Semi-monthly honey report

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Material Information

Title:
Semi-monthly honey report
Portion of title:
Honey report
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Administration
United States -- War Food Administration. -- Office of Distribution
United States -- War Food Administration
United States -- Production Marketing Administration
Publisher:
U.S.D.A.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
semimonthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Honey -- Statistics -- United States   ( lcsh )
Honey -- Marketing -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Published Oct. 1936-July 1956.
Issuing Body:
Issued by various agencies of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11528984
ocm11528984
System ID:
AA00011236:00007

Related Items

Preceded by:
Honey (Washington, D.C. : 1917-1936)
Succeeded by:
Honey market news


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
A :^ t,- z,- .6
-t;IrR, UNITED S:TATLS DEPIr tN t OFT GhICULLIqt:
Agricultural N.r]-eting Service
Fruit and Vegetable Division
-.'elpl.,.- REpublic 7 4142, a.shington 25, D. C.
E:xTejision- 2176. Tuesday, tarch 15, 1955.


SFid-OINTELY _HON_.f Q POR VOL. _.XIX NO._6


SIYTTlEY


during this period spring advanced steadily
northward, kxcent for a few of the extreme
northern sections temperatures moderated to
the pcint where bees could obtain good flights.
As fernorth as Kansas and the Ohio-Potomac
valleys and in the Pacific Northwest pollen
was available from pussywillow, maples, elms
and father early sources available in the
various gecgraphical regions. For the country
as a whole winterin can be considered as
fairly good. In a Few sections where bees
were confined for long periods some beekeepers
reported above average losses. Heavy losses
were reported for north Florida and south
Georgia. Average feeding for the season is
being carried on in most sections. Moisture
conditions are generally favorable for this
season. Snow cover in the high elevations of
the Pacific Ncrthwest is below normal. The
eastern slopes of the Rozkies and the western
Great Plains area also is deficient in
moisture, High winds end dust storms occurred
over eastern Colorado and western portions of
Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas. Forest znd brush
fires, which destroyed considerable bee
pasture, swept some sections of north Florida
and south Georgia. Except in those sections
which suffered drought last year and are still
dry, plant conditions appear good. Several
Ohio Valley states report test clover stands
in several years.
A good citrus flow is on in Florida with strong


colonies expected to rather a fairly large
crop. Ti-ti was in bloom irn north lorida,
south Georgia and slcrng t).e Gulf Coast of
alabana and Mississippi. Good crops were
being gathered in mississippi but many
colonies in Florida and GeorgiF have not
tuilt ut to tke full advantage of the ti-ti
flow. ces are building up well in Texas,
Louisiana and southern California to takb
advantage of spring flays which will soon
come on. Dandelion and fruit will be bloon--
ing in many of the central and northern tiers
of States within the next few weeks, The
hon-.y market continues firm with price rcnees
about the same as in late February but with
average prices generally a little higher. In
California best bulk lots generally sold
within a range of 11-130. Good clover 1orey
over the Intermountain area and eastward
ranged 12-160, mostly 14-150 per pound. New
crown orange honey in Florida brought 12-130
in 3rums, Dark Florida honeys were around
ll-12d. Supplies of old crop honey ar- be-
combing increasingly light.
The beeswax market was also firm with rather
light offerings. Prices on domestic wax
generally ranked 47-490 per lb., with
occasional lots of light wax around 51-530.
Some poor wEx end small lots ranged 42-46/.
The market on imported beeswax was strong in
New York City. African wax was quoted 59-62/
Central American 60-670; West Indian 6C-65 ,
and South American 68-70o per lb.


INFORMATION FROM PRODUCE ING AREAS


A OLIFEnIA POIITS: (Period first half of March)
SPother.SCaliforni. Temperatures in Log
JAnge es raz.ged 5-_5 maximums end 44-58v
minimums. rainfall totaled .94 inches.
Colonies remained in generally good condition.
1 Most colonies have fair to good'supplies of
honey end pollen though some running short on
honey. Development appears normal in relation
to Orange and Sage nectar flows. A few
colonies cculd have more bees. A few swarms
have come out in some areas. Small increases
ere being made by many beekeepers. Some bees
still being taken to citrus, Many southern
Celiforrnia bees rented for pollination of
elfalfa. Honey plants generally in good con-
S edition though wild plants need additional
rein. Bees worked on eucElyptus, ceEnothus,
buck brush, willow fruit blossoms. Almonds,
filEzee, mustard, fiddleneck, and various
other wild flowers.


ii. thm cintrnl Crlifornia Valley region,
Scattered light to moderate precipitation
occurred throughout all areas.
i-iost bees continued in good condition. Feed-
ing was necessary in a number of instances.
-eed of additional feeding is anticipated by
many beekeepers. Broodrearing slow and
colony development behind normal for most
p.rt, Plants are Eiso late. winter losses
were mostly quite small, A little increase
is being m de by many beekeepers, amd a
large increase ya ew. Very few bees movedd
during period. Almonds blossomed heavily but
during part of time weather too cold for them
to yiela much nectar. .,-ny thousands of
colonies rented for pollination of this nut.
Bees Llso worked on fruib blossoms, willcws,
oak, menzE.nita eucalyptus, mustErd, and
other weeds. Aoney Irnts mostly in aood
condition though wild plants in northern
California need more rain.


Cetrel er Nor9he nCe lij'r.aj TempTerotu .onP=jCrTIC NOHWEST:_ (Period first half of March)
Thfir ist half f narch ranged from well be- f
low normal to above normal for nearly all aFshij.int Q_- In the Yakima Valley bees are in
northern and central Celifornia areas. generally good c.'nJition. Some flights have
Greatest below normal readirgs were reported Been made. Pollin is available from pussy-
AGRICULTUPE, IASHINCrTON over -








SRJI-T._ Y _.jEY.Qr = CL..QI3L.-.B a_.-6-
HOEX E LUr71G QPE fC. QCPF BY TJ'lI. OffP'L These prices represent sales axel qfotstions as
reported by correspondent beekeepers end honey handlers. Because of the nany -.Lo sends of bekerpra erA
handlers in the country these should be considered as representative prices and not as f all end complete
coverage of all transactions for any State or area:
- -fA-Ufls' SLEi. & F IaRFJfT O EXTEACTED EJiQ E'TL. BPI0TLEBSi IcpC.JLRCllP -- --,-
I I I_ .BA 1 iLf


SOU. Sage, White
Orange "
Alfafa "
AlfalfaLight Amber-Ex.Lidht Amber
Saoe-icikwheat, Extra Light Amber
e Light Amber
Sage-Lime. Bean Extra Light Amber
Mixed Flowers, ight Amber
Euclyptus (new crop)
Extra, eight Amber
NO.E Thistle Extra Light Aber
Alfalfa "
Mixed Flowers Light amber
OLO. Sweetclover, white
3AHO Alfalfa-Clover, White 1
3NT, Clover, Extra thite
AAH Clover, White
OWA Clover, White
mostly


iPBICE & BASIS STATE i
- QF -_ _- -
NEBB.


