Scenic design of Roberto Zucco

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Title:
Scenic design of Roberto Zucco
Physical Description:
Project in lieu of thesis
Creator:
Ilten, Molly
Publisher:
College of Fine Arts, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Notes

Abstract:
I submit this project in lieu of thesis as a Master of Fine Arts candidate. This document serves as a record of the design process for Roberto Zucco by Bernard-Marie Koltés as produced by The University of Florida School of Theatre and Dance. This production was directed by Dr. Ralf Remshardt and executed at the University of Florida in the Black Box performance space located in Gainesville, Florida. The process began in early September with one on one meetings with the director. I included an account of these meetings, group design meetings and all research leading up to the final concept and design. The appendixes contain sketches, drafting and photographs that resulted from the project. I also cover the creation of the production in relation to scene shop, budget constraints and unforeseen difficulties. A reflection on the success of the production and the process are included in the conclusion.
General Note:
Theatre terminal project

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University of Florida Institutional Repository
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University of Florida
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All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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AA00011373:00001


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SCENIC DESIGN OF ROBERTO ZUCCO By MOLLY ILTEN SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE: PROF. MIHAI CIUPE CHAIR PROF. STACEY GALLOWAY MEMBER A PROJECT IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF FINE ARTS UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 20 1 2

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2 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ................................ ................................ ................................ .......................... 4 PLAY SYNOPSIS ................................ ................................ ................................ .......................... 5 PLAY AND PRODUCTION HISTORY ................................ ................................ ....................... 7 DESIGN PROCESS ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 9 Director Discussions Pre Design Meetings ................................ ................................ .............................. 9 Image Research ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 10 Design Meetings ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ... 11 Design Choices ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 12 Build Schedule ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ...... 15 CREATION OF THE PRODUCTION ................................ ................................ ......................... 16 Scenic Studio Progress ................................ ................................ ................................ .......................... 16 Budget Allocations, Concerns and Choices ................................ ................................ ........................... 17 Production Meetings ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 18 TECH WEEK ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 19 First Tech and Crew Execution ................................ ................................ ................................ .............. 19 Dress Rehearsals ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ... 20 Opening ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................ 20 CONCLUSION ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................. 21 WORKS CITED ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................... 22 APPENDIXES ................................ ................................ ................................ .............................. 23 Visual Research ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 23 Rough Sketches ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 32 Design Packet ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 36 Production Photos ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ 60 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH ................................ ................................ ................................ ........ 67

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3 Summary of Project Option in Lieu of Thesis Presented to the College of Fine Arts of the University of Florida In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Fine Arts SCENIC DESIGN OF ROBERTO ZUCCO By Molly Ilten May 2012 Chair: Mihai Ciupe Major: Theatre I submit this project in lieu of thesis as a Master of Fine Arts candidate. This document serves as a record of the design process for Roberto Zucco by Bernard Marie Kolts as produced by The University of Florida School of Theatre and Dance. This producti on was directed by Dr. Ralf Remshardt and executed at the University of Florida in the Black Box performance space located in Gainesville, Florida. The process began in early September with one on one meetings with the director. I included an account of th ese meetings, group design meetings and all research leading up to the final concept and design. The appendixes contain sketches, drafting and photographs that resulted from the project. I also cover the creation of the production in relation to scene shop budget constraints and unforeseen difficulties. A reflection on the success of the production and the process are included in the conclusion.

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4 INTRODUCTION The Play dark comedy. When one takes into consideration its roots in reality, a whole host of concepts becomes available to the design team. The following information covers the entire scenic design process, starting with a synopsis and initial research. It also includes the construction progression as well as a record of meetings and how they impacted the design. The design team explored many different and varied paths far into the development phase. This approach allow ed creativity and ingenuity to take priority over bu dgets and physical limitations. The final set design possesse d a strong visual environment while maintaining fluidity through its spiral shape and seamless scene shifts.

