Semi-monthly honey report

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Material Information

Title:
Semi-monthly honey report
Portion of title:
Honey report
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Administration
United States -- War Food Administration. -- Office of Distribution
United States -- War Food Administration
United States -- Production Marketing Administration
Publisher:
U.S.D.A.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
semimonthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Honey -- Statistics -- United States   ( lcsh )
Honey -- Marketing -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Published Oct. 1936-July 1956.
Issuing Body:
Issued by various agencies of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11528984
ocm11528984
System ID:
AA00011236:00004

Related Items

Preceded by:
Honey (Washington, D.C. : 1917-1936)
Succeeded by:
Honey market news


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
SITED STiTES DLRP.JarKLET OF ihlCULTUhtE
g bicultural Marketing Service
Fruit end Vegetable Division


Telephone fLjublic 7 4142,
Extension 2176.


Washington 25, D. C.
Tuesday, February 1, 1955.


lJI H TiJY SPORT VOL. XXXIX NO. 3

SUMHARY


.Average temperatures over most of the country,
except for the extreme northern belt of States,
were sonewhet below normal the letter half of
January. Cold weather has not caused any in-
jury to bees or plants however. In nearly
all sections, even including the South,
temperatures were not high enough to permit
much bee flight. Bees appear to be wintering
fairly well in all sections. In parts of the
North Central and Plains area bees have been
confined for several weeks and a good cleans-
ing flight would be beneficial. In some
sections of the Midwest, Northeast and South
where hives were extracted quite closely last
f1ll or little surplus was produced, consider-
able feeding will be necessary.
Total snowfall or rainfall for the season to
date is below average over broad areas of the
country. Considerable snow fell during this
period in the Cascades end Sierra Nevada
Mountains and on the Western Slope of the
Rockies. Snowfall on the eastern slope of
the Rockies, over the entire plains Area, and
much of the North-Central end Northeastern
States is still light end unless considerable
additional snow or rein falls this spring


serious drought conditions may again be ex-
pected. Heavy rfins during late January over
most of the eastern Gulf arec. from Louisiana
to Florida greatly improved moisture condi-
tions.
Demand for honey continued good in nearly ll
sections of the country, both locally rnd in
large lots sought by outside buyers. Supplies
are becoming increasingly light. MWeny bee.-
keepers are sold out; others have only
sufficient to tEke care of their local needs,
While the market is firm beekeepers' scles of
extracted honey in lfrge lots showed little
change as compared with the first half Janucry.
Prices ranged from 11e to 14U2, mostly around
12t-140 on best gutlity. Jparently many
buyers during this period were freely offering
140 per lb. for any sizable lots of good white
clover honey.
Demand for beeswax wrs good. Supplies were
becoming lighter. Beekeepers sales f.o.b.
shipping point were reported mostly 47-494
per lb., with occasional lots Pt 50-520. Some
loc 1 seles ranged as high &s 550. Occasional
small lot sales or dark wax returned as low
as 42-450 per lb.


INFORPalTjION FROM PRODUCING iGJL.kS


CALIlFORNIA POINTS: (Lest hclf of January)
Gene-rilTybelow-normal temperatures and
moderate precipitation prevailed throughout
the State in this period. Re-ins in the San
Diego area were especially generous. In Los
Angeles during the period January 14-27
temperatures ranged 40-51 minimum end 55-73
maximums with 1.76 inches of rainfall.
Moisture supplies generally were ample for
plants though late rains will be needed for
major wild plants. Colony condition was
mostly Eround normal for this time of the
year. Stores, however, are getting light in
many instances. Some colonies have been fed
and others may need feeding before spring
flowers become plentiful. -Bees of the northern
.ta half of the State were generally inactive
during the period. Those of the southern half
worked to a limited extent on such plants as
Sb eucalyptus, nanzita, mustard, pussy willow,
and fil aree where they occur and when the
weather permitted, Almonds are expected to
start blooming early in February in Central
California. Relatively few bees were moved
during the period, partly because of the reins
end wet ground.
PJ.CJIFIC UOKTHUEST: (Lest half of January)
FWe4i-ther has been generally moderate both
east and west of the Cascades, -although it
has been too cold for any bee activity. Bees
are in good condition. IoisLure is plentiful
wAs-rICJIT2jiE, WASllwlroN.
ove


in the lower elevations. Snow build-up at
the higher elevations is running a little
behind normal to date. Consumer demand is
reported slower in western Oregon with some
retEil specials on fair quality honey at
prices which hurt the movement on top
quality honeys.
INTERMODUNTIN SECTION: (Period Jrn. 10-24)
lpr;7diq- iiic-h of this period had below
normal temperFtures ranging as low as 25
below zero in the western part of the Stcte.
Plain end Valley areas have ha.d little or no
snow. There is some snow et the higher
elevations but the snow pack to dete is f-r
below normal. Unless considerable additional
snow f.lls in the mountains another dry year
seems inevitable. Bees have wintered well
to date, Stervation can be expected in some
yards which produced little surplus and
which were not fed heavily in the fall,
Moqtantg -Temperatures were consistently cold
During this period over much of the State.
Light snows htave fallen but the ftll so far
is b-low normal. Despite lack of good
flipnts during recent weeks bees seem to be
wintering well. Food for bees may be short
in aerly sprig due- fall
which risute ioi yeo i n o' winter
stores. Deh 4f rta i s
good.

MAY 2 7 1268


I.F.A.S. Univ. of Florida





i-.iArt.-u C. -'_.cy, Feiruiay 1, 1955.


r1 EICZJr(c- 'L .-1.VGE Pr4i- QuLvE1 EY_-IE L PE'-.'.J ese pr2car rt sent sales iad uotations as
ro-.oated h, unresFsc.r4t L beeaeeTers a:- nacr.ev i.e 4'.er. Bec-zLse cf %:.e ua.y t.:o-uze-as i te t--ejte'rs
-r.d h-er.dler:, rn *j. rour. tr t..ese s.ho.,ld be cor.sider as ro-,'rset.t.tivc prices a not as full aid
umrple:i .r<-voer-t : ,f ill1 tr#;,al-zctj-xer for a .y th.c or art-a.


