Semi-monthly honey report

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Material Information

Title:
Semi-monthly honey report
Portion of title:
Honey report
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Service
United States -- Agricultural Marketing Administration
United States -- War Food Administration. -- Office of Distribution
United States -- War Food Administration
United States -- Production Marketing Administration
Publisher:
U.S.D.A.
Place of Publication:
Washington
Frequency:
semimonthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Honey -- Statistics -- United States   ( lcsh )
Honey -- Marketing -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Published Oct. 1936-July 1956.
Issuing Body:
Issued by various agencies of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11528984
ocm11528984
System ID:
AA00011236:00003

Related Items

Preceded by:
Honey (Washington, D.C. : 1917-1936)
Succeeded by:
Honey market news


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



UNITED STjhTS 1EP..RTI'ENT OF aGRICULTURE
Agricultural 1Mrketing Service
Fruit Fnd VegetEble Division


Telephone REpublic 7 4142,
Extension 2176.


Washington 25, D. C.
PondFy, January 17, 1955-


SEMI-kONTHLY HONEY RPOR VOL..X)JXIX _10._2_

SUl"dRY


Wueather conditions during the first hEilf of
1 Jnu ry were generElly favorable for winter-
ing of bees. qTemperEtures were above normal
in the central and eastern portions of the
country- ermitting bees to move clusters to
new sti.res End to make cleansing flights as
needed in most sections. In a few areas
temper tures were not quite warm enough to
permit flights and in a few instances bees
were beginning to show signs of dysentery.
however, the situation has not become serious
in any area. In far western States the
temperature averaged colder then usual, but
this was considered favorable as the cold
was intense enough to make colonies dormant
but hes not yet been of long enough duration
to cause Eny dysentery troubles from pro-
longed confinement. Stores are reported as
low in Dmny areas, "ith above normal winter
end spring losses from starvation expected if
bees ere not fed early.
Plant conditions st this time ere mostly
dormant except in extreme southern areas.
Moisture is adequate in most areas at this
time considering the dormant condition of
plants. An exception is in northern Florida
where the dry weather is making the outlook
very poor for the spring ti-ti flow.
moisture is lIso bedly needed in northwestern
end west-central Oklahoma, southwestern
Kansas. southeastern Colorado Fnd eastern
New exico.zore snow is needed in some Rocky
hountein areas to assure irrigation water


C.JLIIORNL P111 'SS: (First
Northern 4r C4entr 1 C
winter weather prevril
with rzin, fog, frost,
major producing crers.
m: inly below normal. C
tinued generally normr
Some reports of light
been received from Saci
Movement of bees was 1I
annual honey plants are
started well, but cold
growth. Virtually no I
ing the period. Euclea
manzanita were blooming
some eucalyptus was bloc
Joaquin VElley. Demand
bulk lots of extracted
about steady.


-CGIICUI-TURE, WASHINGTON


for the coming season. On the otherhand at
some points the depth of snow is heavier than
last year at this time making the prospects
more favorable.
Demand for large bulk lots of honey continued
good in most areas during the first half of
January, with reports indicating supplies re-
maining in producers hands are closely cleaned
up in most areas. The market was firm to
slightly stronger. Beekeepers' sales of ex-
tracted honey in large bulk lots for good
quality table honey ranged mostly ll-I4U# per
rb.,with considerable trading reported in the
northern tier of States from hichi en west to
hontane at 140 per lb. for White Clover honey.
OccEsional lots were reported being held by
beekeepers for 150 per lb.
Bottlers of honey reported that demand by
wholesalers for packaged honey continued good
throughout the holidays in December without
the usual let-un, and was continuing good
during the first half of JEnuary.
Demand for crude beeswax continued active with
the market holding firm. Beekeepers' sEles
f.o.b. shinning point were mostly 47-49d per
lb. for either the light lemon or darker colors,
'ith some trading at 50-520, and a few local
srles at 53-550. Occasional small lot seles
were reported at 45$, with a few lower.


