pointed
to one of the millstones that had fallen over his head and hung
about his neck.
The farmer was again overcome with fear, and begged another
fortnight to think of it. So his friends were called together
again, and at last gave this advice--that the foreman should
be sent and made to grind corn by night at the haunted mill,
whence no man had ever yet come out in the morning alive.
That very evening he was told to carry eight bushels of corn to
the mill. and grind them in the night. Away he wernt to the loft,
put two bushels into his right pocket, two into his left, and four
into a long sack slung over his shoulders, and then set off to
1o [ 287 ]
307 00312.jpg
GRI1MM' S
the mill. The miller told him he might grind there in the day-
time, but not by night; for the mill was bewitched, and whoever
went in at night had been found dead in the morning. "Nevrer
mind, miller, I shall come out safe," said he; "only make haste
and get out of the way, and look out for me in the morning."
So he went into the mill and put the corn into the hopper,
and about twelve o'clock sat himself down on the bench in the
miller's room. After a little time the door all at ohce opened of
itself,~ and in came a large table. On the table stood wine and meat
and many good things besides. All seemed placed there by them-
selves; at any rate, there was no one to be seen. The chairs
next moved themselves round it, but still neither guests nor
servants came; till all at once he saw fingers handling the knives
and forks and putting food on the plates, but still nothing else
was to be seen. Now our friend felt somewhat hungry as he
looked at the dishes, so he sat himself down at the table and ate
wPhatever he liked best. "A little wine would be well after this
cheer," said he, "but the good folks of this house seem to take
but little of it." Just as~ he spoke, however, a flagon of the best,
moved on, and our guest filled a bumper, smacked his lips, and
drank "Health and long life to all the company, and success to
our next merry meetmngl
SWhen they had had enough, and the plates and dishes, bottles
and glasses, were all empty, on a sudden he heard something
blow out the lights. "Never mind!" thought he; "one wants no
candle to show one light to go to sleep by." But now that it was
pitch dark he felt a huge blow fall upon his head. "Foul play!"
cried he. "If I get such another box on the ear I shall just give
it back again"; and this he really did when the next blow came.
Thus the game went on all night, and he never let fear get the
better of him, but kept dealing his blows round till at daybreak
all was still. "Well, miller," said he in the morning, "I have had
some little slaps on the face, but I've given as good, I warrant
you, and meantime I have eaten just as much as I liked." The
miller was glad to find the charm was broken and would have
[288]
308 00313.jpg
;FAIRY TALES
given him a great deal of money. "I want no money. I have
quite enough," said he, as he took his meal on his back and went
home to his master to claim his wages.
But the farmer was in great trouble, knowing there was now
no help for him; and he paced the room up and down, while
the drops of sweat ran down his forehead. Then he opened the
window for a little fresh air, and before he was aware his foreman
gave him the first blow, and such a blow that off he flew over
the hills and far away. The next blow sent his wife after him,
and for aught I know they may not have reached the ground yet;
but without waiting to know, the young giant took up his iron
walking-stick and walked off.
309 00314.jpg
GRIMM' S
THE-
JUNIPR-TRE
L OG ogao oetotosadyaso o hr ie
a~~~~~ rihmnwt odadbatflwf.Te oe
In fr ont of o th ous hre was acousn ert, in whic g hrew a uiper
tre On intr' day wthe wif stoo d beundulwer they te o pee
soeac appes, nd asy she ws peoeln tmuc sh t ut her finer and
the lodfell Son gethe sow "Ah," dsihed t hae womn, ta heavily,
"ifI ayd but~ day chd asht red ast blood aendaswited as dlsno,"a
s shen spoke the wordse here a ear gorew igh whithn hrer a ndite
sreem Oed to her' that herwh waes gated, ande she treturned to
thme houlse fn ssh a feeling ldadcmothed. Ah mother passed, and h
snow haod aell disappeared; then another mothe wemntb, hand ll
ti Ihed earh w hias green So theo months folwedoe as nohe," and
fist the troesbuddn the woodse handson h green ih ihn ber anches
grewm t hicl ner th e winhws red, and hetebossom begarne tofll
One agae eing the wie tod uneor thed juniprtr asee, and it was
fuwha ll of sweet sent ththe aher heart leape fo jy, and sh as s
overcome with her happiness that she fell on her knees. Pres-
ently the fruit became round and firm, and she was glad and at
peace. But when they were fully ripe she picked the berries
[ 290 ]
310 00315.jpg
iF AIRY TALES
and ate eagerly of them, and then she grew sad and ill. A little
while later she called her husband and said to him, weeping,
" If I die bury me under the juniper-tree." Then she felt comforted
and happy again, and before another month had passed she had
a little child, and when she saw that it was as white as snow and
as red as blood her joy was so great that she died.
Her husband buried her under the juniper-tree and wept bit-
terly for her. By degrees, however, his sorrow grew less, and
although at times he still grieved over his loss, he was able to go
about as usual, and later on he married again.
He now had a little daughter born to him; the child of his
first wife was a boy, who was as red as blood and as white as
snow. The mother loved her daughter verry much, and when
she looked at her and then looked at the boy, it pierced her heart
to think that he would always stand in the way of her own child,
and she was continually thinking how she could get the whole
of the property for her. This evil thought took possession of
her more and more, and made her behave very unkindly to the
boy. She drove him from place to place with cuffings and buffet-
ings, so that the poor child went about in fear. and had no peace
from the time he left school to the time he went back.
One day the little daughter came running to her mother in
the store-room, and said, "M'other, give me an apple." "Yes,
my child,"' said the wife, and she gave her a beautiful apple out
of the chest; the chest had a very heavy lid and a large iron lock-
"Mlother," said the little daughter again, "may not brother
have one, too?" The mother was angry at this, but she answered,
"Yes, when he comes out of school."
Just then she looked out of the window and saw him coming,
and it seemed as if an evil spirit entered into her, for she snatched
the apple out of her little daughter's hand, and said, "Y'ou shall
not have one before your brother." She threw the apple into
the chest and shut it to. The little boy now came in, and the
evil spirit in the wife made her say kindly to him, My son,
,will you have an apple?" but she gave him a wicked look. Moth-
[ 291 1
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GRIMM' S
er,", said the boy, "~howp dreadful you lookI Yes, give me an.
apple." The thought came to her that she wIould kill him.
"Come with me," she said, and she lifted up the lid of the chest;
"take one out for yourself." And as he bent over to do so the
evil spirit urged her, and crash! down went the lid and off went
the little boy's head. Then she was overwhelmed with fear at
the thought of what she had done. "If only I can prevent any-
one knowing that I did it," she thought. So she went up-stairs
to her room and took a white handkerchief out of her top drawer.
Then she set the boy's head again on his shoulders, a~nd bound
it with the handkerchief so that nothing could be seen, and placed
him on a chair by the door with an apple in his hand.
Soon after this little M~arleen came up to her mother, who was '
stirring a pot of boiling water over the fire, and said, Mother,
brother is sitting by the door with an apple in his hand, and he
looks so pale; and when I asked him to give me the apple, he
did not answer, and that frightened me."
"Go to him again," said her mother, and if he does not answer,
give him a box on th'e ear." So little Marleen went, and said,
"Brother, give me that apple," but he did not say a worord; then
she gave him a box on the ear and his head rolled off. She was
so terrified at this that she ran, crying and screaming, to her
mother. "Oh!" she said, "I have knocked off brother's head,"
and then she wept and wcpept, and nothing would stop her.
"What have you done?" said her mother. "But no one must
know about it, so you must keep silence. What is done can't be
undone; we will make him, into puddings." And she took the
little boy and cut him up and made him into puddings and put
him in the pot. But M~arleen stood looking on, and wept and
wept, and her tears fell into the pot, so that there was no need of
salt.
Presently the father came home and sat down to his dinner.
He asked, "Where is my son?" -The mother said nothing, but
gave him a large dish of black pudding, and Marleen still wept
without ceasing.
312 00317.jpg
FAIRY TALES
THEN SHE LAID THElhl IN THE GREEN GRASS
UNDER THE JUNIPER TRL.E
313 00318.jpg
314 00319.jpg
-FAIRY TALES
The father again asked, Where is my son ?"
"Oh," answered the wife, "he is gone into the country to his
mother's great-uncle; he is going to stay there some time."
"Wlhat has he gone there for? and he never even said good-by
to me!"
"Well, he likes being there, and he told me he should be away
quite six weeks; he is well looked after there."
"I feel very unhappy about it," said the husband, "in case it
should not be all right, and he ought to have said good-by to
me." Wlith this he went on with his dinner, and said, "Little
M~arleen, wlhy do you weep? Brother will soon be back." Then
he asked his wife for more pudding, and as he are he threw the
bones under the table.
Little Alarleen went up-stairs and took her best silk handker-
chief out of her bottom drawer, and in it she wrapped all the
bones from under the table and carried them outside, and all
the time she did nothing but weep. Then she laid them in the
green grass under the juniper-tree, and she had no sooner done
so than all her sadness seemed to leave her, and she wept no
more. And now the juniper-tree began to move, and the branches
waved backward and forward, first away from one another, and
then together again, as it might be some one clapping their hands
for joy. After this a mist came round the tree, and in the midst
of it there was a burning as of fire, and out of the fire there flew
a beautiful bird that rose high into the air, singing magnificently,
and when it could no more be seen, the juniper-tree stood there
as before, and the silk handkerchief and the bones were gone.
Little M~arleen now felt as light-hearted and happy as if her
brother were still alive, and she went back to the house and sat
down cheerfully to the table and are.
The bird flew away and alighted on the house of a goldsmith
and began to sing:
"M~y mother skilled her little son;
My feather grieved when I was gone;
Mvy sister loved me best of all,
[295 1
315 00320.jpg
GRIM M' S
She laid her kerchief over me,
And took my bones that they might lie
Underneath the juniper-tree.
Kywitt, Kyw~itt, what a beautiful bird am II"
The goldsmith was in his workshop making a gold chain, when
he heard the song of the bird on his roof. He thought it so beauti-
ful that he got up and ran out, and as he crossed the threshold he
lost one of his slippers. But he ran on into the middle of the
street,with a slipper on one foot and a sock on the other. He still
had on his apron, and still held the gold chain and the pincers
in his hands, and so he stood gazing up at the bird, while the sun
came shining brightly down on the street.
"Bird," he said, "how beautifully you single: Sing me that
song again "
"Nay," said the bird, "I do not sing twice for nothing. Give
me that gold chain and I will sinlg it you again."
"Here is the chain; take it," said the goldsmith. "Only sing
me that again."
The bird flew down and took the gold chain in his right claw,
and then he alighted again in front of the goldsmith and sang:
"'My mother killed her little son;
My father grieved when I was gone;
My sister loved me best of all;
She laid her kerchief over me,
And took my bones that they might lie
Underneath the juniper-tree.
Kywitt, Kywitt, what a beautiful bird am Il"
Then he flew away, and settled on the roof of a shoemaker's
house and sang:
"My mother killed her little son;
My father grieved when I was gone;
My sister loved me best of all;
She laid her kerchief over me,
And took my bones that they might lie
Underneath the juniper-tree.
Kywitt, Kywitt, what a beautiful bird am Il"
[ 296 ]
316 00321.jpg
FAIRY TALES
The shoemaker heard him, and he jumped up and ran out in
his shirt-sleeves, and stood looking up at the bird on the roof
with his hand ov~er his eyes to keep himself from being blinded
by the sun.
"Bird," he said, "how beautifully you sing!" Then he called
through the door to his wife: "W~ife, come out. Here is a bird;
come and look at it and hear how beautifully it sings." Then
he called his daughter and the children, and then the apprentices,
girls and boys, and they all ran up the street to look at the bird,
and saw how splendid it was with its red and green feathers,
and its neck like burnished gold, and eyers like two bright stars
in its head.
"(Bird," said the shoemaker, "sing me that song again."
"cNay," answered the bird, "I do not sing twice for nothing;
you must give me something."'
"Wife," said the man, "go into the garret; on the upper shelf
you will see a pair of red shoes; bring them to me." The wife
went in and fetched the shoes.
"There, bird," said the shoemaker, "now sing me that song
again."
The bird flew down and took the red shoes in his left claw,
and then he went back to the roof and sang:
"Mhy mother killed her little son;
Mly father grieved when I was gone;
My sister loved me best of all,
She laid her kerchief over me,
And took my bones that they might lie
Underneath the juniper-tree.
Kywitt, Kywitt, what a beautiful bird am II"
When he had finished, he flew away. He had the chain in his
right claw and the shoes in his left, and he flew right away to a
mill, and the mill went, "Click clack, click clack, click clack."
Inside the mill were twenty miller's men hewing a stone, and as
they went, "Hick: hack, hick hack, hick hack," the mill went,
"Click clack, click clack, click clack."
[ 297 1
317 00322.jpg
GRIMM' S
The bird settled on a lime-tree in front of the mill and sang:
"My mother killed her little son;"
then one of the men left off;
"(My father grieved when I was gone;"
two more men left off and listened;
"My sister loved me best of all;"
then four more left off;
"She laid her kerchief over me,
And took my bones that they might Ile"
nowp there were only eight at work;
"Underneath"
and now only five;
"the juolper-tree."
and now only one;
Kywitt, Kywitt, what a beautiful bird am Il"
then he, too, looked up and the last one had left off~ work.
"Bird," he said, "w~7hat a beautiful song that i~s you sing!
Let me hear it too; sing it again."
"(Nay,"1 answered the bird, "I do not sing twice for nothing;
give me that mill-stone, and I will sing it again."
"If it belonged to me alone," said the man, "you should
have it."
"Yes, yes," said the others, "if he will sing again, he can have
it."
The bird came down, and all the twenty millers set to and lifted
up the stone with a beam; then the bird put his head through
the hole and took the stone round his neck like a collar, and
flew back with it to the tree and sang:
[ 298 ]
318 00323.jpg
FAIRY TALES
My mother killed her little son;
M~y father grieved when I was gone;
Myr sister loved me best of all;
She laid her kerchief over me,
And took my bones that they might lie
Underneath the juniper tree,
Kywitt, Kyw\itr, what a beautiful bird am I!"
And when he had finished his song, he spread his wings, and
with the chain in his right claw, the shoes in his left, and the mill-
stone round his neck, he flew right away to his father's house.
The father, the mother, and little Mlarleen were having their
d.10000.
"How light-hearted I feel," said the father, "so pleased and
cheerful."
"And I," said the mother, "I feel so uneasy~, as if a heavy
thunderstorm were coming."
But little M~arleen sat and wept and wept.
Then the bird came flying toward the house and settled on
the roof.
"I do feel so happy," said the father, "and how beautifully
the sun shines; I feel just as if I were going to see an old friend
again."
"Ah !" said the wife, "and I am so full of distress and uneasiness
that my teeth chatter and I feel as if there were a fire in my
veins," and she tore open her dress; and all the while little
Mlarleen sat in the corner and wept, and the plate on her knees
was wet with her tears.
The bird now flew to the juniper-tree and began singing:
M~y mother killed her little son;
the mother shut her eyes and her ears that she might see and
hear nothing, but: there was a roaring sound in her ears like that
of a violent storm, and in her eyes a b Ining and flashing like
lightning :
Mly father grieved when I was gone;
I 299 I
319 00324.jpg
GRIMM' S
"'Look, mother," said the man, "at the beautiful bird that
is singing so magnificently; and how warm and bright the sun is,
and what a delicious scent of spice in the air!"
"M/y sister loved me best of all;"
then little Marleen laid her head down on her knees and sobbed.
"I must go outside and see the bird nearer," said the man.
"Ah, do not go," cried his wife, "I feel as if the whole house
wO~ere in flames."
But the man went out and looked at the bird.
"She laid her kerchief over me,
And took my bones that they might lie
Underneath the juniper-tree.
K~ywitt, Kyrwitt, what a beautiful bird am Il"
With that the bird let fall the gold chain, and it fell just round!
the man's neck, so that it fitted him exactly.
He went inside, and said, See what a splendid bird that is; he
has given me this beautiful gold chain, and looks so beautiful
himself."
But the wife was in such fear and trouble that she fell on the
floor, and her cap fell from her head.
Then the bird began again:
"My mother killed her little son;"
"Ah me!" cried the wife, "if I were but a thousand feet beneath
the earth, that I might not hear that song."
"My father grieved when I was gone;"
then the woman fell- down again as if dead.
"My sister loved me best of all;"
"Well," said little Mclareen, "I will go out, 'too, and see if the
bird will give me anything."
So she went out.
13ool
320 00325.jpg
FAIRY TALES
"'She laid her kerchief over me,
And took; my bones that they might lie"
and he threw down the shoes to her,
"Underneath the juniper-tree.
K'ywitt, Kiywitt, what a beautiful bird am T!"
And she now felt quite happy and light-hearted; she put on
the shoes and danced and jumped about in them. "I was so
miserable,"' she said, "wrhen I came out, but that has all passed
away; that is indeed a splendid bird, and he has given me a
pair of red shoes."'
The wife sprang up, with her hair standing out from her head
like flames of fire, "Then I will go out, too,"' she said, "and see
if it will lighten my misery, for I feel as if the world were coming
to an end."
But as she crossed the threshold, crash! the bird threw the mill-
stone down on her head, and she was crushed to death.
The father and little Marleen heard the sound and ran out,
but they only saw mist and flame and fire rising from the spot,
and when these had passed, there stood the little brother, and he
took the father and little Marleen by the hand; then they all
three rejoiced, and went inside together and sat down to their
dinners and ate.
321 00326.jpg
GRIMM' S
THE WATER OF LIF
LONG~~~ ~~~ beoeyuo eebrthr egei onr
a~~~~~ gra a fakn h a he os hskn
onc fell veyil-oil ha ood hugthecud i
H is son weevr uhgive tterfte'sscns;ad
they we wakngtg ther erymunflyi tegreno h
palace lttl ol ma me thm ad akedwha wa th mater
kig and beggred that hrTe gh goin sacho ther eged Wnate of Life
asc itl wa te onllys ting that nbdtogt could saehm "o"sid e.
ki sng, "I adrae r d.T.muhie v a thanpa ei you in such g et ; dange as
youy m eret with ing youthr jeyourney." But he bggred sof tha
thatthe, kingletol hma go;th and h ke d prnc hout toe hmsrelf,
"Ify Io bingmy fathe theis water, h er will make mea soley heir
hfris koingdom." aehm." nw htwol, si h
Then he sol et out; aand when he had goe o hswayd somget. tme
the cames ton sa dee va lley, overhun ith rck and h wen oodhes; a
as he looke arunhe sa staning ta ol abve him. "on" oneo the
his~30 ]igo.
322 00327.jpg
FAIRY TALES
rocks a little ugly dwarf, with a sugar-loaf cap and a scarlet cloak;
and the dwarl called to him and said, Prince, whither so fast?"
"What is that to thee, you ugly imp?)" said the prince, haughtily,
and rode on.
But the dwarf was enraged at his behavior, and laid a fairy
spell of ill-luck upon him, so that as he rode on the mountain
pass became narrower and narrower, and at last the way was so
straitened thac he could not go a step forward; and wrhen he
thought to have turned his horse round and go back the way he
came, he heard a loud laugh ringing round him, and found that
the path was closed behind him, so that he was shut in all round.
He next tried to get off his horse and make his wray.0n foot, but
again the laugh rang in his ears, and he found himself unable to
move a step, and thus he was forced to abide spellbound.
Meantime the old king was lingering on in daily hope of his
son's return, till at last the second son said, "Father, I will go in
search of the Water of Life." For he thought to himself, "M~y
brother is surely dead, and the kingdom will fall to me if I find
the waterr" The king was at first very unwiilling to let him go,
but at last yielded to his wish. So he set out and followed the
same road which his brother had done, and met with the same
little elf, who stopped him at the same spot in the mountains,
saying, as before, "Prince, prince, whither so fast?" "Mind
y~our own affairs, busybody!" said the prince, scornfully, and rode
On.
But the dwarf put the same spell upon him as he had put on
his elder brother; and he, too, was at last obliged to take up his
abode in the heart of the mountains. Thus it is with proud, silly
people who think themselves above every one else, and are too
proud to ask or take advice.
When the second prince had thus been gone a long time, the
youngest son said he would go and search for the Water of Life,
and trusted he should soon be able to make his father well again.
So he set out, and the dwarf met him too, at the same spot in the
valley among the mountains, and said, "Prince, whither so fast?"
20 300
323 00328.jpg
GRIM M' S
And the prince said: "I am going in search of the Water of Life,
because my father is ill and like to die. Can you help me? Pray
be kind and aid me if you can!" "Do you know where it is to be
found?" asked the dwarf. "No," said the prince, "I do not.
Pray tell me if you know." "Then as you have spoken to me
kindly, and are wise enough to seek for advice, I will tell you how
and where to go. The wclater you seek springs from a w;Pell in an
enchanted castle; and that you may be able to reach it in safety I
will give you an iron wand and tw~o little loaves of bread; strike
the iron door of the castle three times with the wand, and it will
open; two hungry lions will be lying down inside gaping for
their prey, but if you throw them the bread they will let you pass;
then hasten on to the well and take some of the Water of Life
before the clock strikes twelve, for if you tarry longer the door
will shut upon you forever."
Then the prince thanked his little friend with the scarlet cloak
for his friendly aid, and took the wand and the bread, and went
traveling on and on, over sea and over land, till he came to his
journey's end, and found everything to be as the dwarf had told
him. The door ~flew open at the third stroke of the wand, and
when the lions were quieted he wPent on through the castle and
came at length to a beautiful hall. Around it he sa~w several
knights sitting in a trance; then he pulled off their rings and put
them on his own fingers. In another room he saw on a table a
sword and a loaf of bread, wclhich he also took. Farther on he
came to a room where a beautiful young lady sat upon a couch;
and she welcomed him joyfully, and said if he would set her
free from the spell that bound her the kingdom should be his, if
he would come back in a year and marry her. Then she told him
th~at the well that held the Water of Life was in the palace gar-
dens; and bade him make haste and draw what he wanted before
the clock struck twelve.
He walked on; and as he walked through beautiful gardens he
'came to a delightful shady spot in which stood a couch; and he
thought to himself, as he felt tired, that he would rest himself
[ 304
324 00329.jpg
ER ..
~
"
Li-S
r.
-17
r'' =--r_~'
r
FAIRY TALES
\~iiiiiir~~a
'I
"
325 00330.jpg
i:.
326 00331.jpg
FAIRY TALES
for a while and gaze on the lovely scenes around him. So he
laid himself down, and sleep fell upon him unawares, so that he
did not wake up till the clock was striking a quarter to twelve.
Then he sprang from the couch, dreadfully frightened, ran to
the well, filled a cup that was standing by him full of water, and
hastened to get away in time. Just as he was going out of the
iron door it struck twelve, and the door fell so quickly upon him
that it snapped off a piece of his heel.
When he found himself safe he was overjoyed to think that
he had got the Water of Life; and as he was going on his way
homeward he passed by the little dwarf, who, when he saw the
sword and the loaf, said, You have made a noble prize; with the
sword you can at a blow slay whole armies, and the bread will
never fail you." Then the prince thought to himself, "I cannot
go home to my father without my brothers," so he said, "My
dear friend, cannot you tell me where my two brothers are, who
set out in search of the Water of Life before me, and never came
back?" "I have shut them up by a charm between two moun-
'tains,"' said the dwarf, "because they were proud and ill-behaved,
and scorned to ask advice." The prince begged so hard for his
brothers that the dwarf at last set them free, though unwillingly,
saying, "Bew7pare of them, for they have bad hearts." Their
brother, however, was greatly rejoiced to see them, and told them
all that- had happened to him; ho~w he had found the Water of
Life, and had taken a cup full of it; and how he had set a beautiful
princess free from a spell that bound her; and how she had en-
gaged to wait a whole year, and then to marry him and to give
him the kingdom.
Then they all three rode on together, and on their way home
came to a country that was laid waste by war and a dreadful
famine, so that it was feared all must die for want. But the
prince gave the king of the land the bread, and all his king-
dom ate of it. And he lent the king the wonderful sword,
and he slew the enemy's army with it; and thus the kingdom
was once more -in peace and plenty. In the same manner he
[ 307 ]
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GRIMM' S
befriended two other countries through which they passed on
their way.