4 %O'j,. s 'rL ". : jF. KI :AS : I CCLF A rsGFAI PRICE A I-lSIS
SC U. F LE : STATE : "JC E OF S-LEX

CALIF.
SOU. Alfalia,LLEnt A-.ber-Ez.Lt.A.:er 11-4 del. lEPB. A1'alfae ClevLr
,Lig.t AbezC 11-1 lfw 14t fob.
Sape, Extra 'White d1 el. Mixed Flowrs, Light As'tor 14? "
", hite 1.-1 i. Clover 14r "
Extra La gt Ajr.-r 1 i WISX. Clovt. Basw.od 144 "
*rang1o, iExtrq. Li ht Aa.bf.r 1 M Mixc4 Flrcrs, Lint to Faijnc-.b.r 1V(
CENT. Cuttcn, L.gW,t Aafer 11l *i rIx. Clover, abAitc i14 "
NC?. Th.istle Light An.bei--Ex.Lt.Aer 11 Lig i-t Amber 14 "
Thistle-Alfalfa Lzgtt Amber lO ILL. Mixed Fll.mcrs, to Ir..rs 134 &i1.
MCEG. Cluver-.Tetcn,Exara Li ght Amber 13V fob. TT. Clovur 15 fb.
Dark, c:.rrying mint flavor 11 PA. Mixed Flowcrs, Dark 11'-
CLO. lover-All.lfa 11-1' dol. M14D. Tulip-Ccldcnrod 1I "
Li At Anb. r mixedd Flcrers S-l0 d/4 TE T'. 1-tixca licwors 1.. T
In.:O AlfL.f,-Clcvrr ll-4- 3f f b. FLA. Drums: Ccntainrs Exchanged
:'NT. Clov r,cxtr-.i W.ite 1f -141- Jhitc-Liht Amber Crangc 12 "
IOWA CrLvor Is A".-kcr Callbcrry 11i "
-l.icd Flowers, Dark 100 "

FDJ'0ERL-P1C.08s' OR PACZR SJJES OF HOJEY 'lt VIWU l LIS RETAlE s CSJuI--TS
- ---_-__. 1C_
SLTE; T53 1 F T,_Y ON'EIaIIE .p, COLRB d!D hT.JJSSL E'Zr-S l C L
SFRmI' SOuLCE i/ : (GAerally dclivoz d): LC(e-rally dclive.'-d: (Loca-l Salc)
EIZPRC3I ICE n oCGSpCis ZB kc2
FEZ&. Alfalfa-lovr 11 -
COLO. Swo.tclovcr, White 15,
TELS Clover 181t 19.4 -
OKLA. SWoctclovwr 18
NITE. Clover-hlfalfa 16 -
Mixad FloMers 15 -
IGKS. alf lf-Clovor 1
"WISC. ClovLzr-Basswocd 1I6-1
Mixed Flcwors, Light abcr-Ambcr 14- -
MDIN. Clover 17g 15-17
..Y. Clovor 15'
PA. Clovcr I.1
MD. Clover 2
F". Whito-Light Aabor Orange 174 196& 2
AzIbuLr-Various Flowers 15!24- 17 5/6" 21 /3


CL.IF.
NJmi Thistle 20/
OR. Clover-Alfalfa 19 -
COLO. Sweetclover, hiitc 204
MO0 AlfalfeaClover 18 -
TFIAS 1Mxed Fnowrs 1B-
Clover 22.80 24. 2 -
OKLii. Sweetclovcr 184 18-19 -
NEBR. Clovo.lfalfaL 186 -
FK';S. Alfalfa-Clovor -" 16 /3/ 20
'-1i. Clover 17 2:r'
WISC. Clovor-Passwood 200 24 -
MDIN Clovr 20-27;
IIL. Swoatclover 25 -
N.Y. Clover 25f'
7T. Clover 220 240 30;
P?. Clover 26 25-350
D. T'ilip- oldunxod 254
Lima Buan-Clov r-ak 3C,
TBIN. Hixed Flowu r 25
rI,t. Whit-Li ht Anmbcr Orangn 170 19.6^ 23.-
Amber, Various Flwers 15 1 /,3* 17 576* 21 1/34
Tupolo, Aab-.r 18 ? z20e 250


- continued -




Tuesday, Fcbrjaly 1, 1955.


_' _C, _- F OSRLC__ jO_ 0 _

r ._i CeneUaa dceircd)^(c-Eal -.- liaC-dy lCoQal Sa-ies.s
9 ETD HCJfr -. 1/ I -, : i, -- -e as. Pe- ms Q P-JaRr-
-IAO I1fatJfa CloTor 5.00 -
MEi'S Mixcd FlowGrs 5.40-6.25
Clover 6.25 6.80
3EIk. Swoetclover 5. 9 4.80-6.20
NEBR. Clov x-Allfalfa 5.10 -
IcNTS. Alfalfa Clover 5.20
WISC. Clover-Basswood 5.75 6,90 -
IMTN. Clover-Basswood 5.75-5,85 -
M. Clover 6.75- 65-750
14'D. Lina Beon-.Clove:r-imnac 6.10-6.50 -
F TL,. White-Light Amber Orange 4.65* 5.35* 540
Amber, Various Flowers 4.15* 4.77* 480
Amber'Tupolo 5.60* 6,00* 55o
-----------^i4 -------------------------------------------------------------------------
WFACTE4L 80 = 24J LB, L ILMTBi_
IDAHO Alfalfa-Clover 5.25 -
TEXAS Mixed Flowers 5.40-6.00
Clover 6.50 7.00
0ELA. Sweetclover 6.15 6.00-6.40
:EF R. Clove-4Alfalfa 5.45
'JijS. Alfalfa-Clovor 5.40 -
aT '-. Clover 5.00
WISC. Clover-Basswood 6.00 7,20
MITN. Clovei-Basswood 6.30-6,40
ILL. Swoetclover 6.48 -
J. Y. Clover 30 each
VT. Clover 6.15 7.25 400 each
PA. Clover 7.20 40-45
MD. Lima Bean-Clover-Sumac 6.00-6.50 -
VA. Mixed, Liht 7.68 40
FIA. White-Light Amber Ozenge 5.17* 5,95* 30
Amber, Various Flowers 4,66* 5.35- 270
Amber Tupelo 5.75 6.25 330
--------------------------------------------------------------------
TEK. Mixed Flowers 3. 60-3.80
Clover 3.70 4.00 -
OKIA. Swoctclover 3,60 3.75
NEBR. Clover-Alfalfa 3.35
KARS. Alfalfa Clover 3.30
MICH. Clover 3.36
WISC. Clover-Basswood 3.50 4.20
Pa. Clover 4.20 23
i-L. Clover-Bean, Light 3.50 -
IA. White-Light Amber Orange 2.97* 3.40* 170
Amber, Various Flowers 2.72* 3.15' 160
Amber Tupelo 3,75* 4.00* 20
DELKTIO' C0?T {EY_-CASL - - -- - - -
OREG. Clover--Alfalfa, 12 oz. 7.60
KaNS. Alfalfa Clover, 13 oz. 9.00
IIL. Clover, 13 oz. 10.90
VT. Clover 12 oz, 9.00
PA. Mixed Flowers, Dark, 12 oz. 450
-.; I- S CQM -----------------------------------------------
i';S. Alfalfa-Clover 24/- 6.75
12:/ 6.15
12 12.00
DEL. Lima Bean, 1/ jars 6.72 35!
MD. Mixed Flowers, 1 jars 4.00
Mixed, Liiht, 24/i jars 8.00 450
1?312 jars 6.35 -
TENN. I-hzed 1X jars 30

