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Ximenez-Fatio House - The Ximenez-Fatio House: Second Season 1973 (18 pages)
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 Material Information
Title: Ximenez-Fatio House - The Ximenez-Fatio House: Second Season 1973 (18 pages)
Series Title: Herschel Shepard Project Files
Physical Description: Unknown
Language: English
Donor: Shepard, Herschel ( donor )
Publication Date: 1973
Physical Location:
Folder: 7303 Ximenez-Fatio House
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- St. Johns -- St. Augustine
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: AA00011621:00012

Full Text

























The Ximenez-Vatio House; Second Season

Kathleen A. Deagan
June, 1973
University of Florida









e/- Introduction and Site Background

The Ximenez-Fatio House, located in Block 34, Lot 2 of St. Augustine,

Florida, was the subject of preliminary test excavations in 1972 (MacMurray

1972) and 1973. During both projects, the focus of the excavation was the

building known as "the old slave kitchen" (see Figure 1). The Puente Map

of 1764 shows a building on this lot, at the approximate location of the

kitchen building (Figure 4), and it was the purpose of the excavations to

determine if the extant building was the same one, or built on the foundation

of the building appearing on the 1764 map.

The 1972 excavation revealed that the present kitchen building did not

ever extend to Cadiz Street to the south, as the building on the Puente map

seems to have done, and therefore was probably not the same building (Mac-

Murray 1972). The 1973 excavation b! a University of Florida field team

concentrated on the west (back) side of .e kitchen b'-lding, to confirm

MacMurray's conclusions, and a ssek evidence of ar earL> : structure.

There is record c!f cpa&tion on this site from at lease. 1763 to the

present time. Dese z.: a d maps of the lot in the 18;- ,atury reveal

that there was a aasc y house "and outhouses" present. In 1Uj the lot was

purchased by Andre-s imenez, dwo in his will of 1806 noted a dwelling, two

storehouses (one _f *h.; as a grocery store)@ a wash shed and a stone kit-

chen with a chimr...... lot. The store was still in operation in 1830,

when the house was owrnd by Margaret Cook; and by 1855 the Ximenez-Fatio

house was a guesthouse owned by Louisa Fatio. The house was occupied contin-

uously until 1939, when it was purchased by the Florida Chapter of the Nat-

ional Society of the Colonial Dames, who are the current owners. Data on

the kitchen building is scanty, and it cannot be definitely identified on

maps until 1893, when it appears with a shingle-roofed porch along the west










side. (Documentary data from Arana and Snodgrass 1969).

It was necessary to correlate the East-West dimensions of the lot in

1764 with those of the present lot, and the location of the kitchen buil-

ding in order to be certain that the structure under investigation was

actually located within the boundaries of the early 18th century lot. The

1764 dimension was 46 Varas East-West (approximately 126.5 feet). The East

West dimension of the lot in 1939, which has remained unchanged, was 124.8 feet.

(All measurements are taken from the west side of Aviles, or as it was form-

erly called, Hospital Street). The west side of the kitchen building is

lo5 feet west of Aviles Street, and thus falls within the boundaries of the

1764 lot.

Excavation Data

A single exploratory trench was excavated, extending East-West from

the west side of the present kitchen building (see Figure 1). The trench was

4.5 meters east to west, and 1.5 meters from north to south, excavated in

arbitrary 15 cm levels. Because the primary objective of the excavation

was to locate and determine architectural features, and because of time

shortage, only half of the trench area for each level was screened. This

material was screened through slant-sided hand screens wit:. a nch hardware

cloth, bagged by levels, and returned to the Colonial Dames ~i'er analysis.

The material is curren-iy in the possession. of the Historic St. Augustine

/ Board of Preservation.

Vertical control was' maintained with the use of a transit. In the

southeast corner of the test trench, a 1-meter by Y-meter test pit was

excavated immediately adjacent to the west wall of the kitchen building

in order to obtain profiles while avoinding gas and water lines adjacent to

the building.









Stratigraphic Situation

The top 10-15 cm below present ground surface (BPS) had been thoroughly

disturbed by gardening activity, and the material from this level was not retained.