WVhen they came to the sea, they got into a ship and during
their voyage the eldest two said to themselves, "Our brother
has got the water which we could not find; therefore our father
will forsake us and give him the kingdom, which is our right."
So they were full of envy and revenge, and agreed together how
they could ruin him. Then they waited till he was fast asleep
and poured the Water of Life out of the cup and took it for them-
selves, giving him bitter sea-water instead.
When they came to their journey's end, the youngest son
brought his cup to the sick king that he might drink and be
healed. Scarcely, however, had he tasted the bitter sea-wnater
when he became worse even than he was before; and then both
the elder sons came in, and blamed the youngest for what he had
done; and said that he wanted to poison their father, but that they
had found the W~ater of Life, and had brought it with them.
He no sooner began to drink of what they brought him than he
felt his sickness leave him, and was as strong and well as in his
younger days. Then they went to their brother and laughed at
him, and said: "Well, brother, yTou found the Water of Life, did
you? You have had the trouble and we shall have the reward.
Pray, with all your cleverness, why did not you manage to keep
your eyes open? Next year one of us will take away your beau-
tiful princess if you do not take care. You had better say nothing
about this to our father, for he does not believe a word you say,
and if you tell tales you shall lose your life into the bargain;
but be quiet, and we will let you off."
The old king was still very angry with his youngest son, and
thought that he really meant to have taken away his life; so he
called his court together and asked what should be done, and
all agreed that he ought to be put to death. The prince knew
nothing of what wpas going on till one day, when the king's
chief huntsman went a-hunting with him, and they were alone
in the wood together, the huntsman looked so sorrowful that the
[308]
328 00333.jpg
FAIRY TALES
prince said, "My friend, what is the matter with you?" "I
cannot and dare not tell you," said he. But the prince begged
very hard, and said, "Only tell me what it is, and do not think
I shall be angry, for I will forgive you." "Alas!" said the hunts-
man, "the king has ordered me to shoot you." The prince started
at this and said, "Let me live, and I will change dresses with
y'ou; you shall take my royal coat to show to my father, and do
you give me your shabby one." "With all my heart,"' said the
huntsman. "I am sure I shall be glad to save you, for I could
not have shot you." Then he took the prince's coat and gave
him the shabby one, and went away through the wood.
Some time after three grand embassies came to the old king's
court with rich gifts of gold and precious stones for his youngest
son. Nowp all these woere sent from the three kings to whom he
had lent his sword and loaf of bread, in order to rid them of their
enemy and feed their people. This touched the old king's heart,
and he thought his son might still be guiltless, and said to his
court: "Oh that my son were still alive How it grieves me that
I had him killed!" "He is still alive," said the huntsman; "and
1 am glad that I had pity on him and saved him, for when the
time came I could not shoot him, but let him, go in peace, and
brought home his royal coat." At this the king was overwhelmed
with joy, and made it known throughout all his kingdom that if
his son would come back to his court he would forgive him.
Meanwhile the princess was eagerly waiting till her <;eliverer
should come backr, and had a road made leading up to her palace
all of shining gold; and told her courtiers that whoever came on
horseback, and rode straight up to the gate upon it,, wpas her
true lover, and that they must let him in; but whoever rode on
one side of it they must be sure was not the right one, and that
they must send him away at once.
The time soon came when the eldest brother thought that -
he would make haste to go to the princess and say that he was
the one who had set her free and that he should have her for his
wife, and the" kingdom with her. As he came before the palace
1309]
329 00334.jpg
GRIMM' S
and saw the golden road, he stopped to look at it, and he thought
to himself, "It is a pity to ride upon this beautiful roadd" so he
turned aside and rode on the right-hand side of it. But when he
came to the gate the guards, who had seen the road he took, said
to him he could not be what he said he was, and must go about
his business.
The second prince set out soon afterward on the same errand;
and ~when he came to the golden road, and his horse had set one
foot upon it, he stopped to look at it, and thought it very beau-
tiful, and said to himself, "What a pity it is that anything should
tread here!" Then he, too, turned aside and rode on the left
side of it. But when he came to the gate the guards said he was
not the true prince and that he, too, must go away about his busi-
ness; and away he woPent.
Now when the full year was come round, the third brother
left the forest in which he had lain hid for fear of his father's
anger, and set out in search of his betrothed bride. So he jour-
neyed on, thinking of her all the way, and rode so quickly that
he did not even see what the road was made of, but wPent with his
horse straight over it; and as he came to the gate it flew open,
and the princess welcomed him with joy, and said he was her
deliverer and should now be her husband and lord of the kingdom.
When the first joy at their meeting was over, the princess told
him, she had heard of his father having forgiven him, and of his
wish to have him home again; so, before his wedding with the
princess, he went to visit his father, taking her with him. Then
he told him everything--ho-w his brothers had cheated and robbed
him, and yet that he had borne all these wrongs for the love of
his father.' And the old king was very angry, and wanted to
punish his wicked sons; but they made their escape, and got into
a ship and sailed away over the wide sea, and where they went
to nobody knew and nobody cared.
And now the old king gathered together his court and asked
all his kingdom to come and celebrate the wedding of his son and
the princess. And young and old, noble and squire, gentle and
[gro]
330 00335.jpg
simple, came at once on the summons, and among the rest came
the friendly dwarf, with the sugar-loaf hat and a new scarlet cloak.
And the wedding was held, and the merry belis rung,
And all the good people they danced and they sung
And feasted and frolick'd I can't tell how long.
T A LES
FAIRY
331 00336.jpg
GRIMM' S
THE BLELIH
7,, N l olrha eve h
.3' kighs at r m n er .
while the[ war latd u
in~~~~~~ theL en ec ae h rywa rknuad ns
business. U luckilyC~.,SLF h ris I bus inesw s obsnes orh a
shouldN get hilvig edidr not knowd tHoeveh
out nd ournyedhomewad ine war very dowcatmodut
on te evnin heae came t the edge o as dree p, ood. Ans th
Kro ad led ht wayheu pushed forward, into thsen oodut hes
treies,. towardwich hes besnt hs wearyses and soones camre toad
for a night'n llhs loding and something et ande adri but she
would e i listenh tod nothingw. However, he asntobeasil gt
rdof, and at laste shoesaid: "Itink I e w o~i akepty non, ou thi
once. But if I do e you must edg ove al mgadenp foor. me the
morning." Thet soldier ageed veryar wlingyto anything; u she
hasked. "Hungfry men," he said "ms nigt bimern over-nic tea
hres hoard nohing ele to do hso onr thseterms, hed became the ol
Thce. net iIdayo he ket his wor, and dugth garden all overi h
[3Izz]
332 00337.jpg
FAIRY TALES
very neatly. The job lasted all day, and in the evening, when
his mistress would have sent him away, he said, "I am so tired
with my work that I must beg you will let me stay over the
night." The old lady vowed at first she would not do any such
thing; but after a great deal of talk; Kure carried his point, on
the terms of chopping up a whole cart-load of wood for her the
next day.
This task, too, was duly ended, but not till toward night; and
then Kurt found himself so tired that he begged a third night's
rest, which the witch granted, but only on his pledging his word
that the next day he would fetch her up the blue light that
Burned at the bottom of the well.
When morning came she led him to the well's mouth, tied him
to a long rope, and let him down. At the bottom, sure enough,
he found the blue light, as she had said, and he at once made a
signal for her to draw him up again. But when she had pulled
him up so near to the top that she could reach him with her
hands, she said, "Give me the light; I will take care of it," mean-
ing to play him a trick by taking it for herself, and letting him
fall down again to the bottom of the well. But Kurt was too
old a soldier for that; he~saw through her crafty thoughts, and
said: "No, no! I shall not give you the light till I find myself
safe and sound out of the well." At this she became very angry
and, though the light was what she had longed for many and
many a long year, without having before found any one to go
down and fetch it for her, her rage and spite so overcame her that
she, dashed the soldier, and his prize, too, dowcpn to the bottom.
There lay poor Kurt for a while in despair, on the damp mud
below, and feared that his end was nigh, for how he was ever to
get out he could not see. But his pipe happened to be in his
pocket, still half full, and he thought to himself, "I may as well
make an end of smoking you out; it is the last pleasure I shall
have in this worldd" So he lit it at the blue light, and began to
smoke.
Up rose a cloud of smoke, and on a sudden a little black dwarf,
[313 ]
333 00338.jpg
GRIM M' S
with a hump on his back and a feather in his cap, was seen
making his way through the midst of it. "WYhat do you want
with me, soldier?" said he. "Nothing at all, manikin," answered
he. But the dwarf said, I am bound to serve you in everything,
as lord and master of the blue light. "Then, as you are so very
civil, be so good first of all as to help me out of this well!"' No
sooner said than done; the dwarf took him by the hand and drew
him up, and the blue light, of course, came up with him. "Now
do me another piece of kindness," said the soldier; "pray let
that old lady take my place in the well!" When the dwarf had
lodged the witch safely at the bottom, they began to ransack her
treasures; and Kurt made bold to carry off as much of the gold
and silver in her house as he well could, for he was quite sure
that whosesoever it had once been, he had at least as good right to
it now as she had. Then the dwarf said, "If you should chance
at any time to want me, you have nothing to do but to light
your pipe at the blue light, and I shall soon be with you."
The soldier was not a little pleased at his good luck; and he
went to the best inn in the first town he came to and ordered
some fine clothes to be made, and a handsome room to be got
ready for him. When all was ready, he called the imp of the
blue light to him and said: "The king sent me off penniless, and
left me to hunger and want. I have a mind to show him that it
is my turn to be master now; so bring me his daughter here this
evening, that she may wait upon me." "That is rather a danger-
ous task," said little humpty. But away he went, took the
princess out of her bed, fast asleep as she was, and brought t her to
the soldier.
Very early in the morning he carried her back, and as soon as
she saw her father she said, "I had a strange dream last night;
I thought I was carried away through the air to an old soldier's
house, and was forced to wait upon him there." Then the
king wondered greatly at such a story; but told her to make a
hole in her pocket, and fill it with peas; so that if it wopere really
as she said, and the whole was not a dream, the peas might fall
13I4]
334 00339.jpg
FAIRY TAL E S
A LITTLE BLACK DWARF WAS SEEN MAKING HIS
WAY THROUGH THE MIDST OF THE BLUE LIGHT
335 00340.jpg
336 00341.jpg
FAIRY TALES
out in the streets as she passed through, and thus leave a clue
to tell whither she had been taken. She did so, but the dwarf
had heard the king's plot; and when evening came, and the
soldier said he must bring him the princess again, he strewed peas
over many other streets, so that the few that fell from her pocket
were not known from the others; and all that happened was that
the pigeons had a fine feast, and the people of the tow-n were
busy all the next day picking up peas, and wondering where so
many could come from.
When the princess told her father what had happened to her
the second time, he said, "Take one of your shoes with you, and
hide it in the room you are taken to." The dwarf, however, was
by his side and heard this also; and when Kurt told him to bring
the king's daughter again, he said, "I have no power to save you
a second time; it will be an unlucky thing for you if you are
found out, as I think you w77ill be." But the old soldier, like some
other people who are not over-wise, would have his own way.
"Then," said the dwarf, "all I can say to you is, that you had
better take care and make the best of your way out of the city
gate very early in the morning."
The princess kept one shoe on, as her father bid her, and hid
it in the soldier's room; and when she got back to her father he
gave orders that it should be sought for all over town; and at
last, sure enough,,it was found where she had hidden it. The
soldier had meantime run away, it is true; but he had been too
slow, and was followed and soon caught and thrown into a strong
prison and loaded with chains. What was worse, he had, in the
hurry of his flight, left behind him his great prize, the blue light,
and all his gold; and had nothing left in his pocket but one poor
Sducar. As his friend the dwarf belonged to the light, he was there-
fore lost, too.
While Kurt was standing looking very sorrowfully out of the
prison grating he saw one of his old comrades going by; so, calling
out to him, he said, "If you will bring me a little thing or two that
I left in the inn, I will give you a ducat." His comrade thought
[3x7 ]
337 00342.jpg
GRIMM' S
this very good pay for such a job, and soon came back bringing
the blue light. Then the prisoner soon lit his pipe; up rose the
smoke, and with it once more came his old friend and helper in
time of need, the little dwarf. "Do not fear, master!" said he.
"Keep up your heart at your trial, and leave everything to take
its course; only mind to take the blue light with youl" The
trial soon came on; the matter was sifted to the bottom; the
prisoner was found guilty, and his doom passed; he was ordered
to be hung forthwith on the gallows-tree.
But as he was led away to be hung, he said he had one favor to
beg of the king. "What is it?" said his majesty. "That you
will deign to let me smoke one pipe on the road." "(TwFo, if y'ou
like!" said the king, in the politest way possible. Then Kurt
lit his pipe at the blue light; and the black dwarf with his hump
on his back, and his feather in his cap, stood before him in a mo-
ment and asked his master for orders. "Be so good," said Kurt,
as to send to the right-about all these good people who are taking
so much pains to fit me with a halter; and as for the king, their
master, be kind enough to cut him into three pieces."
Then the dwarf began to lay about himn as quick as thought,
for there was no time to lose; and he soon got rid of the crowd
around; but the king begged hard for mercy, and, to savre his life,
he,agreed to let Kurt have the princess for his wife a~nd to leave
him the kingdom when he died. And so the matter was ended,
and terms of peace were agreed upon, signed, and sealed, and
thus peace, for the first time in his life, brought good luck to our
old soldier.
338 00343.jpg
FAIRY TALES
THE WATER FAIRY'
ONCE upon a time there was a miller and his wpife, wcho
together led a life of contentment and ease. They
possessed both money and lands, and their prosperity
steadily increased from year to year. But fortune is fickle,
and misfortune comes upon us unawares; and even so it
happened that as their riches had increased, so gradually, year
by year, they disappeared. This went on until the miller could
scarceiv call the mill he lived in his own. He was now full of
trouble, and even after his day's work was done he was unable
to rest, for he tossed from side to side on his bed, his anxiety
keeping him awake.
One morning he got up before daybreak, and went out; he
thought the heaviness of his heart might perhaps be lightened
in the open air. Just as he crossed the mill-dam, the first beam
of the morning sun shot forth, and at the same moment he heard
the sound of something disturbing the waters of the mill-pond. He
turned, and saw the figure of a beautiful wsPoman slowly rising
above the surface. Her long hair, which she held back over her
shoulders wvith her fair slender hands, fell around her like a bright
garment. The miller knewi that this must be the fairy of the
water, and in his fear was uncertain whether to go or stay. Then
he heard her soft voice calling him by name, and asking him the
reason of his sadness. At first he was struck dumb, but her
kind tones revived his courage, and he then told her how he had
339 00344.jpg
GRIMM'f'S
formerly lIv\ed in happiness aind luxury, but that now he was so
poor that he did not know- which way to turn.
"IBe at peace," answered thd' fairy. "I will make you richer
and happier than you were before, only you must in return prom-
ise to give me what has just been born in your house."
"That can be none other than a puppy or a kitten,"' thought
the miller, and he gave his promise to her as she desired. The
fairy then vanished beneath the waters, and he hurried joyfully
back to the house, greatly comforted at heart. He was but a
little way from the house when a maid-servant ran out, calling
to him to rejoice, for a little son had been born to him. The miller
stood still as if thunderstruck, for it flashed across him in an
instant that the fairy had known of this and had beguiled him.
With drooping head he went in to his wife, and when she
raked, "Why do you show no sign of joy at the sight of your
beautiful boy?" he related to her what had happened, and told
her of the promise he had made the fairy. "And of what use or
pleasure to me are good fortune or riches," he continued, "if I
must lose my sonZ But what am I to do?" .And not one among
the relations who had come in to wish them, joy knew how to
help or advise.
In the mean time prosperity returned to the miller's house.
He was successful in all his undertakings, and it seemed as if
his chests and coffers filled of their own accord, and as if the
money he put away multiplied itself during the night. In a
little while his wealth was greater than it had been before, but
he could not enjoy it in perfect peace, for the remembrance of
the promise he had made to the fairy continually tormented him.
H~e never went near the mill-pond without a dread at his heart
that she would rise out of the water and remind him of what he
owed her. He would not let the boy himself approach it. "Be-
ware," he said to him. "If you but touch the water, a hand will
come up out of it, seize you, and drag you down."
Year after year, howcpever, passed, and the fairy never showed
herself again, so that at last the miller's fears began to be allayed.
[po0]
340 00345.jpg
FAIRY TALES
PL~
-~II
,e
d ,,
--
d-~I
341 00346.jpg
342 00347.jpg
F-AIRY TALES
The boy grew toward manhood; he was placed under a hunts-
man to be trained, and when he had become an accomplished
huntsman he was taken into the service of the lord of the village.
There lived in the village a beautiful and true-hearted girl
with whom the young huntsman fell in love. When his master
knew of this he made him a present of a little house, and the two
were married, and lIv~ed happily and peacefully together.
One day the huntsman was chasing a roe. The animal turned
from the wood into the open and he followed it and finally shot it.
He did not notice that he was now in the neighborhood of the
dangerous mill-pond, and so, after touching the animal, he went
to the water to wash the blood off his hands. He had scarcely
dipped them in when the fairy rose, Hlung her wet arms around
him, laughing, and dragged him down so quickly that in a moment
the waters had closed over him and all was again still.
When the evening came on and the huntsman did not return,
his wife became alarmed. She wFent out to look for him, and as
he had so often spoken to her of his fear of going near the mill-
pond lest the fairyI should by her wiles get possession of him,
she suspected what had happened. She hastened to the waters,
and her worst suspicions were confirmed when she saw her hus-
band's hunting-pouch lying on the bank. Wailing and wringing
her hands, she called her beloved one by name, but in vain;
she ran to the farther side of the pond, and again called him;
she poured angry abuse on the fair, but still no answer came.
The surface of the pond remained unstirred by a single ripple,
and only the rejection of the half-moon looked calmly up at her
from the water.
The poor wife would not leave the pond; she walked round and
round it without rest or pause, sometimes in silence, sometimes
uttering a loud cry of distress, sometimes crying softly to herself.
But her strength failed her at last; she sank to the ground and
fell into a deep sleep. Ere long a dream took possession of her.
She was climbing painfully up between large masses of rock;
her feet were caught by the thorns and briers, the rain beat in
[ 323 ]
343 00348.jpg
GRIMM' S
her face, and her long hair was blown about by the wind. When,
however, she reached the summit, the whole scene changed.
The sky was now blue, a soft air was~ blowing, and the ground
sloped gently away to a pretty cottage, which stood in a green
meadow studded with many colored flo~wers. She went up to it
and opened the door, and there sat an old woman with white
hair, who gave her a friendly nod. At this moment the poor wife
awoke. Day had already dawpned, and she resolved at once to
follow the guidance of her dream. She climbed up the mountain
with diffcult~y, and everything was exactly as she had seen it in
the night. The old woman gave her a kindly welcome, and
pointed to a chair, telling her to sit down. "Some great trouble
must have befallen you," she said, "to bring you in search of my
lonely cottage." The wife told her, amidst her tears, what had
happened.
"Be comforted," said the old woman. "I wcill help you. Here
is a golden comb; wait till the moon is at its full, then go and
comb your long black hair as you sit beside the mill-pond; when
you have finished, lay the comb by the water's edge, and you will
see what will happen."
The woman returned home, but the time seemed long to her
before the full moon appeared. At last its luminous disk was
seen shining in the heavens, and then she went to the mill-pond
and sat down and combed her long black hair. When she had done
this, she laid the comb down beside the water. She had not long
to wait before the depths became troubled and stormy, and a
great wave rose and rolled toward the shore, bearing the comb
away with it as it retired. After no longer space of time than was
required for the comb to reach the bottom, the surface of the
water parted, and the head of the huntsman rose above it. He
did not speak, but he looked mournfully toward his wife. In the
same instant, a second wave came rushing up and swept over the
man's head, and again everything had disappeared. The waters
of the pond were as tranquil as before, and only the face of the
full moon lay shining upon them. Full or sorrow and disappoint-
[ 324 ]
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FAIRY TALES
ment, the woman turned away, but again that night a dream
showed her the old woman's cottage. The following morning
she once more made her w~ay to the wi;se woman and poured out
her grief to her. This time the old woman gave her a golden
flute, and said, W'ait till the full moon comes again, then take
the flute and play a beautiful air upon it as you sit by the mill-
pond; afterward lay it on the sand; you will see what will happen."
The wife did as the old woman told her. She had hardly
laid the flute down on the sand, when the depths of the water
were troubled as before, a great wave rose and rolled toward
the shore, and bore away the flute. Again the water divided,
and this time not only the head, but half the body of the hunts-
man appeared. He stretched out his arms toward his wife with
a longing gesture, but a second wave rose and overwhelmed him,
and drew him down again beneath the water.
"Alas!" exclaimed the unhappy wife, "of what comfort is it
to me to see my beloved one, only to lose him again!"
Grief overflowed her heart, but a third time a dream took; her
to the cottage of the old woman. So she went again to her and the
wise woman gave her a golden spinning-wheel, and spoke cheer-
ingly to her, saying: Everything has not yet been fully accom-
plished. WVait till there is again a full moon, then take the spin-
ning-wvheel and sit down by the shore and spin the spindle full;
When that is done, place the wFheel near the water, and you will
see what will happen."'
The wife followed out all these directions with care. As soon
as the full moon appeared, she carried the spinning-wheel to the
side of the mill-pond, and there sat down and spun industriously
until she had used up all the flax and had lBlled the spindle. She
had but just placed the wheel near the water, when its depths
were stirred even more violently than before, and then an enor-
mous wave rolled rapidly toward the shore and carried away the
wheel. In the same moment a column of water rose into the air,
and with it the head and the whole body of her husband. He
quickly leaped on to the bank, seized his wife by the hand, and
[3251
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GRIMM' S
fled. But they had gone but a little distance when, with a tre-
mendous roar, the whole mill-pond rose, and wpith a gigantic force
sent its waters rushing over the surrounding country. The
fugitives saw themselves face to face with death; in her terror
the wife called upon the old woman for help, and she and her
husband were instantly changed, she into a toad and he into a
frog. The flood as it reached them could not now kill them,
but it tore them, away from each other and carried them far in
opposite directions.
When the waters had subsided and they again found them-
selves on dry land, they were changed back again into their
human form. But neither knew what had become of the other;
they were both among strangers who knew nothing of their
native land. High mountains and deep valleys lay between
them. In order to support themselves, they were both obliged
to tend sheep, and for many long years they led their flocks overr
the plains and through the forests, full of sorrow and longing.
Once more the spring had broken forth over the earth when,
as fate would have it, they met each other one day while out:
with their flocks. The husband saw a flock of sheep on a distant
hillside anld drove his own toward them, and in a valley~ on the
way he came upon his wife. They did not recognize each other,
but both of them were glad to think, that they would no longer
be so lonely as heretofore. From this time forth they tended
their flocks side by side; they did not speak much, but they felt
comforted.
One evening, when the full moon was shining in the heavens
above them, and the sheep were already lying down for the night,
the shepherd drew his flute out of his pocket and playedd on it:
a beautiful but melancholy air. When he had finished, he saw
that the shepherdess was weeping bitterly. "Why do you weep ?''
he asked. "Alas," she answered, "even as now the full moon
was shining when I played that tune for the last time upon the
flute, and saw my beloved one's head rise above the waters."
IN looked at her, and it seemed to him as if a vreil fell from before
[ 326 ]
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his eyes, and he recognized his dearest wife. And she looked
up and saw the moonlight shining on her husband's face, and she
also knew him again.
They kissed and embraced each other, and there is no need to
ask if they were happy.
TZ ALES
FAIRY
347 00352.jpg
ill
I328]
GRIMM PI'S
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FAIRY TALES
rate have earned enough to live upon for the rest of your days in
peace and plenty, at home by your own fireside?" They talked
so often to him in this manner, that he at last said he would go
and try his luck with them; but they all the time thought of
nothing but how they should manage to steal away his money
from him.