I/ State of origin indicartcs State whcir p.--lktd, not neccssnrily where produced. The term "Clover" includes
most logprnios such as W}ite Dutch C1wtvr, Iu4haim Clovcr,.YTll w and White SwIoYt.vl'vr,5 and occasiotnilly such
legumns as alfalfa and Veb,'h niirml with (hbor CI.,vcEIs. i'ra-ir+->tes w;lns f.o.b. slipping point


via 44,**. 25, )D. C,


- 3 -






ruiio y, Fclru'ry I, 195-.


. ...-u.1_. '..'. u-". -, x a I_ ic. ,


.:,"-..-_H r.:F' : : ;. ._ riwd J n. I-:'.,)
S r.* ,,n, f ". T. "-
_'_h-* ',- etun~e ~:re .,9 : r ,er-]. :rir.;
E. C ''. ; ; ri ; *.-izx T.ble sr. w.
The .." -fi i i te i.n .:.--t.err I., .' .
.. j I ; i ,-. t -.i : .- c 1 1.' 1 -.A ie r l
r i:. the :...u;.' isa is :.tEff .t h-Ev -i r,
to ssur : 1.--: .itul i : 7;. tir.T, water *or
ext LJ. .,;r 1 ,' s B s.. wir.t .:r.:. weIl,
.o. ,!, they h ive .--: r, i'.t fo r:e-
t A 1 end wil .. *1 ,a r I fli,.t I.cirtly.
OF ':.! for ,. t. e h.,u.L ,'..s swo., is cod C- ut
*/L-r., little is left Ir. re..: (. .rs' h nLrd..
Ut.. i. north certri; Jt:. the .- rALy
r.-wf "11 i hs been noral, althIg
abititonal sncw in the watershleds would he
?t sir, ', .- rE- iir. s eId blow nor.el
iurn..: L st -f th.s priod. Bees re
:.:r i.r. rtly 'r- tering w-.ll nd h, ye berL, rear-
1:'.4 S br!. i. the -.st Mr-ith. Iate Tebrubry
or early PM-~ch f'.-ding is expected to be
nf.CLssELry in rany yerds.
.LyBRlt Colj, story weather rrzveilLl over
-ucl- of *he St:.te during this period.
.!iition-l snow is n.teed to assure
irrigation water next suia.cr Fn3 ls to re-
store du, '.lted rnlge moisture.
"...__':.M '^':_ ST.. S: (Period Jen. 11-25)
N; i Trt.LS. TL&L --,round 1-: inches of rein
t..Ti 'urinr., tc I period, Iostly as a slow
Srizz1e-. .'r.ilc. t-.is moisture ll soaked
into the crouLml Eind top soil is fairly wet,
heavier rrins Ere needed to put LoistuLrc into
the sut-snil.
E.at TeTrs Cool, cicudv weather keft Leas
irn.ctive, but liri cd zfltrn,.on flights per-
citt'il gktherinq e little pollen nd riLct E
froL. hreccnli, culti"'A.tcJ shratbery lnd a
few ground flowers. BrooQ ;ru.s ire scrll,
cornsurzition af stores light. SOLe feeding.
,ill It. rcessery 's rnodre-ring iLcreLses.
rt.si'dLr tl o soil moisture is building u, fror,
recent ri r.i, 11 whicr hi s bo.en very fvrrar.blL


Nw b.icO In th -icir.ity cl ,.] uic r m--
-:cT. t are is A iiy r-...i-,. I
Irz ir irn w. t-r .,ill f' in ? sh un s
r i'l E Ir. t!- L.unt -s.
-.'. T:.I s rrc wrs .r- 1,1v c l
r.4 71d- fL-t witL :t l =c'.tur L noSt
sect 1 -r.: v'" the r. t'A. '* rts cf -." st.. r
Jkl-l '!.. i / r.:vc.-iVL so t e .' -r c tt
rein which will IL.: rov, :'. i ture c:r .~'cr. ,
but the ctz.te is c'whc:, iz .-ill 'rv :.
Luch liitio% l r_-istur, will -,c3,l tc
assure a crcp t-is year, lrst bees ere
interior." fairly ell, *bu.t vill need iec*lir:
within t.t next mcr.t Kr sc.
PLalNS hFE^: (Period .L-r.. 11-25)
-' 1 TW.? early part cf this rericd was
-iTd-.ut the. lter -'art w&s ratYer cclo.
light snows have f1 lien over most cf the
State, but ccnsidar! le adiiticne. mcistur,
is needed to -ut soil in yrimJ condition.
be-s have been inectri.-.: ut E.-"-eLr to tc
winterin. well. LDmand fcr hbney ccntinues
good wit most !.eede:.ers lhrg.ly scld out.
KBnaF Tem-rLtures wcrt. Flout r.crmel over
most oT the Statt, lt:'.cu-h it wc.s very ccli
in western KLrasEas. A th.re to six inch sncw-
fll' covwrd much of Krrnsts toward the end c:
this I eriold im-rovirn' mci.sture c:r.aiticr.s ir
su'rf'ce soil. ic. Eraitional moisture,
h:vevdr, is needed.
Nehraska Snows r&..ing u: to six inches rr
sliT-pt y'-m.rt- fell ov.,er Mcst cf the State
during t.is ..,riod. Moisture ccr.ditions are
greet y im roved tut some additicrnl mcistur.
is r.eeadc Lefrre s rin$. Under. tc wir.tierini
conditions have prevLi :i. BE,.s have
wir.t, red wv-l in cellars. Outdc.-r l. s hfve
cens,med heavier th.n norml foca s- lies ei
ccnsiiert.blE s: ring fiecirg may >e neLded.
Dercnd Icr hone. vs )-.. s vory ..cd, with
numerous ir.quirILS from loErr users. Very
ftw lrg2o Its :A ..on.y rm? in ir. t1. Stt- ,
hcwuver,