INFORLTIOGN FRONT PRODUCING ,.REMS
ou LF[ern_ nU ifornia -
hr If Jcnuary) Weather was generally cold end stormy during
-lifornia -AL variety of the period following the warmth of late
ed during the period, December. Rains or snow fell in many sections.
and some sunshine in Colonies continued in mostly good condition,
Temperatures were Broodreering was active in some sections,
Colony condition con- particularly during the warm weather at the be-
L for the most part. ginning of the period. Bees still were being
stores, however, have moved into some sEctions from other states.
remento Valley points. Most honey plants were in good condition though
eight during the period, more rain will be needed in the next few months
abundant and have to assure good nectar flows. Warm weather and
weather has retarded adequate moisture earlier in the winter made
plants were worked dur- for good growth of most plEnts. Some citrus
rptus and a little orchards in Los rngeles County have been
Salon the coast and allowed to run down becFuse of planned future
)ssoming in the San subdivisions. Eucalyptus and mustard were
I was moderate for lerge being worked when the weather permitted.
honey with the market Supplies of e tracted hlcy in beekeepers'
h nds were li Ut..
domestic use s -. IlDf A
Continued bo tom l
"PsGF.S 10-18 01 THIS REPORT CLDRY -. BR EF FUk OF HCNY
.,N RTLiSW.A PRICES -AT) ..DK.T NG TIURING 1954"
wer- h iA A/ V -


S--/vqN yr


3 7, 4i ,)





--a.nday, January 17, 1955.


SK f=I-NlLY j I'Y_lEP =.10L, CX .-_J.-2-.

2H a1- Ma RJ~SPQUF lD_!hilG-E10D 9)D rS aY LIT IS W -. These prices represent sales and quotation as
reported by correspondent beekeepers and honey handlers. Becuase of tie many thousands of beekeepers
and handlers in the country these should be considered as representative prices and not as full and
complete coverage of all transactions for any State or area:

- B-DCB I-' _-UjS_0A LAZ E I -TS ._a i YTOBO. &-n LT.EQITE&, JL6-ETI GL6DS E35E ECARS,, ___


STE : COLOR a FLORAL : rICE & B
~-- 1 SOUFCE 07 S-1:


SOU. White, Orange
3x.Li ht Amber,Cotton-Alfalfa
Light Amber, Cotton-Alfalfa
Li ght Arber Sage-Sumac,mixture
Ex.Litht Amber, Buckwheat 1
CENT. Ex.Light Aamber,Alfalfa-Cottan,
beekeepers aski ng
NOP. Light Amber, Mixed Flowers
Extra Light Amber, Alfalfa
VASL. Various Flowers, according to
quality
COLO. White, Alfalfa & Sweetclover ]
Light Amber, Mixed Flowers 9-
MCIT. Extra White, Clover
UTAH White. Clover
Extra White Alfalfa ]
Amber to Extra White
N.DAK, Water White, Clover
IOWA White, Clover
some boec-epers holding
for
NEBF. White, White Svcetclover


1


1 2
11i


L0-13- f

1?.
11A
12 '

14
12-130
lsr


SIS TATE COLOR A FLORAL PRICE BaSIS
E SOURCE OF SALE
-& Sr..MI -v --Ws-F --ES
White Clover ll- dl.., C.
del. MICH. Whitc, Clover 3?-14 dl.. 2 4-fo.'bA/
Lipgt Adocr,Mixod Flowers 12 r-134a1.
WISC. White, Clover 1 14 f.ob:
MI. Whito, Clover-Basswood 13 -140 f.o.b.
White, Clover 14# f.o.b.
Light Amber, Mixed Flowers 1344$ "
f.o.b. White,Swectclovni 1?.0 dol. lI1s.
del. Light Amber,Mixcd Flowers 11. .
IND. White, Clover 14-161 dol.
N. Y. White, Clover 150
f.o.b. VT. Clover 15 "
del. FLA. Drums: (containers exchanged)
4 White, Light Akrbo. Orange 1 "
.f.o.b. Anbor, Gllbory 110
Amber: Oranrc Palmotto, Mangrove a
Partridge Poa 10 "
LA. White, Clover,
60s and drums 114 f.o.b.
del, i. ..ight AmberVarious Flowurs 14-160del.
S. D A ser, Tulip Poplar 12; f.o.b.
itb few snall lots 15 f.o.b.


___ 5-- -. -T-- -I-U-I-- 4 ud .- au---9- -- -

I-------------------WCTO-
STATE : TYPE OF HOiEYa CON1T..INES, COLOR AD .-- -- :-_ :' --.

S-TnPTE -i- LL0%DCoTS EEE EPUR&l
U'LIF.
NOB. Various Flowers
COLO. White, alfalfa A Sacetclovor IS 15 .
UTdLM EStra'White, Alfalfa i 5
TEfS Clover -1%1 19.420 -
ARE. Amber, Wild Flowers 120
OKLA. Various Flowers 18 -
IOWA White, Clover 15
KANS. Clover 1 2
MD. Sweotclover 16 2(3
WISC. White, Clovor 16 -
MINN. White 4 Light amber, Various Flowers 170
IND. White A Light Amcr, Various flowers 200 25-300
N.Y. Whito, Clover 18 15
P;k. Various Flowers 1
MD. Wild Flowers 25
FL.. Whito-Lirft Amber Ormnpo 17*, 19.64 2V./.