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5 PLAY SYNOPSIS ous rampage. Traditional roles of protagonist and antagonist are blurred as the question of what is truly evil arises. The contemporary play is set in France and opens with two guards contemplating their Their banter introduces one of the plays themes and sets up a dark humor as a standard for the rest of the play. Eventually, the guards realize Zucco is escaping and sound the alarm. The first impressions of Zucco are that of a very calm and collected man. He casually escapes and proceeds t chatters on about how others view her and how disappointed she is in her son One can feel a twinge of sympathy for Zucco, but this compassion vanishes when he strangles his mother. After this intera ction, Zucco encounters a girl who has been disregarded by a vile family. Her father is a drunk, her mother is a door mat and her siblings care for her in a dominating way. The girl clings to Zucco who acknowledges her plight. Zucco continues his exploits by committing another callous murder of a detective in Little Chicago. He shifts masks again as he converses with an old gentleman stuck in the metro. He easily fabricates lies, but reveals truths about his outlook of life. Zucco desi res to be transparent and does no t believe that he can veer from the path set before him. The old man bonds with Zucco and tells him it is never too late to change course. The two exit together after a long night of camaraderie. Some of the most enlightening moments of the pl ay happen outside of a bar. A prostitute reflec ts on the importance of image. In a drunken stupor, Zucco reveals how coldhearted people are behind the ir surface. As the bruiser beats up Zucco, he justifies the limits of human endurance and claims he has no Zucco makes his next appearance in a park taking a lady as hostage in order to procure a getaway car. A

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6 strong resemblance forms between the lady with her child and Zucco with his mother. Zucco murder s the child and the lady shows only a mild concern for the loss of her son The police cowardly view the entire event from behind the gathered crowd. The twosome ends up in the railway station. The lady demonstrates a weak attempt at motherly love and Zucc o opens up about his fear of losing his identity and his mind. The girl experiences her own set of difficulties when Zucco leaves her. Her siblings beat her down ever further with their vehement disapproval. Then, her brother drags her to the police stat ion where officers threaten her to gain information. Ultimately, she has her brother take her to a brothel as a de sperate attempt to be reunited with Zucco. Police officers stake out the brothel and Zucco soon presents himself for arrest as the girl pleas for love and forgiveness. The play come s full circle as, once again Zucco breaks out of prison. In his last moments, Zucco is at peace justifying his murders as the natural order of the world. He makes his final escape as he falls to his death.

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7 PLAY AND PRODUCTION HISTORY My research began just after my first reading of the script. I wanted to gain some context regarding how the play could be conducted. My i nitial research started with an online G oogle search. To my surprise the first articles to come up were titled Roberto Succo the real life serial killer that inspired the play Succo did indeed murder h is parents and was sentenced to ten years in a psychiatric prison where he escaped after serving five years. He travelled across Eu rope cutting a swath of robbery, rape and murder. He was eventually caught and during an attempted break out he fell from the prison roof. Two months later he committed suicide on May 23, 1988. The play was f irst produced in Berlin in 1990 (Roberto Succo) This proximity was bound to have a strong impact on the audience. It is written as a comedy and even though Zucco is a mass murderer the audience is forced to question if he is truly the villain in the story. If the audience questions the morality of t he characters surrounding Zucco, they are forced to question their own Even though the main audience for our production was American college students 20 years later, I still wanted the audience to have internal reflection. I put some ini tial sketches down on paper and wrote down three key ideas: inevitability, caged, and transparency. I began to look at how oth er productions were put on stage A production at Open Fist Theatre chose to use a set design based on metal mesh and various cut outs (ROBERTO ZUCCO Back Stage West Professional Journal Archives from AllBusiness.com). This idea went well with the feeling of being trapped. Figure 2 Appendix A is a photograph of another production that utilized this emotion in a more literal sense. Figure 1 Appendix A has the sense of transparency of character that I was envisioning The final photo, Figure 3 Appendix A, has a barren uncaring feeling that I thought was a nice indication of All of the sets that I had come upon during this stage of my research had a

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8 strong presence, a nd they all had a rough aged feel. At this point in the design process I started my interaction with the director, Dr. Ralf Remshardt so I could focus in on specific areas.