fo,r errly season arc.-rd. flowers, wirntr icgunes,
rni tee :l.rTLts in'eneral. ST CET'PjL .NT, NCPTH CE!PL _S2ES-E~:_
(eri^d-JEn7 TYr2)-
Soith_"r st. T.x -A li ht freeze. croun- Mi.chj.Pr Weather has een f.irly nc'rml icr
.7rurry 24 hF s 'ossib .y retrrdei bloon nn -this se-.scn ith steady mcd,.r:te cc.ld r.d
L.rus), which ht.. strrtrtto bud ind bloom f' irly pori si.ow cover. B.- &-r= wint.ring
.:'out tw, u)nth3 h-eLid of the norac blolr.ir.- w -ll,Ithough scm- ccllnies ill ed i. ---c
;ri'vd, Th.re wc.s no rf in iurri.p ir is crie.. fli ht shcrttv. Ir..uIry focr h( r.ny continues
T.. t. r ... 7 .. Ty .I .I.. e^ Vd but much ct the crc-. is .!r..iiy s'ld.


!.EMi r1 1 ArJIXL- U, AI; W(" tzir wc B
cool Icr ruch b.-e TliT nd bees f re slow in
stirtipr t.tir s:ring 'uilidu. The-re were
s0L.e very liz:.t r. i!is. Sou.. nollcn is vcil-
rble when wvrn periods ,r:.'it gr' t..rin.-. Trtdc
esticL.nes it. itc te rc iid 9,000 colronics hive
b..: r..v-.d t the "1 ll..y this winter for hency
r r ir.crc s'-.
;t;.hw,-s T.. T -AbLut thrL -lches oan r. in
7. i-.1 jrir. L.is pt. ri: l, gr. ly icr roving
c-ndlitions' -f I rush pl, nts. B&_-s re in ft ir
! rditi H ,.-1 ; is I( F'l 7 L!I at -f b-'e-
ke.. .;rs' hr:,n:. T.ittle clv r is rppcrring
it. .- f i..- .-is. Pr-s--r.t Tr-.s; ---ts for f crei.,
rre niot -r'.y .vorreble iln.-ss "nis,1' ly
fr-vorO v- wtt..r-r prwv ils this sjlii,.


Wisconiin Im-.trtures have bt=r. fav.-:rle
Tor ''irnterir. rfr1,ir.g steadily telow fr.-Lz-
ing but with li.tlt or no bel,-w zerc weat--,r.
The snow-cover is reth.Lr lie.ht for t- is
suFsrn, rfnoinr. n Ir-m }l.rc. tc t i.:,t inches
in vrrious '-rts of the Stati. Be--s in
cllirs tzi_ wir*trirt. well, 'utadcrr-wi:.tcrrd
K.Cs that hJd ,.ccd st rLs -r w"-re, fd l.st
f z l .re wint'ri-'-g sr tisf-ct-rily, -ut mar.:-
which were nct f~.d r- sh---'ir. dyst-rtct.y,
LDenL-mnd for her.: y c:r.tinucd :t>,. locally
F nd frnm .utsia.- inquiry.
!ires tn C Id we t..-r -rev il...d -iur:rn
much of this erici, with tc.,.ratures h.-'
Ing LrrcuLd vro much of thc tirC. Ir. s,,m.


- .-I il'i -d -







i.-.ir.ngXtc; i L. C.


Dulesdsay, ebruary 1, 1955.


S,!iLJiI liLYHOfsY fEPCff = Iu.J^X1X_- NO._3V


i ies.t ( cut inued.) sections heavy feed-
ngi hEtc teerin necessary. Some yards have
already suffered fairly heavy losses. Other
yards in more favored sections consider
wintering as being fairly satisfactory. Honey,
particularlyy in large lts, is fairly well
cleaned u-. Buyers are generally offering
around 140 ier lb, f.o.b. for gc. d clover
honey in this section.
S C.hio Tem-Deratures held stead- during this
period just a few degees below freezing.
this has kept bees in eight clusters and re-
tarded broodrearine. Wintering to date has
been very good. There is little snow in
* central Ohio but both northern end southern
Ohio at the close of the period had around
five inches or more of snow.
Illinois Temperatures have been moderately
cold which has kept bees quiet in their hives.
It1ost colonies seem to be wintering well el-
though an occasional hive shows signs of
dysentery. Bees have had no flight of
consequence for ahout two months. In some
yards consumption of food stores has been heE.av
and early feeding will be necessary.
SSLiTHS1 h;T i SThTES: (Period JEn. 13-27)
IL-w ri Western and centrc.l New York were
moeFerceTy cold during this period with very
little snou and no rein. Bees in this section
are wintering fairly well although mEny
colonies are Tdly in neeA of good flights.
In southeastern New York rather mild weather
has prevailed and bees have had rather frequenI
flights. Consumption of stores in this section
h s been heEvy ind some feeding will be
necessary by early spring. Most sections of
the State hrve deficiency of moisture End
unless heavy snows or good spring rains occur
honey plants will suffer,
V.rmorint -Cold weather and snow prevailed dur-
ing this period. Bees a-nd legumes both appear
to be wintering well. Sales of honey continue
good.
Pennsylvenia In northern End central
PennsylvyniE this period was cold with no bee
flights for several weeks. Bees, however,
appear to be wintering fairly gocl. In south-
eastern Pennsylvanic temperatures hEave per-
mitted an occasional flight.
SOUTH ATINTIC EJ)D SQ.UTH CENTRpJL STATES:
S(OUH riod Jan. 137- 27)
h-ryland rrTm;.ratures during this period
held steadily around freezing much of the time,
Two or three light snow flurries occurred
over central Meryland, with a couple of fairly
good snowfalls in western iarylend. Bees are
generPlly in good condition, elthr-ueh many
colonies went into winter light in stores and
considerable early feeding may be necessary.
Demand for honey is good with only occasional
smell lots remaining in growers' hands.
Vir inia In north central Virginia bees are
wintering well to date with ample flights but
sufficient steady cold weather to keep bees
quiet and conserve stores. In better yards
only suIsEmen feeding appears necessary
unless the spring should be very unfavorable.
In the mount in areas moisture has been &mple
tc. d.at-, with some snow.