13$ dtl. WISC,

121
112# "
12 "
11-4 OHIO
II1 fob VT.
10b/ delXD
F4,


10$ fob
10 "
9$ "

2 -iS "'
14$ "
12-16, "
14-15/ "


COLOR & FL1UtLU IfRlu S t ZtQ
_T_____ -C---- -_-- ------ ----- -
Clover, White 1 Z 4f
Clover-Basswood 13- 4 "
Mixed Flowers, Amber 1
Clover, White 1lk del. 1
Li t Arber 1 .
White (to Canadian buyers)14$ fob
Clover, White 14,
Clover, White 15 fob
Clover 15
Drums (containers exchanged)
Orange.White-Light Amber 12-13
MixeFlowers, Amber 10-11 "


LA. Clover, White, (containers exchanged)
Drums
60s
HAWAII Mixed Flowers,White 11 3/4$
Light Amber


ll. del
c.i.f. LA
11 1 if


,--,,,,_ ; 0 McEaaACE R_ P APIAC S DY_ _FEy TO I-LBS,_^A^^^- ^^ l
STAE TYPE OF HOm1EY CO~TA POI AND l%, : ~piEL CAND-: 0

- D-O--i------- --- ---Xi3,------- 6 E D
SSCIEs BORo = h0PSD_CiS.O ,- e_9 4.
COLO. Sweetclover White 17-27, 18-19.4
TEXAS Clover Whioe 18 1/2 18-19.4
MEBR. Sweetclover, White 1 .o.b., -
WISC. Clover-Basswood 161 2-18 1/2 -
Mixed Flowers, Amber 14 1/2-160
ILL. Mixed bakery grado 16; 1 I
N. Y. Clover 15 18 1/3 1/
PA. Mixed Flowers 18-25 f.o.b.
MD. Clover 1 1 11 3 22$3 b
FLA.e, White to Light Amber 16 /31 1634
.- Amber 14 1/3 16 --- -------
~------------ ------- ---'----~-----------------------------------S


SlCsACTzi) -Ox s -lBa .ONTjPTETIS_-_PEE..Jfi.
ALIF.NOR. Thistle, Extra Light Amber
fLLO. Sweetclovor
TEXAS Clover, White
O3LA. Clover, Light Amber
N.MEX. Alfalfa-Clov;.r
IOWA Clover White
RANS. Sweetciover, Light Amber
WISC, Clovar-Basswood
KMNN. Clovcr-Basswood, hite to Extra White
'BIO Clover, White
IND, Clover, Light Amber
ILL. Clov.rs
J.Y. Clover
'VT. Clover
Mixod Flowers
.Z, Clover
7.k. Clover, White
F. Or e, White to Light Amber
Ipedlo Amber
Mixed Amber


204
22.8 a
16 2/3$
19$

20$


17 2/3$
21$


17 1/340
18 273
15 1/2/


2Y 2/34-24.20
18$,
17 2/301
19-2 V
16-200
24$
190
16 2/15
19-20#
24?
25$
26$
25$
201
19.6,
20
17,d8


- continued -


STATE COLOR A FOICAL
CA.IF.----


C0
I

I'


20o
20-220
20-25



250
O-ZS

25$
21 4/SF
22-26
25-300
30$
2235$
:~0 fo.b.
3 1/2$
=5p
:1.' 6


Tuesday, KMrch 15, 1955.


- 2 -


Washington 25, D. C.


0


---,-





Tuesday, March 15, 19VS


- EL2UC=PA Diai 2FJI.E1LTQ. fiGIaI L-JA-iE -----
STYPE OF HOTEY OCNTAINiRS, _Io AIT
SE A SOUB nE -r E^1 i7 G-L"a
S EE 12,. a a -.
.OLO. Sweetclover 5,75 5.75.6,00
TEAS Clover, White 6,25 5.75-6.80
O0IA. Clover, Light Amber 4,80
N.ME. Alfalfe.Clover 5,00 5,60
ICWA Clover White 5.88 5,80 6a
SANS. Sweetclover, Light Amber 5 75
WISC, Clove -Basswood 5,75 6,70
MIN. Clovor-Basswood 5,75 7,80
ND&, Claoer Light Amber 5.40
:A Mixed flowers 675 65-750
M Clover 6.50 700
TIA. Orengo, Light Amber-White 4,65 5,35 550
Tupolo, Amer 5.60 6.00 550
Mixed Amber 415 4.77 44


MEwCE- acKR,j3fi .jTa2Ase ------
CO.O, Sweetclover
TEXAS Clover, Whito
.MEz. Alfalfa-Clover
IOWA Clover White
QrNS. Sweetclovor, Light Amber
WISC, Clover-Basswood
MINN, Clover-Basswood
IND. Clover, Light Amber
:LL. Clover
N. T. Clover
VT. Clover
PA. Mixed Flowers
MD, Clover
VA. Clover, White
FLA. Orano, Whito-Light Amber
yipelo. Amber
'Miod Amber


6.00
6.50
,5.25
6.12
SO
6.00
6,15
5,70
6.15


5.17
5.75
4.66


6,00-6.25
6,00-7,00
5.85
5,28-6,00
6.70
7.20
8,40
5.76
6.30
8,90
7.25
6.00-7.20
6.75
6.00
5,95
6.25
5.35


-
30-35'



355 each
300 each
400
36
30A
330
"28


e P3 24- 4, I--Z., sjLBA_
COLE. Sweetclover
TEXAS Clover, White
OKLA. Clover, Light Amber
WISC. Clover-Basswood
IND. Clover, Light Amber
ILL. Clover
PA. Clover, Light Ambcr
FLA. Orange, White-Light Amber
Tupelo Amber
Mixed Amber

--------------------~----

IOW& Clover White, 11-12 oz.
COLO. Sweotclover
MIDN. Clover, Etra White, 12-oz.
11n. Clover, 12-oz.
ILL. Clover
iNY. Clover, 14-16 oz.
Clover, Light Amber


3.75
3.70
3.50
3,20
2.97
3.75
2.72


9,00-10.40 .