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9 DESIGN PROCESS Director Discussions Pre Design Meetings On September 6, 2011 I met with Dr. Remshardt to determine what angle he was leaning towards in direction of the play and share my thoughts on the script. He shared both themes and physical t raits of the set that he wanted to explore. The main concept was that Zucco represents a shifting of identities allowing us to question how we compose our identities in the modern world. Along a similar line of thought was the idea of surprising revelatio ns of hidden things becoming visible. There were many ways to reflect this within a set. Dr. Remshardt wanted to have action take place just outside of our reach, but at the same time offer a surveillance of the world. We discussed the use of a live feed v ideo camera, materials that offered partial visibility, and the use of shadows to achieve this feeling. He preferred to keep the actual murders out of direct sightlines and tease the audience with glimpses so they can never quite grasp what they see. This convention would also reflect Dr. Remshardt offered many suggestions for the set appearance. We agreed that a theatrical approach with hints of realism would best serve the script. In the same vein of thought, the black box would be kept bare and the materials would have a raw feel. We wanted the s et transitions to be smooth and theatrical. While exploring design options I decided I would stay open to untraditional seating layouts. Dr. Remshardt also had ideas involving using a puppet to portray the child utilizing chalk on the walls and the floor and realistic elements such as a n actual refrigerator in the kitchen. Now that I had a direction to pursue my next step was to explore specific imagery

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10 Image Research German Expressionism possessed many of the traits the director desired in this set. In particular were its use of harsh shadows and a distortion of reality as seen in architectural elements. While it was the job of the lighting designer, B ryan Lussier, to create shadows I explored the idea of providing areas where the a ctors c ould interact with them s uch as Figure 6 Appendix A. I also found an image from the movie The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (Figure 5 Appendix A) that held strong appeal. I liked the distortion of reality and I thought utilizing a similar warped feel would serve the set well. I also wanted to explore how some of my initial ideas would intermix with some of the preferences One image I came a cross wa s the squirrel cage jail ( Figure 4 Appendix A ) This cylindrical cell rotates as a means of trapping the prisoner within. It made me wonder if I could incorporate something similar into the set. A turn table could provide the smooth transitions while the cell has the trapped feeling th at Zucco often exudes. I also toyed with differ ent materials that would offer partial visibility by either partly blocking the audience view or presenting the actors in silhouette. Various m etal meshes (Figure 7 Appendix A) would hide the actors just enough while still having a scrappy sensibility. I also looked at butcher paper and Visqueen. All of these materials had a theatric al feel to them and transparent quality. I also looked at aged wall papers and kitchens such as Figure 8 Appendix A as a mea ns to bring in essential and theatrically enhanced bits of realism. I shared my images with my mentor, Mihai Ciupe, to get his opinion on the progress Dr. Remshardt and I had made thus far. He told me at present the cage element was very strong and the idea of shadows was interesting, but counseled m e t o keep an open mind throughout the rest of the design process and not lock myself into one idea too early on. Dr. Remshardt and I met

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11 one more time on September 13 th to go over specific requirements for each scene. I confirmed with him the direction he wished to pursue. At this point we were ready for the first design meeting with all of the designers and advisors. Design Meetings The first design meetin g was on September 12 th This was the first time that all of the designers and the director met as a group. Dr. Remshardt reiterated his vision of shifting identities and German Expressionism visuals All of the designers shared their initial research images. Costume designer, Becki Stafford, presented some images that strongly reflected German Expressionism by their use of netting, an umbrella (to emphasize shadows) and film noir si lhouettes. These images corres ponded well with my metal mesh and cage research images as well as supporting images t he lighting desig ner brought in of film noir. We left that meeting feeling secure in the direction the design was heading. In between the first and secon d design meeting s, I had daily meetings with the director and the designers in order to exchange initial ideas and to stay updated on design developments. I shared a series of thumbnail sketches with my ment or and director (Appendix B ) The first design direction utilized a variety of materials resulting in a skeletal feel to the set Two of the sketches appealed st rongly to the director. Figure 1 Appendix B utilized two stories and was laid out by individual rooms. Dr. Remshardt liked that this set was able to isolate scenes to the extreme. The second approach is represented in Figure s 2 3 Appendix B These designs used a series of ladders and a catwalk system. These designs would allow him to block Zucco in a place where he could survey over his world. My mentor thought my designs were still in the