South Carclina Weether during this period
was favoraobe Tfr bees. Considerable flight
was possible during the early part, but net
warm enough to induce unseasonable activity.
Broodrxarang h&s started in the upper part.
of the Stct,. and is well along in the CorstEl
Frea. In the Piedmont area. red maple buds
were swelling et the end of the period.
Winter honeysuckle will furnish pollen End
nectar Es soon as weather permits bees to
work.
Kentuqcky- In north central Kentucky the
weEtEer wes consistently cold during this
period with more then usual snowfall. Bees
ere in need of a cleansing flight. Vegetation
is dormant but in excellent condition with nc
signs of heEving of legumes.
Tennessee Cold weather prev iled during this
period with some ri;in and snow which gr-.atly
improved soil moisture conditions. Ftll on.
winter croos tre in fairly good condition.
Nost colonies Ere in good condition.

SLUTHkSTEJ-d4 SaTCES: (Period Jen, 12 26 )
Georga Temperatures ever ged considerably
9btow normal during January, Rinfll, on
the other hand, with slightly above normal,
although much cdditionrl rainfll will be
needed to a-ssure good spring honey flow.
Bees which had sufficient stores lIst fell
have wintered well. Mcple E.nd elder cre
furnishing pollen for early broodreFring.
n Florida -In north Florida bees are in below
normal condition for this season due to th(e
dry summer and fall. Hea:y feeding is being
carried on. In spite of this fairly heavy
losses have occurred from starvation End will
likely continue until early spring flowers ar..
available. IMaple and iron wood are in bloom,
but the cold weather with some rain has pre-
vented bee flights and cold is killing many
of these early blooms. In central end south
Florida colonies are in only fair condition,
Some colonies ere being fed. While honey
plants are in fair condition cool weather has
retarded their development and prevented bees
from working such bloom as is available.
ivdssis^.inriL Weather conditions are about
normal with enough cold to discourage brood-
rearing and keep bee activity at a minimum.
PlEnt and moisture conditions are very favor-
able with fairly heavy rains during this
period in some sections.
Lo.i.iana Heavy rains have eatly improved
soil moisture end plant conditions. Weather
has been sufficiently cold End damp to Trevent
bee flights. lleple collards, mustard, end
early weedsare in bloom. Demand and inquiry
for package bees is increasing.


- 5


- v..r -







'
ssed hi r g x >' D C


Istt4pv Vahnisr-w ~ -


.


h''!C':': Arrvals 79,000 IS. dr.wstic. Lemend

.t.tr-, C01. r, 6, E5-1 jErs .80
6, ?-lb. decanters 4.05
12, 2-1b. Jers 6.2E
21, 1-lb. jyrs 6.00-6,.F0
12, 1-lb. Jars 3.30
12, i-lb. servers 4.70
24, 12-0o. jers 5.25
24, P-oz. jars 2.55-3.95
mostly 3.85-3.95
C-TEAMED 12, 12-oz. cups 2.65
C":lcACo:_ Arrivals 166,200 lbs. domestic.
-Lemlr.a gc.od, market firm to slightly stronger
for lulk, firm for others.
60-15. *ins, MIMWESTEl,
White Clover .160- .17
Light nmber .157- .16
some high as .16I
Caetor.s; 12, 5-1b. tins
Whit'. Clover 11.80
in jers 6, 5-1t. E.80
12, 2-1b. 5 75
I?, 1-1b. .05
24, 1-lb.(self serve containers
24, 12-oz. 5.10
24, -oz.(self-serve containers)3.70
3t 4-nz. 3.06
Cr1-2-.D 12, 12-oz. 2.50


CINCINQNTJ : rrivEls 2,965 Ibs, domestic.
Derrnd ro.. market firm.
Which Clover, MIDI4WbTI.N, drums
Light ati r "
White Clover, 60-1b. tins .16.
Light amber "
Whte. Clover, 12, 5-1b. jars 1
6, 5-1b. jErs
6 ?lb. .-cesnturs
12, 2--l. ":Lrs 5.50-
24. 1 -Il r
12, .-lb j;rs
12. :-lb. server jars
24r, <--0- jrs
12. 8-oz. jers
CRAMED, 12, 1-lb.
T-Tr=; Supplies light. eml,.rd good, mark
;t'. dy.
wc. ".c rv.r, C.LOGJO,
.'-oz. j rs 5.15-
.-oz. j$rs 4.50-
S-.2. j-rs 2.20-
S -52.
S., z8-cz. jzrs 4.00-
2.- 16-oz. jars 6o40-
12, 32-nz. Jrs 6.25-
12, z-lb. tins 11.75-1
C, F-lb. glcss 6.60-
CI. .JD, 24, 12-oz. curs 6.90-
.'. l'-'-cz.. gloss 2.80-


.17,
.13t
..201
.14;
0.75
5.80
4.05
6.25
6.50
2.60
4.70
3.85
1.60
6.50
et

5.35
4.70
2.35
4.25
6.60
6.50
2.65
6,80
7.00
.3.00


DETROIT: srrivls 29 773 lrs. ioicstic;
YucattE.j. (lexicc) 32G,6C .E., u Lte.l I.
32,000 .t.. re- Tad gr0.,, market slightly
stronger.
mostly '.'hitt Clover tr.A Ortage
6 -lb. E-.0-6.00
12, "-lt. f 5.1E
24 1-lb. E.25-5.50
24, 8-oz. 3.15-3.25
few 1 crver


&.NRAS CIT. Arrivals by tr
1,000 lbs. Midwest. ,.-rkw
6 5-lb. jerrs
1t, 2-1b. jcrs
24, 1-lb. jirs
some brands higher


uck, rc prcximf tly
t steady.
5.25-5.7:
S.90-5.30
2.40-3.70


iNGELES: Dt-mnd good.
WhTte Tor better)Or: r rge,ClIver
6. 5-lb. gl ss or tin C 6.40
1K, 32-oz. jtrs 6.34-6,35
12, 24-oz. jars 4.85
12, 16-oz, Qcrs 3.32-3.35
12, 12-oz. jErs 2.61-2.65
2i, 8-oz. j. rs .8C
Light Amber, Bler.dei Flavors
1, 5-lhb. tins 9.10
24, '-1b. Frs 5.40
Lipht t mber, $ixed Flowers
E6, 5-lb. tins 4.55
?xtre LiFht ..mber, Ifclfa
12, 5-lb. tins 10.20
Extre Light ,cmbir, Bl.-rndd Flrvcrs
1i, 32-oz. irs 5.16
12, 16-oz. J rs 2.70
24,,8-oz. .jrs 3.20
'White kor better) Orrnge
24,. 12-oz. jrrs 4.87
.1'hite (or bettLr) Buckwhe t
24, e-oz. ;ars 3. S0
White Orncre-Claover
12, 1-lb. glcss servers 4.50
CR. i-.D, WF.ite (or better )Ori ure-Clover
12, 12-oz. cups 2.75
24, 12-oz. cups 5.50
CHUNK CCI-3, White 0Or: ng.. ,St .c, Clover
12, 1-l. a3xs 5.15
'T1ite (or better )Cl,.ver
12, 12-oz. pickzges -..80
24, B-nz. pickiges 5.50
BiES,4:i.rriva Is by truck 16,000 lbs.
dr.mestic. Demrnd very gocd, mcrkEt firm.
Purchascs by lec: 1 rLceivers delivered
Ios sx.geles mostly .47
few .49
in tradc, some dark low s .45