7.75


3.55-3,85
3,55-4.00
6.00
4,20
3,36
4,20
3,40
4,00
3.15


6.00
8,40

10.50
9.00


309 coach

33 1 each
48.-.49
50o each
50o eah


^&E B -i3 ~9 -- -- -'- --- ----------~ "~ '- --- --- ~ ---""-------- ---"
IOWA Clover, White -6.00 30 each
T. Clover, 24, -oz. ;. 3.00 4.00
VA. Clover, 11 ~z, 3.60 doz, -


- over -


- 3 -


Vashin ton 25, D. C,





Tuesday, March 15, 1955


ATE a OF HCNEHYY CTAI JS EP. = VOLOO1BJ N',-._6_
no1SE _SaO SOURCE J/3 JJ
- - - -(.ena ......limev...l(CGnerally .elizeedh.(oGAl A
TEXAS Clover 24 1-lb. 7.5) 8.20
ORLA. Alfalfea-C ton, Light Ambor 24, 1-lb. 6.00 -
12 2-lb. 480 -
KIJS. Sweetclover Light Amber 5-lb. jars 1 1.50
ILL. Clover, 12/1-oz. 3.20
12glb. 8.50-9.10 -


CR~-EAE S irois ~ ~"- -- -- -- -
COLO. Sweetclovor 24, I-b. 6.25 6.50 -
TEXAS Clover 24, 10-oz. 5,0t 5,50
KaNS. Swectclover, Light Amber -34 lb.
N. Y. Clover, 24, 1-1. 8,50 -



i State of origin indicates State where packed, not necessarily where produced. Tho term "Clover" includes
most logu.os such as White Dutch Clover, Hubam Clover, Yellow and Whito Swoetclovor, and occasionally such
legumes as alfalfa and Vetch mixed with other Clover.,


INIORmT ION FROlh PRODUCING LAREAS IC. TINUEDI


PAhIFIC ORTWEST_: (continued from Page 1)
willow. Some light feeding has been done.
Weather ranged cool to moderate, with some
wind. Cool nights are holding back fruit
bloom. In western Washington queens are lay-
ing heavily. Bees have gathered some pollen
from pussywillow. Winter losses are expected
to run around 10 percent which is about normal
for this section. About 25 percent of
colonies are being fed,
Creg.n_- Temperatures were generally below
norcml with snow flurries end cold rain at
lower levels. Rzinfell end snow coverage at
higher levels ere still below normal. Bees
have wintered well, Short flights have been
possible; gathering pollen from pussywillow
end filberts. The honey market is firm with
very few lots available,
INTERIE.IQLTAIN REGION: (Period Feb. 24-1Jhrch 10)
Colorado -Tenperetures moderated during this
period, Bees obtained soLe good flights. In
most sections bees heve wintered fairly well,
elthcugh m ny colonies need heavy feeding.
In the southern part of the State, where
drought conditions were severe last yeEr,
winter losses hrve been heevy in soue yards,
urnning as high as 50 percent. In western
Colorado moisture conditions are greatly
improved, with some sections having the best
moisture End snow pack in several years. '
Southern mnd eEsterni Colorado are still very
dry. Unless considerable rein falls within
the next two or three months severe drought
conditions cry gain be expected,
kcntcna In northeastern hontans the period
was quite cold, c1though temrere.tures moderated
at the end of the period. Despite considerable
cold weather during the winter bees hbve not at
any time gone longer then about three weeks
without a good cleansing flight,
IE-ho In the Upper Snake River Velley bees
hrve Ween confined without a good flight for a


a long period. This nay result in heavy
losses or many weak colonies this spring,
especially where stores were not of good
quality. In western rnd southern Idaho
wintering is variable with some yards fairly
good End others running 15 to 20 percent.
er.ther warmed up somewhat during this peria
Utah Heavy snows in late February greatly
improved moisture conditions, which are now
considered 90 percent of normal. From one
to two feet of snow still remain on valley
floors Et end of this period. Bees have
been confined since around the first of the'
year. Winter losses can be expected to be
eevy. No bees have been unpacked as yet.
aRIZQNA:_ (Period Feb. 24-March 10)
In the Salt River Velley rainfall was above
normal during Janurry, There has been no
rein since that time Unless additionr.1 rerF
falls soon there is little hope for the
spring honey flow in this section. Arizona
streams are ncw running about 50 percent of
a normal flow. Bees did well on smell
flowers produced from the January reins,
Most colonies hrve from three to four frames
of brood end ere gaining rapidly, Fruit
blossoms are Eppetring in profusion in the
irrigated areas which will further stimuleat
broo rerrirg. Alfalfa is showing hervy aphid
infestation, Some farmers have planted for
the third time to get E. fEir crop, Unless t
Ephids are controlled it seems doubtful if
much seed alfalfa will be produced this
summer.
S01ZrHTWESERN STAES: (Period Feb.25-MErch 11)
Northest Texas. around 1 inches of..rpin
fell durTng the errly part of this period.
At that time rE.infall was close to normal
for this year. No rrin has fe.llem since,
While top soil is still in good condition
it is drying out fast because of high winds,
Peach, plum Jnd other e.rly fruits are


- continued -


Vashington 25, D, C.


- 4 -






Tus&sy, ME-rch 15, 1955.


_SEZll-hDNTELY HQl@.Y RFPORT LOL, XXXIX NO, 6


east
Nort.hTezas Continued blooming. These
together with elm are furnishing & little
pollen. Redbud are beginning to bloom. To
date no new nectar hE.s been gathered. '
Nectar is expected uo
s~rrt with tne warmer weather, which E.t the
und of the period ranged mostly in the upper
70s cnd lower 80s End as high as 95 degrees.
Prospects for ground flowers are good with
the good top soil moisture. Broodrearing is
advancing rEpidly. Fest colonies have ample
stores for this season. However, some feed-
ing is being done. Beekeepers are quite
optimistic since moisture conditions are
better thfn at this season for the pest three
or four years.
East Texas Most of this section has epple
moisTure. -Bees are in Socd condition with
active broodrecring. Pollen End nectar were
gathered during the lost week of this period
which was very warm, Some bees will need
feeding,
Southeast Texc.s The weather was generally
warm. Moisture conditions are fairly good
but more rain will be needed as the subsoil
is still dry. Condition of colonies is
variable. Some Ere in norurl condition with
adequate feed for the present. Others are
not yet up tc normal strength and will need
some feeding r.t least until yaupon (holly)
blooms. BroJdreoring is expanding rapidly.
Colonies E.re dr.wir.g heavily on reserve stores.
Bees are gathering nectar and pollen from
wild plum, red bua, dewberries and ground
flowers, E.nd pollen from oak end cedars.
Lower Rio CGraide VElley Werther was dry and
very windy during this period. Citrus if E
blooming well, but most trees are SLEll so
totEl volume of bloom in the Valley runs far
below what it did prior to the freezes of the
early -50s. Bees are using practically all
present pollen and nectar for broodrearing.
Production of queens is fairly heavy.
Southwest TexaS In the vicinity of San
nTor.nio soi-e light showers occurred, but
additional moisture is needed. Weather was
warm during this period. Bees were working
elms, willows horehound, and at the end of
the period a little pollen. Some cattlemen
having clover pastures want bee men to place
bees in clover fields. Soce have been
placed in such locations.
New Mexico In the hesilla Valley bees
CEam though the winter in fairly good con-
dition, RPin is needed badly. Bees are
getting so.:e pollen from elm and wild
mustard.
kl~pohoaa ich of Oklahoma is still dry,
particucrly in the subsoil. Elm, peaches,
rple, dandelion, end apricots are blooming
nd furnishing some pollen for early build-
up. Most bees wintered fairly well es the
result of the mild winter. Sbroe have atmp.e
stores. Others need feeding.