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12 rudimentary phase and I should stretch my imagination and come up wi th a stronger symbol. Eventually I landed on the idea of a spiral for my central inspiration and visual metaphor I returned with these additional sketches of spirals to Dr. Remshardt (Figure 4 6 Appendix B) From there we developed the design further and broke the spiral down into individual panels (Figure 7 Appendix B) and changed over to a concrete texture for the walls (Figure 9 Appendix A) I presented additional images at design meeting two along with a white model and rough drafting. Over the pa st two weeks the design di rection shifted to cleaner lines with a more realistic feel. Costumes also switche d over to a hyper realism style A meeting also took place between the director, lighting designer, projection designer (Tim Difato ) and m yself We discussed some of the initial thoughts regarding uses for the projections and how they could best be integrated into the set. Over t he next couple weeks I met with the designers to collaborate on the design as a whole and to make sure all elements fu nctioned well together I was out of town for the third design meeting and asked Professor Ciupe to present on my behalf. My complete drafting, storyboarding, and renderings were distributed to everyone present at the meeting. I posted all of my work on and continued to update it as changes were made. Minor adjustments were made and I created a color model and the paint elevation s for the last meeting. The design packet was now complete (Appendix C) Any further ch anges made were a r esult of the rehearsal process and the practicality of building the set and lighting it. Design Choices The final design consisted of a giant spiral made up of 11 simulated concrete slabs. Each of these slabs could pivot around a poi nt to create differ ent locations. Many of the panels had

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13 mechanisms hidden inside them, such as benches and tables. The paint treatment was aged concrete on the panels and a glossy black floor. Live feed as well as designed video was projected on to the pa nels. Modern society dictates which mask people should wear when they are angry, confused and even aroused. Roberto Zucco is not only a product of this society, but an acute observer as well. He has learned the art of shifting his personality in order to manipulate others. Slowly Zucco loses sight of his true self and he sinks into a mirage of identities. He becomes a Minotaur unable to escape his labyrinth and forever destined to devour those who cross his path. The shape of the spiral emphasized how twi themselves in a mental maze where they can never quite escape. shifting identities. Concrete texture struck me as being a reflection of rigidity. Aged concrete shows off the dirty underbelly of society. Creating a sense of height would create a domineering feeling that society has created. I also wanted the set to be asymmetrical to reflect instab ility. The concrete texture reflected immobility and a sense of being trapped at the same time. However, it was important that it was still moveable for two purposes. Practically speaking the play has ulations of people are reflected in a mobile environment. I wanted to keep the set simple and sleek so as not to detract from the overall concept However, t he director and I still wanted the set to have realistic elements. We achieved this through two m ethods. The first means was to use projections. We were able to use realistic images of various locations. I also looked at aged wall papers for a kitchen as a means to bring in an essentia l and theatrically enhanced bit of realism. Other examples of reali sm brought in