Ambor, Various Flowers
ILL. ite Cloverr

CALIF.
NOR. Various Flowers
OREG. Clover-Alfalfa
CCLO. White Alfalfa-Swoctclovor
UTAH Extra White, Alfalfa
TEXCS Various Flowcrs
r lovers
ARB. Amber, Wild Flowers
CiKL. Whito, Swcctclover
Various Flowers
NEW MX. Various Flowers
IOWA Whito, Clover
'NS.. Clovor


1s 1/2p"


16 2/3


Extra White, Alfalfa
Extra White, YTllow a WnhitQ Swcctclovcr
Swohetlover


17 si5/6r L. "i
17


200
200



30$


22-250
25-300
2fl^
30%
300


17%

200
24.179

180
19-2L 2/tv
17 1/20
18-19%
18-190


- r-r.tin'ued -


WKazhinet. 25, L. C.


- 2 -





hinflt. 2?, D. C. 3 Monday, January 17, 1955.
S- c-iLc I ...EE. PORF -.VOL Xi- W.. _Z -


STY7 OF HO:Y cwa.mn M, COLC J s--~:3^~ ~:~ ~ ~ : -C ?
oiTE :, FLC SOUL_ __i -(-Gene-allx Aeli3 &UPA)J.CBe Alx l alixeC ._AP.orPA);-Lv eo.st__
_D! UI 0,Z f = iiQ MT. I.0QIL :-- la- (CO4T INED)/
WISC. White Clover 19 2/3 16-21
White Golden Clover Passwocd & Easpbory 15-250
MINN. White, Clover-Aasswood 19$
Light labor, Various Flowers 2L
CHI0 White, Clover 30
N. I. White Clover 2 3 1 /3 20-30
N. H. amber, Mixed Flowers 25 320
VT. Clover 21 24 25
PA. Various Flowers 250
Light amber, Clover 260 305
MD. Wi d Flowers 2530
'IENN, Wite, Clover 2 2
FLa. Amnber, Tupelo 18 21/39 200 1/"
White-Light arbcr, Orange 170 19.66* 21 1/3
amber, Various Flowers 15 1
Lt. White, Clover 18e* 20* -


OREG. Clover-ultalfa 5.40 So0
COLO. White, Alfalfa-Swcetclover 5.20
UTAH EIt ra Whi to, Alfalfa 5.40 -
TEXAS Various Flrwers 5.40 -
Clover 6.25 6.80 -
OKL0I. White, 3weotclover 4,80 -
Various Flowers S.95 6.20-6.40 -
N.MEX. Various flowers 5.00 5.60 -
ICWL White, Clover 4.80 -
KLIS. Clove r 4.35-5.75 48
WISC. White, Clover S.40 6.00 -
MI I. White, Clover-Basswcod 5.2S 6
N. Y. WhiteI Clover 5.76 65
N.H. Laber, Mixed Flowers 720 640
A. Various Flowers 6. 75
Light Amber Clover 6.75 '5
FLK. .mbur, Tu o e 5.6C 6.00 550
White-Lilt Amber, Orange 4.65' 5.35* 5
,mbir, Various Flowers 4.15* 4.77*/" 48
MISS. White, Alfalfa (Colo.) 6.00 6
LA. White, Clover 5.18* 5.76*

S~.l ao i e4 6..ji. WA Rf Cc i rS_00
OREG. Clover-A1lffa 6.00-
COLO. White, AlfalfP-wectrlovor 5.40 -
hTtB Extra White, Alfalfa 5.84 -
TEXAS Various Flowers 5.40 -
Clover 6.50 7.00 -
OKL',. White, Sweetclover 6.00 -
Various Flowers 6.15 6.40-6.70 -
N.MEX. Various Flowers 5.25 5.85 -
IOWa White, Clover 5.28 30-
K4NS. Clover 4.35-6.50 -
WISC. White, Clover 5.50 6.40 -
MUIN. White, Clovor-Passwood 5.60 -
IND. White & Light amber, Various Flowers 6.96 -
N.Y. White, Clover 7.25.6 30-
VT. Clover 6.15 7.25 40
NA. Various Flowers -45
Libht Amber, Clover 7.20 40%
N. J. Various Flowers 2.68
VA. White, Mixed Flowers 7.68 40
TEI. Clover -38
FIL. Amber Tupolo 5.75 6.25 330
White Light Amber, Orange 5.17* 5.95* 300
Amber, Various Flowers 4,66* 5.35 270
MISS. White, Alfalfa (Colo.) 6.25 350
LA. White, Clover 5.61* 6.24*