When they had gone a little way, the two rogues said, "We
must go by the right-hand road, for that will take us quickest
into another country, where we shall be safe."' Now they knew
all the while that what they were saying was untrue; and as soon
as Conrad said, "No, that will take us straight back into the
town we came from--we must keep on the left hand," they
picked a quarrel with him, and said: "W!hat do you give yourself
airs for? You know nothing about it." Then they fell upon him
and knocked him down, and beat him over the head till he was
blind. And having taken all the money out of his pockets,
they dragged him to a gallows-tree that stood hard by, bound
him fast down at the foot: of it, and went back into the town with
the money. But the poor blind man did not know where he
was; and he felt all around him and, finding that he was bound
to a large beam of wood, thought it was a cross, and said, "After
all, they have done kindly in leaving me under a cross; now
Heaven will guard me."
When night came on he heard something fluttering over his
head. It turned out to be three crows that flew round and round,
and at last perched upon the tree. By and by they began to
talk together, and he heard one of them say, "Sister, what is
the best news with you to-day "Oh, if men did but know
all that we know!" said the other. "The princess is ill, and the
king has vowed to marry her to any one who will cure her; but
this none can do, for she will not be well until yonder blue flower
is burned to ashes and swallowed.by her." "iOh, indeed," said
the other crow, "if men did but know what we know! To-night
there will fall from heaven a dew of such power that even a blind
man, if he washed his eyes with it, would see again." And
[3291
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G R IM M' S
the third spoke, and said: "Oh, if men knew what we know!
The Blower is wanted but for one, the dew is wanted but for
few; but there is a great dearth of water for all in the town. All
the wells are dried up; and no one knows that they must take away
the large square stone by the fountain in the market-place, and
dig underneath it, and that then the finest water will spring up."
Conrad lay all this time quite quiet; and when the three crows
had done talking, he heard them fluttering round again and at
last away they flew. Greatly wondering at what he had heard,
and overjoyed at the thoughts of getting his sight, he tried with
all his strength to break loose. At last he found himself free,
and plucked some of the grass that grew beneath him and washed
his eyes with the dew that had fallen upon it. At once his eye-
sight came to him again, and he saw by the light of the moon
and the stars that he was beneath the gallows-tree, and not be-
neath a cross, as he had thought. Then he gathered together in
a bottle as much of the dew as he could, to take away with him,
and looked around till he saw the blue flower that grew close
by; and when he had burned it, he gathered up the ashes and set
out on his wary toward the king's court.
When he reached the palace, he told the king he was come
to cure the princess; and when he had giv~en her the ashes and
made her well, he claimed her for his wiife, as the reward that
was to be given. But the princess, looking upon him and seeing
that his clothes were so shabby, had no mind to be his wife;
and the king would not keep his w~ord, but thought to get rid
of him by say-ing, "W'hoever wants to hav~e the princess for his
wife must find enough water for the use of the tow~n, where there
is this summer a great dearth." Then the soldier went out and
told the people to take up the square stone by the fountain in
the market-place, and to dig for water underneath; and when
they had done so there came up a fine spring that gave enough
water for the whole town. So the king could no longer get off
giving his daughter; and as the princess began to think better of
him, they were married and lived very happily together, after all.
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FAIRY TALES
Soon after, as he was walking one day through a field, he met
his two wicked comrades who had treated him so basely. Though
they did not know him, he knew them at once, and went up to
them and said: "Look at me! I am your'old comrade whom
you beat and robbed and left blind. Heaven has defeated your
wicked wishes and turned all the mischief which you brought
upon me into good luck." When they' heard this they fell at his
feet and begged for pardon; and, as he had a very kind and good
heart, he forgave them and took them to his palace and gave
them food and cloches. And he told them all that had happened
to him, and how he had reached these honors. After they had
heard the whole story they said to themselves: Why should
not we go and sit some night under the gallows? We may hear
something that will bring us good luck, too."
Next night they stole away; and when they had sat under the
tree a little while, they heard a fluttering noise over their heads,
and the three crows came and perched upon it. "Sisters," said
one of them, "some one must have overheard us, for all the wcporld
is talking of the wonderful things that have happened--the
princess is w~ell, the flower has been plucked and burned, a blind
man hlas found his sight, and they have found the spring that
gives water to the whole town. Let us look round; perhaps we
may fnd some one skulking about; if we do, he shall rue the day."
Then they began fluttering about, and soon spied out the
twro men below, and flew at them in a rage, beating and pecking;
them in the face with their wings and beaks till they were quite
blind and lay half dead upon the ground under the gallows-tree.
The nextc day passed over and they did not return to the
palace, so Conrad began to wonder where they were, and went.
out the following morning in search of them, and at last he found
them where they lay, dreadfully repaid for all their folly and
baseness.
351 00356.jpg
GRIMM' S
.-I I
ONE fine evening a young princess .
put on her bonnet and clogs, and Wlil
~went out to take a walk by herself
Sin a wood; and when she came to a cool spring of water that rose
in the midst of it, she sat herself down to rest a while. Now she
had a golden ball in her hand, which was her fa vorite p lay th ing, and
she was always tossing it up into the air and catching it again
as it fell. After a time she threw it up so high that she missed
catching it as it fell, and the ball bounded away and rolled along
upon the ground till at last it fell dowcpn into the spring. The
princess looked into the spring after her ball, buc it was very
deep, so deep that she could not see the bottom of it. Then
she began to bewail her loss, and said, "Alas! if I could only get
my ball again I would give all my fine clothes and jewels, and
everything that I have in the world."
Whilst she was speaking a frog put its head out of the water
and said, "Princess, why do you weep so bitterly?" "Alas!"
said she, "what can y~ou do for me, you nasty frog? Mvy golden
ball has fallen into the spring." The frog said, I want not your
pearls and jewels and fine clothes; but if you will love me, and let
[332]
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THE FROG DIVED DEEP AND CAME UP AGAIN WITH
THE BALL IN HIS MOUTH
FAIRY
TAL E
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FAIRY TALES
me live with you and eat from off your golden plate, and sleep
upon your bed, I will bring you your ball again." "Wh1at non-
sense," thought the princess, "this silly frog is talking! He can
never even get out of the spring to visit me, though he may
be able to get my ball for me, and therefore I will tell him he shall
have what he asks." So she said to the frog, "Well, if you will
bring me my ball, I will do all you ask." Then the frog put his
head down, and dived deep under the water; and after a little
while he came up again with the ball in his mouth and threw it
on the edge of the spring. As soon as the young princess saw
her ball, she ran to pick it up; and she was so overjoyed to have
it in her hand again that she never thought of the frog, but ran
home with it as fast as she could. The frog called after her, "Stay,
princess,. and take mne with you as you said." But she did not
stop to hear a word.
The next day, just as the princess had sat down to dinner,
she heard a strange noise--tap>, tap--plash, plash--as if some-
thing was coming up the marble staircase, and soon afterward
there wocas a gentle knock at the door and a little voice cried out
and said:
"Open the door, my princess dear,
Open the door to thy true love here!
And mind the words that thou and I said
By the fountain cool, in the greenwood shade."
Then the princess ran to the door and opened it, and there
she sawcp the frog, whom she had quite forgotten. At this sight
she was sadly frightened, and, shutting the door as fast as she
could, came back to her seat. The king, her father, seeing that
something had frightened her, asked her what was the matter.
"There is a nasty frog," said she, "at the door that lifted my ball
for me out of the spring this morning. I told him that he should
live with me here, thinking that he could never get out of the
spring; but there he is at the door, and he wants to come in."
Whle she was speaking the frog knocked again at the door, and
said:
1335]
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GRIM' MS
"Open the door, my princess dear,
Open the door to thy true love herel
And mind the words that thou and I said
By the fountain cool, in the greenwood shade."
Then the king said to the young princess, "As you have given
your word you must keep it; so go and let him in." She did so,
and the frog hopped into the room, and then straight on--tap,
tap--plash, plash--from the bottom of the room to the top, till
he came up close to the table where the princess sat. "Pray
lift me upon a chair," said he to the princess, "and let me sit next
to you." As soon as she had done this, the frog said, "Put your
plate nearer to me, that I may eat out of it." This she did, and
when he had eaten as much as he could, he said, "Nowi I am tired;
carry me up-stairs, and put me into your bed." And the prin-
cess, though very unwilling, took him up in her hand and put
him upon the pillow of her own bed, where he slept all night long.
As soon as it was light he jumped up, hopped do~wn-stairs, and
went out of the house. "Now, then," thought the princess,
"at last he is gone, and I shall be troubled with him no more."
But she was mistaken, for when night came again she heard
the same tapping at the door, and the frog came once more and
said:
"Open the door, my princess dear,
Open the door to thy true love here
And mind the words that thou and I said
By the fountain cool, in the greenwood shade."
And when the princess opened the door, the frog came in and
slept upon her pillow as before, till the morning broke. And the
third night he did the same. But when the princess awroke on
the following morning she was astonished to see, instead of the
frog, a handsome prince, gazing on her with the most beautiful
eyes she had ever seen, and standing at the head of her bed.
He told her that he had been enchanted by a spiteful fairly,
who had changed him into a frog; and that he had been fated so
1336)
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_
FAIRY TALES
to abide till some princess should take him out of the spring and
let him eat from her plate and sleep upon her bed for three nights.
"(You," said the prince, "have broken this cruel charm, and
now I have nothing to wish for but that you should go with me
into my father's kingdom, where I will marry you and love you
as long as you liv'e."
The young princess, you may be sure, was not long in saying
"Yes" to all this; and as they spoke a gay coach drove up, with
eight beautiful horses decked with plumes of fathers and golden
harness; and behind the coach rode the prince's servant, faithful
Heinrich, who had bewailed the misfortunes of his dear master
during his enchantment so long and so bitterly that his heart had
well-nigh burst.
They then took leave of the king, and got into the coach with
eight horses, and all set out, full of joy and merriment, for the
prince's kingdom, which they reached safely; and there they
lived happily a great many years.
357 00362.jpg
GRIMM' S
THE ELVES AND THE
COBBLER
T~HERE was once a cobbler who worked very hard and was
Very honest; but still he could not earn enough to live
upon; and at last all he had in the world was gone save
just leather enough to make one pair of shoes.
Then he cut his leather out, all ready to make up the next
day, meaning to rise early in the morning to his work. His
conscience was clear and his heart light amidst all his
troubles, so he went peaceably to bed, left all his cares to
Heaven, and soon fell asleep. In the morning, after he had
said his- prayers, he sat himself down to his work; when, to
his great wonder, there stood the shoes all ready made, upon
the table. The good man knew not what to say or think at such
an add thing happening. He looked at the workmanship; there
was not one false stitch in the whole job; all waS so neat and true
that it was quite a masterpiece.
The same day a customer came in, and the shoes suited him
so well that he willingly paid a price higher than usual for them;
and the poor shoemaker, with the money, bought leather enough
to make two pair more. In the evening he cut out the work
and ~went to bed early that he might get up and begin betimes
next day; but he was saved all the trouble, for when he got up
in the morning the work was done ready to his hand. Soon in
[338.1
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THE SHOEMAKER AND HIS WIFE WATCHED. FROM
BEHIND 'THE CURTAIN
FAIRY TAL E S
359 00364.jpg
pp eg saggregyggggiggy
360 00365.jpg
FAIRY TALES
came buyers, who paid him handsomely for his goods, so that he
bought leather enough for four pair more. H-e cut out the work
again overnight and found it done in the morning, as before;
and so it went on for some time; what w~as got ready in the
evening w'as always done by day!break, and the good man soon
became thriving and w~ell off again.
One evening, about Christmas-time, as he and his w~ifet were
sitting ov~er the tire chatting together, he said to her, "I should
like to sit up and watch to-night, that we~ may see who it is that
comes and does my w~ork for me." The w\ife liked the thought;
so they left a light burning, and hid themselves in a corner of the
room behind a curtain that was hung up there, and watched what
should happen.
As soon as it was midnight there came in two little naked
dwvarfs; and they sat themselves upon the shoemaker's bench,
took up all the work that was cut out, and began to ply with
their little fingers, stitching and rapping and tapping away at
such a rate that the shoemaker was all wonder, and could not
take his eyes off them. And on they went till the job was quite
done, and the shoes stood ready for use upon the table. This
was long before daybreak; and then they bustled away as quick
as lightning.
The next ~day the wife said to the shoemaker: "These little
wi~ghts have made us rich, and we ought to be thankful to them
and do them a good turn if we can. I am quite sorry to see
them run about as they do; and indeed it is not very decent, for
they have nothing upon their backs to keep off the cold. Il
tell you what. I will make each of them, a shirt and a coat and
waistcoat, and a pair of pantaloons into the bargain; and do you
make each of them a little pair of shoes."
The thought pleased the good cobbler very much; and one
evening, when all the things were ready, they laid them on the
table, instead of the work that they used to cut out, and then
went and hid themselves, to watch what the little elves would do.
About midnight in they came, dancing and skipping, hopped
[34x ]
361 00366.jpg
GRIMM' S
round the room, and then went to sit down to their work as
usual; but when they saw the clothes lying for them, they laughed
and chuckled, and seemed mightily delighted.
Then they dressed themselves in the twinkling of an eye,
and danced and capered and sprang about, as merry as could
be; till at last they danced out at the door and away ovrer the
green.
The good couple saw them no more; but everything went
well with then from that time forward as long as they lived.
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FAIRY TALES
WA- TE FRO-BRID
T HERE was o~nce a ig h hdtre on.No
Here on ay to hae o thirg wown But there sold. wom anie
apeeathmwihhrdaughter, h a called Cherry, be-igsethssosott
cause she liked cherries better than any other kind of food, and
wTould eat scarcely anything else.
Now her poor old mother had no garderi, and no money to
buy cherries every day for her daughter. And at last she was
tempted by the sight of some in a neighboring garden to go in
and beg a few of the gardener. But, as ill-luck would have it,
the mistress of the garden was as fond of the fruit as Cherry was,
and she soon found out that all the best were gone, and was not
a little angry at their loss. Now she was a fairy, too, though
Cherrv~'s mother did not know it, and could tell in a moment
who she had to thank for the loss of her dessert. So she vowed
to be even with Cherry one of these days.
The princes, while wandering on, came one day to the town
where Cherry and her mother lived; and as they passed along
the street, sawPP the fair maiden standing at the window, combing
her long and beautiful locks of hair.
1343 1
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GRIM M' S
Then each of the three fell deeply in love with her, and began
to say how much he longed to have her for his wife! Scarcely
had the wish been spoken than each broke out into a great rage
with the others for wanting to have poor Cherry, who could
only be wife to one of them. At last all drew their swords, and
a dreadful battle began. The fight lasted long, and their rage
grew hotter and hotter, when at length the old fairy, to whom
the garden belonged, hearing the uproar, came to her gate to
know what was the matter. Finding that it was all about her
fair neighbor, her old spite for the loss of the cherries broke forth
at once, worse than ever. "~Now, then," said she, "I will have
my revenge"; and in her rage she wished Cherry turned into an
ugly frog, and sitting in the water under the bridge at the world's
end. No sooner said than done; and poor Cherry became a frog,
and vanished out of their sight. The princes now had nothing
to fight for, so, sheathing their swords again, they shook hands
as brothers, and went on toward their father's home.
The old king meanwhile found that he grew weak, and ill-fitted
for the business of reigriing, so he thought of giving up his king-
dom; but to whom should it be ? This was a point that his fatherly
heart could not settle, for he loved all his sons alike. "My dear
children," said he, "I grow old and weak, and should like to
give up my kingdom; but I cannot makeup my mind which of
you to choose for my heir, for I love you all three; and, besides, I
should wish to give my people the cleverest and best of you for
their king. However, I will give you three trials, and the one
who wins the prize shall have the kingdom. The first is to seek
me out one hundred ells of cloth, so fine that I can draw it th rough
my golden ring." The sons said they would do their best, and
set out on the search.
The two elder brothers took with them many followers, and
coaches and horses of all sorts, to bring home all the beautiful
cloths which they should find; but the youngest went alone by
himself. They soon came to where the roads branched off into
several ways; two ran through smiling meadows, with smooth
[ 344 ]
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FAIRY TALES
paths and shady groves, but the third looked dreary and dirty,
and went over barren wastes. The two eldest chose the pleasant
ways; but the youngest took his leave, and whistled along over
the dreary road. Whenever fine linen was to be seen, the two
elder brothers bought it, and bought so much that their coaches
and horses bent under their burthen.
The youngest, on the other hand, journey~ed on many a weary
day, and could find no place where he could buy even one piece
of cloth that was at all fine and good. His heart sank beneath
him, and every mile he grew more and more heavy~ and sorrowful.
At last he came to the bridge at the world's end, and there
he sat himself down to rest and sigh over his bad luck, when an
ugly-looking frog popped its head out of the water, and asked,
with a voice that had not at all a harsh sound to his ears, what
was the matter. The prince said in a pet, "Silly frog! thou canst
not help me." "WVho told you so?" said the frog. "'Tell me what
ails you." The prince still sat down moping and sighing, but
after a while he began to tell the whole story, and why his father
had sent him out. "'I will help you," said the frog; so it jumped
into the stream again, and soon came back, dragging a small
piece of linen not bigger than one's hand, and by no means the
cleanest in the world in its look. However, there it was, and the
frog told the prince to take it away with him. He had no great
liking for such a dirty rag; but still there was something in the
frog's speech that pleased him much, and he thought to himself,
"It can do no harm, it is better than nothing"; so he picked it
up, put it in his pocket, and thanked the frog, who dived down
again, panting and quite tired, as it seemed, with its work. The
farther he went the heavier he found the pocket grow~, and so
be turned himself homew~ard, trusting greatly in his good luck.
He reached home nearly about the same time that his brothers
came up with their horses and coaches all heavily laden. Then
the old king was very glad to see his children again, and pulled
the ring off his finger to try who had done the best; but in all
the stock that the two eldest had brought there was not one piece
[3451
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GRIMM' S
a tenth part of which would go through the ring. At this they
were greatly abashed, for they had made a laughing-stock of their
brother, who came home, as they thought, empty-handed. But
how great was their anger when they saw him pull from his
pocket a piece that for softness, beauty, and whiteness was a
thousand times better than anything that was ever before seen!
It was so- fine that it passed with ease through the ring; indeed,
two such pieces would readily have gone in together. The father
embraced the lucky youth, told his servants to throw the coarse
linen into the sea, and said to his children: "Now you must set
about the second task which I am to set you. Bring me home a
little dog so small that it will lie in a nutshell."
His sons were not a little frightened at such a task, but they all
longed for the crown, and made up their minds to go and try their
hands; and so, after a fewP days, they set out once more on their
travels. At the crossways they parted as before, and the young-
est chose his old, dreary, rugged road, with all the bright bopes
that his former good luck gave him. Scarcely had he sat himself
dow~n again at the bridge foot when his old friend the frog jumped
out, sat itself beside him, and, as before, opened its big, wide
mouth, and croaked out, "'What is the matter?" The prince
had this time no doubt of the frog's power, and therefore told
what he wanted. "It shall be done for you," said the frog, and,
springing into the stream, it soon brought up a hazel-nut, laid
it at his feet, and told him to take it home to his father, and crack
it gently, and then see what would happen. The prince went his
way very well pleased, and the frog, tired with its task, jumped
b~ack into tlie water.
His brothers had reached home first, and brought with them
a great many very pretty little dogs. There were Wag-tails,
Cur-tlails, and Bob-tails, Crops and Brushes, Spitzes and Spright-
lies, Fans and Frisks, Diamonds and Dashes, enough to stock
the bowers of all the fair ladies in the land. The old king, willing
to help them, all he could, sent for a large walnut-shell, and tried
it with every one of the little dogs. But one stuck fast with the
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FAIRY TALES
hind foot out, another with the head out, and a third with the
fore foot, a fourth with its tail out--in short, some one wvay and
some another; but none were at all likely to sit easily in this
new kind of kennel. When all had been tried, the youngest made
his father a dutiful bowoP and gave him the hazel-nut, begging him
to crack it very carefully. The moment this was done out ran
a beautiful little white dog upon the king's hand; and it wagged
its tail, bowed to and fondled its new master, and soon turned
about and barked at the other little beasts in the most graceful
manner, to the delight of the whole court, and then went back and
lay down, in its kennel without a bit of either tail, ear, or foot
peeping out. The joy of every one was great; the old king again
embraced his lucky son, told his people to drown all the other
dogs in the sea, and said to his children: Deat sons, your weighti-
est tasks are now over. Listen to mylast wish. Whoever brings
home the fairest lady shall be at once the heir to my crown."'
The prize was so tempting, and the chance so fair for all, that
none made any doubts about setting to work, each in his own
way, to try and be the winner. The youngest was not in such
good spirits as he was the last time; he thought to himself, "The.
old frog has been able to do a great deal for me, but all its power
must be nothing to me now, for where should it find me a fair
maiden, and a fairer maiden, too, than was ever seen at my
father's court? The swamps where it'lives have no living things
in them but toads, snakes, and such vermin." Meantime he went
on, and sighed as he sat down again with a heavy heart by the
bridge. "Ah, frog!" said he, "this time thou canst do me no
good." "Never mind," croaked the frog, "only tell me what is
the matter now."' Then the prince told his old friend what
trouble had nowop come upon him. "Go thy ways home!" said
the frog; "the fair maiden will Ifollow hard after; but take care,
and do not laugh at; whatever may happen!" This said, it sprang
as before into the water, and was soon out of sight.
The prince still sighed on, for he trusted very little this time
to the frog's word; but he had not set many steps toward home
1 347) a
367 00372.jpg
GRIMM' S
before he heard a noise behind him and, looking round, saw six
large water-rats dragging along, at full trot, a large pumpkin cut
out into the shape of a coach. On the box sat an old fat toad, as
coachman, and behind stood two little frogs, as footmen; and
two fine mice, with stately w~hiskers, ran on before, as outriders.
Within sat his old friend the frog, rather misshapen and unseemly,
to be sure, but still with somewhat of a graceful air. as it bowed
and kissed its hand to him in passing.
The prince was much too deeply~ wrapped up in thought as to
his chance of finding the fair lady whom he w~as seeking to take
any heed of the strange scene before him. He scarcely looked at
it, and had still less mind to laugh. The coach passed on a little
way, and soon turned a corner that hid it from his sight; but
how astonished was he, on turning the corner himself, to find
a handsome coach and six black horses standing there, with a
coachman in gay livery, and with the most beautiful lady he had
ever seen sitting inside! And who should this lady be but the
long-lost Cherry, for whom his heart had so long ago panted, and
wPhom he knew again the moment he saw her! As he came up,
one of the footmen made him a low bow as he let down the steps
and opened the coach door; and he was allowed to get in and
seat himself by the beautiful lady's side.
They soon came to ~his father's city, where his brothers also
came with trains of fair ladies; but as soon as Cherry was seen,
all the court, with one voice, gave the prize to her as the most
beautiful. The delighted father embraced his son, and named him
heir to his crown, and ordered all the other ladies to be sent to
keep company with the little dogs. Then the prince married
Cherry and lived long and happily with her, and indeed lives
with her still--if he be not dead.
368 00373.jpg
there is a fine country that
neither you nor I, nor any-
body else that we know, ever saw;
4 but a very great king once reigned.
buthere who had no son at all,
bthad twelve most beautiful
daughters. Now this king had no
II queen to help him to take care of
all these twelve young ladies, and
so 5 you may~ well think that they
j ~gave him no little trouble. They
slept in twelve beds, all in a row,
m i one room, and when they went
to bed the king alwTay-s went up
and shut and locked the door. But, ~-~
for all this care that wyas taken of I
them, their shoes were every~ morn-
~.~ing Found to be quite worn through,
13491
.-.- .r ;
liar II
c~s
-)-~LL~
THE DANCING SHOES
FAIRY
TALES
At~T
369 00374.jpg
GRIMM'I'S
as if they had' been danced in all night; and yet nobody could
find out how it happened, or where they could have been.
Then the king, you may be sure, was very angry at having
to buy so many new shoes; and he made it known to all the land
that if anybody could find out where it was that the princesses
danced in the night he should have the one he liked best of the
whole twelve for his wife, and should be king after his death;
but that whoever tried, and could not, after three days and nights,
make out the truth, should be put to death.