PLAIIS S2ATES: (Period Feb, 25-March 11)
Iowa rlch of this period was relatively
mild for this season. Bees obtained several
days of good flying weather which was badly
needed. Reports f losses are extremely
"arieble. Some beekeepers indicate wnly
normal losses of around 5 percent, Lthers
report very high losses due to starvation,
particularly where poor quality food stores
were left lest fall. Surface soil moisture
is good. Some additional rain is needed to
provide best subsoil conditions. Honey
plants are reported in generally oood shape.
Demend for honey continues very good, with
very light offerings and prices generally a
little higher than at early March, Beeswax
supplies are also very light, with a good
demand.
Nebraska_-Both cold and warm weather pre-
vailed during this period, permitting very
good bee flights but holding back plant bloom.
Bees are apparently winterin fairly well,
Beekeepers who cut food supplies short last
fall Ere already feeding Considerable
additional feeding may be necessary. Other
beekeepers report their bees have ample
stores.
Kansas Quite warm weather prevailed toward
The en3& of this period. Elm and soft maple
bloomed during that time, Bees gathered a
flrf y good supply of pollen and a little
nectar. In eastern Kansas moisture condi-
tions are fairly good. Some dust storms have
occurred in the western part of the State,
Broodrearing is becoming active.
:AST CENTRAL AND NORTH CENT iL ST .TES:
(PFeiodTFb, 2F6-Erch-I2)
Michigan -On the lower peninsula bees
obt-aned the first good flight since the
first of the year. Early examination of
colonies indicate fairly heavy losses in
many yards. Some yards are coming through
the winter in fairly good shape. Heavy feed-
ing is expected in most sections to prevent
spring starvation. Moisture conditions are
generally good. Supplies of honey are
light, demand good, and the market somewhat
stronger. Cellar-wintered bees on the upper
peninsula are in good condition. There is
still about a foot of snow on the upper
peninsula.
Wisconsin Bees obtained several wood
flights during this period, A portion of
the time days were warm and nights freezing.
Examinations to date show an extremely wide
range in colony condition. Some yards have
come through the winter in fairly 2ooj con-
dition. Others have shown relatively heavy
winter losses. Some cellar-wintered bees
also show considerable loss. Nosema has
shown up badly in some yards. Heavy feed-
ing will be necessary. Moisture and plant
conditions are generally good for this
season.


- ovtr


Washington 25, D. C.


- 5 -






Washiington 25, D. C.


SE,.I..i.O:,.THIY HO iLfY 1ME'f -OL, _XXXIX NO. _


.iep,_0. Bees obtained two or three good
.ights lurinr this period. lost colonies
nave come through the winter in fairly good
:=orition, although considerable feed ng will
,e necessary. Some sections of the Stec.
-Fve had fairly hLavy snowfall during the
winter. With a rapTid thaw floods can be ex-
rected. Moisture and plant conditions are
zEnerally good.
Ohio_- I'ost of this period was mild. with
cornsidLrable rain causing flood conditions
a-ong the Ohio River and mejor tributari-s,
Bi.es were able to fly considerably. Soft
maple came into bloom around March 5 rn
southern Ohio. This provided fresh pollen
for broodrearing. Most colonies are in
fairly good condition, althoughh with early
end rcpid broodrearing considerable feedirn
will be necessary. Winter losses have been
light;largely confined to colonies which
were queenless last fell. Moisture condi-
tions ar:- extremely favorable. Plant condi-
tions are also good, with some sections re-
porting the beos stands of clover since 1948.
For th3s early season conditions look more
favorable for & good honey crop then during
the past several years. Supplies of honey
in beekeepers' hands a.re closely cleaned up
with prices advancing slightly,
Indiana Mbst of this period was Lild with
severs- d.ays of good bee flir'hts. Bees
apporr to be coming through the winter in
good condition. BirnfEll has been ample.
Clovers are wintering well. Very little
honey reamins in the hands of beekeepers.
llinois_-_ Considerable moisture in the
form of rnin. hail End snow fell during this
period, greatly improving plant conditions.
Bees obtFined several gooi flights. Some
beekeepers' report light winter losses.
Others report above average losses.ranging
to over 50 percent. Considerable feeding is
necessary. Although there was some freezing
and thawing clover plEnts appear in very good
condition 'rith very little winter killing.
NOErHEASTERN STLTES: (Period Feb. 27-karch 13)
New York Bees had several good flights
during this period. Examination of hives
indicated only rather light outright winter
losses. Irny colonies are dangerously light
in bees and will need careful feeding to
obtain a buildup. On Fisher's Island bees
obtained some pollen at the end of the
period from swamp cabbage and pussywillow.
Moisture end plant conditions are favorable
over most of he State.
Vermont EMuch snow has melted. Bees had
their Tirst flight since lest frll. both
bees and clover appeEr to be wintering well.
Pennsylvania Bees flew considerably during
Thls perTob.- In warmer locations broodrearn,
is becoming rather active. Some beekeepers
report fairly heavy losses from starvation
during the past winter. Others report little
actuaI loss, but with many colonies light in
bees and stores. Others report fairly good
wintering Feeding hes been general,
Moisture conditions are favorable. Clover
plants appear somewhat better than during
recent years.


SOUTH aJLtL. IC AND SOUTH CEITR ~L STATES:
Perid-eb 7i-'ch 13
iAryland Weather was variable during this
period, 71though generF.lly mild. Considerate ,
rain fell, Boes iere very active on maple ar
alder. Broodre-iring is progressing well
Winter losses so fir appear to be light
Demand for honey from consumers has been good
Producers' stocks of honey are rapidly dis-
apparing, with prices generElly e little
higher,
Vi~ruia Northern Virginip. had consideri.bl
rain dfTvrng this period; Pollen has been
coming in since the first of M-rch, Brood-
ruering, however, at that date was somewhat
behind normal. Bees seem to have wintered
well and broodreEring should advance xepidly.
Kentucky..- Heevy rain fell during this period
accompanied by high winds and unseasonably
high tLoerrtures. Flood conditions existed
in the Ohio vr.lley End its tribut-ries,
Pussywillow, maple end elm were in bloom at
the Lnd of the period. R ins and high winds
practically eliminated this bloom as a source
of pollen. In northcentrrl Kentucky colony
losses are expected to run 15-20 percent,
c--ny colonies'are rather light in bees.
Veg.etation is starting to green up and preset
prospects Rre excellent for a honey flow.
UenerFl fErm work is behind schedule.
Tunnessee Pollen on nDples ceme in about
F.rFc' 5 about one week later than normal,
SOUTi1AST.,RN_STA.TES: (Period Feb, 27-var. 13)
Georgia In south Georgia wrrm weethez has
Frouuh- on ti-ti very rapidly. Bees hrve
begun to build up on this source. One re-
porter paints a most pessimistic picture of
south Georgia conditions very dry over thi
section &nd north Florida. Forest fires have
destroyed considerable of the g~llberry crop;
States this is worst yerr for dryness End .
need for feeding since 1932, when similar co,
editions existed. As of present claims 25
percent of colonies are totcl loss; another
25 percent very weck, leaving 50 percent to
produce a crop. Probably more feeding done
during pj st winter then ever before,
Indications are that package season is about
three weeks late. Probably no queens ready
for shipment before tpril 1-10, Many
p.ckEge bee producers waiting to see how they
cn build up their colonies before making
meny definite commitments on queens and
pt ck ge s.
Florida In most citrus erers colonies are
gathering en averrpe flow of 5 to 6 pounds a
cy. Cool werther'and lack of moisture in
many sections is holding back citrus bloom. .
Old trees ere in full bloom while younger
trees are just coming into bloom. So far
g the season looks favorable for a good citrus
crop from strong colonies. Packers are
rapidly taking new citrus honey before the
flow is completed. In northern Florida ti-ti
is blooming heavily in the highland wooded
sections. Pany colonies are weak, however,
so no lrrge surplus crop is anticipated from
ti-ti or gEllberry. Prospects are fair for
tupelo, provided colonies build up. In this
section blueberries were E.lso in full bloom Ea
the end of the period,


- continued -


- 6 -


Tuesday, Me-rch 15, 1955.