ipz~


310



400


- over -







..s__-MSmyhHLY. _HL s_ LRME--_VaLa W1. = N. 2 -
-W-a--i 2E5 fD.E .-C-PacM o.FAna JESa nIa Fryar-o WOlSuLV,.nWlS_-A- 9 S -1-7- --
StarE .; TYPE OF .-EgD' CChlT. rS, COLT. AN) :-- -z" -" -,"-- gy.-- -- --. ~- ~ .&i
FLOfuL SOUaCE jj M IM E
E C3xZr IYW 24 -TL 3bBS_ EPC G.ap ?er Qase_ _AP&rJar _
GREG. Clover-Alfalfa 4o50
COLO. White, Clover 3.40 -"
TEXaS Various Flowers 3.60
Clover 3.70 4.00
0Li.. Various Flowers 3.60 3.75
WISC. White, Clover 3.30 3.70 -
Pa. Light amber, Clover 4.10 230
FLA. White-Light Amber, Orange 2.97* 3,40" 170
Amber, Various Flowers 2.72* 3.15* 160
It. White, Clover 3.89* 4.32* -


fNIOdi HOW! CC- CASE 21 SECTicgWS..~ ~
WbSH, Clover-Alfalfa
COLO. White, Alfalfa-Swcetclover, 12 oz.
NEHR. Extra White, Yellow & White Sweetclover
12 oz. or wrro
N. Y. White, Clover 1i-14-oz.
PA. Light Amber, Clover
MD. Wild Flowers
VA. White, Mixed Flowers
Extra White, Clover
TE N. Clover, 14-oz.

W .TEED Qaj Iaff -- -


MIT.
r^,
Pass.


Clover, 24, 3-oz. sections
variouss Flowers l-lb. sections
White, Vetch and White, Clover


Per. 5Qotj!on
7.20 8.40 -
- 7.80 400


10,00


3.00


9.00
7.50
8.40


4.00
35% sect.


40!
502
50 ,
33 1/30
400
454
29-300


4.50
400
45% sect.


----------------------------
OFEG. Clover-Alf Ifa 12/1-lb. jars 4.80
TEXhS Clover 24/1-ib. jars 7.49 8.28
OKLh. Light oer. Alfalfa A Cotton,
24/l-lb. jars 6.00 -
12, 2-lb. jars 4.00 -
TENN. Clov.r, 5-lb. jars 100 :-1.7S
N.H. AmberMixed Flcers Ib.jars -
. f -...._ Acx,'^ild. Elwer-. JIb i-..r_ ----- -- -1.225_ .---- -
p -EG, Clover-Alfalfa 24/10-oz. jazs 4.50 -
C0LO. White, Clow r, 24/1-Ib. jars 6.20 -
TELXS Clover, 24/10 oz. jars 5. 0 5.50 -
WISC. 'White Clover, 24/- lb. 5.50 6.40 -
N. Y. White Clover, 24/1-lb. jars 8.50 50



I/ State of origin indicates State where packed, not necessarily wh.ro produced. The torm "Clover" includes
most legumes such as White Dutch Clover, Hubam Clover, Yellow and White Swoctclovur, and occasionally sucL
legumes as alfalfa and Vetch mixed with other Clovers. Indicates sales f.o.b. shopping point.


anday, January 17, 1955.


- 4 -


Washington 25, D. C.


..INFQ-MTlPN..r.Qyi --#JclGO Mjad icJL.(1l3D)l


.CI.EIC 1.Q0EWEST:_ CPeriod Dec. ?3-Jan. 9)
D=Zej_- Bees axe generally in fair condition, but
msny colonies are short on stores. Leumos and
cane berries arc generally in good condition. A
,ood snow cover was protecting new sccdings in most
areas. There is some concern in the Wilamotte
Valley over the small plantings of votch, which is
a major nectar source., Bcek-upoers
a re hard pressed financially in sce cwas because
of having no mirpl.n lImny to %" ll,


WagjpipatWL Weather during tie first half of
January has been ideal in western Washington for
boes. Some cleansing flights were made last wLok.
Very little honey remains in beekeepers hands,
and what tC-cy hnvo is mostly sold. lost buyers
h-ve a fairly gocd supply, and i.-.quiry and domud
h,.s boen li ht. In central Washington weather wrs
moderately cold, -nd cloudy with a few sanow
flurries. Colonies of boos roeiinncd in good canti-
tion.