A king's son soon came. He was well lodged and fed, and in
the evening was taken to the chamber next to the one where
the princesses lay in their twelve beds. There- he was to sit
and watch where they went to dance; and in order that nothing
might pass without his hearing it, the door of his chamber was
left open. But the prince soon fell asleep; and when he awoke
in the morning he found that the princesses had all been dancing,
for the soles of their shoes were full of holes. The same thing
happened the second and third nights, so the king soon had this
young gentleman's head cut off.
After him came many others; but they had all the same luck,
and lost their lives in the same way.
Now it chanced that an old soldier, who had been wounded
in battle and could fight no longer, passed through this country;
and as he was traveling through a wood he met a little old woman,
who asked him where he was going. "I hardly know where I
am going, or what I had better do," said the soldier, "but I
think I should like very well to find out where it is that these
princesses dance, about whom people talk so much; and then I
might have a wife, and in time I might be a king, which would
be a mighty pleasant sort of a thing for me in, my old days."
"'Well, well," said the old dame, nodding her head, "~that is no
very hard task; only take care not to drink the wine that one
of the princesses will bring to you in the evening; and as soon
as she leaves you, you must seem to fall fast asleep."
Then she gave him a cloak, and said, "As soon as you put that
1350]
370 00375.jpg
F AIRY TALES
on you will become invisible; and you will then be able to follow
the princesses wherever they go, without their being at all aware
of it." W'hen the soldier heard this he thought he would try
his luck, so be went to the king and said he was willing to under-
take the task.
He was as well lodged as the others had been, and the king
ordered fine royal robes to be given him; and when the evening
came he was led to the outer chamber. Just as he was going to
lie down the eldest of the princesses brought him a cup of wine;
but the soldier slyly threw it all away, taking care not to drink
a drop. Then he laid himself down on his bed and in a little
while began to snore very~ loudly, as if' he was fast asleep. When
the twelve princesses heard this they all laughed heartily~, and the
eldest said, "This fellow, too, might have done a w-iser thing
than lose his life in this way!" Then they rose up and opened
their drawers and boxes, and took out all their tEne clothes, and
dressed themselves at the glass; and put on the twelve pairs
of new shoes that the king had just bought them, and skipped
about as if they were eager to begin dancing. But the youngest
said, "I don't know how it is, but though you are so happy, I
feel very uneasy; I am sure some mischance will befall us."
"Y'ou simpleton!" said the eldest, "you are always afraid. Have
you forgotten ho~w many kings' sons have already watched us in
vain ? As for this soldier, he had one eye shut already when
he came into the room, and even if I had not given him his sleep-
ing draught he would have slept soundly enough."
When they were all ready, they went and looked at the soldier,
but he snored on and did not stir hand or foot, so they thought
they were quite safe; and the eldest went up to her owpn bed and
clapped her hands, and the bed sank into the floor and a trap-
door flew open. The soldier saw them going down through the
c rap-door, one after another, the eldest leading the way; and,
thinking hs had no time to lose, he jumped up, put on the cloak
which the old fairy had given him, and followed them. In the
middle of the stairs he trod on the gown of the youngest, and
sa [3ss ]
371 00376.jpg
GRIPUMM'S
she cried out, "All is not right; some one took hold of my
gown." "Y'ou silly thing!" said the eldest; "it was nothing but
a nail in the wall."
Then down theyr all went, and thenr ran along a dark walk
till they came to a door, and there they found themselves in a
most delightful grove of trees; and the leaves were all of silver,
and glittered and sparkled beautifully. The soldier wished to take
some token of the place, so he broke off a little branch, and
there came a loud noise from the tree. Then the youngest daugh-
ter said again: "I am, sure all is not right. Did not you hear
that noise? That never happened before."' But the eldest said,
"It is only the princes who are shouting for joy at our approach."
They soon came to another grove of trees, where all the leaves
were of gold; and afterward to a third, where the leaves were all
glittering diamonds. And the soldier broke a branch from each;
and every time there came a loud noise that made the youngest
sister shiver with fear, but the eldest still said it was only the
princes who were shouting for joyr. So they went on till they
came to a great lake; and at the side of the lake there lay twelve
little boats, with twelve handsome princes in them, waiting for
the princesses.
One of the princesses went into each boat, and as the boats
were very small the soldier hardly knew~ what to do. My
company will not be very agreeable to any of them," said he;
"but, however, I must not be left behind." So he stepped into
the same boat with the youngest. As they were rowing over the
lake, the prince who was in the boat with the youngest princess
and the soldier said: "I do not know how it.is, but, though I
am. rowing with all my might, we get on very slowly, and I am:
quite tired. The boat seems very heavy to-day, especially at;
one end." "It is only the heat of the weather," said the prin-
cess. "I feel it very warm, too."
On the other side of the lake stood a fine illuminated castle, from
which came the merry music of horns and trumpets. There
they all landed, and went into the castle, and each prince danced
1352 I
372 00377.jpg
FAIRY TALES
with his princess; and the soldier, who was all the time invisible,
danced with them, too; and when any of the princesses had a
cup of wine set by her, he dranrk it all up, so that when she put
the cup to her mouth it was empty. A4t this, too, the youngest
sister was sadly frightened; but the eldest always stopped her
mouth. They danced on till three o'clock in the morning, and
then all their shoes were worn out so that they were forced to
leave off. The princes rowed them back again over the lake;
but this time the soldier sat himself in the boat by the eldest
princess, and her friend, too, found it v~ery hard work to row that
night. On the other shore they all took; leave, saying they would
come again the next night.
When they came to the stairs, the soldier ran on before the
princesses and laid himself down; and as they came up slowly,
panting for breath and very much tired, they heard him snoring
in his bed, and said, "Nowr all is quite safe." Then they un-
dressed themselves, put away their fine clothes, pulled off their
shoes, and went to bed and to sleep.
In the morning the soldier said nothing about what had hap-
pened, for he wished to see more of this sport. So he went again
the second and third nights, and everything happened just as
before, the princesses dancing each time till their shoes were
worn to pieces, and then going home tired; but the third night the
soldier carried aw ay one of the golden cups, as a token of where he
had been.
On the morning of the fourth day he was ordered to appear
before the king; so he took; with him the three branches and the
golden cup. The twelve princesses stood listening behind the door
to hear what he would say, laughing within themselves to think
how cleverly they had taken him in, as well as all the rest who
had watched them. Then the king asked him, "Where do my
twelve daughters dance at night?" and the soldier said, "With
twelve princes in a castle underground." So he told the king
all that had happened, and showed him the three branches and
the golden cup that he had brought with him. On this the king
1353 I
373 00378.jpg
GRIMM S
called for the princesses, and asked them whether what the
soldier said was true or not; and when they saw they were found
out, and that it was of no use to deny wchat had happened, they
said it was all true.
Then the king .asked the soldier which of them he would
choose for his wife, and he said, "I am not very young, so I
think I had better take the eldest."' And they were married that
very day, and the soldier in due time was heir to the kingdom,
after the king, his father-in-law, died; but what became of the
other eleven princesses, or of the twelve princes, I never heard.
374 00379.jpg
(3ss1
FAIRY
TAL E S
375 00380.jpg
GRIMM' S
comrade," said Snip. "There you sit at your ease like a gentle-
man, looking the wide world over; I have a mind to go and
try my luck in that same world. What do you say to going
with me?" Then the giant looked down, turned up his nose at
him, and said, You are a poor trumpery little knave!" "That
may be," said the tailor, "but we shall see by and by who is the
best man of the tw~To."
The giant, finding the little man so bold, began to be somewhat
more respectful, and said, Very well, we shall soon see who is
to be master." So be took up a large stone into his hand, and
squeezed it till water dropped from it. Do that," said he, "if
you have a mind to be thought a strong man." "Is that all?"
said the tailor. "I will soon do as much." So be put his hand
into his wallet, pulled out of it the cheese (which was rather new),
and squeezed it till the whey ran out. "W'hat do you say now,
Mr. Giant? M~y squeeze was a be-tter one than yours." Then
the giant, not seeing that it was only a cheese, did not know what
to say for himself, though he could hardly believe his eyes. At
last he took; up a stone and threw it up so high that it went
almost out of sight. "Now then, little py~gmy, do that if you
can." "V~ery good," said the other; "your throw was not a very
had one, but after all your stone fell to the ground. I will throw
something that shall not fall at all." "(That you can't do,"
said the giant. But the tailor took his old hen out of the wallet
and threw her up in the air; and she, pleased enough to be set
free, flew away' out of sigh t. Now, comrade," said he, "what do
you say to that?" "I say you are a clever hand," said the giant;
"but we will now try how you can work."
Then he led him into the wood, where a fine oak-tree lay felled.
"Come, let us drag it out of the wood together." "Oh, very
well," said Snip; "do you take hold of the trunk, and I will carry
all the top and the branches, which are much the largest and
heaviest." So the giant took the trunk and laid it on his shoulder;
but the canning little rogue, instead of carrying anything, sprang
up and sat himself at his ease among the branches, and so let
[3561
376 00381.jpg
FAIRY TALES
the giant carry stem, branches, and tailor into the bargain.
All the way they- went he made merry, and whistled and sang his
song, as if carrying the tree were mere sport; while the giant,
after he had borne it a good way, could carry it no longer, and
said, "I must let it fall." Then the tailor sprang down and held
the tree as if he were carrying it, saying, "W~hat a shame that
such a big lout as you cannot carry a tree like this!"
On they went together till they~ came to a tall cherry-tree;
the giant took hold of the top stem and bent it down to pluck
the ripest fruit, and when he had done gave it over to his friend,
that he, too, might eat. But the little man was so weak that he
could not hold the tree down, and up he went with it, dangling
in the air like a scarecrow. "Holla!" said the giant, "what
now? Can't you hold that twig?" "To be sure I could," said
the other, but don't you see that sportsman who is going to shoot
into the bush where we stood ? I took; a jump over the tree to
be out of his way. You had better do the same." The giant
tried to follow, but the tree was far too high to jump over, and
he only stuck fast in the branches for the tailor to laugh at him.
"Well, you are a fine fellow, after all," said the giant; "so come
home and sleep with me and a friend of mine in the mountains
to-night. We will give you a hot supper and a good bed."
The tailor had no business upon his hands, so be did as he was
bid, and the giant gave him a good supper and a bed to sleep
upon; but the tailor was too cunning to lie down upon the bed,
and crept sly~ly into a corner, and there slept soundly. W'hen
midnight came, the giant stepped softly in with his iron walking-
stick and gave such a stroke upon the bed, where he thought
his guest was lying, that he said to himself, "It's all up now with
that grasshopper; I shall have no more of his tricks."
In the morning the giants went off into the woods and quite
forgot Snip till all on a sudden they met him trudging along,
whistling a merry tune; and so frightened were they at the sight
that they both ran away as fast as they could.
Then on went the little tailor, following his spuddy nose,
[ 357 1
377 00382.jpg
till at last he reached the king's court, and then he began to brag
very. loud of his mighty deeds, saying he was come to serve the
king. To try him, they told him that the two giants, who lived
in a part of the kingdom a long way off, were become the dread
of the whole land; for they had begun to rob, plunder, and ravage
all about them, and that if he was so great a man as he said,
he should have a hundred soldiers, and should set out to fight
these giants; and that if he beat them he should have half the
kingdom. "With all my heart!" said he; "but as for your hun-
dred soldiers, I believe I shall do as well without them."
However, they set off together, till they came to a wood.
"Wait here, my friends," said he to the soldiers. "I will soon
give a good account of these giants"; and on he went, casting
his sharp little eyes here, there, and everywhere around him.
After a while he spied them both lying under a tree, and snoring
awPay till the very boughs whistled with the breeze. "The game's
won for a ducat!" said the little man, as he filled his wallet with
stones and climbed up into the tree under which they lay.
As soon as he was safely up, he threw one stone after another
at the nearest giant, till at last he wpoke up in a rage and
shook his companion, crying out, "What did you strike me for?"
"Nonsense, you are dreaming," said the other. "I did not strike
you." Then both lay down to sleep again, and the tailor threw
a stone at the second giant, that hit him on the tip of his nose.
Up he sprang, and cried: "What are you about ? Y~ou struck me."
"I did not," said the other; and on they wrangled for a while till,
as both were tired, they made up the matter and fell asleep
again. But then the tailor began his game once more and flung
the largest stone he had in his wallet with all his force, and hit
the first giant on the eye. "That is too bad," cried he, roaring
as if he was mad. "I will not bear it!" So he struck the other
a mighty blow. He, of course, was not pleased with this, and gave
him just such another box on the ear, and at last a bloody battle
began. Up flew trees by the roots, the rocks and stones were
sent bang at each other's head, and in the end both lay dead
[358 3
378 00383.jpg
FAIRY TALES
upon the spot. "It is a good thing," said the tailor, "that they
let my tree stand, or I must have made a fine jump."
Then down he ran, and took his sword and gave each of them
two or three very deep wounds on the breast, and set off to look
for the soldiers. "There lie the giants," said he. "I have
killed them; but it was no small job, for they evlen tore trees up
in their struggle." "Have you any wounds?" asked they.
"Wounds! That is a likely matter, truly," said he. "They could
not touch a hair of my head." But the soldiers would not believe
him till they rode into the wood and found the giants weltering
in their blood, and the trees lying around torn up by the roots.
The king, after he had got rid of his enemies, was not much
pleased at the thoughts of giving up half his kingdom to a tailor.
So be said: "Yrou have not done yet. There is a unicorn running
wild about the neighboring woods and doing a great deal of dam-
age, and before I give you my daughter you must go after it
and catch it, and bring it to me here alive."
"After the two giants, I shall not have much to fear from a
unicorn," said the tailor, and he started off, carrying with him an
ax and a rope.
On reaching the wood, he bade his followers wait on the out-
skirts while he went in by himself. It was not long before the
unicorn came in sight and forthwith made a rush for the tailor, as
if to run him through without more ado.
"Not quite so fast, not quite so fast," cried the little man.
"Gently does it," and he stood still until the animal was nearly
upon him, and then sprang nimbly behind a tree. The unicorn
now made a fierce leap toward the tree, and drove his born into
the trunk with such violence that he had not the strength to
pull it out again, and so be remained caught.
"I have him safely now," said the tailor, and, coming forward
from behind the tree, he put the rope round the animal's neck, cut
off the horn with his ax, and led him captive before the king.
After this further brave deed, the king could no longer help
keeping his word, and thus a little man became a great one.
[ 359 I
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GRIMM' S
GIANT GOLDEN-BEARD
INa country village, over the hills
-and far away, lived a poor man who
had an only son born to him. Now
this child was born under a lucky~ star,
and was therefore what the people of that country call a Luck's-
child; and those who told his fortune said that in his fourteenth
year he would marry no less a lady than the king's own daughter.
It so happened that the king of that land, soon after the
child's birth, passed through the village in disguise and, stopping
at the blacksmith's shop, asked what news was stirring. "Good
newcs!" said the people. "1Vaster Brock, down that lane, has just
had a child born to him, that they say is a Luck;'s-chld; and we
are told that, when he is fourteen years old, he is fated to marry
our noble king's daughter." This did not please the king; so
be went to the poor child's parents and asked them whether they
would sell him their son? "No," said they. Buit the stranger
begged very hard, and said he would give a great deal of money;
so, as they had scarcely bread to eat, they at last agreed, saying
to themselves, "He is a Luck's-child; all, therefore, is no doubt
for the best--he can come to no harm."f
The king took the child, put it into a box, and rode away;
but when he came to a deep stream he threw it into the current,
and said to himself, "That young gentleman will never be my
1360)
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FAIRY TALES
daughter's husband." The box, however, floated down the
stream. Some kind fairy watched over it so that no water
reached the child; and at last, about two miles from the king's
chief cit4, it stopped at the dam of a mill. The miller soon saw
it and took a long pole and drew it toward the shore, and, finding
it heavy, thought there was gold inside; but when he opened it
he found a pretty little boy that smiled upon him merrily. Now
the miller and his wife had no children, and they therefore re-
joiced to see their prize, saying, "Heaven has sent it to us." So
they treated it very kindly, and brought it up with such care
that every one liked and loved it.
About thirteen years passed over their heads, when the same
king came by chance to the mill, and, seeing the boy, asked the
miller if that was his son. "No," said he. "I found him, when
a babe, floating down the river in a box into the mill-dam."
"How long ago?" asked the king. "Some thirteen years," said
the miller. "He is a fine fellow," said the king. "Can you spare
him to carry a letter to the queen? It will please me very much,
and I will give him two pieces of gold for his trouble." "As your
majesty pleases," said the miller.
Now the king had guessed at once that this must be the child
he had tried to drown, so be wrote a letter by him to the queen,
saying, "As soon as the bearer of this reaches you, let him be
killed and buried, so that all may be over before I come back."
The young man set out with this letter, but missed his way,
and came in the evening to a dark wood. Through the gloom he
saw a light afar off, to which he bent his steps, and found that
it came from a little cottage. There was no one within except
an old woman, who was frightened at seeing him, and said, "Why
do you come hither, and whither are you going?" "I am going
to the queen, to whom I was to have given a letter, but I have
lost my way, and shall be glad if you will give me a night's rest."
"You are very unlucky," said she, "for this is a robbers' hut, and
if the band come back while you are here it may be worse for you.''
"1I am so tired, however," replied he, "that I must take my
[36x ]
381 00386.jpg
-GRIM M' S
chance, for I can go no farther." So he laid the letter on the
table, stretched himself out upon a bench, and fell asleep.
When the robbers came home and saw him, they asked the
old woman who the strange lad was. "I have given hun shelter
for charity," said she; "he had a letter to carry to the queen,
and lost his way." The robbers took up the letter, broke it
open, and read the orders which were in it to murder the bearer.
Then their leader was very angry at the king's trick; so be core
his letter and wrote a fresh one, begging the queen, as soon as
the young man reached her, to marry him to the princess. M'ean-
time they let him sleep on till morning broke, and then showed him
the right way to the queen's palace, where, as soon as she had
read the letter, she made all ready for the wedding; and as the
young man was very handsome, the princess was very dutiful,
and took him then and there for a husband.
-:After a while the king came back; and when he saw that this
Luck's-child was married to the princess, notwithstanding all
the art and cunning he had used to thwart his luck, he asked
eagerly how all this had happened, and what were trhe orders
which he had given. "Dear husband," said the queen, "here
is your own letter-read it for yourself." The king took it and,
seeing that an exchange had been made, asked his son-in-law
what he had done wiith the letter he gave him to carry. "I
know nothing of it," said he. "If it is not the one you gave me,
it must have been taken away in the night when I slept." Then
the king was very wroth and said, "No man shall have my daugh-
ter who does not go down into the wonderful cave and bring
me three golden hairs from the beard of the giant king who reigns
there; do this, and you shall have my free leave to be my daugh-
ter's husband." "I will soon do that,"' said the youth. So be
took leave of his wife, and set out on his journey.
At the first city that he came to the guard at the gate stopped
him, and asked what trade he followed, and what he knew. "I
know everything," said he. "If that be so," said they, you are
just the man we want; be so good as to find out w~Ghy our fountain
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FAIRY TALES
I
\/ Ur -:
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FAIRY TALES
in the market-place is dry and will give no water. Tell us the
cause of that and we will give you two asses loaded with gold."
"With all my heart," said he, "w~hen I come back."
Then he journeyed on, and came to another city~, and there the
guard also asked him what trade he followed, and what he under-
stood. "(I know everything," answered he. "'Then pray~ do us a
good turn," said they. "Tell us w~hy a tree, which alwrays before
bore us golden apples, does not even bear a leaf this year."
"M:ost willingly," said he, "as I come back."
At last his w~ay led him to the side of a great lake of water
over which he must pass. The ferryman soon began to ask, as
the others had done, what was his trade, and what he knew.
"Everything," said he. "Then,"' said the other, "pray~ tell me
why I am forced forever to ferry over this warei and have never
been able to get my freedom; I will reward you handsomely."
"LFerry me over," said the young man, "and I will tell you all
about it as I come home."
When he had passed the water, he came to the wonderful cave.
It looked very; black and gloomy; but the wizard king was not
at home, and his grandmother sat at the door in her easy chair.
"What do you want?" said she. "Three golden hairs from the
giant's beard," answered he. "Ylrou will run a great risk,"' said
she, "when he comes home; yet I will try' what I can do for you."
Then she changed him into an ant, and told him to hide himself
in the folds of her cloak. "'Very well,"' said he; "but I want
also to know why the city fountain is dry, why the tree that
bore golden apples is now leafless, and what it is that binds the
ferryman to his post." You seem fond of asking puzzling
things," said the old dame; "but lie still, and listen to what the
giant says when I pull the golden hairs, and perhaps you may
learn what you want." Soon night set in, and the old gentleman
came home. As soon as he entered he began to snuff up the air,
and cried, "All is not right here; I smell man's flesh." Then
he searched all round in vain, and the old dame scolded, and
said: "Why should you turn everything topsy-turvy? I have
[365 J
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GRIM M"S
just set all straight." Upon this he laid his head in her lao and
soon fell asleep. As soon as he began to snore, she seized one of
the golden hairs of his beard and pulled it out. "Mercy!" cried
he, starting up. "W'hat are you about?" "I had a dream that
roused me," said she, "and in my trouble I seized hold of your
hair. I dreamed that the fountain in the market-place of the
city was become dry, and would give no water. What can be
the cause ?" "Ah iif they could find that out they would be glad,"
said the giant. "Under a stone in the fountain sits a toad; when
they kill him, it will flow again."
This said, he fell asleep, and the old lady pulled out another
hair. "What would you be at?" cried he, in a rage. "Don't
be angry," said she. "I did it in my sleep. I dreamed that I
was in a great kingdom a long way off, and that there was a beau-
tiful tree there, that used to bear golden apples, but that now
has not even a leaf upon it. What is the meaning of that?"
"Aha!" said the giant, "they would like very well to know that.
At the root of the tree a mouse is; gnawing; if they were to kill
him, the tree would bear golden apples again; if not, it will soon
die. Now do let me sleep in peace; if you wake me again, you
shall rue it."
Then he fell once more asleep, and when she heard him snore
she pulled out the third golden hair, and the giant jumped up
and threatened her sorely; but she soothed him, and said: "It
was a very strange dream I had this time. M~ethought I saw a
ferryman who was bound to ply backward and forward over a
great lake, and could never find out how to set himself free.
What is the charm that binds him?" "A silly fool!" said the
giant. "If he were to give the rudder into the hand of any pas-
senger that came, he would find himself free, and the other would
be forced to take his place. Now pray let me sleep."
In the morning the giant arose and went out; and the old
woman gave the young man the three golden hairs, reminded
him of the three answers, and sent him on his way.
He soon came to the ferryman, who knew him again, and asked
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FAIRY TALES
for the answer which he had said he would give him. Ferry me
over first," said he, "and then I will tell yrou." Wlhen the boat
reached the other side, he told him to give the rudder to the
first passenger that came, and then he might run away as soon
as he pleased. The next place that he came to was the city
where the tree stood. Kill the mouse,"' said he, that is gnawing
the tree's root, and you will have golden apples again." They
gave him a rich gift for this news, and he journeyed on to the
city where the fountain had dried up; and the guard asked him
how to make the water flow. So he told them how to cure that
mischief, and they thanked him, and gave him the two asses
laden with gold.
And now at last this Luck's-child reached home, and his wife
was very glad to see him, and to hear how7g well everything had
gone with him. Then he gave the three golden hairs to the
king, who could no longer deny him, though he was at heart
quite as spiteful against his son-in-law as ever. The gold, however,
astonished him, and when he saw all the treasure he cried out
with joy, My dear son, where did you find all this gold ?"
"By the side of a lake," said the youth, "where there is plenty
more to be had." "Pray tell me where it lies," said the king,
"Lthat I may go and get some, too."' "As much as you please,"
replied the other. "You must set out and travel on and on, till
you come to the shore of a great lake. There you will see a ferry-
man; let him carry you across, and when once you are over
you will see gold as plentiful as sand upon the shore."
Away went the greedy king; and when he came to the lake he-
beckoned to the ferryman, who gladly took him into his boat;
and as soon as he was there gave the rudder into his hand and
sprang ashore, leaving the old king to ferry away, as a reward for
his craftiness and treachery.