- ccntir.ued -


IL I'r- i i- *"S ;T S
arrivev s ir.! .e ei.ts ur-ng pre- c r. two we-es- less tt.-Jrwise schwn prices !ep-
resentsalo-. -r cur, r. nuotaT.ions by r 'crke. local bottlers, orother receivers tr
whjlesKlers, Terwu r-tai er:., bekers, c,' *Ie' {rner3, r other large users. R.orket condi-
tion comments re'-,t.er.t the opinion. cf t' '. rede and are Tfr trhe last .lf cf .enaea:-'.
*ll au..tinr.s e're x'.iF.td ur les otherwise s',~r.. CO-lb. cans are on a 1ctr.d basis
r.d small,;-- arits ni tx'rert.-d 'SAd .t.ert- tyes of honey are .-r. per cpse besis unless
Oi.ij*LwjSC s0lrwn1. BeLtswax prices are per poutd.)


VW


lIl Y







Tu.sdc!y, February 1, 195E,.


SEMI-i.iirT-L'T HUNEY RECrT -VL .QIX NO,_ 3


iINJEkrtPOLIS:_ rrivel3 by truck, 60-lb. cans
nn.. White Swaetclover 250, Light 1.mber 140.
DemFnd for small conteinmrs fair, large
containers slow.
Price to jobbers -
U. S. ancy Blended Honey
24, 8-oz. aers 3.25
12, 1-lb, jars 2 60
12, 2-lb. jers 5.,30
6, 3-lb. jars 3.60
6, 5-lb, tins 5,30
6, 5-lb. jars 5.80
24, 7,-oz. tumblers 4.20
12, 14-oz. tumblers 3.95
12, 11-oz. gless mugs 3.15
CREIZED, 12. 11-oz, glass mugs 3.35
60-lb. cans per Ibl'hite Sweetclover .17
Light -mber .16
BEl'SWAX: Arrivals by truck 490 lbs.
domestic. Dealers paying Cash .40
Trade .42


PHIIAJELPHIj&: Arrivals 66,620 lbs. dome stic.
Dem:and moderate, market firm,
60-lb, tins CJ.l -J; White Clover .17
PUF.FTO RICO Light .mber .16
Domestic, White Clover, 12, 5-
and 6, 10-lb.. tins 11.50
24, 1-lb, jers 5.75.5,.95
24, 8-oz. jars 3.35-3,45
Blended Sweet and White Clover
6, 5-lb. jars 5,80
24, 1-lb., ears 6.50
12, 1-lb. JErs 3.30
24, 8-oz. Qars 3.85
36. 4-oz. jars 3.06
PITTSBURGH: .rrivels by truck 33,100 lbs.
dojmestie_,: .Temnd improving, market steady.
White Clover and Light Amber
6, 5-lb. jars 5.80
6, 3-lb. jars 4.05
24, 1-lb. jers 5.50-6.50
24, 8-oz. jers 3.50-3.85


.EAN IRJACISCO: Demand moderate, market steady. 12, 1-lb. servers 4.70
TDomestic,7Light Amber (or better) Orange, CREEfkED 24, 1-lb. jars 6.50
Clover, Sage, Thistle end some blended Flavors- .
24, 8-oz, jtrs 3.05 3,50 1ORTLIND: Arrivals -10 000 lbs. domestic.
2 12-oz. jers 4.70 5.40 Supplies moderate. Demand slow, market dull.
24, 12-oz,, jars Sage With Light Amber, Alfalfa.-Sweetclover
cut comb 7.50 12, 5-lb.. tins 10.80-11.00
12 8-oz, j3irs 1.34 some lower
12, 12-oz. jars 1.88 12, 24-oz, jars 4.80- 5.00
12, 12-oz. 3Ers Sage, with 21, 12-oz, 5.30- 5.40
cut comb 3.00 24, 8-oz, 3,95, 4.00
12, 1 lb. jars 2,40 3.04 Bulk 5 gal. cans Light imber .16-- .17
12, 11-lb. jers 3.20 3.53 Dark .14 ,15
12, 2-lb. jars 4.75 5.64 COMB supplies light. Demand slow. market
12, 5-lb., cans 8.45 9.24 dull, Ifl.-HO, few sales
24, 12-oz. Fancy 7.75
SEATTLE: Arrivels approximately 41,256 lbs. 10 oik, No. 1 6.25
`MTennd slow, market dull. CHREaMED White Clover 24,1-lb.cups 6,25
Sweetclov..r-Alfalf Light Amber BEESWAX: Supplies fairly liberal, Deeand
12, 5-11. tin pails 10.25 -10.80 mcer&feFe, market steady -
12, 2-lb. jErs 5.50 6.10 Dealers paying Cash or trade ,45


24, 1-lb. jars 6.00- 6.50
24, 12-oz. jars 5,30
12, 24-oz, 3jrs 5.00
24, 8-oz. jars 3.95
CREAMED 24, 1-lb. cups 6.25
24, 14-oz. cups 5.50
24, 1l-oz. cups 5.40
24, &s-pz. cups 3.00


ST. LOUIS: market firm.
-O`0lb. tins COLORkDO end NORTHERN
White Clover L.16
Light amber .14-..15
1White Clover, 6, 5--lb. tins 6.15
Whitc Clover end Mixed Flowers
6, 5-lb. 5,65-6.25
mostly 5.80-6,25
12, 2-lb. jars 6.,10-6.25
mostly 6.25
24. 1-lb, jErs 5.40-6,50
mostly 6,25-6,50
24, 12-oz. jars 5.25
2,, 8-oz. jars 3.25-3.85
mostly 3.80-3.85
CREJSJ.> 12, 12-oz. packages 2.65


- ov r -


Washington 25, L. C.