Washington 25, D. C.


~Sii'-I.ONTTHJZYHONEY _iPO.T ,VOL._X~.WNQ 6


MsiLsia. i. Along the Gulf Coast ti-ti is
yielding eavily. Colonies are building up
rapidly. In central iississippi spring
opened up unseasonably early. Little pollen
or nectar are available but bees have re-
sponded well to stimulative feeding.
Advance orders for queens and package bees
have been good.


Lci.iAina Warm, dry weather during this
period helped bees to build up and .ake care
of food needs, Some calories are in 'oci
condition; others have below normal
populations. Shortage of bees is deleyir.n
queen rearing operations. At the Uriversity
Station scale colonies have gained 5 to 10
pounds, Strong colonies have brood in 12 tt
15 frames. Plants are in good condition.
Now producing either pollen or nectar are
willow, redbud, oak dewberry white clover,
yellow top and fruit trees. Recent war
weather has speeded upPlant growth, 1-:
favorable weather continues en early srrir,'
flow can be expected. One package producer
reports that orders for cueens and packages
are far belcw average for this season,


- over -


. Tuesda-y, li'z. r., I.. .


- 7I-






Tuesday, March b1, 1955.


SE.-CjmNHL_ jiHOgigY REF-)RT VOL ._.rIx _-_J., _6


T LEIGkPPhIC REPORTS FROM ILhPOLTRNT ARKE'TS
(Arrivals include receipts duriTn precedrng T&wo wee~ks,- UnTess oTherwise shcvwn prices rep-
resent sales or current quotatiCns by brokers local bottlers, or other receivers to
wholesElers and large retailers for small containers, and to bakers, confectioners, or
other large users for 60-1b. containers or larger containers. Market condition comments
represent the opinion of the trade aid are for the first half of Ma-ch, All quotations
are extractted unless otherwise sh:.wn. 60-lb. cans are on a pound basis and smaller units
of extracted and other types of honey bre on per case basss unless otherwise shown.
Beeswax prices arc per pound..)


bUSTON: Arrivels none. Offerings light,
pErtly account local warehouse strike which
affected awvElable offerings. Market
stronger.
6, 5-1b. jars 6.40
24, 1-lb. jars 6.45-6.70
mostly 6.70
12, 1-lb. jars 3.3e
12, l-lb. servers 4.90
24, 12-oz. jars 5.60
24, 8-oz. jars 3.80-3,95
mostly 3.95
36, 4-oz. ars 3.18
CEEfEED, 12, 12-oz. cups 2,83-2o85


CHICAGO: Arrivals 119,000 lbs. Dlmai
market slightly stronger.
60-1b. tins, MIEWESTERI1, per lb.
White Clover
Light Amber
some low as
in granulated form 1l less
White, Clover,
Cartons 12, 5-lb. tins
12, 1-lb. jars
24, l-lb,(self-service contei,
24, 12-oz
24, 8-oz.(self-service cont&ai
36 4-oz.
CREAiFD 12, 12-oz.


nd good,


I17- .181
.17- .17*
.16

11.80
2.25
nersU6,45
5,25
ners)3.95
3.09
2.75


CIICINNATI: Arrivals 73.251 lbs. domestic.
De-mand moderate, market slightly stronger.
Bulk end large sizes mostly withdrawn.
12, 5-lb. jars few 12.50
12, 2-1b. jars 5,85
24, 1-lb. jars 6,70
12, 1-lb. jars 2.95-3.38
12, 1-lb server 4,90
Cartons, 24, 12-oz, 5.60
12, 12-oz. 2,83
12, 12-oz. jars 2,93
24, 8-oz, jars 3.95
lENVER Supplies old stock very nearly
exhausted. Demand moderate, market strongt-r.
Sweetclover, COLORAPlO
12, 28-oz, jars 5.35-5.55
12, 20-oz. jars 4.75-5.00
12, 8-oz, jars 2,40-2,60
24, 8-oz, Jars 4.35-4.60
24, 16-oz, rs 6.65-7.00
12 32-oz. ajrs 6,45-6,75
12 5-lb. tins 12,00-12.85
6 5-lb, glass 6.90-7.10
CREAiED 24,12-oz.cups 7.10-7.25
12, 12-oz, glass 3.00-3.25


IETROIT: Receipts 34 130 lbs.
- mThnd ood market firm.
Mostly White Clover, case's
6, 5-lb.
few
24, 1-lb.
24, 8-oz,


domestic.

6.00-6,20
6,40
5.50-5.75
3,15-3.25


K-NSAS CITY: Imports 60,000 Ibs. Market
slightly stronger,
2. 1-lb. jars
12, 2-lb. oars
12, 4-lb. jars


3,20
5,85
10.80


LOS ANGEL: Demand good, market firm,
White (or better) Orenge, Sage, Clover
6, b-lb. glass or tin 6.00-6.60
12, 32-oz. jers 6.35-6.80
12, 24-oz, jars 5.20
12, 16-oz. jars 3.35-3.55
12, 12-oz. jars 2.61-2,85
24, 8-oz. jars 3.80-4,04
Light amber, Blended Flavors
12, 2-lb. tins 5,20
24, 1-lb jars 5,40
Light Amber, Mixed Flowers
6, 5-1b. tins 5.00-5.25
Extra Light Amber, Alfalfa.
12. 5-lb, tins 10,20
Extr&'Li ht imber, Blended Flavors
12, 3 2-z, Jars 5,60
12, 16-oz, j-rs 2,95
24, 8-oz. jars 3,45
White (or betLer)assorted. Orange,Sege Clover
24, 8-oz, .ars 4.12-4.14
White (or better) Buckwheat, Orange, Clover,
Sage
12, 8-oz, jars 2.04
White, Orange-Clover
12, 1-lb, glss servers 4,50-4.75
CREAMED White (or better) Orange, Clover
12, 12-oz. cups 2,75-2.93
24, 12-oz. cups 5,85
CHUNK, COMB White,Orange,Sage, Clover
12. 1-lb. jars 5,15
Whit (or better) Clover
12, 12-oz. section 4,80
12, 8-oz. section 2.90
Honey & Butter Plain rnd Cinnamom
12,6-0oz. cups 3,15
Jellied honey Clover and Orange
12 10-oz. jars 2.85
BEESWMX;Arrivals by truck 6,000 Ibs,
&omestic. Demand exceeds supply, market
stronger, Purchases by local receivers
delivered Los Angeles cash .50- ,52
mostly .50
in trade ,52


i-TTTSPURGH: x.rrivals by truck 15,030 lbs.
-domestic. Demand fair, market slightly
stronger.
White Clover Light -mber
6, 5-lb. jars none reported
6, 3-lb. jars none reported
24, 1-lb. jars 6.70
24, 8-oz. jars 3.95
12. 1-lb. server mug 4.90
CRiMED 24, 1-lb. jars 6,70


- continued -


Washirngton J5, D. C,


- 8 -






Washington 25, D. C.