"And is his majesty plying there to this day?" You may be
sure of that, for nobody will trouble himself to take the rudder
out of his hands.
24 37
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GRIMM' S
~.~~ CC~~PEE-WIT)---J-
POOR- conrmn hoenm a
Pee-wit,~~~~. lie ih i ie navr
quietway, n th pris whr h
bon.Oe aya h wsplwigwih i
bidi aldaPee- Wir an, li ked thhhi ie cuckoorq
alwy eeps crying outn it os o name. But
th cunetrmay n thought it was ocin hima
sorn be too u as hge wstpone nd wthre atit.
st7 oxne fe pn thehlhe heard ofl one of the en
aond, kled him uponthen sot. "Wir hat cant
one do with an od n? thought Pee-Wmokig it1,
/to himself as he looked at the oxr that was
(368)
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FAIRY TALES
left; so, without more ado, he killed him, too, skinned them both,
and set out for the neighboring town to sell the bides to the
tanner for as much as he could get.
He soon found out where the tanner lived, and knocked at the
door. Before, however, the door was opened, he saw through
the window that the tanner's daughter was hiding in an old chest
a friend of hers, whom she seemed to wish that no one should see.
By and by the door was opened. "What do you wiant?" said
the daughter. Then Pee-Wit told her he wanted to sell his hidesr
and it came out that the tanner was not at home, and that no
one there ever made bargains but himself. The countryman said
he would sell cheap, and did not mind giving his hides for the old
chest in the corner, meaning the one he had seen the young
woman's friend get into.
Of course the maiden would not agree to this, and they went
on talking the matter over so long that at last in came the tanner
and asked what it was all about. Pee-Wit told him the whole
story, and asked whether he would give him the old chest for
the hides. "To be sure I will," said he, and scolded his daughter
for saying nay to such a bargain, which she ought to have been
glad to make if the countryman was willing. Then up he took the
chest on his shoulders, and all the tanner's daughter could say
mattered nothing; away it went into the countryman's cart,
and off he drove. But when they had gone some way the young
man within began to make himself heard and to beg and pray
to be let out. Pee-Wit, however, was not so soon to be brought
over; but at last, after a long parley, a thousand dollars were.
bid and taken; the money was paid, and at that price the poor
fellow was set free and went about his business.
Then Pee-Wit went home very happyl, and built a new house,
and seemed so rich that his neighbors wondered and said, "Pee-
Wit must have been where the golden snow falls." So they took
him before the next justice of the peace to give an account of
himself and show that he came honestly by his wealth; and then
he told them that he had sold his hides for one thousand dollars.
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GRIMM' S
When they heard it, they all killed their oxen that: they might
sell the hides to the same tanner; but the justice said, My
maid shall have the first chance"; so off she went, but: when she
came to the tanner, he laughed at them all for a parcel of noodles
and said he had given their neighbor nothing but an old chest.
At this they were all very angry, and laid their heads together
to work him some mischief, which they thought they could do
while he was digging in his garden. All this, however, came to the
ears of the countryman, who was plagued with a sad scold for
his wife; and he thought to himself, "If any one is to come into
trouble, I don't see why it should not be my wife rather than
Pee-Wit." So he told her that he wished she would humor him
in a whim he had taken into his head, and would put on his
clothes and dig the garden in his stead.
The wife did what was asked, and next morning began digging.
But soon came some of the neighbors, and, thinking it was Pee-
Wit, threw a stone at her--harder, perhaps, than they meant--
and killed her at once. Poor Pee-Wit was rather sorry at this;
but still he thought that he had had a lucky escape for himself,
and that perhaps he might, after all, turn the death of his wife
ito some account, so he dressed her in her own clothes, put a
basket with fine fruit (which wopas now scarce, it being winter)
into her hand, and set her by the roadside on a broad bench.
After a while came by a fine coach with six horses, servants, and
outriders, and within sat a noble lord who lived not far off. When
his lordship saw the beautiful fruit, he sent one of the servants
-to the woman to ask what was the price of her goods. The man
went and asked, "What is the price of this fruit?" No answer.
He asked again. No answer. An'd when this had happened three
times, he became angry, and, thinking she woas asleep, gave her
a box on the ear, when down, she fell backward into the pond that
was behind the seat. Then up ran Pee-Wiit, and cried out and
sorrowed, because they had drowned his poor dear wife; and
threatened to have the lord and his servants tried for what they
had done. His lordship begged him to be easy, and offered to
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FAIRY TALES
give him the coach and horses, servants and all; so the countryv-
man, after a long time, let himself be appeased a little, took
what they gave, got into the coach, and set off toward his own
home again.
As he came near the neighbors wondered much at the beautiful
coach and horses, and still more when they stopped and Pee-
Wit: got out at his own door. Then he told them the whole
story, which only vexed them still more; so they took him and
fastened him up in a tub and were going to throw him into the
lake that was hard by. But whilst they were rolling the tub on
before them toward the water they passed by an ale-house, and
stopped to refresh themselves a little before they put an end
to Pee-Wit. Meantime they tied the tub fast to a tree and there
left it while they were enjoying themselves within-doors.
Pee-W'it no sooner found himself alone than he began to turn
over in his mind how he could get free. He listened, and soon
heard, Ba, ba! from a flock of sheep and lambs that were coming
by. Then he lifted up his voice and shouted out. "I will not be
burgomaster, I say; I will not be made burgomaster." The
shepherd, hearing this, went up and said, "WVhat is all this noise
about?"' "Oh!" said Pee-Witc, "my neighbors will make me
burgomaster against my will; and when I told them I would
not agree, they put me into this cask and are going to throw me
into the lake." "I should like very well to be burgomaster, if
I were you," said the shepherd. "Open the cask, then," said the
other, "and let me out, and get in yourself, and they' will make
you burgomaster instead of me." No sooner said than done.
The shepherd was in, Pee-Wit was out; and as there was nobody
to take care of the shepherd's flock, Pee-Wit drove it off' merrily
toward his own house.
Wlhen the neighbors came out of the ale-house they rolled
the cask on, and the shepherd began to cry out, "I will be burgo-
master now; I will be burgomaster now!" "'I dare say you widl,
but you shall take a swim first," said a neighbor, as he gave the
cask the last push over into the lake. This done, away they
[ 37= '
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GRIM M' S
went home merrily, leaving the shepherd to get out as well as
he could.
But as they came in at one side of the village, who should
they meet coming in by the other way but Pee-Wit, driving a
fine flock of sheep and lamps before him! "'Howv came you
here?" cried all with one voice. "Oh! the lake is enchanted,"
said he. "When you threw me in I sank deep and deep into
the water till at last I came to the bottom. There I knocked out
the bottom of the cask, and then I found myself in a beautiful
meadow, with fine flocks grazing upon it; so I chose a few for
myself, and here I am." "Cannot we have some, too?" said
they. "Why not? There are hundreds and thousands left; you
have nothing to do but to jump in and fetch them out."
So they all agreed they would dive for sheep--the justice first,
then his clerk, then the constables, and then the rest of the parish,
one after the other. When they came to the side of the lake,
the blue sky was covered over with little white clouds, like
flocks of sheep, and all were reflected in the clear water; so they
called out, "There they arel there they are already!" and, fear-
ing lest the justice should get everything, they jumped in all
at once; but Pee-Wit jogged home, and made himself happy
with what he had got, leaving his neighbors to find flocks for
themselves as well as they could.
392 00397.jpg
FAIRY TALES
lieda or woo cutter
wasE R great derh nth ant e mncul o te e vngn
the daily bread. As he lay in bed one night thinking of
this, and turning and tossing, he sighed heavily, and said to
his wife:
"W~hat will become of usi' We cannot even feed our children;
there is nothing left for ourselves."
I will tell you what, husband," answered the wife. "We
will take the children early in the morning into the forest, where
it is thickest; we will make then a fire, and we will give each
of them a piece of bread; then we will go to our work and leave
them alone; they will never.find the way home again, and we
shall be quit of them."
"(No, wife,") said the man, "I cannot do that. I cannot find
it in my heart to take my children' into the forest and to leave
1373 1
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GRIMM' S
them there alone; the wild animals would soon come and devour
them."
"Oh, you fool!" said she. "Then we will all four starve; you
'bad better get the coflins ready," and she left him no peace until
he consented.
But I really pity the poor children," said the man.
The two children had not been able to sleep for hunger, and
had heard what their stepmother had said to their father. Grethel
wept bitterly, and said to Hansel:
"It is all ov~er with us."
"Do be quiet, Grethel," said Hansel, "and do not fret; I
will manage something." And when the parents had gone to
sleep he got up, put on his little coat, opened the back door,
and slipped out. The moon was shining brightly, and the
white Bints that lay in front of the house glistened like pieces
of silver. Hansel stooped and filled the little pocket of his
coat as full as it would hold. Then he went back again, and
said to Grethel:
Be easy, dear little sister, and go to sleep quietly. God
will not forsake us," and laid himself down again in his bed.
When the day was breaking, and before the sun had risen,
the wife came and awakened the two children, saying:
"Get up, you lazybones; we are going into the forest to cut
wood." Then she gav~e each of them a piece of bread and said,
"That is for dinner, and you must not eat it before then, for
Syou will get no more."
Grethel carried the bread under her apron, for Hansel had
his pockets full of the flints. Then they set off all together on
their way to the forest. H71en they had gone a little way Hansel
stood still and looked back toward the house, and this he did
again and again, till his father said to him:
"Hansel, what are you looking at? Take care not to forget
your legs."
"Oh, father," said Hansel, "I am looking at my little white
kitten who is sitting up on the roof to bid me good-by."
13741
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FAIRY TALES
"You young fool!" said the woman. "That is not your kitten,
but the sunshine on the chimney-pot."'
Of course Hansel had not been looking at his kitten, but had
been taking every now and then a flint from his pocket and drop-
ping it on the road.
When thev reached the middle of the forest the father told
the children to collect wood to make a fire to, keep them warm;
and Hansel and Grethel gathered brushw~ood enough for a licole
mountain; and it was set on fire, and when the i-ame was burning
quite high the wife said:
"Now lie down by the fire and rest yourselves, you children,
and we will go and cut wood; and when we are ready we will
come and fetch you."
So Hansel and Grethel sat by the fire, and at noon they each
ate their piece of bread. They thought their father was in the
wood all the time, as they seemed to hear the strokes of the ax,
but really it was only a dry branch hanging to a withered tree that
the wind moved to and fro. So when they had stayed there a
long time their eyelids closed with weariness,: and they fell fast
asleep. When at last they woke it was night, and Grethel began
to cry, and said:
How shall we ever get out of this wood?" ,But Hansel comf-
fortedd her, saying:
'Wait a little while longer, until the moon rises, and then we
can easily find the way home."
And when the full moon got up Hansel took his little sister by
the hand, and followed the way where the flint stones shone
like silver and showed them the road. They walked on the
whole night through, and at the break of day they came to their
father's house. They knocked at the door, and when the wife
opened it and saw that it was Hansel and Grethel she said:
"Y'ou naughty children Why did you sleep so long in the
wood ? We thought you were never coming home again!"
But the father was glad, for it had gone to his heart to leave
them both in the woods alone.
[3751
395 00400.jpg
GRIMM' S
Not very long after that there was again great scarcity in those
parts, and the children heard their mother say at night in bed
to their father:
"Everything is finished up; we have only half a loaf, and
after that the tale comes to an end. The children must be off;
we will take them farther into the wood this time, so that they
shall not be able to find the way back again; there is no other
way to manage."
The man felt sad at heart, and he thought, "It would be better
to share one's last morsel with one's children."
But the wife would listen to nothing that he said, but scolded
and reproached him. He who says A must say B too, and when
a man has given in once he has to do it a second time.
But the children were not asleep, and had heard all the talk.
When, the parents had gone to sleep Hansel got up to go out
and get more flinc stones, as he did before, but the wife had
locked the door, and Hansel could not get out; but he comforted
his little sister, and said:
"(Don't cry, Grethel, and go to sleep quietly, and God will help
us.")
Early the next morning the wife came and pulled the children
out of bed. She gave them each a little piece of bread--less than
before; and on the way to the wood Hansel crumbled the bread
in his pocket, and often, stopped to throw a crumb on the ground.
"Hansel, what are you stopping behind and staring for?"
said the father.
"I am looking at my little pigeon sitting on the roof, to say
good-by to me," answered Hansel.
"You fool" said the wife. "That is no pigeon, but the morn-
ing sun shining on the' chimney-pots."
Hansel went on as before, and strewed bread crumbs all along
the road.
The woman led the children far into the wood, where they had
never been before in all their lives. And again there was a large
fire made, and the mother said:
1376 ]
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F"AIRY TALES
"Sit still there, you children, and when you are tired you
can go to sleep; we are going into the forest to cut wood, and
in the evening, when we are ready~ to go home we will come and
fetch you."
So when noon came Grethel shared her bread with Hansel,
who had strewed his along the road. Then they went to sleep,
and the evening passed, and no one came for the poor children.
When they awoke it was dark night, and Hansel comforted his
little sister, and said:
"Wait a little, Grethel, until the moon gets up, then we shall
be able to see the way home by the crumbs of bread that I have
scattered along it."
So when the moon rose they got up, but they could find no
crumbs of bread, for the birds of the woods and of the fields had
come and picked them up. Hansel thought they might find the
way all the same, but they could not. They went on all that night,
and the next dayl from the morning until the evening, but they
could not find the way out of the wood, and they were very~ hun-
gry, for they had nothing to eat but the few berries they could
pick up. And when they were so tired that they could no longer
drag themselves along, they lay down under a tree and fell asleep.
It was now the third morning since they had left their father's
house. They were always trying to get back to it, but instead
of that they only found themselves farther in the wood, and if
help had not soon come they would have been starved. About
noon they saw a pretty snow-white bird sitting on a bough, and
singing so sweetly that they stopped to listen. And w~hen he had
6nished the bird spread his wings and flew before them, and
they followed after him until they came to a little house, and the
bird perched on the roof, and when they came nearer they saw
that the house w~as built of bread, and roofed with cakes, and the
window was of transparent sugar.
"We will have some of this," said Hansel, "and make a fine
meal. I will eat a piece of the roof, Grethel, and you can have
some of the window--that will taste sweet."
[ 377 ]
397 00402.jpg
GRIMM' S
So Hansel reached up and broke off a bit of the roof, just to
see how it tasted, and Grethel stood by the window and gnawed
at it. Then they heard a thin voice call out from inside:
"Nibble, nibble, like a mouse,
W'ho is mibbling at my house?"
And the children answered:
"N~ever mind,
It is the wind."
And they went on eating, never disturbing themselves. Hansel,
who found that the roof tasted very nice, took down a great
piece of it, and Grethel pulled out a large round window-pane
.and sat her down and began upon it. Then the door opened, and
an aged woman came out, leaning upon a crutch. Hansel and
Grethel felt very frightened, and let fall what theyl had in their
hands. The old woman, however, nodded her head, and said:
"Ah, my dear children, how come y'ou here ? Y'ou must come
indoors and stay with me. You will be no trouble."
So she took them, each by the hand and led them into her
little house. And there they found a good meal laid out, of milk
and pancakes, with sugar, apples, and nuts. After that she
showed them two little white beds, and Hansel and Grethel laid
themselves down on them and thought they were in heaven.
The old woman, although her behavior was so kind, was a
wicked witch, who lay in wait for children, and had built the
little house on purpose to entice them. WThen they were once
inside she used to kill them, cook them and eat them, and then
it was a feast-day with her. The witch's eyes wrere red, and she
could not see very far, but she had a keen scent, like the beasts,
and knew very well when human creatures were near. When she
knewF that Hansel and Grethel were coming she gave a spiteful
laugh and said, triumphantly:
"I have them, and they shall not escape me!"
Early in the morning, before the children were awake, she
[378 ]
398 00403.jpg
K=~-~I~
--
~-~'"~
1. d
'I
\~a~a~
1
I,
1
f
3i:ii:'
,
rv---~"
_I
~. ~.crr~i
"CREEP IN," SAID THE WVITCH,"AND SEE IF IT IS
PROPERLY HOT"
FA IRY ~
TALES
399 00404.jpg
400 00405.jpg
FAIRY TALES
got up to look at them, and as they lay sleeping so peacefully,
with round rosy cheeks, she said to herself:
"W~hat a fine feast I shall have!"
Then she grasped Hansel with her withered hand, and led him
into a little stable, and shut him up behind a grating; and, call
and scream as he might, it was no good. Then she went back
to Grethel and shook her, crying:
"Get up, lazybones; fetch water, and cook something nice for
your brother; he is outside in the stable, and must be fattened
up. And when he is fat enough I will eat him."
Grethel began to weep bitterly, but it was of no use; she had to
do what the wicked witch bade her.
And so the best kind of victuals was cooked for poor Hansel,
while Grethel got nothing but crab-shells. Each morning the
old woman visited the little stable and cried:
"Hansel, stretch out your finger, that I may tell if you will
soon be far: enough."
Hansel, however, used to hold out a little bone, and the old
woman, who had weak eyes, could not see what it was, and,
supposing it to be Hansel's finger, wondered very much that it
was not getting fatter. When four weeks had passed and Hansel
seemed to remain so thin, she lost patience and could waic no
longer.
"Now then, Grethel," cried she to the little girl, "be quick
and draw water; be Hansel fat or be he lean, to-morrow I must
kill and cook him."
Oh, what a grief for the poor little sister to have to fetch water,
and how the tears flowfed down over her cheeks!
"Dear God, pray help us!" cried she. "If we had been de-
voured by wild beasts in the wood at least we should have died
together."
"Spare me your lamentations," said the old woman; "they
are of no avail."
Early next morning Grethel had to get up, make the fire,
and fill the kettle.
[38I]
401 00406.jpg
GRIMM' S
"First we will do the baking," said the old woman. "L1 have
heated the oven already, and kneaded the dough."
She pushed poor Grethel toward the oven, out of which the
flames were already shining.
"(Creep in," said the witch, "and see if it is properly hot, so
that thle bread may be baked."
And Grethel once in, she meant to shut the door upon her and
let her be baked, and then she would have eaten her. But
Grethel perceived her intention, and said:
"I don't know how to do it. How shall I get in ?'
"Stupid goose!" said the old woman; the opening is big
enough. Do you see? I could get in myselff" and she stooped
down and put her head in the oven's mouth. Then Grethel
gave her a push, so that she went in farcher, and she shut the
iron door upon her, and put up the bar. Oh, how frightfully
she howled! But Grethel ran away and left the wicked witch
to burn miserable. Grethel went straight to Hansel, opened the
stable door, and cried:
"Hansel, we are free! The old witch is dead!"
Then, out flew Hansel, like a bird from its cage as soon as the
door is opened. How rejoiced they both were! How they fell
each on the other's neck, and danced about, and kissed each
other! And as they had nothing more to fear theyr went over
all the old witch's house, and in every corner there stood chests
of pearls and precious stones.
"This is something better than flint stones," said Hansel, as
he filled` his pockets; and Grethel, thinking she also would like
to carry something home with her, filled her apron full.
"LNow, away we go,"' said Hansel--"if` we only~ can get out of
the witch's wood."
When they had journeyred a few hours they came to a great
piece of water.
"We can never get across this," said Hansel. "I see no step-
ping-stones and no bridge."
"And there is no boat, either," said Grethel, "but here comes
[3821
402 00407.jpg
FAIRY TALES
a white duck. If I ask her. she will help us over." So she
cried :
"Duck, duck, here we stand,
Hansel and Grerhel, on the land.
Stepping-stones and bridge we lack.
Carry us over on your nice white back."
And the duck came accordingly, and Hansel got upon her and
told his sister to come, too.
"(No," answered Grethel, "that would be too hard upon the
duck; we can go separately, one after the other."
And that was how it was managed; and after that they went
on happily until they came to the wood, and the way grew more
and more familiar, till at last they saw in the distance their
father's house. Then they ran till they came up to it, rushed
in at the door, and fell on their father's neck. The man had not
had a quiet hour since he left his children in the wood; but the
wife was dead. And when Grethel opened her apron the pearls
and precious stones were scattered all over the room, and Hansel
took one handful after another out of his pocket. Then was all
care at an end, and they lIv~ed in great joy together.
Sing every one,
M~y story is done.
And look! round the house
There runs a little mouse.
He that can catch her before she scampers in,
May make himself a very very large fur cap out of her skin.
403 00408.jpg
'S
13841
GRTL I~MM
404 00409.jpg
FAIRY TALES
went into any garden and asked for such a thing, the people
laughed at him, and asked him whether he thought roses grew
in snow. This grieved him very much, for Lily was his dearest
child; and as he was journeying home, thinking what he should
bring her, he came to a fine castle; and around the castle was a
garden, in one half of which it seemed to be summer-time, and
in the other half winter. On one side the finest flowers were in
full bloom, and on the other evlerything looked dreary and buried
in the snow. "A lucky hit!" said he, as he called to his servant
and told him to go to a beautiful bed of roses that was there and
bring him away one of the finest Bowers.
This done, they were riding away well pleased, when up sprang
a fierce lion and roared out, "Whoever has stolen my roses
shall be eaten up alive!"' Then the man said: "I knew not that
the garden belonged to you. Can nothing save my life?" "No!"
said the lion, "nothing, unless you undertake to give me what-
ever meets you on your return home. If you agree to this, I
w~ill give you your life, and the rose, too, for your daughter."
But the man was unwilling to do so, and said, "It may be my
youngest daughter, who loves me most and always runs to meet
me when I go home." Then the servant was greatly frightened,
and said, "It may perhaps be only a cat or a dog." And at last
the man yielded with a heavy heart, and took the rose; and said
he would give the lion whatever should meet him first on his
return.
And as he came near home, it was Lily, his youngest and
dearest daughter, that met him. She came running, and kissed
him, and welcomed him home; and when she saw that he had
brought her the rose, she was still more glad. But her father
began to be very sorrowful, and to weep, saying: "Alas, my
dearest child! I have bought this How~er at a high price, for
I have said I would giv~e you to a wild lion; and when he has
Syou, he will tear you in pieces and eat you." Then he told her
all that had happened, and said she should not go, let what
would happen.
[3851
405 00410.jpg
GRI MM' S
But she comforted him, and said: "Dear father, the word you
have given must be kept. I will go to the lion and soothe him;
perhaps he will let me come safe home again."
The next morning she asked the wayl she was to go, and took
leave of her father, and went forth with a bold heart into the
wood. But the lion was an enchanted prince. By day he and
all his court were lions, but in the evening they took; their right
forms again. And when Lily came to the castle, he welcomed
her so courteously that she agreed to marry him. The wedding-
feast was held, and they lived happily together a long time. The
prince was only to be seen as soon as evening came, and then he
held his court; but every morning he left: his bride and went
away by himself, she knew not whither, till the night came again.
After some time he said to her, "To-morrow there will be a
great least in your father's house, for your eldest sister is to be
married; and if you wish to go and visit her my lions shall lead
you thither." Then she rejoiced much at the thoughts of seeing
her father once more, and set out with the lions; and every one
was overjoyed to see her, for they had thought her dead long
since. But she told them how happy she was, and stayed till
the feast was over aind then went back to the wood.
H-er second sister was soon after married, and when Lily was
asked to go to the wedding, she said to the prince, "I will not go
alone this time-you must go with me."' But he would not, and
said that it would be a very hazardous thing, for if the least ray
of the torch-light should fall upon him his enchantment would
become still worse, for he should be changed into a dove, and
be forced to wander about the world for seven long years. How-
ever, she gave him no rest, and said she would take care no light
should fall upon him. So at last they set out together, and
took with them their little child; and she chose a large hall with
thick walls for him to sit in while the wedding-torches were
lighted; but, unluckily, no one saw that there was a crack in
the door. Then the wedding was held with great pomp, but as
the train came from the church, and passed with the torches
1386 ]
406 00411.jpg
FAIRY TALES
before the hall, a very' small ray of light fell upon the prince.
In a moment he disappeared, and when his wife came in and
looked for him, she found only a white dove; and it said to her,
"Seven years must I fly up and down over the face of the earth,
but every now and then I will let fall a white feather that will
show you the way I am going; follow it, and at last you may
overtake and set me free."
