Graduate organ recital

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Material Information

Title:
Graduate organ recital
Physical Description:
Project in lieu of thesis
Creator:
Casady, Jonathan
Publisher:
College of Fine Arts, University of Florida
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date:

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Committee Chair:
Laura Ellis

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Organ music.
Passacaglias (Organ)
Symphonies (Organ) Excerpts.

Notes

Abstract:
This organ recital includes music of England, Germany, and France, and showcases compositions of the Baroque, Romantic, and Contemporary eras. The middle two pieces in this program were selected because they employ the passacaglia form, a piece written in triple meter that features a basso ostinato. The first passacaglia based composition is Bach’s Passacaglia in c minor and the second is Franck’s Chorale in b minor, which was the first significant composition based on a passacaglia since Bach’s. Franck also led a new French tradition called the symphonic organ tradition. The concluding piece was chosen because it is demonstrates the zenith of the French Romantic symphonic style started by Franck. In preparation for this recital, performance practice and scholarly research were examined, both of which heavily influenced the interpretation of the repertoire learned for this performance. This graduated recital was performed at Three o’clock in the afternoon, Saturday, March 17, 2012, on the Andrew Anderson Memorial Organ in the University Auditorium on the University of Florida campus.
General Note:
Recital in lieu of thesis.
General Note:
Contents. Alleluyas / Simon Preston -- Passacaglia and fugue in c, BWV 582 / Johann Sebastian Bach -- Chorale no. 2 in b / César Franck -- Sixieme symphonie pour grand orgue, op. 59. Final / Louis Vierne.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID:
AA00011369:00001

Full Text

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GRADUATE ORGAN RECITAL By JONATHAN CASADY SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE: LAURA ELLIS, CHAIR RONALD BURRICHTER, MEMBER A PERFORMANCE IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF MUSIC UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2012

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Summary of Performance Option in Lieu of Thesis Presented to the Graduate School of the University of Florida in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Music GRADUATE ORGAN RECITAL By Jonathan Casady May 2012 Chair: Laura Ellis Major: Music This organ recital includes music of England, Germany, and France, and showcases compositions of the Baroque, Romantic, and Contemporary eras. The middle two pieces in this program were selected because they employ the passacaglia form, a piece written in triple meter that features a basso ostinato. o led a new French tradition called the symphonic organ tradition. The concluding piece was chosen because it is demonstrates the zenith of the French Romantic symphonic style started by Franck. In preparation for this recital, performance practice and sch olarly research were examined, both of which heavily influenced the interpretation of the repertoire learned for this performance. This graduated recital was Anderson Memo rial Organ in the University Auditorium on the University of Florida campus.

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Jonathan Casady, organ Graduate Recital Saturday, March 17, 2012 3:00 pm Alleluyas Simon Preston (b. 1938) Passacaglia and Fugue in c, BWV 582 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 1750) Chorale No. 2 in b Csar Franck (1822 1890) Sixime Symphonie pour grand orgue, Op. 59 Louis Vierne V. Final (1870 1937) Program Notes English organist, conductor, and composer Simon Preston wrote Alleluyas in the style of French com poser Olivier Messiaen. The work, which features several solo reed stops, including the trompette en chamade at the end of the piece, is prefaced with a text from the Liturgy of St. James: At his feet the six winged Seraph; Cherubim with sleepless eye, Vei l their faces to the Presence, as with ceaseless voice they cry, Alleluya, alleluya, alleluya, Lord most high. Preston was a pupil of C.H. Trevor and Sir David Willcocks and has held many prestigious ambridge and Organist and Master of the Choristers at Westminster Abbey. Johann Sebastian Bach perfected the passacaglia form. The passacaglia is based on a sacred tune by French organist Andre Raison (1650 1719). Bach expanded the four measure

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theme into eight measures. The composition begins with the ostinato stated unaccompanied in the pedal, upon which Bach presents twenty variations featuring the following rhythms: quarter note, eighth note, sixteenth note, triplet, and pedal point. The passacagli a elides into the fugue, which features the passacaglia theme as its subject. This fugue is fascinating as it contains two countersubjects. Incredibly, at every entry of the subject, the subject and two countersubjects all sound together simultaneously. As cending sequential material sparks the final entrance of the subject leading to a dramatic landing on a Neapolitan sixth chord, before ending the piece with supreme sonic exhilaration. Franck put the final touches on his Trois Chorales while on his deathb ed. Two other composers, Bach and Brahms, also wrote organ chorales as their final compositions. However, it canti firmi but on original material. The b minor chorale is a free passacagli a and the first substantial passacaglia based pedal, which is paired with tolling figures played by the hands. Quarter, eighth, triplet, and sixteenth note varia tion s follow, leading into the beau tiful chorale written in the parallel major. The second half of the piece begins with a brief fantasia be fore stating the opening theme as a fugue subject. The piece builds up and moves through sonorous turbulence before a clima c tic statement of the ostinato and the return of the tranquil chorale. chromatic introduction, the brilliant opening theme appears and is then immediately repeat ed over an ostinato. A chromatic secondary theme is presented followed by a return of the o pening theme. In the middle sec tion, a melancholic theme is introduced but proves to be joyous in its exhilarating reappear ance over B major pedal scales.

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BIOGRAPHIC AL SKETCH Jonathan Casady is pursuing the Master of Music degree in Organ Performance at the University of Florida, where he holds the graduate assistant position in the carillon department. His responsibilities include a weekly performance schedule on the 61 b ell carillon housed in Century Tower, as well as performances for commencements, convocations, the Carillon Recital Series, and the annual Sacred Music Workshop. In addition to his duties at the university, Casady is the Organ Scholar at Gainesville's Holy Trinity Episcopal Church where he assists in service playing, conducting, and accompanying during liturgies and concerts. He also assists in directing the chorister's program, which is affiliated with the Royal School of Church Music in America (RSCMA). Casady assisted in music sales in Michigan at the 2011 joint congresses of the Guild of Carillonneurs in North America (GCNA) and World Carillon Federation (WCF), where he and several UF carillon studio members performed in the GCNA 75 th Anniversary Concer t. As a student of Dr. Jeremy Chesman, Casady graduated in 2010 with the Bachelor of Music degree in Organ Performance from Missouri State University in Springfield, Missouri. While in residence at Missouri State, Casady held the university's largest scho larship in the keyboard area, performed several recitals at various venues in the Springfield area, and served as organist at Springfield's Covenant Presbyterian Church. Prior to his position at Covenant, he worked with children's choirs at Springfield's S chweitzer United Methodist Church.