SFMI-..'lTHLY ~. TPOXR. I OL._X =xQ_-_Lt._ 6.N


MIE POLI.: Arrivals by truck, 60-1l, can;s:
Mnn.White Sweetclover 250; Iowa Light Amber
70, Demand small containers good, large
containers fair. Price to jobbers -
U. S. Fancy Blended honey
24, 8-oz. jars 3.50
12, 1-lb. jars 2.90
12, 2-lb. j3rs 5.30
., 3-lb. jars 3.90
6, 5-lb. tins 5,30
6, 5-lb jars 5,80
24: 7?-o, tumblers 1.20
12, 14-oz, tumblers 3.95
12 11-oz. glass Mugs 3.25
CRAMED 12, 11-oz. 'lass mugs 3,35,
60-1b, cans,White Sweeclcver per lb. .17-
Light Amber .16
NEW -IRK- Arrivals by boet, 260 drs. Cuba;
30 rs. -exico; 32 drs. Dominican Fepliblic;
50 ctns. Holland. Supplies lih., market
strong, few sales. Sales and nominal
quot tons -
IPORTED ex dock New York City duty paid -
PUERTO RICO, tins .14y-.15
drums ,12l- 13
GUATEMkLk, drims 33-.14
Ex warehouse end ex dock. 60s
MIDWESTERN and INTEROUTUITAIN
White Clover 18-.20
lIDWESTERN and INTERMDUNTAIN
Bakers Blend .16
IMPORTED, 12, 8-oz. jars 1.75
24 1-lb. jars 2,80
Domestic, Ligrt Amber, Mixed blowers
24, 8-oz. jars 3.35
24, 1-lb. Jars 5.80
12, 1-lb. jars 2,90
12. 2-lb. ars 5.60
6 5-lb. tins 5-55-5.80
24,}-lb. tins 6.20
Domestic, Orange-Clover
24, 8-oz. jars 3.85-3.95
12, 1-lb. ars 3.45
12, 2-lb. 3ars 6.45-6.60
24, 1-lb. tins 6.90
6, 5-1b. tins 6660
dTESSMAX_:irrivals by boat 446 bags Brazil;
229 bags Cuba; 204 bags Dominican Republic;
187 blocks Fr, Somaliland- 77 bags Mrocco;
102 blocks Eritrea; 227 bis. Angola; 38 bags
Spain; 190 blocks 373 bls., 274 bags
Portuguese West Africa. Offerings Iight.
Market strong. Sales and nominal quotations-
AFRICA .59- .62
CENTRAL AMERICA, Light .65- .67
Darker ,60- .52
WEST INDIES ,60- .65
SOUTH AMERICA .68- .70
ST~LOUIS: lvarket firm to slightly stronger.
O- "fern s light
60-lb. tins 0LORLAD and NORTHERN
Light Amber .15~-. 1
White Clover .162
Cases, mostly White Clover
6, 5-lb. jsrs 5.70-6,25
tins 6.15
12, 2-lb. jerp 6.10-6.25
24, 1-lb. java 5.65-6.70
mostly 6.25-6.70
Honey.Sprea, 24.12-oz. jars 5.60
24, 8-oz. jars 3.40-3,95
mostly 3.80-3.95
CRMED 1 1212-oz. packages 2.83
12, i-lb. pLekages 3.38


PHIL DELPHIT.: Arrivals Domestic 75,100 ibs;
- -GteeialTa 40 drums; Puerto Rico 10 drums.
Demand gocd, market -trong,
GUkTE1M.LA, Light Clover
60-lb, tins, per lb, .17
12, 5-lb. & 6, 10-1b. tins 11.50
24, 1-lb, jars 6.00
24, 8-oz, jars 3.50
12 1-lb. jars 3.10
Domestic Blenaed Sweet & White Clover
6, 5-lb. jars 6.90
24, 1-lb. aeas 6.20
24, 8-oz. ;ars 3.5
12, 1-lb, jars 3.38
36, 4-oz 3jars 3.18
White Clover, 24, 1-lb. jars 6.10
24, -.oz jars 3.50
03T.B4: Arrivals approximately 20,000 lbs.
SppTes moderate Dm&nd feir market steady
Light Amber Sweetclover-Alfalfa
12, 5-lb. tins 10.80-11,00
120 24-oz, jars 4@00- 5,00
24, 12-oz, rrs 5.30- 5.40
24, 8-oz. jars 3,95- 4,00
Bulk, supplies very light
5 gal cans Light Amler .16- .17
Dark .14 .15
]UEES h:_ Market steady. Deelbrs paying
in cash or trade .45
fi~TS IhkMNICO Demand moderate market firm.
DTomestic Light Amber (or better) Orange,
Clover, Sage, Thistle, and some blended
Flavors -
24, 8-oz, jars 3.05- 3.50
24 12-oz. jars 4.70- 5,40
24, 12-ozjars Sage with
cut comb 7.50
12, 8-oz, jars 1.34
12, 12-oz, jars 1,88
12" 12-oz, jars Sage, with
cut comb 3.00
12, llb, jars 2.40- 3,04
12, l- ob, jars 3.20- 3.53
12 2-lbt jars 4.75- 5.64
12, 5-lb. cans 8,45- 9.24
_AT I_ Arrivals 36-745 Ibs. incomplete,
Supplies lightmarket firm to slightly
stronger,
Sweetclover i.lfElfa, Light ~Lber
12, 5-lb. tins 10,80-11.80
mostly 11.00-11.80
12, 2-lb. jars 5.80- 6,40
24, 1-lb. jars 6.30- 6.80
24, 12-oz. jars few 5.30
12, 24-oz, jars few 5.00
24, 8-oz, jers few 3.95- 4.00
Fireweed, 24 1-lb. jars 6,60
12, 2-lb. jars 6.00
6 5-lb. pails 5.80
CEEAED, :24, 1-lb~ cups 6,25
24~ 14-ooz, 5.65
24, 12-oz, 5.50
24, 19-oz, 4.60
24, 6--oz. 3.15


Tuesday, March 15, 1955.


- 9 -



































Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2012 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from LYRASIS and the Sloan Foundation


http: 'archive.orgdetailsiseonth15unit




-.S~.TA, T..-M-S, .snurINrc 25, ". %.