At 15 cm BPS, immediately adjacent to the kitchen building, a lime-mortar capped

ormigon pavement appeared, Ormigon is a building material similar to tabby, mak-

ing use of coquina rather than oyster shell in the process. This pavement was

approximately 15 cm thick, and was connected with the base of the kitchen building

foundation (Figures 2,3). It extended west from the base of the kitchen foundation

for a distance of 2.2 meters, and it extended north-south the width of the test

trench. To the west of the pavement's end, a zone of grey midden soil was present,

which began just below the modern sod level, and extended to just below the ormi-

gon pavement.(l0cm 30cm BPS). This zone contained mixed modern, Spanish col-

onial, and aboriginal material.

At, 30 cm BPS, both in the souiheast test pit and in the rest of the test

trench, a layer of crushed coquina which appeared to be a deteriorated floor

occurred (Figures 2,3). This possible floor was well defined in the eastern por-

tion of the trench, and became fugitive as it extended westward. Figure 2

shows this floor immediately Aajacent vo the extant kitchen building. It is

below the base of the kitchen building foundation, and ends 30 o: -est of the

foundation itself. Although no distinct builders trench was appar e during the

excavation o2 tie southeast test pit, it seems likely that this cocaina floor

may ha~~ been cut through by the builder's trench for the present kitchen building,

and may actually have extended underneath the site of this building.

Below the coquina floor was a zone of brown midden soil containing predom-

inant y 18th century and aboriginal material. This zone ended in sterile sand

at 70 80 cm BPS; however in the south side of the test trench a large aborig-

inal pit extended to below 1.4 meters BPS, at which point excavation was









suspended.

Artifact Material

Figure 5 shows the distribution of artifact material throughout the

excavated levels. Level 2, which ends just above the coquina floor level,

contains mixed colonial, aboriginal and 19th century material, although the

ceramics are predominantly early 19th century pearlware and creamware. Below

this level no 19th century ceramics occur. The proportions of 18th century

British ceramics (slipware, early creamware: after Noel-Hume 1970) decline

steadily from level 2 to level 4, where they are no longer present. The prop-

ortions of Spanish Majolica, Olive Jar, and aboriginal pottery, however, in-

crease from levels 2 to 4. By level 5 only aboriginal ceramics and Olive Jar

are present.

The ceramic distribution at this site reflects the occupation of St.

Augustine by successive populations. The earliest inhabitants, the Eastern

Timucua Indians, are represented in the lower levels of the site by St. Johns

ceramics (Goggin 1952). These are gradually replaced in succeedingly higher

levels by the San Marcos ceramics associated with the Guale Indians, who are

known to have moved into St. Augustine in the late 17th century (Smith 1948).

San Marcos pottery at SA-34-2 is the predominant type in the lowest three levels

and in levels 4 and 5 it is associated with Spanish ceramics only British

18th century ceramics first appear in level 3, along with Spanish and 4borig-

inal material. This does not necessarily imply a British occupation of the

site at this time, once it is known that illicit trade between the British

and the Spanish inhabitants of St. Augustine was carried on at a high tempo

in the 18th century.(Tepaske 1964). In level 2 the ceramic assemblage is

quite mixed, but the predominance of pearlware or creamware suggests a 19th

century occupation.







Interpretation

From its stratigraphic position, as well as the ceramic distribution, the

mortar-capped ormigon pavement, and the kitchen foundation it extends out from,

appear to be post-18th century features. The level of this ormigon pavement

correlates closely with the ormigon pavement excavated by MacMurray on the south

side of the kitchen building. While MacMurrays pavement was uncovered at 1 foot

BPS, and the 1973 excavation's pavement to the west of the building was at

15 cm BPS; the transit vertical measurements of the present surfaces at the

sites of both excavations, showed that the ground surface at the 1972 excavation

(1.60 meters below datum) was 15 cm higher than the ground surface at the 1973

site (1.75 meters below datum). This was probably the result of the concrete

sidewalk to the south of the kitchen building. Taking the differences in

surface level into account, the ormigon pavements of both excavations were at

the same below datum level. It seems likely that this pavement was part of the ( L

floor of one of the warehouses mentioned in the 1806 will of Andres Ximenez, which

was described as having an ormigon floor (Arana and Snodgrass 19.7.