- 7 -





ruesdey, Februery 1, 1955.


l.-_ij Il '.1-Y H-.-Y -a Pt.l iL. ? IX .._.
EWj YO:K Airrivl l y boat O2 cs. ex 23 drs.
Cubb. llb irs. 'jat.iLlf ; 95 dr:.-,. M xico.
Supplies, li.,t. Off:erinis 11L-:t. I e Tr
moderate, arrKtt fiim. Cpl.";s Ed nominal
auutat inins -
SIM 'rTED ex dock NMew York City duty peid
ktIEC'J drums .1g- .14
.Ji j.EL' drums .14
Ex warehouse -rd ex doch, 60s
1f.lrA.STEERN and INT I l-.:ITAIN
bakers rler.d 1 -.16
NF. YORK, Buckwhc.t .16
Lipht nimber Clever .16
Domestic W'li*e Cluver
6, E-IL. tins E.75-i.60
24, -oz. ?.---..95
12, 1-lb. jers E.95-u.90
12, 2-1b. jars 5.70--.&)3
12, 1-1b. gea 2 .20
24, 1-lb. jer. 6.40
24, 1-lb. tins 1.90
rDmestic, Light kmber, Mxed Flowers
24, 8-oz. jbrs 3.?5
24, 1-lb. jars 5.16-5.O0
12, 1-lb. jars 2.90
12, 2-lb. jaers 4.92-5.60
6, 5-1b. tins 5.55
24, 1-lb. tins 6.20
12 5-lb. tins 11.10
Domestic, Orange
24, 8-oz. jaers 3.95
12, 1-lb. jers 3.45
12, 2-lb. jars 6.60
24, 1-lb. tins 6.90
6 5-lb. tins 6.60
NEW YO. K, Buckwheat
6, E-lb. jers 5.75
6, 5-lb. tins 5.90
BPS3J.A: Arrivals by boat 254 bags Cuba;
96 bags Dominican Republic; 10 bags Egypt;
8 bars El Salvador; 55 b-gs GuatemalE; 47 bags
Hbiti; 165 begs Mexico; 116 blocks tnd 46 b1s.
Portuguese West Africa. Offerings light,
market strong, wide rtnge in prices, mostly
nomninEl uotations -
AFRICA .59- .61
CENTI-L j aEiICj., Light .65- .67
DErker .60- .62
WEST INDIES .60- .65
SOUTH .EPICa .68- .70
m m e e -


- continue! -


,'.' e.o r I C.


- 8 -






Tuesday, February 1, 1955.


s'EC-,L^oNTFYJ4l!YiAE.Y__ hEP'T VOL. MXX_-_NO, 3.

U. S HONEY QAT F.EFSjY PFOLUC. T ION 1954
(By Crop EeortinglBord, ThiS,JST,3 Washington, TC. C, J-n. 25, 1955)


Honey production in 1954 totaled 217,414,000
pounds, 3 percent less tha-n in 1953, and the
smallest crcp since 1948. Honey production
per colony was 39.8 pounds, compared with
40.6 pounds in 1953, 49.5 pounds in 1952 a.nd
the 1948-52 E.verage of 42.8 pounds. In mid-
December, producers hed ebout 41 million Dounds
of hcney on hand for sale -- 19 percent of
total production. Thl 154 honey crop was pro-
duced by 5,467,000 colonies of bees -- 1 per-
cent less then in 1953, Beeswax production
totaled 4,021,000 pounds, con-pered with
4,093,000 pounds in 1953, a decrease of 2
percent,
CompEred with 1953, production was down in 11ll
regions of the country except the West End
South Atlantic. where it Was up 16 End 4 per-
cent respectively. Decreases from last year
were as follows. North Atlantic, 23 percent;
East North Centrel. 15; -West North CentrFl, 13;
and South Centrel Stctes, 8 percent.
The leading honey, producing Stetes in 1954
were CEliforniE, mfinnesot., Floride, Wisconsin,
Iowt, Idaho Texcs, Ohio, illinois End
Michigm n., These Stctes produced 59 percent of
the crops
The everrge honey production was 39.,8 pounds
per colony, compared with 40.6 pounds in 1953.
P*i inly because of the widespread drought, hoiny
yields per colony this yetr were the lowest
since 1948. Yields were down in all regions of
the country except the West End South Atlantic.
Yield per colony ever:ged 60.2 pound in the
West North Centr'l, 60.0 in the West, 36.4
in the Ea;st North Centrrl, 34.9 in the South
AtlEntic, 23.7 in the North Atlantic end
19.7 pounds in the South Central States.


Estimated stock of honey for stle by
producers in mid-December totaled 41,056,000
pounds -- 19 percent of production. Stocks
as a percent of production were: East North
Central, 31 percent; West Nurth Central, 24;
North Atlantic, 21; South Atlantic, 15, South
Central, 14; and West, 13 percent. Stocks
of honey included 1,120,459 pounds under the
Government farm storage loans and 705,750
pounds under Government purchase agreements.
Beekeeners received en average price of 17,0
cents per pound for all honey sold in 1954
including the combined wholesale and retail
sales of extracted, chunk and comb honey.
This was about 3 percent higher than the
combined average Price for 1953 of 16..5 cents.
These prices cover large and smell aniaries
owned by farmers and non-farmers, PFrice in-
creased were sm&ll but fairly general.
Extracted honey in wholesale lots, the
principal method of sale, brought an average
price of 13.2 cents per pound, compared with
12.9 cents in 1953.. Retail prices for ex-
tracted honey averaged 22.5 cents per pound,
six-tenths of a cent more then in 1953,
Prices received for chunk honey in wholesale
lots averaged 25.1 cents, and at retail 31.9
cents per pound, both four-tenths of a cent
higher then in 1953. Prices received for
comb honey sold at wholesale in 1954 averaged
30.2 cents per pound, the same as a ye&r
earlier. Comb hone at retail brought 35
cents, one-helf cent higher thn in 1953.,
Prices received by beekeepers for beeswax in-
creased in all areas during the year and
averaged 44,1 cents per pound for selos in
1954, compared with 41.0 cents a year
earlier.


- over -


Washington 25, D. C,


-9 -






- 10 -


Tuesday, e-Sb Ly -1, 1>5.