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14 through projections include, a brothel wallpaper print, a shattered window, metro station, train station, a tree with falling leaves and rain. These elements helped to set the scene, but they also allowed for smooth scene shifts. Dr. Remshard t also wanted to incorporate a live feed video camera and project the image on the set walls. This allowed the audience to see events in a different and strange way. Another way to introduce realistic elements was to have them hidden behind panels in the set or brought in with a single piece of furniture. I wanted to make each element unique to help maintain audience interest, while at the same time versatile enough to function for more than one scene. I wanted all bulky set pieces to be built into the se t so the show would have a seamless feel. Two me tal benches were set into the walls with a series of hinges and could be setup in a few seconds. These benches were designed to be neutral enough to act as both park and train station benches. The kitchen scenes required both a window and table; I was able to incorporate them into one mechanism. This same mechanism is flipped around during the bar scene. Since Zucco gets thrown through the window, the table on the bac kside of the wall provided him better fo oting to push himself through the opening Two shutters on the far stage right panel allowed access to the tech ledge and provided the actors with another level of playing space. The other mechanisms included a fo ld up ironing board and a neon sign for the brothel scene that was raised and lowered within the wall using electronic actuators. The sleek swivel chair and a couple wooden chairs were the only other furniture pieces that were brought in. They were unobtrusive enough to b e carried on by a single ac tor, but had character to help create a full picture. I wanted to use minimal masking. This would make the concrete structure stand out in the space and provide a stark background. However, actors still needed to enter the space without

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15 being noticed. I selected Visqueen to act as masking This material worked well with the constructionist feel. It also provided a surface to play with shadows and projections when the concrete panels that formed the spiral were open. Build Schedule The build schedule held much flexibility due to a month lull in production and unpredictable work schedules. An initial set of build drawings was provided by the technical director Zak Herring, on November 15 th Both stages were in use until November 20 th preventing major progress from being made due to lack of build space. Once the main stage was cleared a jig was setup to construct the metal walls for the shop to determine how long it would take to complete t he set. Herring opted for a schedule that started with the walls to be built first, followed by the mechanisms and finally the Visqueen masking. He set a target date for the two central walls to be installed before winter break and the remaining walls to b e erected before classes started up again. In order to account for a flux in labor and a rearrangement of build priorities, the timeline was adjusted a couple times Parts of the mechanisms were small enough to be built ahead of time and when wall construction was held up. Also, many of the mechanisms needed to be installed before the walls could be completed. The shop fell behind over break due to a lack of labor and unforeseen problems. The shop had one Saturday work call on January 14 th to catch up along with several additional paint calls. Ordinarily the set would have been completed on time. H owever the set was supposed to be completed sooner than normal, at the start of tech weekend, so the projectionist would have time to work. All elements of the set were completed January 26 th

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16 CREATION OF THE PRODUCTION Scenic Studio Progress The scenic studio production progress happened in phases. Due to complications with the d to the master carpenter Tony Berry. The first week of build was limited due to a lack of space. Two panel frames were constructed and contact cement was tested as a means to attach the luan facing to the steel frame. The following week the main stage bec ame available and a jig was set up to mass produce the steel framework. By the end of the week two panels were temporarily put in place. Two other panels were also on their way to completion. Both Liquid Nails and Loctite were us ed to attach the luan to the steel. Much of the shop staff had met their require d work hours for the semester. This led to a shortage of staff in the shop. Production was also slowed while Berry and I adjusted the technical drawings to correct for the pivot point and the mechanism s. Berry produced drawings for the pivot point and adjustments to the framing. I printed out a scale set of drawings to fill in any gaps in the technical drawings and show how the remaining mechanisms should function. Over break, Berry along with a minimal shop staff welded the majority of the remaining frames. Upon returning from break, I discovered none of the luan stuck to the metal frames. The final solution was to use gorilla glue. During the next two weeks, the remaining walls were constructed and pu t in place. The benches and side facing were installed towards the end of production The original design of the benches changed slightly to make mounting easier. The Visqueen walls were the last element to be installed. The light bounce was greater than expected and additional time was spent covering it in black scrim. Painting was the final step in the process. The paint treatment was simple, but the amount of surface area made it a large task.