This said, he flew our at the door, and poor Lily followed;
and every now and then a white feather fell, and showed her
the way she was to journey. Thus she went roving on through
the wide world, and looked neither to the right hand nor to
Sthe left, nor took any rest for seven years. Then she began to
be glad, and thought to herself that the time was fast coming
when all her troubles should end; yet repose was still far off,
for one day as she was traveling on she missed the white feather,
and when she lifted up her eyes she could nowhere see the dove.
"rNow," thought she to herself, "ino aid of man can be of use to
me." So she went to the sun and said: "Thou shinest every-
where, on the hill's top and the valley's depth. Hast thou any-
where seen my white dove?" "No," said the sun, "I have not
seen it; but I will give thee a casket. Open it when thy hour of
need comes."
So she thanked the sun, and went on her way till eventide;
and when the moon arose, she cried unto it and said: "Thou
shinest through all the night over field and grove. Hast thou
nowhere seen my white dove?" "No," said the moon, "I cannot
help thee, but I will give thee an egg. Break it when need comes."
Then she thanked the moon, and went on till the night wind
blew; and she raised up her voice to it, and said: "Thou blowfest
through every tree and under every leaf. Hast thou not seen
my white dove?" "No," said the night wind, "but I will ask
three other winds; perhaps they have seen it." Then the east
wind and the west wind came, and said they, too, had not seen
it, but the south wind said: "I have seen the white dove. He
has fled to the Red Sea, and is changed once more int- tn 1, for
L3871
407 00412.jpg
GRIM M' S
the seven years are passed away, and there he is fighting with a
dragon; and the dragon is an enchanted princess who seeks to
separate him from you." Then the night wind said: "I will
give thee counsel. Go to the Red Sea. On the right shore stand
many rods; count them, and when thou comest to the eleventh,
break it off and smite the dragon with it; and so the lion will
have the victory, and both of them will appear to you in their
own forms. Then look round and thou wilt see a griffin, winged
like a bird, sitting by the Red Sea; jump on to his back with
thy beloved one as quickly as possible, and he will carry you over
the waters to your home. I will also give thee this nut," continued
the night wind. "Wlhen you are half-wTay over, throw it down,
and out of the waters will immediately spring up a high nut-tree
on which the griflin will be able to rest; otherwise he would not
have the strength to bear you the whole way. If, therefore, thou
dost forget to throw down the nut, he will let you both fall into
the sea."
So our poor wanderer went forth, and found all as the night
wind had said; and she plucked the eleventh rod, and smote the
dragon, and the lion forthwith became a prince, and the dragon
a princess again. But no sooner was the princess released from
the spell than she seized the prince by the arm and sprang on to
the griffin's back and went off, carrying the prince away with her.
Thus the unhappy traveler was again forsaken and forlorn,
but she took heart and said, "As far as the wind blowvs, and so
long as the cock crows, I will journey on till I find him once
again." She went on for a long, long way, till at length she came
to the castle whither the princess had carried the prince; and
there was a feast got ready, and she heard that the wedding was
about to be held. Heaven aid me now!"' said she, and she took
the casket that the sun had given her, and found that within it
lay a dress as dazzling as the sun itself. So she put it on and went
into the palace, and all the people gazed upon her; and the
dress pleased the bride so much that she asked whether it was
to be sold. "Not for gold and silverr" said she, "but for flesh
[358]
408 00413.jpg
FAIRY TALES
and blood." The princess asked what she meant, and she said,
"Let me speak with the bridegroom this night in his chamber,
and I will give thee the dress." At last the princess agreed, but
she told her chamberlain to give the prince a sleeping-draught,
that he might not hear or see her. When evening came, and
the prince had fallen asleep, she was led into his chamber; and she
sat herself down at his feet and said: "I have followed thee seven
years. I have been to the sun, the moon, and the night wind
to seek thee, and at last I have helped thee to overcome the
dragon. Wilt thou then forget me quite?" But the prince all
the time slept so soundly that her voice only passed over him
and seemed like the whistling of the wind among the fir-trees.
Then poor Lily was led away and forced to give up the golden
dress; and when she saw that there was no help for her, she
went out into a meadow and sat herself down and wept. But
as she sat she bethought herself of the egg that the moon had
given her; and when she broke it, there ran out a hen and twelve
chickens of pure gold that played about and then nestled under
the old one's wings, so as to form the most beautiful sight in the
world. And she rose up and drove them before her, till the
bride saw them from her window, and was so pleased that she
came forth and asked her Tf she would sell the brood. "Not
for gold or silver, but for flesh and blood. Let me again this
evening speak with the bridegroom in his chamber, and I will
give thee the whole brood."
Then the princess thought to betray her as before, and agreed
to what she asked; but when the prince went to his chamber he
asked the chamberlain why the wind had whistled so in the night.
And the chamberlain told him all--how he had given him a
sleeping-draught, and how a poor maiden had come and spoken
to him in his chamber, and was to come again that night. Then
the prince took care to throw away the sleeping-draught; and
when Lily came and began again to tell him what woes had be-
fallen her, and how faithful and true to him she had been, he
knew his beloved wife's voice, and sprang up and said, "You
[3891
409 00414.jpg
GRIM M' S
have awakened me as from a dream, for the strange princess
had thrown a spell around me, so that I had altogether forgotten
you; but Hea:en hath sent you to me in a lucky hour."
And they stole away out of the palace by night unawares, and
seated themselves on the grif~n, who flew back with them over
the Red Sea. When they were half-way across Lily let the nut
fall into the water, and immediately a large nut-tree arose from
the sea, whereupon the griffn rested for a while, and then carried
them safely home. There they found their child, now grown up
to be comely and fair; and after all their troubles they lived
happily together to the end of their days.
410 00415.jpg
FAIRY TALES
~~I--Z- Wl sl
RAPUNZE
T HERE onelvdamnadhswf
back HER ofc theirhou a littl wndo hchi ov ferloe euiu
garden full of the finest vegetables and flowers; but there was a
high wall all round it, and no one ventured into it, for it belonged
to a witch of great might, and of whom all the world was afraid.
One day that the wife w~as standing at the window and looking
into the garden, she saw a bed filled with the: finest rampion;
and it looked so fresh and green that she began to wish for some,
and at length she longed for it greatly. This went on for days,.
and, as she kine~w she could not get the rampion, she pined away,
and grew pale and miserable. Then the man was uneasy, and
asked:
"WVhat is the matter, dear wife?"
"Oh," answered she, "I shall die unless I can have some of
that rampion to eat that grows in the garden at the back of our
house." The man, who loved her very much, thought to himself:
"Rather than, lose my wife I will get some rampion, cost
what it will."
[39z ]
411 00416.jpg
GRIMM' S
So in the twilight he climbed over the wall into the witch's
garden, plucked hastily a handful of rampion, and brought it to
his wife. She made a salad of it at once, and are of it to her heart's
content. Bluc she liked it so much, and it tasted so good, that
the next day she longed for it thrice as much as she had done
before; if she was to have any rest the man must climb over the
wall once more. So be went in the twlight again; and as he was
climbing back he saw, all at once, the witch standing before him,
and was terribly frightened as she cried, with angry eyes:
"Howv dare you climb over into my garden like a thief and
steal my rampion? It shall be the worse for you!")
"LOh,") answered he, "be merciful rather than just. I have only
done it through necessity, for my wife saw your rampion out of
the window, and became possessed with so great a longing that
she would have died if she could not have- had some to eat."
Then the witch said:
"If it is all as you say you may have as much rampion as
you like, on one condition--the child that will come into the
world must be given to me. It shall go well with the child, and
I will care for it like a mother."
In his distress of mind the man promised everything; and
when the time came when the child was born the witch appeared,
and, giving the child the name of Rapunsel (which is the same
as campion), she took it away with her.
Rapunzel was the most beautiful child in the world. When
she was twelve years old the witch shut her up in a tower in the
midst of a wood, and it had neither steps nor door, only a small
window above. When the witch wished to be let in, she would
stand below and would cry:
Rapunzel, Rapunzel! let down your hair!"
Rapunzel had beautiful long hair that shone like gold. When
she heard the voice of the witch she would undo the fastening of
the upper window, unbind the plaits of her hair, and let it down
twenty ells below, and- the witch would climb up by it.
After they had lived thus a fewoP years, it happened that as the
1392)
412 00417.jpg
11l/
__ _
C~
-~=I=-~
~=-=
.n~C~=
J a
KI
i
~_i----=_ .C~5;
~c~;~2j;
f gif
AND SHE LIET DOWN HER HAIR, AND THE KING'S SON
CLIMBED UP BY IT
FAIRY
TAL E
r
L.= ~L
ve
~
~-
--
413 00418.jpg
414 00419.jpg
FAIRY TALES
King's son was riding through the wood, he came to the tower;
and as he drew near he heard a voice singing so sweetly that he
stood still and listened. It was Rapunzel in her loneliness trying
to pass away the time with sweet songs. The King's son wished
to go in to her, and sought to find a door in the tower, but there
was none. So be rode home, but the song had entered into his
heart, and every day be went into the wood and listened to it.
Once, as he was standing there under a tree, he saw the witch
come up, and listened while she called out:
"Oh, Rapunzel, Rapunzel! let down your hairl"
Then he saw how Rapunzel let down her long tresses, and how
the witch climbed up by it: and went in to her, and he said to
himself, "Since that is the ladder, I will climb it and seek my
fortune." And the next day, as soon as it began to grow dusk,
he went to the tower and cried:
"Oh, Rapunzel, Rapunzel! let down your hair!"
And she let down her hair, and the King's son climbed up by it.
Rapunzel was greatly terrified when she saw that a man
had come in to her, for she had never seen one before, but the
King's son began speaking so kindly to her and told how her
singing had entered into his heart, so that he could have no peace
until be had seen her herself. Then Rapunzel forgot her terror,
and when he asked her to take him for her husband, and she saw
that he was young and beautiful, she thought to herself:
"I certainly like him much better than old Mother Gothel,"
and she put her hand into his hand, saying: "I would willingly
go with thee, but I do not know how I shall get out. When
thou comest, bring each time a silken rope, and I will make a
ladder, and when it is quite ready I will get down by it out of
the tower, and thou shalt take me away on thy horse." They
agreed that he should come to her every evening, as the old
woman came in the daytime. So the witch knew nothing of all
this until once Rapunzel said to her, unwfittingly:
"M~other Gothel, how is it that you climb up here so slowly,
and the King's son is with me in a moment ?"
L395 1
415 00420.jpg
GRIM M' S
"Oh, wicked child!" cried the witch. "What is this I hear?
I thought I had hidden thee from all the world, and thou hast
betray'ed me!"
In her anger she seized Rapunzel by her beautiful hair, struck
her several times with her left hand, and then, grasping a pair
of shears in her right--snip, snap--the beautiful locks lay on
the ground. And she was so hard-hearted that she took Rapunzel
and put her in a waste and desert place, where she lived in great
woe and misery.
The same day on which she took Rapunzel away she went
back to the tower in the evening and made fast the severed
locks of hair to the window-hasp, and the King's son came and
cried:
"Rapunzel, Rapunzel! let down your hair!"
Then she let the hair down, and the King's son climbed up,
but instead of his dearest Rapunzel he found the witch looking
at him with wicked, glittering eyes.
"Ahal" cried she, mocking him, "you came for your darling,
but the sweet bird sits no longer in the nest and sings no more;
the cat has got her, and will scratch out your eyes as well! Rapun-
zel is lost to you; you will see her no more."
The King's son was beside himself with grief, and in his agony
he sprang from the tower; he escaped with life, but the thorns
on which he fell put out his eyes. Then he wandered blind
through the wood, eating nothing but roots, and berries, and doing
nothing but lament and weep for the loss of his dearest wife.
So he wandered several years in misery until at last he came to
the desert place where Rapunzel lived with her twin children that
she had borne, a boy and a girl. At first -he heard a voice that
he thought he knew7, and when he reached the place from which
it seemed to come, Rapunzel knew him, and fell on his neck and
wept. And when her tears touched his eyes they became clear
again, and he could see with them as well as ever.
Then he took her to his kingdom, where he was received with
great joy, and there they lived long and happily.
[ 396 ]
416 00421.jpg
FAIRY TALES
DOKE-WR
MERR yugunsan
naedPtewa oc rd
"Merril priest untsma tsmn bold
Blihsme ad gayer ris he: id
As~ n he journey along, there aeup a ltl
old woan, andce saidn to hm:r) "Good: da oo
daMer.i Hie h untsman bold! Yo semmer
give mesomethin ga to eat. So e te okp
onher and pu his ho and in hins s pocke, andgav
her e whthe had Ten hed wated o ohi ay
butl setohold ofhim, and said t i: "Listena~, Maste
Peterg, towht I am goingr tod tell tyo. Io wlre-
w ~ard you for your kindness. Go your way, and 1
I 397 1
417 00422.jpg
GRIMM'S
after a little time you will come to a tree where you will see nine
birds sitting upon a cloak. Shoot into the midst of them, and
one will fall down dead. The cloak will fall, too; take it as a
wishing-cloak, and when you wear it, you will find yourself at
any place you may wish to be. Cut open the dead bird, take
out its heart and keep it, and you will find a piece of gold under
your pillow every morning when you rise. It is the bird's heart
that will bring you this good luck."
The huntsman thanked her, and thought to himself, "If all
this do happen, it will be a fine thing for me." W~hen he had gone
a hundred steps or so, he heard a screaming and chirping in the
branches over him; so he looked up, and saw a flock of birds pull-
ing a cloak with their bills and feet; screaming, fighting, and
tugging at one another, as if each wished to have it himself.
"W~ell,") said the huntsman, "this is wonderful; this happens
just as the old woman said." Then he shot into the midst of
them, so that their feathers flew all about. Off went the flock
chattering away; but one fell down dead, and the cloak with it.
Then Peter did as the old woman told him, cut open the bird,
took out the heart, and carried the cloak home with him.
SThe next morning, when he awoke, he lifted up his pillow,
and there lay the piece of gold glittering underneath; the same
happened next day, and, indeed, every day when he arose. He
.heaped up a great deal of gold, and at last thought to himself:
"'Of what us~e is this gold to me wphilst I am at home? I will go
orit into the ~world, and look about me."
Then he took leave of his friends, and hung his horn and bow
about his neck and went his way merrily as before, singing his
song:
*IMerrily rides the huntsman bold,
Blithsome and gay rides he:
He winds his horn and he bends his bow,
Under the greenwood tree."
Now it so happened that his road led through a thick wood,
at the end of which was a large castle in a green meadow; and
1398 I
418 00423.jpg
FAIRY TALES
at one of the windows stood an old woman with a very beautiful
young lady by her side, looking about them. The old woman was
a fairy, and she said to the young lady, whose name was M~eta:
"There comes a young man out of the wood with a wonderful
prize; we must get it away from him, my dear child, for it is
more fit for us than for him. He has a bird's heart that brings
a piece of gold under his pillow every morning." M~eantime the
huntsman came nearer and looked at the lady, and said to himself,
"I have been traveling so long that I should Ilke to go into this
i-astle and rest myself, for I have money enough to pay for any-
thing I want"; but the real reason was that he wepanted to see
more of the beautiful lady. Then he went into the house and
was welcomed kindly; and it was not long before he was so much
in love that he thought of nothing else but looking at Meta's
eyes, and doing everything that she wished. Then the old
woman said, "Now is the time for getting the bird's heart." So
Meta stole it away, and he never found any` more gold under his
pillow. it lay now under Meta's and the old woman took it
away every morning; but he was so much in love that he never
missed his prize.
Well," said the old fairy, "we have got the bird's heart, but
not the wishing-cloak yet, and that we must also get." "'Let
us leave him that," said MI~eta; "he has already lost all ~his
wealth."' Then the fairy was very angry, andl said, "Such a
cloak is a very rare and wonderful thing, and I must and will have
it." So M1eta did as the old woman told her, and sat herself at
the window, and looked about the country, and seemed very sor-
rowful. Then the huntsman said, "What makes you so sad?"
"L Alas, dear sir," said she, "yonder lies the granite rock, where all
the costly diamonds grow, and I want so much to go there that,
whenever I think of it, I cannot help being sorrowful, for who can
reach it ? Only the birds and the flies-'man cannot.'" "If that's
all your grief," said huntsman Peter, "I'll take you there with all
my heart." So he drew her under his cloak, and the moment het
wished to be on the granite mountain they were both there.
26[39
419 00424.jpg
GRIMM' S
The diamonds glittered so on all sides that they were delighted
with the sight, and picked up the finest. But the old fairy made
a deep drowsiness come upon him, and he said to the young lady:
"Let us sit down and rest ourselves a little. I am so tired that
I cannot stand any longer." So they sat dowvn, and he laid his
head in her lap and fell asleep; and whilst be was sleeping on,
the false Meta took the cloak from his shoulders, hung it on her
own, picked up the diamonds, and wished herself at her own home
agamn.
When poor Peter awoke and found that his faithless Meta had
tricked him, and left him alone on the wild rock, he said, "Alast
what roguery there is in the world!" And there he sat in great
grief and fear upon the mountain, not knowing what in the world
he should do.
Now this rock belonged to fierce giants, who lived upon it;
and as he saw three of them striding about, he thought to him-
self, "I can only save myself by feigning to be asleep"; so be
laid himself down, as if he were in a sound sleep. When the giants
came up to him, the first kicked him with his foot, and said,
"What worm is this that lies here curled up?" "Tread upon him
and kill him," said the second. "It's not worth the trouble,"
said the third. Let him live; he will go climbing higher up the
mountain, and some cloud will come rolling and carry him away."
Then they passed on. But the huntsman had heard all they
said, and as soon as they were gone he climbed to the top of the
mountain; and when he had sat there a short time a cloud came
rolling around him, and caught him in a whirlwind and bore him
along for some time till it settled in a garden, and he fell quite
gently to the groimd amongst the greens and cabbages.
Then Miaster Peter got up and scratched his head, and looked
around him, and said, "I wish I had something to eat. If I have
not I shall be worse off than before, for here I see neither apples
nor pears, nor any kind of fruits; nothing but vegetables." At
last he thought to himself, "I can eat salad; it will refresh and
strengthen me." So he picked out a fine head of some plant
[4oo]
420 00425.jpg
FAIRY TALES
that he took for a salad, and ate of it; but scarcely had he swal-
lowed two bites when he felt himself quite changed, and saw with
horror that he was turned into an ass. However, he still flet very
hungry, and the green herbs tasted very~ nice; so be are on till
he came to another plant, which looked very like the first; but
it really was quite different, for he had scarcely tasted it when
he felt another change come over him, and soon saw that he was
lucky enough to have found his old shape and to have become
Peter again.
Then he laid himself down and slept off a little of his weariness;
and when he awoke the next morning he broke off a head of each
sort of salad, and thought to himself, "This will help me to my
fortune again, and enable me to punish some folks for their
treachery." So be set about trying to find the castle of his old
friends; and, after wandering about a few days, he luckily found
it. Then he stained his face all over brown, so that even his
mother would not have known him, and went into the castle and
asked for a lodging. "I am so tired," said he, "that I can go
no farther." "Countryman," said the fairy, "who are you?
and what is your business?"' "I am," said he, "a messenger
sent by the king to find the nest salad that grows under the
sun. I have been lucky enough to find it, and have brought it
with me; but the heat of the sun is so scorching that it begins
to wither, and I don't know that I can carry it any farther."
When the fairy and the young lady heard of this beautiful
salad, they longed to taste it, and said, "Dear countryman, let
us just taste it!" "To be sure!" answered he. "I have two heads
of it with me, and I will give you one"; so he opened his bag
and gave them the bad sort. Then the fairy herself took; it into
the kitchen to be dressed; and when it was ready she could not
wait till it was carried up, but took a few~ leaves immediately an
put them in her mouth; but scarcely were they swallowed when
she lost her own form, and ran braying down into the court in
the form of an ass. Now the servant-maid came into the kitchen,
and, seeing the salad ready, was going to carry it up; but on the
[4or ]
421 00426.jpg
GRIMM' S
way she, too, felt a wish to taste it, as the old woman had done,
and are some leaves; so she also was turned into an ass, and
ran after the other, letting the dish with the salad fall on the
ground.
Peter had been sitting all this time chatting with the fair
MIeta, and as nobody came with the salad, and she longed to taste
it, she said, "I don't know where the salad can be." Then
he thought something must have happened, and said, "I will
go into the kitchen and see." And as he went he saw two asses
in the court running about, and the salad lying on the ground.
"All right!" said he, "those two have had their share." Then
he` took up the rest of the leaves, laid them on the dish, and
brought them to the young lady, saying, "I bring you the dish
myself, that you may not wait any- longer." So she ate of it,
and, like the others, ran into the court braying away.
Then Peter the huntsman washed his face and went into
the court, that they might know him. "Now you shall be paid
for your roguery,"' said he, and tied them all three to a rope,
and took them along with him, till he came to a mill, and knocked
at the window. "WFhat's the matter?"' said the miller. "I have
three tiresome beasts here," said the other. "If you will take
them, give them, food and room, and treat them as I tell you, I
will pay you whatever you ask." WVith all myr heart," said
the miller; "but how shall I treat them?" Then the huntsman
said, "Give the old one stripes three times a day and hay once;
give the next [who was the servant-maid] stripes once a day and
hay three times; and give the youngest [who was the pretty
Meta] hay three times a day and no stripes"; for he could not
find it in his heart to have her beaten. After this he went back
to the castle, where he found everything he wanted.
Some days after the miller came to him and told him the old
ass was dead. "The other two," said he, "are alive and eat, but
they are so sorrowful that they cannot last long." Then Peter
pitied them and told the miller to drive them back to him; and
when they came he gave them some of the good salad to eat.
I40s ]
422 00427.jpg
FAIRY TALES
The moment they had eaten they were both changed into their
right forms, and poor Mfeta fell on her knees before the hunts-
man and said: Forgive me all the ill I have done thee; my
mother forced me to it, and it was sorely against my will, for I
always loved you well. Your wishing-cloak hangs up in the
closet; and as for the bird's heart, I will giv~e you that, too."
But Peter said: Keep it. It will be just the same thing in the
end, for 'I mean to make you my wife."
So M'eta was very glad to come off so easily; and they were2
married, and lived together very happily till they died.
423 00428.jpg
GRIMMhi'S
TH IGO TEGLE
MOUNTAIN~
THR was onc a ecat h a ol n cid
sothtwa er ong ndbre abet ru alne
Hehd w icl adnshp he ain vyg uo
the easin wh1~ichh a makdalhswat, h oeo
makig grat ains whn th nes ca e tat bth ere ost
sOne tas h was \r oamng, alng n b~rown study thirnklng
ihe nod get~~ comfort oan hats hehadben maknd hat hoe npow a
and weas, ike to~c behdebr all ons a udntee stood befoe hime a itl
roghloking bleac danwarf. Prthe es friend why sot sorr owful
said be om thei mrch an. Whe eat e i l i t you t e so deepy too
heart? "f y iteou ci toubld ome aygo oldwligyt
youd," aid the mesrchamn. "Whon know but I mauy?"si thenin
littl mn. "Tell cmeoto what h ail you, and pehapsh you willfid
In may iet be ofl som us. Then thee merchant told him ho altle
hais elhwsgoe to the boat."htto i Jof thke sea ad hw epl ha
heart?"~~~~~40 ]I ucudd eaygodIwudwligytl
424 00429.jpg
FAIRY TALES
nothing left but that little plot of land. "Oh! trouble not your-
self about that," said the dwarf; "only undertake to bring me
here, twelve years hence, whatever meets you tGrst on your going
home, and I will give you as much as you please." The mer-
chant thought this was no great thing to ask; that it would
most likely be his dog or his car, or something of that sort, but:
forgot his little boy Heinel; so he agreed to the bargain, and
signed and sealed the bond to do what was asked of him.
But as he drew near home, his little boy was so glad to see
him that he crept behind him and laid fast hold of his legs, and
looked up in his face and laughed. Then the father started,
trembling with fear and horror, and saw what it was that he had
bound himself to do; but as no gold was come, he made himself
easy by thinking that it was only a joke that the dwarf was
playing him, and that, at any rate, when the money came, he
should see the bearer, and would not take it in.