-continued -





a-ionday, Jenuery 17, 195b.


SE.d-i'DlNTHLY HGON'Y IFORT VOL. XXXIX NO.2


ITELh,0OUNT,.IN ST..TES (Pe2icd Dec.. 24-Jan. 10)
Colorado exports indicate bees 6re winter-
ing weTl, E Itriough in some locations they hrve
been confined for about five weeks and are
showing signs of needing a cleansing flight
end in some yards many colonies will need
eerly feeding. MPoisture conditions are
variable. Precipitation during December was
less then helf of normal over much of the
plains area east of the Rocky Vountains, but
was more nearly normal in the Rocky mountains
end on theWestern Slope. Some mountain
watersheds hirve a fairly 1ood depth of snow
while others have only a light supply.
Idaho Bees are wirtering well to date.
CoTC-wcether has kept them dormant and cleans-
ing flights will be needed soon. Temperatures
were co der than for the past two years. A
little snow and rE in fell dwu ing this period.
Some points in the mountains have more snow
than et this time last year. Trading for *
honey slowed down as usual during the Holidays,
but was still fairly active. Very little honey
remains in producers' hEnds. locel retail
movement of honey was good.
ha'ntana -Colder weather has occurred since
the first of the ycFr, which is believed bene-
ficial as it will cut dr.wn on. consumptior. of
stores of wintered colonies. There has been
a little precipitation in the form of snow.
UtEh_- MPisture conditions ar'e about 91 per-
cent -f normal. Icrv snuw storms he ve occurred
in the m-uint:ixis ard hUve iLump-.'ved the outlook
for Irr igtino, wFter sunnlis.c for xt season.


4ortheest Texas "''-ether during this period
has beer. exceptionally mild with
temperatures in the upper 76s almost daily
end lows of 35 to 45 degrees. Precipitation
was very light, in form of drizzling r1ins,
and was not enough to put moisture in the
ground. Good r. ins Ere badly needed for
smell gra ins and vetch, and also for any wild
flowers which usually come in the spo irg to
supply the early pollen end possibly emrly
nectar. Colonies of bees appeFr to be
wintering well, with fair size clusters and
quantities of stores. Feeding will have to
be done to occasional colonies in the early
spring.
New VJex.ico- Weather hEs been cold for two
or three weeks. Bees are wintering about
normal. Pmisture conditions are very dry.
Oklahoma Liht to heavy reins and snows
occurred during this period and were very
helpful to plant life. However, much more
moisture is still needed in western areas
of the State. The ground is not frozen end
moisture received has penetrated into the
soil. M'ild temperature permitted good
cleansing flights on January 1. Reports
indicate colonies of bees are in good to fair
condition.
arkanse.s Precipitation hFs been heavier
Th-rn fo the' pEst three years. There is a.
good supply of moisture in the ground.
Colonies in some yards are light on stores
and in need of feeding. Some colonies have
starved.


Additionral h, vy snow storms before lt.rch will S-Tn
be helpful. Bees Ere quit, aftur a week of PL.N1S S_'rTES:_ (Period Dec. 25-Jan. 11)
zero weather. Td _ier Vel.gy_of Miuuesof.- I._Id NXrth
Dakota _-Tmp.ertures continuRd niild r than
Nevada A he, vy r: in -nd sncw storm on usuaT Fthirougihout this period. Snowfell has
December 31-Jinutry i brought much needed been light, End the ground his only a light
moisture over most of the State. Prosp-cts are covering. Heavy winter losses of bees are
now much brighter for aiple water ior irrigation expected because of small clusters going into
in 1955. the winter.