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17 Most of the set surfaces were either base coated or had the final paint treatment by the time tech weekend started. Budget Allocations, Concerns and Choices There were several physical constraints I considered when designing the set. A rough budget was set at 4,000 dollars, but could go up to 6,000 dollars if necessary. The majority of the budget went towards steel. Consideration was also given to the metal choice for the benches. I originally drafted them for aluminum to minimize weight and I liked the appearance. Herring opted for steel for its dimensions, durability and price. I had two options for the neon brothel sign. The shop could construct it out of Neoflex or have it sent to a professional and made of actual neon. The price of the two options was comparable. While the Neoflex coul d potentially be reused, real neon has a unique look that cannot be fully be replicated. I decided the authentic look outweighed its recyclability. of the mechanisms in the walls to be completely hidden. Since it was unlikely the seams would completely disappear, I decided to emphasize them and turn it into a cho ice. I made some of the parts project out and others sunk in. Since there was a high concentration of these mechanisms just right of center stage, I added some fake protruding panels and alcoves to balance the set I originally wanted the panels to be skin ned in muslin instead of luan. This would allow for light to shine through as well as prevent any seams from showing which would emphasize the immense size of the concrete slab. However, I opted for a heavy paint treatment so the panels no longer needed to let light through. This meant that luan could be used underneath the muslin which would help prevent the frame from showing. Once the luan was on, Berry and I chose to

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18 cut the muslin. We believed we would be able to minimize the appearance of seams by fil ling them in and using a heavily texture paint. Also, at this stage there was no way to seamlessly apply the muslin and the time investment was not worth it. Herring and Berry opted to use glue to attach the luan so that no fasteners would show. Producti on Meetings There were very few production meetings since winter break interrupted the build schedule. A safety concern was brought up by the lighting department. The lighting instruments were placed close to the Visqueen masking and there was a greater risk of fire. There were two solutions. The first was to do a test with normal Visqueen and coat it in Borax. The second, and chosen option, was to order fire proof plastic. Two other set decisions were made during these meetings. They were what type of fan to use to create wind and t he best way to create the snow e ffect. The original fan proved too big so we opted for a small, but powerful floor fan. Snow options ranged from soap based flakes to mechanical drums. Ultimately, we went with ou r original choice of a simple snow bag. The majority of the issues were solved outside of the production meetings. Many problems required us to be in the space and it was not always possible for all production members to attend meetings. The meetings ser ved as a platform to inform the rest of the production team of potential probl ems and how they were resolved. The stage manager, Alexi DuF ries, arranged times to go over the functionality of the set and go over scene shifts with me. Ultimately, the produc tion meetings ran smoothly and were another communication aid.

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19 TECH WEEK First Tech and Crew Execution The major elements of the set were in place for tech weekend. Apart from minor adjustments, the only component still missing was parts of the finished paint treatment. All surfaces had a basecoat similar to the final paint color so the lighting and projection design ers would know how it would impact their designs. A couple changes were made to the set regarding aesthetics or functionality. Once the set was seen under stage light, the designers realized there was too much light bounce off the Visqueen masking. Since the masking was no longer used for shadows or projections, I felt comfortable adding black scrim over the top to darken the surface. This di d produce a moir effect, but Dr. Remshardt Lussier and I agreed this was a minimal disadvantage since the set was only backlit during one scene and could not be seen by the entire audience. The shop added several fasteners to keep the shutters closed and the central panel from shifting when people climbed through the window. The fan was cut after the second attempt. The actor did not have hair and was wearing very little clothing so it was hard to tell that there was any breeze. Some of panels would not s tay in their position due to an unlevel floor. Berry applied patches of Bondo to the floor to prevent the castor s from floating. The majority of the scene shifts were actor driven. The actors had been working with the panels and mechanisms since the installation so the transitions went fairly smoothly. The majority of the time spent working on the set was coordinating the crew backstage and spiking the exact locations of the panels so the projection team could perform accurate image mapping.

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20 Dres s Rehearsals From a scenic standpoint, the dress rehearsals went smoothly and few adjustments were made. The biggest challenge was creating the schedule for the following day that allowed time for that scenic, lighting, sound and projection departments t o have time in the space. During these last few days, the backsides of the panels were painted and I finished aging the concrete. T he props master, Caitlin Callahan, finished the wanted poster and a steel plate could now be added to the backside of the far stage right panel and a magnet secured to the poster. My main focus during the dress rehearsals was to make sure that the costumes corresponded well with the set. Stafford did an excellent job making the costumes prominent against the grey walls. Stafford and my main concern was that the white tablecloth and chair for the kitchen scene, would be too much white on stage when costumes were integrated Overall, the costumes and the set meshed well with each other. Openin g Upon opening, the set was comp letely finished It was a full house and the audience was genuinely focused on the action of the play. Due to the failure of multiple computers, projections and sound had to be reprogrammed. The design team recovered well, but a little more time would have allowed all of the elements to be finessed.