About a month afterward he went up-stairs into a lumber-
room to look for some old iron, that he might sell it and raise a
little money; and there, instead of his iron, he saw a large pile
of gold lying on the floor. At the sight of this he was overjoyed,
and, for getting all about his son, went into trade again and
became a richer merchant than before.
Meantime little Heinel grew up, and as the end of the twelve
years drew near the merchant began to call to mind his bond
and became very sad and thoughtful; so that care and sorrow
were written upon his face. The boy one day asked what was
the matter, but his father would not tell for some time; at last,
however, he said that he had, without knowing it, sold him for
gold to a little, ugly-looking, black dwarf, and that the twelve
years were coming round when he must keep his word. Then
Heinel said, "Father, give yourself very Little trouble about that;
I shall be too much for the little man."
When the time came, the father and son went out together to
the place agreed upon, and the son drew a circle on the ground and
set himself and his father in the middle of it. The little black
[ 40s ]
425 00430.jpg
GRIMM' S
dwarf so.mn came, and walked round and round about the circle,
'but could not find any way to get into it, and he either could not,
or dared not, jump over it. At last the boy said to him, "Have
you anything to say to us, my friend, or what do you want?"
No~w Heinel had found a friend in a good fairy that was fond of
him, and had told him what to do, for this fairy knew wohat good
luck was in store for him. "Have you brought me what you
said you would?" said the dwarf to the merchant. The old man
held his tongue, but Heinel said again, "WYhat do y~ou want here?"
The. dwcarf said, "I come to talk with your father, not with you."
"You have cheated and taken in my father," said the son.
"Pray give him up his bond at once." Fair and softly," said
the little old man; "right is right. I have paid my money and
your father has had it, and spent it; so be so good as to let me
have what I paid it for." "You must have my consent to that
firstt" said Heinel; "so please to step in here and let us talk it
over." The old man grinned, and showed his teeth, as if he
should have been very glad to get into the circle if he could.
Then at last, after a long talk;, they came to terms. Heinel agreed
that his father must give him up, and that so far the dwarf should
have his way; but, on the other hand, the fairy had tok'l Heinel
what fortune was in sto. for him if he followed his own course;
and he did not choose to be given up to his humpbacked friend,
who seemed so anxious for his company.
So, to make a sort of drawn battle of the matter, it was settled
that -Heinel should be put into an open boat that lay on the sea-
shor~e hard by; that the father should push him off with his own
hand, -and that he should thus be set adrift and left: to the bad
or good luck of wind and weather. Then he took leave of his
father and set himself in the boat; but before it got far off a wave
struck it,' and it fell with one side low in the water, so the mer-
chant thought that poor Heinel was lost, and went home very
sorrowful, while the dwarf went his way, thinking that at any
rate he had had his revenge.
The boat, however, did not sink, for the good fairy took care
[ 4o6 ]
426 00431.jpg
n unmar hi II Ilw*rrrP~~sy man.T r n m*P~'Y~ 7 mm wis wu~u I\ tll'Mease K"Ta
THE LITTLE BLACK DWARF WALKED ROUND
TALE
FAIRY
427 00432.jpg
428 00433.jpg
FAIRY TALES
of her friend, and soon raised the boat up again and it went
safely on. The young man sat safe within till at length it ran
ashore upon an unknown land. As he jumped upon the shore
he saw before him a beautiful castle, but empty and dreary within,
for it was enchanted. "Here," said he to himself, "must I find
the prize the good fairy told me of." So he once more searched
the whole palace through till at last he found a white snake lying
coiled up on a cushion in one of the chambers.
Now the white snake was an enchanted princess; and she was
very glad to see him, and said: "Are you at last come to set me
free? Twelve long years have I waited here for the fairy to bring
you hither as she promised, for you alone can save me. This
night twelve men will come; their faces will be black, and they
will be dressed in chain-armor. They will ask what you do here,
but give no answer; and let them do what they wll--beat,
whip, pinch, prick, or torment you; bear all, only speak not a
word, and at twelve o'clock they must go away. The second night
twelve others will come, and the third night twenty-four, who
will even cut off your head; but at the twelfth hour of that night
their power is gone, and I shall be free, and will come and bring
you the water of life, and will wash you with it, and bring you
back to life and health." And all came to pass as she had said.
Heinel bore all, and spoke not a word; and the third night the
princess came, and fell on his neck and kissed him. Joy and glad-
ness burst forth throughout the castle, the wedding was cele-
brated, and he was crowned king of the Golden lRlountain.
They lived together very happily, and the queen had a son.
And thus eight years had passed over their heads when the
king thought of his father; and he began to long to see him once
again. But the queen was against his going and said, "I know
well that misfortunes will come upon us if you go." However,
he gave her no rest till she agreed. At his going away she gave
him a wishing-ring, and said, "Take this ring and put it on your
finger; whatever you wish it will bring you--only promise never
to make use of it to bring me hence to your father's house."
[ 4o9
429 00434.jpg
GRIMM~' S
Then he said he would do what she asked, and put the ring on'-
his finger, and wished himself near the town where his father lived.
Heinel found himself at the gates in a moment, but the guards
would not let him go in because he was so strangely clad. So he
Sent up to~ a neighboring hill where a shepherd dwfelt, and bor-
rowed his old frock, and thus passed unknown into the town.
When he cam~e to his father's house, he said he was his son;
but the merchant would not believe him, and said he had bad but
one son, his poor Heinel, who he knew was long since dead;
and as he was onlyr dressed like a poor shepherd, he would not
even give him anything to eat. The king, however, still vowed
that he was his son, and said, "Is there no mark by which you
would know me if I am really your son ?" Yes," said his mother.
"Our Heinel had a mark like a raspberryv on his right arm."
'Then he showed them the mark, and they knew that what he had
said was true. i
He next told them how he was king of the Golden Mountain,:
and was married to a princess, and had a son seven years old.
But the merchant said, "That can never be true; he must be a
fine king, truly, who travels about in a shepherd's frock!" At
this the son was vexed; aind, forgetting his word, turned his ring,
and wlished for his queen and son. In an instant they stood.
before him; but the queen wept, and said he had broken his word,
and had luck would follow. He did all he could to soothe her,:
and she at last seemed to be appeased; but she was not so in,.
truth, and was only thinking how she should punish him.
One day he took her to walk with him out of the town, andj
showed her the spot where the boat was set adrift upon the
wide waters. Then he sat himself down, and said, "I am very
much tired. Sir by me; I will rest my head in your lap and sleep:
awhile." As soon as hle had fallen asleep, however, she drew
the ring from his finger, and crept softly awcay, and wished herself
and her son at home in their kingdom. And when he awoke he
found himself alone, and saw that the ring was gone from his fin-
get. "I can never go back to my father s house," said he; they
[I 4o
430 00435.jpg
FAIRY TALES
would say I am a sorcerer. I will journey forth into the world till I
come again to my kingdom."
So saying, he set out and traveled till he came to a hill where
three giants were sharing their father's goods; and as they
saw him pass, they cried out and said, "Little men have sharp
wits; he shall part the goods between us." Now there was a
sword, that cut off an enemy's head whenever the wearer gave
the words, "( Heads off!" a cloak, that made the owner invisible,
or gave him any form he pleased; and a pair of boots that carried
the wearer wherever he wished. Heinel said they must first let
him try these wonderful things, then he might know how to set
a value upon them. Then they gave him the cloak, and be wished
himself a fly, and in a moment he was a fly. "The cloak is very
well," said he; now give me the sword." "No," said they; not
unless you undertake not to say, 'Heads off!' for if you do, we are
all dead men." So they gave it him, charging him to try it on a
tree. He next asked for the boots also; and the moment he had
all three in his power, he wished himself at the Golden lRlountain;
and there he was at once. So the giants were left behind with no
goods to share or quarrel about.
As Heinel came near his castle he heard the sound of merryl
music, and the people around told him that his queen was about
to marry another husband. Then he threw his cloak around him
and passed through the castle hall, and placed himself by the
side of his queen, where no one saw him. But when anything
to eat was put upon her plate, he took; it away and ate it himself;
and when a glass of wine was handed to her, he took it and
drank it; and thus, though they kept on giving her meat and
drink, her plate and cup were always empty.
Upon this fear and remorse came over her, and she went into
her chamber alone, and sat there weeping; and he followed her
there. "Alas!" said she to herself, "was I not once set free?
Why, then, does this enchancment still seem to bind me?"
"False and fickle one!" said he. "iOne indeed came who set
thee free, and he is now near thee again; but how have you
[411]
431 00436.jpg
UiKIMM' ~S
used him? Ought he to have had such treatment from thee?"
Then he went out and sent away the company, and said the wed-
ding was at an end, for that he was come back to the kingdom.
But the princes, peers, and great men mocked at him. However,
he would enter into no parley with them, but only asked them if
they would go in peace or not. Then they turned upon him and
tried to seize him; but he drew his sword. "Heads off!" cried he,
and with the word the traitors' heads fell before him, and Heinel
was once more king of the Golden M~ountain.
432 00437.jpg
7~ 111KY 'IA LE
THE BREMEN TOWN MUSICIANS
AN honest farmer had once an ass that had been a faithful
servant to him a great many years, but was now growing
old and every day more and more unfit for work. His
master therefore was tired of keeping him and began to think of
putting an end to him; but the ass, who saw that some mischief
was in the wind, took himself slyly off, and began his journey
toward the great city, "for there," thought he, "I may turn
musiciRH."
After he had traveled a little way he spied a dog lying by the
roadside and panting as if he were very tired. "What makes
you pant so, my friend?" said the ass. "Alas!" said the dog,
"'my master wa going to knock me on the head because I am
old and weak, al, can no longer make myself useful to him in
;'hunting; so I ran away. But what can I do to earn my liveli-
hood?," "Hark ye!" said the ass. "I am going to the great city
to turn musician. Suppose you go with me and try what you can
do in the same way?" The dog said he was willing, and they
Jogged on together.
They had not gone far before they saw a cat sitting in the mid-
I dle of the road and making a most rueful face. Pray, my good
Ladyy" said the ass, "what's the matter with you? You look
Quite out of spiritsl" "Ah me!" said the cat, "how can one be
[~ 4I3]
433 00438.jpg
v
in good spirits when one's life is in danger? Because I am begin-
ning to grow old, and had rather lie at my ease by the fire than
run about the house after the mice, my mistress laid hold of me,
and was going to drown me; and though I have been lucky
enough to get away from her, I do not know what I am to live
upon." "Oh!" said the ass, "by all means go ;th us to the
great city. You are a good night singer, and may make your
fortune as a musician." The cat was pleased with the thought,
and joined the party.
Soon afterward, as they were passing by a farm-yard, they
saw a cock perched upon a gate, and screaming out with all
his might and main. "Bravo!" said the ass; "upon my word,
you make a famous noise. Pray what is all this about?)" "Why,"
said the cock, "I was just now saying that we should have fine
weather for our washing-day, and yet my mistress and the
cook don't thank me for my pains, but threaten to cut off my
head to-morrow, and make broth of me for the guests that are
coming on Sunday!" "Heaven forbid!" said the ass. "Come
with us Master Chanticleer; it will be better, at any rate, than
staying here to have your head cut off! Besides, who knows?
If we care to sing in tune, we may get up some kind of a concert;
so come along with us." "With all my heart," said the cock. So
they all four went on jollily together.
They could not, however, reach the great city the first day,
so when night came on, they went into a wood o sleep. The ass
and the dog laid themselves down under a ,.eat tree, and the
cat climbed up into the branches; while the cock, thinking that
the higher he sat the safer he should be, Hfew up to the very top
of the tree, and then, according to his custom, before he went
to sleep, looked out on all sides of him to see that everything
was well. In doing this, he saw afar off something bright and
shining, and, calling to his companions, said, "There must be
a house no great way off, for I see a light." If th at be the case,"
said the ass, "we had better change our quarters, for our lodging
is not the best in the world !" Besides," added the dog, "I should
[414 1
LJIL 1 17.1 171
434 00439.jpg
F~`AIRY ~TA LE S
435 00440.jpg
r.
.
436 00441.jpg
FAIRY TALES
not be the worse for a bone or two, or a oit of meat." So they
walked off together toward the spot where Chanticleer had seen
the light; and as they drew near it became larger and brighter,
till they at last came close to a house in which a gang of robbers
lived.
The ass, being the tallest of the company, marched up to the
window and peeped in. "Well, Donkey," said Chanticleer,
"Lwhat do you see?"' "What do I see?" replied the ass. "Why,
I see a table spread with all kinds of good things, and robbers
sitting round it making merry." "That would be a noble lodging
for us,") said the cock. Yes," said the ass, if we could only get
in." So they consulted together how they should contrive to
get the robbers out, and at last they hit upon a plan. The ass
placed himself upright on his hind legs, with his forefeet resting
against the window; the dog got upon his back; the cat scrambled
up to the dog's shoulders, and the cock flew up and sat upon
the cat's head. When all was ready, a signal was given, and they
began their music. The ass brayed, the dog barked, the cat
mewed, and the cock screamed, and then they all broke through
the window at once, and came tumbling into the room, amongst
the broken glass, with a most hideous clatter The robbers, who
had been not a little frightened by the opening concert, had now
no doubt that some frightful hobgoblin had broken in upon them,
and scampered away as fast as they could.
The coast once clear, our travelers soon sat down and de-
spatched what the robbers had left, with as much eagerness as
if they had not expected to eat again for a month. As soon as
they had satisfied themselves, they put out the lights, and each
once more sought out a resting-place to his own liking. The don-
key laid himself down upon a beap of straw in the yard; the
dog stretched himself upon a mat behind the door; the cat rolled
herself up on the hearth before the warm ashes; and the cock
perched upon a beam on the top of the house; and, as they were
all rather tired with their journey, they soon fell asleep.
But about midnight, when the robbers saw from afar that the
{ 417)
437 00442.jpg
GRIMM' S
lights were out and that all seemed quiet, they began to think
that they had been in too great a hurry to run away; and one of
them, who was bolder than the rest, went to see what was going
on. Finding everything still, he marched into the kitchen and
groped about till be found a match in order to light a candle;
and then, espying the glittering fiery eyes of the cat, he mistook
them for live coals, and held the match to them to light it. But
the cat, not understanding this joke, sprung at his face, and spit
and scratched at him. This frightened him dreadfully, and away
he ran to the back door; but there the dog jumped up and bit
him in the leg; and as he was crossing over the yard the ass
kicked him; and the cock, who had been awakened by the
noise, crowed with all his might. At this the robber ran back as
fast as he could to his comrades and told the captain "how a
horrid witch had got into the house, and had spit at him and
scratched his face with her long, bony fingers; how a man with
a knife in his hand had hidden himself behind the door and
stabbed him in the leg; how a black monster stood in the yard
and struck him with a club, and how the devil had sat upon the
top of the house and cried out, "Throw the rascal up here!"
After this the robbers never dared to go back to the house; but
the musicians were so pleased with their quarters that they took
up their abode there; and there they are, I dare say, at this very
day.
438 00443.jpg
(419]
.F AI R Y
TALES
439 00444.jpg
GRIM M" S
till in the evening they came to a great wood, and then they were
so tired and hungry that they sat down in a hollow tree and
went to sleep.
In the morning when they awoke, the sun had risen high
above the trees, and shone warm upon the hollow tree. Then
Hansel said: "Sister, I am very thirsty; if I could find a brook,
I would go and drink, and fetch you some water, too. Listen, I
think I hear the sound of one." Then Hansel rose up and took
Grettel by the hand and went in search of the brook. But
their cruel stepmother was a fairy, and had followed them into
the wood to work them mischief; and when they had found a
brook that ran sparkling over the pebbles, Hansel wanted to
drink; but Grettel thought she heard the brook, as it gabbled
along say, "Whoever drinks here will be turned into a tiger."
Then she cried out, "Ah, brother! do not drink, or you will
be turned into a wild beast and tear me to pieces." Then
Hansel yielded, although he was parched with thirst. "I
will wait," said he, "for the next brook." But when they
came to the next, Grettel listened again, and thought she
heard, "Whoever drinks here will become a wolf." Then she
cried out, "Brother, brother, do not drink, or you will become
a wolf and eat me." So he did not drink, but said, "I will
wait for the next brook; there I must drink, say what you
will, I am so thirsty."
As they came to the third brook, Grettel listened, and heard,
"'Whoever drinks here will become a fawn." "Ah, brother!"
said she, "do not drink, or you will be turned into a fawn and run
away from me." But Hansel had already stooped down upon
his knees, and the moment he put his lips into the water he was
turned into a fawn.
Grettel wept bitterly over the poor creature, and the tears,~
too, rolled down his eyes as he laid himself beside her. Then
she said: Rest in peace, dear fawn. I will never, never leave
thee." So she took off her golden necklace and put it round.
his neck, and plucked some rushes and plaited them120 into a softly
440 00445.jpg
FAIRY TALES
string to fasten to it, and led the poor little thing by her side
farther into the wood.
After they had traveled a long way they came at last to a little
cottage; and Grettel, having looked in and seen that it was quite
empty, thought to herself, "We can stay and live here." Then
she went and gathered leaves and moss to make a soft bed for
the fawn; and every morning she went out and plucked nuts,
roots, and berries for herself, and sweet shrubs and tender grass
for her companion; and it ate out of her hand, and was pleased,
and played and frisked about her. In the evening, when Grettel
was tired; and had said her prayers, she laid her head upon the
fawn for her pillow and slept; and if poor Hansel could but have
his right form again, they thought they should lead a very happy
life.
They lived thus a long while in the wood by themselves, till it
chanced that the king of that country came to hold a great hunt
there. And when the fawn heard all around the echoing of the
horns, and the baying of the dogs, and the merry shouts of the
huntsmen, he wished very much to go and see what was going on.
"Ah, sister, sister!" said he, "let me go out into the wood. I
can stay no longer." And he begged so long that she at last
agreed to let him go. "But," said she, "be sure to come to me
in the evening; I shall shut up the door to keep out those wild
huntsmen; and if you tap at it, and say, 'Sister, let me in,' I shall
know you; but if you don t speak, I shall keep the door fast."
Then away sprang the fawn, and frisked and bounded along in
the open air. The king and his huntsmen saw the beautiful
creature, and followed, but could not overtake him, for when they
thought they were sure of their prize, he sprang over the bushes
and was out of sight in a moment.
As it grew dark he came running home to the hut, and tapped,
and said, "Sister, sister, let me in." Then she opened the little
door, and in he jumped and slept soundly all night on his soft bed.
Next morning the hunt began again; and when he heard the
huntsmen's horns, he said: "Sister, open the door for me, I
[422]
441 00446.jpg
GRIM: M" S
must go again." Then she let him out, and said, "Come back
in the evening, and remember what you are to say." When the
king and the huntsmen saw the fawn with tche golden collar
again, they gave him chase; but he was too quick for them,
The chase lasted the whole day; but at last the huntsmen nearly
surrounded him, and one of them wounded him in the foot so
that he became sadly lame and could hardly crawl home. The
man who had wounded him followed close behind and hid him-
self, and heard the little fawn say, "Sister, sister, let me in!" upon
which the door opened and soon shut again. The huntsmen
marked all well, and went to the king and told him what he had
seen and heard; then the king said, "To-morrow we will have
another chase."
Grettel was very much frightened when she saw that her
dear little fawn was wounded; but she washed the blood away
and put healing herbs on it, and said, "Now go to bed, dear
fawn, and you will soon be well again." The wound was so small
that in the morning there was nothing to be seen of it, and when
the horn blew, the little creature said: "I can't stay here. I
must go and look on. I will take care that none of them shall
catch me." But Grettel said: "I am sure they will kill you this
time. I will not let you go." "I shall die of vexation," answered
he, "if you keep me here. When I hear the horns, I feel as if I
could fly." Then Grettel was forced to let him go; so she opened .
the door with a heavy heart, and he bounded out gaily into the
wood .
When the king saw him he said to his huntsman, "Now chase
him all day long till you catch him; but let none of you do him
any harm." The sun set, however, without their being able;
to overtake him, and the king called away the huntsmen, and said
to the one who had watched, "Now come and show me the
little hut." So they went to the door and tapped, and said,:
"LSister, sister, let me in." Then the door opened and the king
went in, and there stood a maiden more lovely than any heha
ever seen. Grettel was frightened to see that it was not herf
[42z] ;
442 00447.jpg
AIYTALES
Sfawn, but a king with a golden crown that was come into her hut.
However, he spoke kindly to her, and took her hand, and said,
"Will you come with me to my castle and be my wife "Yes,"
said the maiden; "but my lawn must go with me. I cannot part
with that." "Well," said the king, "he shall come and live with
you all your life, and want for nothing." Just at that moment
in sprang the little fawn; and his sister tied the string to his neck
and they left the but in the wood together.
Then the king took Grettel to his palace, and celebrated the
marriage in great state. And she told the king all her story;
and he sent for the fairy and punished her; and the fawn was
changed into Hansel again, and he and his sister loved each other,
and lived happily together all their days.
443 00448.jpg
THE FOX AND THE
HORSE
that had been an excel-
lent faithful servant to
him; but he was now grown
too old to work, so the farmer
would give him nothing more
to eat, and said: "I want you
no longer, so take yourself off
out of my stable. I shall not
take you back again until you
are stronger than a lion." Then
he opened the door and turned
him adrift.
The poor horse was very
melancholy, and wandered up
and down in the wood, seeking
some little shelter from the cold
wind and rain. Presently a fox
[ 424 ]
444 00449.jpg
I' AYLf 52
met him. "What's the matter, my friend?" said he. "Why do
you hang down your head and look so lonely and woebegone?"
"'Ahl" replied the horse, "justice and avarice never dwell in one
house. My master has forgotten all that I have done for him so
many years, and because I can no longer work he has turned me
adrift, and says unless I become stronger than a lion he will not
take me back again. What chance can I have of that? He
knows I have none, or he would not talk so."
However, the fox bid him be of good cheer, and said: "I will
help you. Lie down there; stretch yourself out quite stiff, and
pretend to be dead." The horse did as he was told, and the
fox went straight to the lion who lived in a cave close by, and
said to him: "A little way off lies a dead horse. .Come with me
and you may make an excellent meal of his carcass." The lion
was greatly pleased, and set off immediately; and when they came
to the horse, the fox said: "Y'ou will not be able to eat him com-
fortably here. 1I'l tell you what-I will tie you fast to his tail,
and then you can draw him to your den and eat him at your
leisure."
This advice pleased the lion, so he laid himself down quietly
for the fox to make him fast to the horse. But the fox managed
to tie his legs together and bound all so hard and Fast that with
all his strength he could not set himself free. When the work
was done, the fox clapped the horse on the shoulder and said:
"Jip! Dobbin! Jip!" Then up he sprang, and moved off, drag-
ging the lion behind him, The beast began to roar and bellow,
till all the birds of the wood flew away for fright; but the horse
let him sing on, and made his way quietly over the fields to
his master's house.
"Here he is, master," said he. "I have got the better of
him." And when the farmer saw his old servant, his heart re-
lented, and he said, "Thou shalt stay in thy stable and be well
taken care of." And so the poor old horse had plenty to eat,
and lived--till he died.
X 11 1 K
_
445 00450.jpg
HANS AND HIS WIFE GRETTEL
SHOWING WVHO GRETTEL WAS
shoes with red heels, and when she went abroad she turned
out her toes, and was very merry, and thought to herself,
"What a pretty girl I am!" And when she came home, to
put herself in good spirits, she would tipple down a drop or
two of wine; and as wine gives a relish for eating, she would
take a taste of everything when she was cooking, saying, "A
cook ought to know whether a thing tastes well." It hap-
pened one day that her master said, "Grettel, this evening
I have a friend coming to sup with me; get two fine fowls
ready." "Very well, sir," said Grettel. Then she killed the
fowls, plucked, and trussed them, put them on the spit, and
when evening came put them to the fire to roast. The fowls
turned round and round, and soon began to look nice and
brown, but the guest did not come. Then Grettel cried out,
"Master, if the guest does not come I must take up the
fowls, but it will be a shame and a pity if they are not eaten
while they are hot and good." "Well," said her master, "I'll
run and tell him to come." As soon as he had turned his back,
[426]
446 00451.jpg
FAIRY TALES
Grettel stopped the spit, and laid it with the fowls upon it on
one side, and thought to herself: "Standing by the fire makes
one very tired and thirsty. Who knows how long they will be?