7-1- -L.r: .i_.rJruru.s rif
IJ'tv ,Je. J..' _Ir cIl A E X3P CES s - -
: tui tor' s : hoje | $ $ :Honey Stocks
State : of : Prd'.rt:on : Piney : eeswaz : Vlue rf P-oduction :n hand for
rJa : ees : per reior.y : "-rod.r'.ion : I L- auction : 'n "-.' :. Fe'-". : sale
_- v/. I t i,_:_.5. a ^":,_;_1,4 $ i_ __ A.4_ _. 3_ .l:1t ., AL _.A_ ,L- 1-51 _..e .-.llgS -
416. 1 ,;,.S cI S4La .-2 5 ;sa d t L _-e 7.a xS 1
ti--Ia ) b "o Ae ItC 95 2 57 34 1 1
N... S 2F I.' nS 60 2 33 19 1 1 15
Vt. 'A'* 11 ,6 4 ,60 56 3 8 74 147 1 4 177
ass. :0 31 16 I e8c 465 12 1 155 15; 6 167
R. I. 2 2 16 .- ,'6 1 1 10 8 A J 8
Crr.n. 16 17 16 15 56 855 7 4 81 83 3 2 8;
N. Y. '19 22 41 78 8 979 6,188 144 10E 1, 311 99 63 18 1,052
N. J. 31 3i Jl :, '961 768 a4 18 274 z2S 11 3 300
. J 16d 6 3 A' _y v 9 3 360 92 77 :i.2 72 42 37 3,7
-._A. 494 495 0.8 _..7 15,?1e 1], .l4 287 229 2 807 1-59 127- 10 9
01.o 801 168 /8 .2 8,6' b 6,9j6 143 125 1,49; 1,242; 7 54 1,803
Iri. 180 1786 5 3. 6 'O S 196 20 10 1 ,279 1 168 48 54 2,164
IJ7. 164 164 ,A 4. 5'084 7 052 112 127 1,007 1'4S. 45 57 2,116
Yich. 18C 18S 45 s6 8 10C 6 660 130 127 1, 15 1.07; 53 57 1998
W a?. or. k.; 7d 5' 15 o00 10o81? 312 184l 2'418 .'67_ 128 79 3 35
^ -I -,1 -- ---- -------A----------- ---------------- ----- -
T.E.C. Lue' 7 1, 4.%.S .i, 4,5? _.' 156 4817 681 7,411 6611... 331 301 1,143
'bnm. 251 e24 8, 80 21 335 19 4:0 405 369 3 072 2,819 170 16Z 5,832
la sG 163 lb5 7/ 56 14,091 10 360 240 '07 1.832 1 502 101 93 2, S90
Mo. 15: 137 ,.. 19 3 496 60a 52 5, 706 51B 22 23 5-l
N.Iek. 13 15 1.10 14C 1:820 100 29 40 229 281 13 18 252
3.Ik. 23 ,'. 80 115 1, 4:. 2 60 40 47 ZUS 395 18 21 276
' --. 42 43 9' 75 4 07.1 3 2?5 73 55 46 432 30 25 419
S 51 48 J. 78 1 50 l,.J44 31 27 .46 230 12 11 262
'. :',C 5 695 _67,4 60.2 48,186 41 .8, 870 797 6,889 6 177 366 353 10,17_
S. s 3 33 -C -0 90 2 26 -7 1 1 39
29 30 27 28 78.1 840 13 14 206 220 5 6 260
14b 143 21 28 3,066 4 004 61 72 658 1,157 26 30 1,041
3.La. 124 122 17 18 1,108 2,196 40 44 658 659 16 19 439
i. C. 191 193 20 26 3 820 5 018 69 95 1,203 1,641 28 39 953
S. C. 56 59 12 14 672 826 17 18 2C1 250 7 7 99
Ga. 209 .Cs 22 20 4,598 4,100 115 86 1,099 955 46 38 573
"T- 2386 98 76 74 18,088 17 612 281 282 3,057 _.js_ 1:4 127 1,761
, -. -33.4 349 3_3,225 686 C" Z 613 7 308 ,04 o3 167 5 _25
. .. 146 139 7 15 1,022 2,065 27 42 319 678 11 17 396
':-. 17: 170 19 11 3,268 1,870 72 47 931 531 29 20 374
Ala. 200 190 16 16 i 200 3,040 70 52 797 763 28 22 334
74 7'3 16 22 1 184 1 606 22 29 268 381 9 12 321
Are 88 91 21 19 1 .848 1'748 37 35 362 371 14 14 :6:
S100 L3 22 76 2,200 2 418 37 48 341 394 15 20 36.
L,'A4 5. .?C 16 2.1 954 1'050 .5 28 214 245 10 12 147
Tara L.8 _3 _2Z 9636 _7,60 __ Xj_ _U6_ 1,_41 _1,ll_ 4 ... S_
.. !. ll I 1 jO.' 20.7 ? .7 23,312 21 377 454 417 4 648 .1474 180 175 2 95_
:. 67 6a 90 8S 6 030 5 780 98 104 844 855 40 48 578
.- 178 174 37 5: 6S586 9 048 1"5 154 889 1,212 48 69 905
S. 34 33 55 93 1, 870 3 069 37 SS 236 390 15 25 307
67 68 90 56 6,030 3,808 121 72 898 575 47 32 647
S. 16 15 35 560 525 11 10 71 67 4 5 105
A.az. 73 77 90 69 6,570 5,313 99 80 756 ll 39 35 372
Utah 49 50 56 50 2,744 2,500 58 50 354 338 23 22 300
r:ev. 15 14 57 70 855 980 16 L0 116 140 6 9 98
Wash. 86 86 47 50 4,042 /,300 61 77" 554 550 24 31 1,118
Ore,. 57 55 36 ;7 2, 52 1.485 31 ?7 i.4 241 13 1 386
i3a!f, 537 537 44 63 23 628 3 ,831 402 643 2.^77 4A2.29- 161 283 4 060
West. 1179 1,177 51.7 60.0 60,967 70,639 1 059 1.292 8,019 9C Z08 420 571 8,876
A._S. 5,,53-, 40.6 ,6 39.8 2: ,414 ~ 19,414 40 49 a.21 37,08: 3t4873 1i677 774 41 O

V Less t.rian .E-00 dollars.
I5.' Revised.
]y 5,' F'elinminary.
* By Crop Reporiiig oari, AW, ITiDA, Wn..hirtb-ra 2., P. C. Jan, 5, 195S. Complete report a3y be secuize
2 nan Cr'.p eWJ nt. ring Tird,.

UNIvERSITY OF FLORIDA


"" 3 1262 06589 5826




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