SOUTHWESTERN STATES: (Period Dec. 25-Jan. 11)
-Lower Bio rra de VFllev Texe s -Temperatures
have been mild. ;nd 7ees have gathered some
nectar end pollen. Colonies h "-e capped brood.
Miny colonies ere boing trucked into th.
Valley for honey end producing of nuclti.
Southwest Ttexs ioest beekeepers report
coTonies oT Fces are in pond condition. Few
extracted anv honey, but l.-ft it ii. the hives
for winter stores. Weather continued v ry
dry. ILight frosts hrve occurred but nnt h-rd
enough to kill ell vegetation. The outlook
for honey Ilows this comirn spring is pocr,
unless rr-ins come. '"
F;ast and Sirtthneast Tcxs Brazos County. -
ITfifl11 during this period w: s frequent, i 1-
though below norma I for Emnouits. Thi winter
thus fer h;s been relrtivoly mil. Luch
cloudy weather hEs kept b.-eo flight Lctivity
light, however, colorwes were broodltss for
only short period. Bees hive started to get
pollen and nectar from some early season ground
flowers cnd ornamental shrubbery. Queens have
started laying- Some broodrcaring has been in,
progress for most of thu sLeson. Yards in
favored locations have adequate winter stores,
but in others colonies will need spring feeding.
Coast l Bend Extremely dry weather continued.
onie brush hE.s put on buds end a lew blooms
have Eppeared. The condition of colonies of
bees is fair.


- over -


1swa Temperatures a.vcrcgd warmer then
usu:T during this period, vith cleansing
flights occurring. Colonies ere wiinturng
well. There was little or no precipitation
and the ground was bare of snow. plants are
in Rood condition but r snow cover is needed
to keep the ground fr'm drying end to protect
plants. Very few large lots of bulk honey
rema in in producers' hEnds. Demc nd continued
good with the market firm. Packers of honey
report demand through wholes ale channels
continued heavy throughout the year-end
holidays, without the usual slow-up, The
market for crude beeswax continued strong,-
with offerings light.
Ncbraskca_- Weather wes fairly mild during
the first part of this period. Bees were
able to have several good flights. On
January 5, the first substant al moisture
of the winter Frrived in the form of rein,ice
and then snow. There. is five inches of snow
on the ground at Lincoln, more further wust,
and less eastward. Bees appear to be winter-
ing well. Colonius th:t went into the
winter with plenty of stores still hove
plenty. A few beek epers were feeding light
colonics during this past mild spell. Dmar.,id
for honey conti ued good. There are very
few bulk lots of honey remaining unsold in
beekeepers hainds. Reports throughout the
State indicate thrt the dem;.nd for bottle4i
honey in retA il stores rnd by stores did nct
slump off during late December cs is usually
the case.


- 5 -


Washington 25, D. C.





Mnnday ,JFnutry 17, 1955.


SE.-ONTHLLrY _HOQEY iPOhT V01 XXXIX -_ N.2


Kensps Weather hes been mild end wet. Go',
c TrE Tell in eastern and central arees with
lighter amounts in the west. The last week
in December from 8 to 25 inches of snow fell
in the three southeast counties of Kanses,
followed by heFvy rrins. Therlgo run off
of consequence. Bees are wintering well.
There have been many flight days. ?ost bee-
keepers heve sold the bulk of their 1954 crop
of honey. Prices end movement are consider-
ably improved over the pest few years.
i.suri__- Cnlonies of bees in southwestern
Hissouri are we;k and light. Precipitation
during December throughout the southern pert
of the State was more than twice of normal,
evereging around 6 inches.
EAST CENTdLL AND NORTH CENTRAL STATES:
(Periodlc- 26-J-n7 T27 -
licIhjgn__- Temperatures were milder then
usue throughout thisperiod and favorable for
wintering nf bees. However, many colonies
will need feeding by spring. Snow cover is
light, but moisture conditions &re g6od and
plants are in good condition. Lemand was
good for large bulk lots of honey, but little
remains in producers' hands.
Wisconsin Temp-eratures continued milder
Then usua-l End bees hive wintered better then
average so fEr this winter both outside and
in cellars. moisture conditions are good.
Snow wrs affording protection to plants in
the central and northern prrts of the StEte,
but in the southern pert the snow cover has
melted away. rem&nd for large bulk liLs of
honey continued good, with reports indicating
most lerge lots are sold. Local 1 IemEnd for
packaged honey ranged from slow to good.
tAjpnesnt, Temperatures continued milder
thin usul ] throughout this period, but not
worm enough to permit bee flights. Colonies
Ere generElly in good condition, but the bees
hove ba.d uly very limited flights for some
tj5ac end a few signs of dysentery are Eppear-
inr. Many colonies I light on stores, and
a few hEve starved. smoe beekeepers were e
feeding bees. There is a good snow cover'mOst
of the St.te and plant and moisture conditions
are good, despite the fEct that precipitation
during December averaged less thin hElf of
normal ever most of the State. Very few
large bulk lots of honey remain in producers'
hands. Demand was active with the market
tending higher.
Ohi.o- WeLther has bccn quite fEvorable for
bees during this period. Early in the period
temperatures permitted cleaning flights in
some perts of the StatE. There ere reports of
broodreFring but not E-s extensive Es lIst
yeir probFbly less then 5 percent of the
colonies indicate such E.ctivity. Stores are
reported Es adequate Et present. Soil
moisture is building up from frequent reins
with very little runoff. Honey and nectar
flora appear in excellent condition End mere
Sbundint thin thf t occurring for the pest
several 1 years. There is no frost in the
ground. The orly snow fe 11 occurred in
southern Ohio, with ;bout 5 inches inftXelder-
ing on the river. Very little honey is re-
ported in hnzds of pronurors only that being
held for future delivery. Buyers are
looking for honey.