S1 ,* 0 0
-1 000 8--5060 6 0 12 800 125207: 1,60 109500: 1,000: : 13,320:" 34 720: 7 680- 6 720" 24 0002 -
S 24,279,754 674 930: 458,598:9178 37: 1056,475: 286,927: 108673: 971,548:1747,96: 6,129,98:6,555,82:3,397,752:2,847,245
SD olle., s : _?,690 3U3- 67,876: 63.711: 9 799 115 990 -31.397* 16,469: 150_29: 196,304: 646,330: 738,119: 378 502: 324 8.7-


Te Angj os
San Fruacisco
'lctigan
Florida
'381L70OBtc=
iT and Idaho
Bew York
renco
SDiego
sconsun
8audfalo
bohile


: 12008 719: 365 220: 340,158-809,340:
: 537,846: 97 380: 15,000: 26904:
: ?,21470: 31,400: 69 240: 36623:
: 1 932,759: 82,500: :
665,880: 58,500: -
660,937: 30,000: 24,000-
453772 : -
S 291180. 3,930: -
S 237,000: : : -
135,766 -
: 60,000- : .. : -
S 44 160: : : -
S 34 974 : IS,200: 8,4500
: 12000: : : -
: 5,200: : 5,200: :


571,930. 2,400: 5,280: 2,400: 7 82700: 3,196,285:3,284, 7001 73.76681i
S81,564: 152;100: 6 056: : 279,510: 1,660 00;1~335 648: 919 933: 797.671
-102,190: 7 400: 54,000: 65,148: 271 980: 119,530. 817806 207, 74: 432310
: 114527: 291706: 748,147: 501 181: 62,668: 132030
138,000: : 181,380: : 210 000; 78 000
: : 31,237: 30,000: : 4 980P 193-: 8C: 191,520: 59,220
: : : 1~ 250: 194150: 120 372
125,541 11,100: : 08,750: 3.000: 33 300: 5 559:
237,000: -
15,600: : 85,56 : 10,200: 24,110
: : : : 60000: -
: : : : : : 44160: 0
: 5,280: : 5,044
S : .. : : 12,000:


-'w" "--: -i ^ __. .. : .... _^31: : ..... a_ .. : ... ....
1.o *860S 6 000: 12,. 0o: s 14520 :. 00- 50_ 0: 000-: -S : 1 320. 34 720: .7 680 20 ,4 .oo
A : 24,279 754: 674 930: 458 59891.7 837: 1,056 475: 286 2: 0 3 97548 :747,966: 6,129,978 551 3.3972752:2 47 245:
S-s, --- .. 6. 6 .2 .978.6 555 i-L,3 .97 -75-.. ...


s~~ IL~rz~~Pm~n 3.1)~ -rrc~ PI~~E-ia6


... D .-a 1 ,


KEEPPHS REHPYJ..oLI U- THSED1 LU_ E JR ..GC SE CESD. f -BE P_31,J.l9.54 BYC TiTEIESO gSTDiN ICi
S- JY :F.SAB Y : APRIL : : JU.1E JUIOT iGOST -- B-Ir OCTOBER :NOTM'BER rrBCa -
'"L L -- -- _^ 7- :-J_' -- Poi__:_ Po B4 8 _- 3_ -M -Olt .
.= Ge 13,680,031: 338,160: 221,460:824,580: 413,100: 47,634: 2,400: 674,924: 4,550,374:4, 341,845: 997, 93:1268 461
C,- Genl. 1,60,01 : ,2 e 04 : : :
Labrador) 3,099,284 61 400! 89,538: 69,073: 164,50: 7,400: 90,517: 95,14h: 274 860: 306,.66:1, 26, 316: 879,112: 595, 04
lgium snd Inasbourg 1,489,356: 39 000: ,46 : 300: : : 550: ,73,680: J4546: 73 820: 171 000
:ne 936 780: 109 80: 53,340: : 2,020: : l, u0 : : 153 300: 314,160 371,880
it .er3anmd 716 518: 20 040: : 6,000: : 120,000: 135,600: 2 57 938: 71 400: 105 E40:
t al : 164 100: : : 120,000: : 4'100:
Liboria 6 000 : : : 6600: : -
pubic of te iipin 4 958: 5,310: 441: : 34,248 3,059:
aP y : 33 000: : : : : 3 000
- -c 918 600: .. : 6,600: 12,000: -
S 13 O110: ,00: : 100: -
a a0 :. 130 944: : 1,464: 000: 5,040: 1,440: -
.eden 4800: : : : : 4,800
apa 96 : : 3,996: : : -
cMoocco : 2,760: : : : : : :2,760 -
id6i Aabia 2,500: : : --- : 7: 20:,500:
ln (Siam) : 060: : 2 060 : :
noia :200: i : 1,200: : -





U.SD.A., 2A.KS., WASMIGT(CC 25, 3. C.


11 -
SCB~~sW;~ES,,o~L Z~~Xs P4


Tuesday, Mzarh 15, 195S.


_3f f MM0 M ... -STEEa _TES.U" l_ GjA.lM AR V lRJ iZE 24- 19...4__B _. ...........6.E.
".TOI : JAT : 1B. : MB : APR : MA J:KE JULY LAID. : SNEP. CJCT. 'O?.- .
i jn' cs. = L- Po s_-S L Pn._ -e A~ PBO d-_.J..- eo.lgpd _-.3 ._.d "om4 J _Mg LA. E?_ spdi^..wgdp_ L_ Eo&l._:_ mE _-
JE.w. : : :
a5c: 5,569 867: 309, 339 338 415: 745,742: 733,810: 481,703: 384,544: 652,093: 448,441: 620,336: 3/5,243: 347,262:132,939
c 1671,318: 129 823: 96 834: 132,707: 223 231: 366,628: 68 581: 133,572: 135,965: 117 834: 16,260: 104 622.:145,261
btenala : 1,237,153: 97 430- 224 350 153,907: 168,613: 145,681: 11,200: 76 481: 152,530: 54 741: 52 308: 33 196: 66,716
Cmada (ncl. Newfoundland and : : : : 24:: : : : :
Labrador) : 241 710: 109,200: 35,100: 46 650: 8, 16C : 4,000 : Id,600
Ijminican Bepublic : 234 044: 38 179. 4n 142 43,860: 73,954: :36,548: 4,361: -
El Salvador : 121 696: 30 424: 30 42: : 60,848 -
Le ward and Windward Islands 36 632: : : : : 36,632 : -
GSrece : 21085: 4,670: 1,200 : 5 567 3854: 794
Pre~c Morcco : 6 400: : 640: : :
West Germn : 1 785: : 51: : 51: : 765
Chile : 1 512: : : : 1,512
ritzerland 1320: : 1,320: -
LIrael 1 200: 600: : 600 -
I aly : 1163: : 563: 600
zh ce : 1 143: 576: : 56 -
Whited Kingdom of Great Britain: : : :
and Uort.Lem Ireland : 1,128: : : 646: : 480
orway : 1,058: : : : 529: 529: -
Netbherlanrs 725: : 725: : : -
Sredn : 574: : : -- 574: : -
Turey : 434; : 434 : : : -
"