One feature of interest in both excavations was the foundation of the extant

kitchen building. The 1972 excavation revealed the base of this foundation

at 2.2 feet BPS, while the 1973 excavation encountered the base at only 25 cm

BPS. MacMurray's profile of this foundation on the south side of the building

showed a plastered surface extending to 1.4 feet BPS, and a coquina foundation

extending below this to 2.2 feet BPS. The 1973 excavation encountered only

a plastered-surface foundation which, allowing for the 15 cm ground surface diff-

erence, is at approximately the same below datum level as MacMurrays plastered

surface foundation. There was no trqce on the west side of the kitchen of any

foundation lower than the one upon which the kitchen was built.

Possibly the coquinkoundation encountered by MacMurray was part of an

earlier foundation, over which the present kitchen was built, probably in the

early 19th century; although more extensive archeology will be necessary to







coquina
to determine the nature and extent of this possibly earlier 'foundation.

The second, fugitive floor level encountered in the 1973 test trench

occurred between 45 and 55 cm BPS (approximately 2.04 2.50 feet). This

coincides with the base of the 1972 excavation's coquina foundation (2.2 feet BPS).

The artifacts associated with this floor (level 3) and below it (levels 4-5) are

exclusively 18th century, and suggest that this may have been part of the west

building shown on the 1764 map. Again, more archeology is needed to determine the

relationship of this coquina floor level to the coquina foundation of MacMurray's

excavation, and to the rest of the present kitchen building.







FIGURE 5


C



Majolica 4

Olive Jar 1

ioarse Glazed
artnenwares 4

Slipware

Creamware 22

glazea Sionewarel

Pearlware 43

San Marcos 14

St. Johns 1

Ntec-4
Vmexican)
**
Other 8

TOTAL 98


oramics from SA-34-2

Level 2

S .04 1

.01 1

.04


.23

.01

.44

.14

.01


:08

1.00


Level 3

0 .12

9 .24


.03

.01

.02


.42

.12


3 .03


1.00


Level 4

6 .06

24 .22

3 .03


.49

.16


Level 5

1 .1----4
1 .14


.57

.29


4 .04


106


1.00


7


1.00


S- an Ldeunflfee ue on-W ite 3
** AranaaP olychrome,-1
0 aaP 91 ghr me -2 1
Ja e P nRe 'White, 2
n Augus in'Tiue on,.hiter-2

"* 1sdenMmeClue 2on While 1
Pueoga Polychrome


nidentifiedBlue on _-
cne uc cn ee lue on lufe 1

an tuis ueon oni e 11


SIronstone 7
European Porcelain 1


i .










References


Arana, Eugenia and Dena Snodgrass
1972 Early History of the Xirnenez-Fatio House
Manuscript on File Ximenez-Fatio House Museum, St. Augustine


MacMurray, Carl D.
1972 Excavations at the Ximenez-Fatio House, St. Augustine, Florida
Historical Archeology Volume VI

Noel-Hume, Ivor
1970 A Guide to Artifacts of Colonial America
New York Knopf


Smith, Hale G.
1948 Two Historical Archeological Periods in Florida
American Antiquity Volume 13 Number 4 pp. 313-319

Tepaske, John J.
1964 The Governorship of Spanish Florida 1700 1763
Durham


















































lGridi Ares


FIGUR[ I


TiI XIMENIZ'FATIO LOT


2 METERS

0 1 2






0


West Wall


D
1- -


E


North Wall


A -Modern Humus

B Mortar-Capped Ormigon Pavement

C Brown Midden Soil

D Crushed Coquina

E- Sterile Sand


+


South Wall


1 METER I
I ----_----


A


Kitchen Wall


















Kitchen Foundation


FIGURE II



PROFILES SOUTHEAST TEST PIT
PROFILES SOUTHEAST TEST PIT


SA-34-2

















FICERE III


PROFILES: EIPLQKATOIR TREIC


A E~cr Exams
I-Crey Ua id Soil
C-Crstried Cemia teen
I-Brown 13iddes Soil
E -Tat Soil:Feature S
F-Sterile Saud
S-Martar- Capped OrmiusE Partment


S -34 2



METERS


0)











*'i*. Gorle


.t ~ ...3.r
rA 4

Aviles (1+oIpiPtJW


JETP-RIE5 MAiP 176 -3



erictr 4 de. Solaso ap7.
are o.loout -hAC SAe .