I IndianE Trmper&tures ire continuing above
normal. In some pirts of the State
temperatures hEve ranged in the 60s. Bees
have hld flights in the middle of the day,
and have hrd Emple opportunity to shift
clustrs to fit the conditions. The southern
pert of the Strte is still deficient in
moisture, when the entire ye;r is considered,
but there his been plenty to give Ell
necessEry icte growth to most plants
pertinent to beekeeping. Clovers are looking
Pood in most all sections of the State. Very
ew bulk lots of honey remf.in in the h.nds
of producers. Prices for both honey end wax
are gener; lly strong, with less distinction
because of ce]or.
Illinois Temperatures continued milder than
usui 1 Throughout this period, and coleries of
bees with necessary stores should be coming
long in good condition. Precipitation wrns
fEirly heavy during this period, but more is
needed in central areEs to overcome previous
deficiencies. Loci 1 movement of prckged.
honey was normLl.
NORTHEASTERPN P2TES:_(Period Dec. 27-Jan. 13)
!Ne. York Above norm; 1 temperE tures pre-
v;iled during this period, but not wrrm
enough to permit cle nsing flights except in
r-out rn counties. Colonies in centrEl End
northern, tiers here been confined since lfte
November rnd will need c. flight soon, cl-
though most ,rc still quiet. Bees have been
hble to shift clusters as needed. Colonies
of bec-s in the Hudson Ve lley ; re in the
poorest condition in r number of years. Some
beekeepers hive fed dry sugar. loney wa s
moving norma 11:,, rnd is expected to cleun up
before the new crop is rerdy.
V3ermont Wee other continued cold, with some
snow. --ees rnd clovers seem to be wintering
well. The beeswax market wes active, with
considerable inquiry. The honey demand a-lso
continued good.
New HFE.pshire The sE le of honey h es beern
fairly good, nd most of the beekeepers are
short of honey. Prices remrired steady.
Pennsylvynic Temperatures were rbove 2no0l
during tRis p-eriod, but cool enough to keep
bees quiet. They hrd partic.l to good cleF-as-
ing flights the first part of the period,v:nd
l1 Ipperred normal with few decA bees being
removed rnd no signs of dysentery. Only
light snows occurred vnd they hr.ve melted
Ewry rapidly. Movement of honey hrs been
fa ir.
New Jersey_- The 1 st pr.rt of the period w'.s
cold with snow. Bees rre wintering
excellently. However, some colonies will
need feeding before spring. Moisture ha.s
been sufficient for plants. New Jersey
produced honey for 1954 is prtcticElly all.
sold, end stores end ro.dstEnds Ere bringing
in honey from out of the Strte.
SOUTH TI NFPIC _aND SOUTH CEITRiL ST4.TES:
ST(rerid~T c. t?7 --JFn. T3)
akryland_:- 6rioalo'lbpve normal temperatures
prevailed during this period. There were
several days during which bees made partial
to good cleansing flights. Except where


- continued -


Weshingtn 25, D. C.


- E -





iondey, January 17, 1955.