TOEALS : 9,151,$971 .5319U2 844648: 1,069,944: 1,244,028.: 1,051,466Z464,325 s 862,146: b14,800: 854,672: 547,348: 495,711;367,667
-- r UBS : 837,4-04 48,403: 75,784~ 17,431: 112,805: 96,815: 39,038 73, 418: 69,402: 75,469; 48,424: 42,332: 8,063


CUSTOMiS DISTRICT
BE3wfo 4,5029462t
/iew Orleans 2,313,d79:
Philadelphia 1,766 911:
St. Lawrence : 136410:
Cilvestcn 132 460:
L~a Amiles : 107,985:
Buffalo 105 300:
Wisconsin 54,762:
Arizona : 233400:
aIeedo : 4284:
Ch"oa, 4 n494


230,799:

:
9,900:


52r,228s
129,680:
64 020:
74,100:
16 500:

35,100:

;o o*


21.7,638:
:a
19,800:
61 814:
35,100:


0474 119-
470;490=
207,689:
11,550-
45,080:

35,100;

:
-* :I
_- :


184600: 64~680 184,860:
209,300:124,866 : 289,993:
8160: : -
-. $ 26,000 -
: 43,548 2,623:
: -
: a -
-
: : a
: : --
*


-490 ?m60-
125'060:
183,800:

15,180

-


328 .'z.f
286,650:
215,997:
24,000:
-
-- *
-


- -4 -
149,608: 94,250: 9,750
18,600


54,762:
23,400: -
S4 -284
2,074:


-__-------- ----J----.-.----...- __..-----------------

TOTALS : 9,151,947 537,192: 842,648: 1,069,944: 1,244,028: 1,051,460464,325 : 862,146: 814,800 854,672: 547,348- 495,711:367,667
L* __ _. _: 1 .... --- .... -- -" -------


- oer --






U.S.D.A-, .~-r..., WASHINGTON 25, D. C.


12 -
S'-J-iONTiHLY HONEY REPORT VOL. XXXX -_NO.__


Tuesday, Mezch IS, 1955.


IMHaEBS BFBE Sw(&E)_ITO THE UNITED_S3r S 3eING_CAIIAS. IEJD lNG EOLMBER 31, _1JS1 _CUNTISOF OP IGfDI _
_Scured thrau3h Bureau of Census) (Preliminay)
: TOTIS : JAN. : FlB. : M fCH : APRIL : MfY : JU : .JUvLY : AUUST : SEPI'. : OCT. : N
- R (? GJIrWl :Paas .L- -ymnda -- ERaoais_ Paysnds j _PaA.: 1riups_ ; ZoDIs_ L _Pgrand & Eoiads_ .. Eopid_. L EqoaZs_ Eq.s


OV. *: DEC.
Ads ..J'fMal. -


Turkey
OCuba
Mhbiopia (Abyssinia)
Dominican Reprulic





Portuaal
Quatematsla
Franwe
Frenh Vest Africa
B-ritish East Afric
Haiti

Western 0ortguese
Africa n.e.c.
French Equatorial

1'eru
L5btana :



Lrgentine
P'nrtugnese Asiegn.e.c.
.'8lo Egyptiaa Sudan :
i1 Salvador
niaon of South Africa
ehda.pecar :
'4etherlands
'mmada (Incl. Newfoundland
and Labradur)
kmcador
' -durza


-347
-N0 56r
631 651:
484 529:
453,450:
372 347:
328 242:
150,992:
125 823:
1.20196:
90 198:
89 262:
66 173:
65 713:
62 708:
56,480:

44,114:

44, 10&
24 748:
2L 036:
21 320:
15 352;
14 189:.
13 791:

11,211:
9 456:
7 ")00:
6 765:
6 547:

187717
1 866:
1 191:


59,952-
5A, 939:
25,750:
66,030:
40,250:
29,151:
:
22,46:

9,885:
29,118:

55.882:

25,134:







5,000:
6,9.13:


11,211:





66
1,866:
:


66,039:
83, 385:
25,392:
36 878:
33,070:


5,300:



1, 200:
-





:


:



11l78





1,080:


22,119:
92,454:
67,198:
19,978:



3,/99:


7,232:
15,900:


2,015:





9,035:
22,046:




750
1,750:


74,803:
73,860:
39,055:
66 340:
192,773:
44 832:
4 848;
22,046:
33 020:
15:064:
:
:

19,280:


?

11 053:
7:358:

:
4,240:





:


C
:
:
:


TOTAL : 95 443,127 273,522: 263,526: 610,636:
TOTAL : 439,553& 443,127: 273,522: 263,526: 610, 636:


54 327:
38 596-
95 453:
44 030:

58 28:
18 304:
44,046:

--

:
6 OB-:
',14%













6,765:
-







-o:


64,49r:
123,851:
70,660:
33,101:
!
61,451:
8 427:
37 685:
21,983:

-
:
:

11.616:
27,z04.




:
29656%
4,920:







6, 547:

797:
-
:


53 748:
35,080:
68,526:
41,112"


11,095:
28,945:
:

24 336:
:

--:
2,099:


I


5,699:

16,400:
--:
6,615:



5, 642:





16191:


40,224:
44 499:
34,604:
:
11,200:
30 864:
5,394:
:

26,175:



9,376:


-6
:


661:

:


22,040:
41,769:

3j,359:
122,442:

28 350:
23 699:
:


22,112:
9,831:
3,293:











500


132,462:
17,251:
62,372:
?4 259:
55,297:
6,614:
52 164:
12,992:

20,832:
:











6,612:

13 791:
:







*

:


:


94 176
/2,823:
3t 713:
35, 6b2:
22,074:

12,097:
25,918:
-
22,375:
:
33,044:
33,098:

5,495:


22,067;

11,072:

;
-
-


-
-

-- |
2
C



C


5 C


369,949: 475,393: 300,488: 202,997: 319,395: 404,646: 42~634: 34/,238


TOTAL IOLLAS : 2,253,817: 217,515: 134,524: 121,812: 297,950: 197,214; 249,990: 149,694: 103,973: 164,784: 209,095: 221,863 : 185,403
Turkish S* 9 6 1 2 *
... ... -.. *-- :: :-- : -: .: :_
SImports of Turkish beeswax for Nov. 1954 as shown on the Februa-y 15 1955 Semi-Monthly Honey Report, should have read 94,176 lbs. instead of 941,761.
Total iJovember imports should have read 428,634, instead of 1,276,219 Ibs. Value figure for November was correct as shown.


eleasedl March 18, 1955 5 eb


32,887
23,997
33,705
22,739
11,066
121,510

13,366

21,986
7,506

10,963

3,486


22,047

21,980


Y
-~-~~~~~-~-Z


- - -






































































































i,!,






UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT CF AGRICULTURE
Agricultural Marketing Service
Washington 25, D. C.


OFFICIAL BUSINESS


Penalty for Private "Jae tc A&viAd
Payment of Postage $300



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


I3 1262 085l 5851
3 1262 08589 5851


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