3r j 7 2 .


s5+. (ed. e


s
a
-4
C
u
4,
- ,


I I


pr )4j(5i


NONCrieC MA


C3- Xirmerne--Fatio Loi Strucutes;..

Positions on EirJy \aps


-4

st
S.,


'. ', ", S + ., '. ,,*r ,i ,' '" ib
















1 4 X0*Z |A. 'PM:N MAP.
., S ". ,, .... : ... .9'


) ,.~ ; ..'
*,, s .... .,3 ,j .'/:..
"' I. .i.. '. ...
'..f. I. ", "' ;" .'' *




,c .I.,.,.


". Av e (H-sp,+ ,' "" ,", .,s



1 D E ;L A."P U:"15 """ I f 'i. '

. .. ,, i. ,,. .
I,,





',. '"' : ''" '


9 e


Aviles (fvosp'W St.)


Flsure m













ASSESSMENT OF THE HOUSE OF THE DECEASED DON ANDRES JIMENEZ, LOCATED ON

HOSPITAL STREET, MADE BY MARTIN HERNANDEZ, CHIEF MASTER CARPENTER OF THE

ROYAL WORKS OF THIS CITY, STATING TEE PRICE OF EACH ITEM.

.... PESOS REALES

For 15 doors ...... *........ **. 210 -

For 16 windows .. .. .. .. .. 280 4

For floors, ceilings and partitions *..... 450. -

For 1 stairway with a pantry under

it, handrail and balusters ...* ... ... 163 .

For 1 roof with 4 windows .. .* 434 .

For mouldings and trimmings .. 202 -


TOTAL 1,739 4



WARE-IOUSE

For 3 doors and 3 windows .. 68 -

For a floor .. .. 2 '4 4

For 1 shingle roof 0. .. *

For 1 roof of pine sh'e. .. .. .. o -

For 1 ladder .. 4


TOTAL


254.


For 3 doors .. .

For 3 windows

For a shingle roof .. .


* 4 *


) 4'0 *
* 0 0 0 9


21

14

60


.95


TOTAL


* 0*


* 9 r


For the privy, wai-. d and wooden fences 79 *


LOT IN FRONT OF THE HOUSE

For one wooden house located in the rear

of the lot measuring 17+ feet long ,

12 feet wide, and 7 feet high and split

pale fences ... 45 *
pal '\ -


14. '


294 4_j


4


f ,...,_
. 1
L,


,


*













RECAPITULATION




Main House .. .

Warehouse .......... *

Kitchen .... .... ... .

Privy, wash shed and fences ..

Lot in front and house in rear .


TOTAL


SAINT AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA


8 JULY 1806


MARTIN HERNANDEZ


Exhibit X: Assessment by Master Carpenter. aRecords of
Proceedings 1756-1821." Bundle No. 308Q12, Document No.
I'Florida Ano de 1806, Testamentaria por fallecimiento
Ximenez." Reel 139.


Testamentary
7, 93 pages.
de Andres


PESOS

1,739


REALES


* a


254 ..

95 .


79

45


* S

* S


2,213 .











ASSESSMENT OF THE HOUSE AND LOT OF THE DECEASED DON ANDRES JIMENEZ, LOCATED

ON HOSPITAL STREET, MADE BY THE CHIEF MASTER MASON OF THE ROYAL WORKS OF

THIS CITY, TO WIT:


PESOS

/ 3 I3 For 135 varas of masonry of the / 45 7,27 13

^* ~s/y .z East wall, at 22- reales per vara 292 .

eI 27 For 82 varas of masonry.',f the /I/ ( 7.27 /,27
North wall, at 22- reales per vara ... 232 .

S% / Foor 135 varas of masonry of the .-A -

West wall, at 221 reales per vara .. 292 .