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21 CONCLUSION Roberto Zucco was a strong production for the University of Florida. The majority of the performances were sold out and audiences seemed to be pensive at the end of the shows. The integration of all the technical elements was one of the more impressive aspects for me. The image mapping of the projectio ns to fit the panels added to the total picture. I would have liked to have access to projectors that could cover the entire panel instead of le aving a band on the bottom. Also, it would have been preferable to have had shutters for the projectors in order to have complete blackouts. The sound was truly designed and all of the environmental noises brought the set to life. Lussier, Stafford and I f ollowed through on our design concepts which merged and enhanced the overall production. There were some changes that I would have made to the set. I would have preferred for all of the mechanisms to sit flush with the panels, but I believe I made the right choice in luan. Even though we were able to minimize the seams, the luan warped and was extremely noticeable under top light. I would have liked more time to experiment with the projections. I selected sand as a paint additive to give a concrete texture, and I knew it would take projections well. The sand under stage lights was barely noticeable and a heavier texture would have served the set better. Lookin g back, I would have produced more technical drawings and met with the entire shop staff and to make sure they understood the scope of the project.

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22 WORKS CITED Bernard Marie, and Martin Crimp. Roberto Zucco London: Methuen Drama, 1997. Print. ""Robert Zucco" A Funny and Sad True Story | Goldstar." Goldstar | Go Out More Web. 21 Nov. 2011. . "Roberto Succo." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia Web. 21 Nov. 2011. < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roberto_Succo>. "ROBERTO ZUCCO | Back Stage West | Professional Journal Archives from AllBusiness.com." Small Business Advice | Business News & Articles | AllBusiness.com Web. 21 Nov. 2011. . "Roberto Zucco: a Play by Koltes at the ADC Theatre in Cambridge." Welcome to State of Design UK Web. 21 Nov. 2011. .

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23 APPENDIXES APPENDIX A Visual Research Figure 1: Past Production Photograph http://www.stateofdesign.com/zucco/pages UK/prod%20team.html

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24 APPENDIX A Visual Research Figure 2: Past Production Photographs http://www.estinst.ee/Ea/1_03/harm.html

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25 APPENDIX A Visual Research Figure 3: Past Production Photo http://www.adamwiltshire.com/pa ge18.htm

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26 APPENDIX A Visual Research Figure 4: Squirrel Cage Jail http://route6walk.com/PastArticles/articles/072904.html

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27 APPENDIX A Visual Research Figure 5: The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (German Expressionism) http://filmsnoir.net/film_noir/the cabinet of dr caligari germany 1919 german expressionism and film noir.html

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28 APPENDIX A Visual Research Figure 6: Interaction with Shadows http://break4fun.zarke.net/weird/russ and reyn shadow puppets.html

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29 APPENDIX A Visual Research Figure 7: Metal Mesh http://axertion.deviantart.com/art/Metal Mesh Patterns Pack 1 107942844

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30 APPENDIX A Visual Research Figure 8: Kitchen Research http://uglyhousephotos.com/wordpress/?p=4496

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31 APPENDIX A Visual Research Figure 9: Concrete Research http://oliviatamsin.blogspot.com/2011/04/textures.html

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32 APPENDIX B Rough Sketches Figure 1: Two Story Compartments Figure 2: Catwalk / Ladders in Corner

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33 APPENDIX B Rough Sketches Figure 3: Catwalk / Ladders Proscenium Figure 4: Catwalk / Ladders with Beginnings of a Spiral

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34 APPENDIX B Rough Sketches Figure 5: Dual Spiral Figure 6: Full Spiral