Meanwhile I will just step into the cellar and take a drop." So
off she ran, put down her pitcher, and said, "Your health, Gret-
tel," and took a good draught. "This wine is a good friend,"
said she to herself. "It breaks one's heart to leave it." Then
up she trotted, put the fewis down to the fire, spread some butter
over them, and turned the spit merrily round again.
The fowls soon smelt so good that she thought to herself, "They
are very good, but they may want something still; I had better
taste them and see." So she licked her fingers, and said: "Oh!
how good! What a shame and a pity that they are not eaten!"
Away she ran to the window to see if her master and his friend
were coming; but nobody was in sight, so she turned to the fowls
again, and thought it would be better for her to eat a wing than
that it should be burnt. So she cut one wing off, and ate it, and
it tasted very well; and as the other was quite done enough,
she thought it had better be cut off too, or else her master would
see one was wanting. When the two wings were gone, she went
again to look out for her master, but could not see him. "Ahl"
thought she to herself, "who knows whether they will come at
all? Very likely they have turned into some tavern. Oh, Grettel!
Grettel! make yourself happy, take another draught and eat
the rest of the fowl; it looks so oddly as it is; when you have
eaten all, you will be easy. Why should such good things be
wasted ?" So she ran once more to the cellar, took another drink,
Sand ate up the rest of the fowl with the greatest glee.
Still her master did not come, and she cast a lingering eye
upon the other fowl, and said: "'Where the other went this had
better go, too; they belong to each other; they who have a
right to one must have a right to the other, but if I were to take
another draught first it would not hurt me." So she tippled
down another drop of wine and sent the second fowl to look
after the first. While she was making an end of this famous
[ 427 ]
447 00452.jpg
Li K 1 MM 5'~
meal her master came home and called out, "Now quick, Grettel;
my friend is just at hand!" "Yes, master, I will dish up this
minute," said she. In the meantime he looked to see if the cloth
was laid, and took up the carving-knife to sharpen it. Whilst
this was going on the guest came and knocked softly and gently
at the house door; then Grettel ran to see who was there, and
when she saw him she put her finger upon her lips and said:
"Hush! hush! Run away as last as you can, for if my master
catches you it will be worse for you. He owes you a grudge,
and asked you to supper only that he might cut off your ears;
only listen how he is sharpening his knife." The guest listened,
and when he heard the knife, he made as much haste as he could
down the steps and ran off. Grettel was not idle in the mean-
time, but ran screaming: Master! master! What a fine guest
you have asked to supper!" "WThy, Grettel, what's the matter?"
"Oh!" said she, "he has taken both the fowls that I was going to
bring up, and has run away with them." "That is a rascally
trick to play," said the master, sorry to lose the fine chickens;
"at least he might have left me one that I might have had some-
thing to eat; call out to him to stay." But the guest would
not hear; so he ran after him with his knife in his hand, crying
out: "Only one, only one! I want only one!" meaning that the
guest should leave him one of the fowls, and not take both;
but he thought that his host meant nothing less than that he
would cut off at least one of his ears; so he ran away to save them
both, as if he had hot coals under his feet.
448 00453.jpg
F`AIR Y` TALES
? SII
HANS IN LOVE
Hans's mother says to him, "Whither so fast?" "To see
Grettel," says Hans. "Behave well." "Very well. Good-by,
mother!" Hans comes to Grettel. "Good day, Grettel!" "Good
day, Hans! Do you bring me anything good ?" "Nothing at
all. Have you anything for me?" Grettel gives Hans a needle.
Hans says, "Good-by, Grettel!" "Good-by, Hans!" Hans takes
the needle, sticks it in a truss of hay and takes both off home.
"Goo0d evening, mother!" "Good evening, Hans! Where have
you been?" "To see Grettel." "What did you take her?"
"Nothing at all." "What did she give you?" "She gave me
a needle." "Where is it, Hans?" "Stuck in the truss." "How
silly you are! You should have stuck it in your sleeve." "Let
me alone! PH ldo better next time."
"Where now, Hans?" "To see Grettel, mother." "Behave
yourself well." Very well. Good-by, mother!" Hans comes
to Grettel. "Good day, Grettel!" "Good day, Hans! What
have you brought me?)" "Nothing at all. Have you anything
for me?" Grettel gives Hans a knife. "Good-by, Grettell"
"Good-by, Hans!" Hans takes the knife, sticks it in his sleeve,
and goes home. "Good evening, mother!" "Good evening,
Han's! Where have you been?" "To see Grettel." "What
did you carry her?" "Nothing at all." "What has she given
(4191
449 00454.jpg
Li KIMM'V1' S
you?" "A knife." "Where is the knife, Hans?" "Stuck in
my sleeve, mother." "You silly goose! You should have put
it in your pocket." "Let me alonel I'll do better next time."
"Where now, Hans?" "To see Grettel." "Behave yourself
well." "Very well. Good-by, mother!" Hans comes to Grettel.
"Good day, Grettel!'' "Good day, Hans! Have you anything
good?" "No. Have you anything for me?" Grettel gives Hans
a kid. "Good-by, Grettel!" "Good-by, Hans!" Hans takes
the kid, ties it up with a cord, stuffs it into his pocket, and chokes
it to death. "Good evening, mother!" "Good evening, Hans!
Where have you been?" "To see Grettel, mother!" "What
did you take her?" "Nothing at all." What did she give you "
"She gave me a kid." "Where is the kid, Hans?" "Safe in my
pocket." "Y'ou silly goose! You should have led it with a string."
"Never mind, mother. I'll do better next time."
"Where now, Hans?" "To Grettel's, mother." "Behave
well." "Quite well, mother. Good-by!" Hans comes to GretteL
"LGood day, Grettel!" "Good -day, Hans! What have you
brought me?" "Nothing at all. Have you anything for me?"
Grettel gives Hans a piece of bacon. Hans ties the bacon to a
string and drags it behind him; the dogs comes after and eat it
all up as he walks home. "Good evening, mother!" "Good
evening, Hans! Where have you been?" "To Grettel's." "What
did you take her?" "Nothing at all." "What did she give you?"
"A piece of bacon." "Where is the bacon, Hans?" "Tied to
the string, and dragged home, but somehow or other all gone."
"What a silly trick, Hans! You should have brought it on your
head." "Never mind, mother. I'll do better another time."
"W~here now, Hans?" "Going to Grettel." "Take care of
yourself." "Very well, mother. Good-by." Hans comes to
Grettel. "Good day~, Grettel!" "Good day, Hans! What have
you brought me "'Nothing. Have you anything for me?"
Grettel gives Hanls a calf. Hans sets it upon his head, and it
kicks him in the face. Good evening, mother!" Good evening,
Hans! Where have you been?" "To see Grettel." "What
(43o]
450 00455.jpg
THE DOGS EAT UP ALL THE BACON AS HANS
WALKS HOME
1
:F AIRY TALES
451 00456.jpg
i':
r.
452 00457.jpg
FAIRY TALES
did you take her?" "Nothing." "What did she give you?"
"(She gave me a calf." "WThere is the calf, Hans?" "I put it
on my head, and it scratched my face." "You silly goose-1 You
should have led it home and put it in the stall." Very well.
I'll do better another time."
"LWhere now, Hans?" "To see Gref'tel." "'Mind and behave
well." "Good-by, mother!" Hans comes to Grettel. "Good
day, Grettel!" "Good day, Hans! What have you brought?"
"Nothing at all. Have you anything for me?" "I'll go home
with you." Hans ties a string round her neck, leads her along,
and ties her up in the stall. "Good evening, mother!" "Good
evening, Hans! Where have you been?" "At Grettel's." "W~hat
has she given you?" "She has come herself." "Where have you
put her?" "Fast in the stall with plenty of hay." "How silly
you are! You should have taken good care of her, and brought
her home." Then Hans went back to the stall; but Grettel
was in a great rage, and had got loose and run away. Yet, after
all, she was Hans's bride.
453 00458.jpg
Li KINVI.M'Si
rnz'P
HANS MARRIED
Has ndGetellve i hevilgetoehe, u Gete
didassheplase, nd assolaz tat henevr oul wrk
Hand make onete." "Ife tht's alllsai hoe, "Iwil got intothe
wood and cut rleael-tck. Thn ret was folz htsenvrightend lest
a when her hdcutbn thestck he should make a reel, and thus she
wloueld bey focd ond then yar and spu h i no agin. So sh on-t
eredl au whleti to i at ltastl a brgthougt. cansme into her head,
and she ran sllwys eftrerher husband into thean wood. As soo
ashe shaud go wind to ahe t aree adbgnt bend don aoug th oo
cut itse crept "int thebush belo," whee he, couwldg ino seeher
anod sang:u elsik. hnGrte a rgtndls
when e hadcut"Bed notk the bhough;k are, n hu
and he an 14y at~rHer ho bends into sha diel s o
RBeel not the reelh;
He who reels it shall diel"
[4341
454 00459.jpg
FAIRY TALES
Mans listened a while, laid down his ax, and thought to him-
self, "'What can that be?" "What, indeed, can it be?" said he
at last; "it is only a singing in your ears, Hans! Pluck up your
heart, man!" So he raised up his ax again, and took hold of the
bough, but once more the voice sang:
"'Bend not the bough;
He who bends it shall diel
Reel not the reel;
He who reels it shall diel"
Once more he stopped his hand; fear came over him, and he
began pondering what it could mean. After a while, however,
he plucked up his courage again and took up his ax and began for
the third time to cut the wood; again the third time began the
song:
"Bend not the bough;
He who bends it shall diel
Reel not the reel;
He who reels it shall die!"
At this he could hold no longer; down he dropped from the
tree and set off homeward as fast as he could. Away, too, ran
Grettel by a shorter cut, so as to reach home first, and when
he opened the door met him quite innocently, as if nothing had
happened, and said, Well, have you brought a good piece of
wood for the reel?" "No," said he; "I see plainly that no
luck comes of that reel;" and then he told her all that had hap-
Spened, and left her for that time in peace.
But soon afterward Hans began again to reproach her with the
untidiness of her house. "Wife," said he, "is it not a sin and a
shame that the spun yarn should lie all about in that way?"
"LIt may be so," said she, "but you know very well that we have
Sno reel; if it must be done, lie down there and hold up your
i hands and legs, and so I'll make a reel of you and wind off the
yarn into skeins." Very well," said Hans (who did not much like
the job, but saw no help for it if his wife was to be set to work); so
[435 1
455 00460.jpg
Li KIMM'b1'
he did as she said, and when all was wound, "The yarn is all in
skeins," said he; "now take care and get up early and heat the
water and boil it well, so that it may be ready for sale." Grettel
disliked this part of the work very much, but said to him, "Very
well, I'll be sure to do it very early co-morrow morning." But
all the time she was thinking to herself what plan she should take
for getting off such work for the future.
Betimes in the morning she got up, made the fire and put on
the boiler; but, instead of the yarn, she laid a large ball of tow
in it and let it boil. Then she went up to her husband, who was
still in bed, and said to him: "I must go out. Pray look mean-
time to the yarn in the boiler over the fire; but do it soon and
take good care, for if the cock crows and you are not looking to
it, they say it will turn to tow." Hans soon after got up that he
might run no risk, and went (but not, perhaps, as quickly as he
might have done) into the kitchen, and when he lifted up the
boiler lid and looked in, to his great terror nothing was there
but a ball of tow. Then off he slunk as dumb as a mouse, for he
thought to himself that he was to blame for his laziness; and
left Grettel to get on with her yarn and her spinning as fast as
she pleased and no faster.
One day, however, he said to her, "W7ife, I must go a little
way this morning; do you go into the field and cut the corn."
"LYes, to be sure, dear Hans!i" said she. So when he was gone she
cooked herself a fine mess and took it with her into the field.
When she came into the field, she sat down for a while and said
to herself: "~Hat shall I do? Shall I sleep first or eat first?
Heigho! I'll first eat a bit." Then she are her dinner heartily,
and when she had had enough she said again to herself: "What
shall I do? Sb all I reap first or sleep first? Heigho! I'll first sleep
a bit." So she laid herself down among the corn and went fast
asleep. By and by Hans came home, but no Grettel was to be
seen, and he said to himself: "What a clever wife I havel She
works so hard that she does not even come home to her dinner!"
Evening came and still she did not come; then Hans went of
[436]
456 00461.jpg
to see how much of the corn was reaped, but there it all stood,
Untouched, and Grettel lay last asleep in the middle. So he ran
home and got a string of little bells and tied them quietly round
her waist, and went back and set himself down on his stool and
locked the house door.
At last Grettel woke when it was quite dark, and as she rose
up the bells jingled around her every step she took. At this she
was greatly frightened, and puzzled to tell whether she was really
Grettel or not. "Is it I, or is it not said she as she stood doubt-
ing what she ought to think. At last, after she had pondered
awhile, she thought to herself,"I will go home and ask if it is I
or not; Hans will know." So she ran to the house door, and when
she found it locked, she knocked at the window and cried out,
"Hans, is Grettel within?" "She is where she ought to be, to
be sure," said Hans. "Oh dear, then!" said she, frightened,
"this is not 1." Then away she went and knocked at the neigh-
bors' doors, but when they heard her bells rattling no one would
let her in, and so at last off she ran back to the field again.
457 00462.jpg
GRIMM" S
THE FIVE SERVANTS
SOME time ago there reigned in a country
many thousands of miles off an old queen
who was very spiteful and delighted in
nothing so much as mischief. She had one
daughter, who was thought to be the most beau-
tiful princess in the world; but her mother only
made use of her as a trap for the unwary,. and
whenever any suitor who had heard of her beauty
came to seek her in marriage, the only answer
the old lady gave to each was that he must under-
take some very hard task and forfeit his life if
he failed. Many, led by the report of the
princess's charms, undertook these tasks, but
failed in doing what the queen set them to do.
1438 ]
458 00463.jpg
SF A I`RY TALES
No mercy was ever shown them; but the word was given at once,
and off their heads were cut.
Now it happened that a prince who lived in a country far off
heard of the great beauty of this young lady, and said to his
father, "Dear father, let me go and try my luck." "No," said
the king; "if you go you will surely lose your life." The prince,
however, had set his heart so much upon the scheme that when
he found his father was against it he fell very ill, and took to his
bed for seven years, and no art could cure him, or recover his
lost spirits; so when his father saw that if he went on thus he
would die, he said to him with a heart full of grief, "If it must
be so, go and try your luck." At this he rose from his bed, re-
covered his health and spirits, and went forward on his way
light of heart and full of joy.
Then on be journeyed over hill and dale, through fair weather
and foul, till one day, as he was riding through a wood, he thought
he saw afar off some large animal upon the ground, and as he
drew near he found that it was a man lying along upon the grass
under the trees, but he looked more like a mountain than a man,
he was so far and jolly. When this big fellow saw the traveler,
he arose and said, "If you want any one to wait upon yrou, you
will do well to take me into your service." "WChat should I do
with such a fat fellow as you?" said the prince. "It would be
nothing to you if I were three thousand times as fat," said the
man, "so that I do but behave myself well." "That's true,"
answered the prince, "so come with me. I can put you to some
use or another I dare say." Then the fat man rose up and fol-
lowed the prince, and by and by they saw another man lying
on the ground with his ear close to the turf. The prince said,
"What are you doing there?" "I am listening," answered the
man. "To what?" "To all that is going on in the world, for I
can hear everything. I can even hear the grass grow." "Tell
5me," said the prince, "what you hear is going on at: the court
of the old queen who- has the beautiful daughter." "I hear,"
saidd the listener, "the noise of the sword that is cutting off the
[4391
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GRIMM' S
head of one of her suitors." "Welll" said the prince, "I see I
shall be able to make you of use. Come along with me!" They
had not gone far before they saw a pair of feet, and then part of
the legs of a man stretched out; but they were so long that they
could not see the rest of the body till they had passed on a good
deal farther, and at last they came to the body, and after going
on a while farther, to the head. Bless me!" said the prince,
"what a long rope you are!" "Oh!" answered the tall man,
"this is nothing; when I choose to stretch myself to my full
length, I am three times as high as any mountain you have seen
on your travels, I warrant you. I will willingly do what I can
to serve you if you will let me." "Come along, then," said the
prince. "I can turn you to account in some way."
The prince and his train went on farther into the wood, and next
saw a man lying by the roadside basking in the heat of the sun,
yet shaking and shivering all over, so that not a limb lay still.
"What makes you shiver," said the king, "while the sun is shin-
ing so warm ?" "Alas!" answered the man, "the warmer it is, the
colder I am; the sun only seems to me like a sharp frost that
thrills through all my bones; and, on the other hand, when others
are what you call cold I begin to be warm, so that I can neither
bear the ice for its heat nor the fire for its cold." "You are a
queer fellow," said the prince; "but if you have nothing else to
do, come along with me." The next thing they saw was a man
standing, stretching his neck and looking around him from hill
to hill. "What are you looking for so eagerly?" said the prince.
"LI have such sharp eyes," said the man, "that I can see over
woods and fields and hills and dales; in short, all over the world."
"Well," said the prince, "come with me if you will, for I want
one more to make up my train."
Then they all journeyed on, and met with no one else till
they came to the city where the beautiful princess lived. The
prince went straight to the old queen, and said, "Here I am,
ready to do any task you set me, if you will give me your daughter
as a reward when I have done." "I will set you three tasks,"
[44o]
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'FAIRY TALES
said the queen; "and if you get through all, you shall be the hus-
band of my daughter. First, you must bring me a ring which
I dropped in the Red Sea." The prince went home to his friends
and said, "The first task is not an easy one; it is to fetch a ring
out of the Red Sea, so lay your heads together and say what is to
be done." Then the sharp-sighted one said, I will see where it
lies," and looked down into the sea, and cried out, "There it lies
upon a rock at the bottom." "I would fetch it out," said the
tall man, "if I could but see it." "Well," cried out the fat one,
"I will help you to do that," and laid himself down and held his
mouth to the water, and drank up the waves till the bottom of the
sea was as dry as a meadow. Then the tall man stooped a little
and pulled out the ring with his hand, and the prince took it to
the old queen, who looked at it, and, wondering, said: "It is
indeed the right ring; you have gone through this task well.
But now comes the second. Look yonder at the meadow before
my palace. See! There are a hundred fat oxen feeding there;
you must eat them all up before noon; and underneath, in my
cellar, there are a hundred casks of wine, which you must drink
all up." "1Vay I not invite some guests to share the feast with
me?" said the prince. "Why, yes!" said the old woman with a
spiteful laugh; "you may ask one of your friends to breakfast
with you, but no more."
Then the prince went home and said to the far man, "You
must be my guest to-day, and for once you shall eat your fill." So
the far man set to work and ate the hundred oxen without leaving
a bit, and asked if that was to be all he should have for his break-
fast; and he drank the wine out of the casks without leaving
a drop, licking even his fingers when he had done. When the
meal was ended, the prince went to the old woman and told her
the second task was done. Your work is not all over, however,"
i muttered the old hag to herself. "I will catch you y'et; you shall
not keep your head upon your shoulders if I can help it." "This
~'evening," said she, "I will bring my daughter into your house
anmd Ileve her with you. You shall sit together there, but take
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GRIMM' S
care that you do not fall asleep, for I shall come when the clock
strikes twelve, and if she is not then with you, you are undone."
"Oh!" thought the prince, "it is an easy task to keep such a
watch as that; I will take care to keep my eyes open." So he
called his servants and told them all that the old woman had
said. "Who knows, though," said he, "but there may be some
trick at the bottom of this? It is well to be upon our guard and
keep watch that the young lady does not get away." When it
was night, the old woman brought her daughter to the prince's
house; then the tall man twisted himself round about it, the
listener put his ear to the ground, the fat man placed himself
before the door so that no living soul could enter, and the sharp-
eyed one looked out afar and watched. Within sat the princess
without saying a word, but the moon shone bright through the
window upon her face, and the prince gazed upon her wonderful
beauty. And while he looked upon her with a heart full of joy
and love, his eyelids did not droop; but at eleven o'clock the old
woman cast a charm over them so that they all fell asleep, and
the princess vanished in a moment.
And thus they slept till a quarter to twelve, when the charm
had no longer any power over them, and they all awoke. "Alast
alast woe is me," cried the prince. "LNow I am lost forever!"
And his faithful servants began to weep over their unhappy lot;
but the listener said, Be still and I will listen." So be listened a
while, and cried our, "I hear her bewailing her fate"; and the
sharp-sighted man looked, and said: "I see her sitting on a rock
three hundred miles hence. Now help us my tall friend; if you
stand up, you willl reach her in two steps." Very well," answered
the tall man; and in an instant, before one could turn one's head
round, he was at the foot of the enchanted rock. Then the tall
man took the young lady in his arms and carried her back to the
prince a moment before it struck twelve; and they all sat down
again and made merryr. And when the clock struck twelve the
old queen came sneaking by with a spiteful look, as if she was
going to say, "Now he is mine!" nor could she think otherwise,
[442 ]
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FAIRY TALES
for she knew that her daughter was but the moment before on
the rock three hundred miles off; but when she came and saw
her daughter in the prince's room, she started and said, "There
is somebody here who can do more than I can." However, she
now saw that she could no longer avoid giving the prince her
daughter for a wife, but said to her in a whisper, "It is a shame
that you should be won by servants, and not have a husband of
your own choice."
Now the young lady was of a very proud, haughty temper,
and her anger was raised to such a pitch that the next morning
she ordered three hundred loads of wood to be brought and piled
up; and told the prince it was true he had by the help of his ser-
vants done the three tasks, but that before she would marry
him some one must sit upon that pile of wood when it was set
on fire and bear the heat. She thought to herself that though his
servants had done everything else for him, none of them would
go so far as to burn themselves for him, and that then she should
put his love to the test by seeing whether he would sit upon it
himself. But she was mistaken, for when the servants heard this,
they said, "We have all done something but the frosty man;
now his turn is come"; and they took him and -put him on
the wood and set it on fire. Then the fire rose and burned
for three long days, till the wood was gone; and when it was
out, the frosty; man stood in the midst of the ashes, trembling
like an aspenleaf, and said, "I never shivered so much in my
'life; if it had lasted much longer, I should have lost the use of
my limbs."
When the princess had no longer any plea for delay, she saw
that she was bound to marry the prince; but when they were
going to church, the old woman said, "I will never consent," and
sent secret orders to her horsemen to kill and slay all before
them and bring back her daughter before she could be married.
However, the listener had pricked up his ears and heard all that
the old woman said, and told it to the prince. So they made
haste and got to the church first, and were married; and then
S[ 443 i
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GRIMM' S
the live servants took their leave and went away, saying, "We
will go and try our luck in the world on our own account."
The prince set out with his wife, and at the end of the first
day's journey came to a village, where a swineherd was feeding his
swine; and as they came near he said to his wife: "Do you
know who I am? I am not a prince, but a poor swineherd; he
whom you see yonder with the swine is my father, and our
business will be to help to tend them." Then he went into the
swineherd's but with her, and ordered her royal clothes to be
taken away in the night, so that when she awoke in the morning
she had nothing to put on till the woman who lived there made a
great favor of giving her an old gown and a pair of worsted
stockings. "If it were not for your husband's sake," said she,
"I would not have given you anything." Then the poor princess
gave herself up for lost, and believed that her husband must in-
deed be a swineherd; but she thought she would make the best
of it, and began to help him to feed them, and said, "It is a just
reward for my pride." When this had lasted eight days she could
bear it no longer, for her feet were all over wounds, and as she
sat down and wept by the wayside, some people came up to her
and pitied her, and asked if she knew what her husband really
was. "'Yes," said she, "a swineherd; he is just gone out to
market with some of his stock." But they said, "Come along
and we will take you to him"; and they took her over the hill
to the palace of the prince's father; and when they came into
the hall, there stood her husband so richly dressed in his royal
clothes that she did not know him till he fell upon her neck and
kissed her, and said, "I have borne much for your sake, and you,
too, have also borne a great deal for me." Then the guests
were sent for, and the marriage feast was given, and all made
merry and danced and sang, and the best wish that I can wish
is, that you and I had been there, too.
THE END
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