V,. 217 For 82J varas of masonry of the Au. A-f4tP(
_-__) South wall, at 22+ reales per vara .. 232

.. For 41 varas of masonry of the two 2x64,fS 3,63

partitions of the lower parlor

at 14 reales per vara .. .. 71 .
13,2 49^t*-27 ?'l- -* ."
For 100 varas of masonry of the, irk- .',

West wall of the dining room /i

at 17 reales per vara .. .... 212 .

23, 7 f For 19 varas of masonry of the 3,6,23.7f

partition of the upper parlor ,

at 17 reales per vara ... 40

-& .' For 216 varas [of masonry] of .9 4 fi-- j,42

foundations of the house _at s i 4.0~.
/a4 ao
6 reales per vara .... 182 .

S\ 14 For 14 varas of masonry of the 7, J 4 f

chimney of the parlor at

36 reales per vara' .. .* 63

For 198 varas of tabby [ormig6n] /8,4ix / /, /
o. 27
floors of the ground floor of

the house at 4 reales per vara 99 *

For 33 varas of masonry of the u. /L?+ (' 36t ~*

North wall of the first

Warehouse at 17 reales per vara .. 70 *


REALES


?1









~~-r .s



kBU

14




-i .-

/-.--4, /

PESOS REALES

Sor 45 varas of masonry of the /24* V i

S West wall at 17 reales per vara ..... 95 .. 5

For 33 varas of masonry of the 9,'-9 OV

/' South wall at 17 reales per vara .. 70 .. 1

For 22 varas of masonry foundations.

of the above wall [South] at

5 reales per vara .. .'. 13 6

For 45 varas of tabby [ormig6n]

floors of the above [warehouse]

at 3 reales per vara ... 16 7
,i7 .: .Co? /15.40 f,.r*
For 14 varas of masonry of the lL/

North wall of the second ware- /o, j 8

f/ house at 17 reales per vara. .. 29 6

For 16 varas of masonry of the 43' #1 i 1 /2L r /2 1 /7,6 0
12. 0,, o
West wall at 17 reales per'vara .* 35 2
I* ? 6 0 vsx., 't
For 24 varas of masonry of the
.17 ^ 5
South wall at 17 reales per vara 4

For 16 varas [of masonry] of the

foundations at 4 reales per vara ..... 8 .. -

For 8 varas of masonry of the

chimney at 28 reales per vara 28 .. -

For 18 varas of masonry of the
2, x 7 S4-
/c East wall of the kitchen.at

21 reales per vara .. 47 2

For 18 varas of masonry of the .

-/ West wall at 21 reales per vara .. ... 47 2

For 10 varas of masonry of the 2

North wall at 21 reales per vara .. ... 26 *. 2

For 20 varas of masonry of the
(z, ?
South wall at 21 reales per vara .. 26 2. 2

For 6j varas of masonry of the

kitchen chimney at 28 reales
per vara .. .. *. 22 4


0.
r ii


\- ..*.





LOT OF THE SAME OWNER,


LOCATED ON TEE SAME STREET


For 12 varas of masonry of the kitchen

chimney at 3 reales per vara ,

For 214 sq. varas of kitchen and

lot at 2 reales per vara .

TOTAL


SAINT AUGUSTINE,. FLORIDA


8 JULY 1806


JOSE LORENTE



Translator's notes:

Spanish vara = 33- U. S. inches

Spanish peso = a monetary unit consisting of 8 reales






Exhibit XI: Assessment by Master Mason. "Records of Testamentary Proceedings
1756-1821." Bundle No. 308Q12, Document No. 7, 93 pages. "Florida Ano de
1806, Testamentaria por fallecimiento de Andres. imene." Reel 139.


I-:


PESOS

20 .


For an oven ,. *.. .

For 26 varas [of masonry] of

foundations of the kitchen

at 4 reales per vara .

For a masonry well . ...

For 49 varas of masonry of the

South fence at 10 reales per vara .

For 902 sq. varas of house and lot

at 2 reales per vara .. .

TOTAL


699



* ..


9..


2



7

5


* *


36



66


102


* 9


* 9


7


7


I I I I I I I I


I I i i i i i l i il II


REALES
-


13

30



56



281


2,718