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35 APPENDIX B Rough Sketches Figure 7: Segmented Spiral

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36 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 1: Scene 1 (Prison Breakout) Rendering

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37 APPENDIX C Design Packet

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38 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 3: Scene 3,7 (Kitchen) Rendering

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39 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 4: Scene 4,11,14 (Brothel) Rendering

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40 APPENDIX C Design Packet

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41 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 6: Scene 6,12,13 (Metro / Railway Station) Rendering

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42 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 7: Scene 8 (Bar Exterior) Rendering

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43 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 8: Scene 9 (Police Station) Rendering

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44 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 9: Scene 10 (Park) Rendering

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45 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 10: Scene 15 (Final Moment) Rendering

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46 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure: 11 Ground Plan

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47 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 12: Front Elevation

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48 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 13: Section View

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49 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 14: Panels 9,7,6 Figure 15: Panels 5,4,1

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50 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 16: Panel 11 Figure 17: Panel 10

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51 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 18: Panel 8 Figure 19: Panel 3

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52 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 20: Panel 2 Figure 21: Benches with Action

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53 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 22: Story Boarding

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54 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 23: Panels 11 8 Paint Elevations

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55 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 24: Panels 7 4 Paint Elevations

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56 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 25: Panels 3 1, Noen Sign, Bench Paint Elevations

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57 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 26: Floor Paint Elevation

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58 APPENDIX C Design Packet Figure 27: Furniture / Props Samples

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59 APPENDIX C Design Packet Props List from Scenic Designer Roberto Zucco Scene Prop Origin Page 1 Guns and holsters? Personal prop guards 3 2 Phone? On stage 3 Iron On stage 3 Laundry basket, w/uniform On stage 4 3 Table cloth On stage 6 Wooden chair On stage 6 clutter (beer bottle, mail)? On stage 9 Breakable object (angel) On stage 9 Knife Personal prop Zucco 10 4 Guns and holsters? Personal prop detective 14 Madame chair On stage 12 5 6 7 Bag (full) Personal prop girl 18 8 Neon bar sign On Stage 21 Cell Phone Personal prop Fatman 21 9 Wooden Chair On stage 25 Lamp On stage 25 10 Astro turf On stage 28 Puppet Personal prop Child 29 Guns and holster Personal prop Zucco 30 Car Keys (in pocket, purse?) Personal prop Lady 35 Porsch keys Off Stage Man 36 Stick On stage 36 Toy car(Porsche) Personal prop Child 28 11 Madame chair On stage 37 Money (Wallet?) Personal prop Pimp 39 12 13 14 Madame chair On stage 46 Guns and holsters? Personal prop police 46 15 Table 1: Props List from Scenic Designer

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60 APPENDIX D Production Photos Figure 1: Figure

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61 APPENDIX D Production Photos Figure 3 : Figure 4: Little Chicago

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62 APPENDIX D Production Photos Figure Figure

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63 APPENDIX D Production Photos Figure 7: Trapped in Metro Station Figure 8: Bar Brawl

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64 APPENDIX D Production Photos Figure 9: Interrogation

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65 APPENDIX D Production Photos Figure 10: Park Figure 11: Train Station

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66 APPENDIX D Production Photos Figure 12: Falling Rain Figure 13 :

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67 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH Molly Ilten is a native of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. She earned her BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin Platteville. Throughout her undergraduate years Molly explored various forms of theatrical design and came to the conclusion that it is indee d possible to combine engineering with theatre. To that end, she chose to earn her MFA in Scenic Design from the University of Florida. She has had the opportunity to design five shows at the University: Agbedidi (an African dance show), In the Blood, City of Angels, The Grapes of Wrath and Roberto Zucco. Her work outside academic settings inclu ded the scenic designer and charge artist position at the Arundel Barn Playhouse. She has also severed as a charge artist at t he Wagon Wheel Thea tre, Flat R ock Playhouse, Hippodrome Theatre and Ohio Northern University.