SEi'J-i~.NHLO Y HC,.1-Y R-P(.hT VOL. XXXIX NO.2


there is F shortF:e of stores colonies are
wintenrrg very -ell. In the 5lue Biige
Section eplErists with many box colonies
expect big losses. zlso some think th.t all
swarms hived will not overwinter as not much
in stores was made during thelate summer and
fall. CenerF] spring feeding will probably
be nccded in this area. Honey continued to
move slowly, but steadily. There is no con-
cern about moving the entire crop by the
time new crop is rveilable by beekeepers in
the vicinity of Washington, 11. C. However,
in the Blue" idge Section sales of dark honey
have been slow. Moisture and plant conditions
ire firirly good in the ec stern pF rt of the
StEte. In the Blue hidge Section,
precipitrticn hi s been light, ground water is
low, many wells Fre dry, End heevy frosts
have cracked the srd" end forced out some
clov,.r plants,
.Kentucky -Good r< ins rnd snowstorms ere
plFcing the subsoil in excellent condition.
Bees have been quiet. However, many
colonies are short of stores and will starve.
There hFs been no reel cold weather so far
this winter End vegetation is green for this
time of the year,
Tennissee Weathcr was frosty in the morn-
ings with warm days. Bees have had good
flights and are holding their own where
stores Ere t.mple. Light to heavy ra ins fell
during this period, which were needed. In
some sections the ground. nd wulL -, ..till
dry. Practically no hor,-y rcra .is in
producers' hard for sClliig.F

HON.Y PICE Silwl'O PQROGi i.: %j
T- e TefolIwjn, ifor-i.mTin is provided by the
Wat., rric & ommo -lity Iro'rm Br r ranch,
Sugar Division, CSS as of IZc. 15, 1954. -


195_ Pro ram_


j.laba me
.rizonE
CGlifornia
Colorado
Floriie
GeOorgia
Idaho
I owe
louisiana-
Minnesotc
Nebraska
New Nexic2
Oklehoma
South Carolina
South Dkkote
Tuxes
UtEh
Washington


Loa ms

Lbs.
6,120
250,654
105,600
13, 60
139,150
15-,020
132,440
81,791
12,762
192,500
22,055
19,250
25,410
6-1,625
77,055


Loans
Out-_.
St T iidsig_
6,120
201,044

60,500
139,382
132,4J0
81.791
4,292
192,5UO
22,055
19,250
21,780
6.1,625
77,055


97,625 97,625


TCTo.L 1,394,617 ] ,120,4599
TCoI', IS pS OF S,.iE P. iannf
PrigrEm 2,384,029 2,097,239
1952
program 7,021,681 6,891,070


m.nt s
6- bs.-



625,000


SOUTHF.. T' N ST.T-ES: (Period Dec. 27-JEr.13)
Ge2g7iqa_- Beekeeping conditions remained
practically unchargcd during this period.
Considerable moisture gunerelly throughout
the Stt-te for the past sevcril weeks may
brighten spring prospects. Considerable
feeding hEs been tiecessary lately over maiy
parts of the State. A few cnl:.nits may
hve been lost by cold weather tnd lEck of
food.
Florida -Weather has been warm and dry,except
forF rTef periods when killing frosts
occurred d.ep into the Sttte. In the
northern part of thEh1tEtt,tjhe outlook at
this time is poor for sprig'ti -ti honey
crop because of the lek of good reins for
months. Small streams and ponds are dry. In
central Florida bees were findiixg some
pollen &nd were Ettempting to build up a
little earlier then usual. In west-central
areas (Pampa vicinity) red mtple hfs finished
blooming. Willows started about JaTnuary 4
i'ving a continuing light build up flow.
Colonies are in fair condition. Very little
honey remains inproducers' hands.
fssissp.ipi Moisture conditions have
improved within the pest 30 days so that
clov-r c d other legumes planted in the fell
End seed on the ground from last year's crop
have come up, Some warm &ys have given the
plants a very good start. ll old clover was
killed by the drought. There hE.s been con-
sidercble bee flight activity. Food con-
sumption has been hcevy, and s, me colonies
may require feeding in the early spring.
ickage- ,ad quei u-shippers report oedurs
Share coming in tt i fast rvte.
Louisi&rn -WeEther has been unseesonably wrru,
ith heavy prccipita tion. Clovers cnd obher
nectEr producing plants have made a heavy
growth during the last two or three weeks.
Bees were bringing in pollen Fnd r little
nectar fro eld, finwood, collards, mustard,
End eErly weeds. Broodrerring wrs cxpcndinU,
perhaps Loo fest, Ps stores Fre very light in
some y"rds. Surpe feeding was being done.
F.iph,'is by beekeepers is expected to be
plcud on honey production, rather thrn on
pack go bees rs prices for the letter tre re-
ported. to be too low for profitable
oper tions.
-


- IIN~YPHlICE STLPIIZsTI0N: 1


76,050



500
<,200

705,750

184,401 2,
2,981,839


A ccordin" to information furnished by the
S'ecielity Crops Brr.nch, 'Fruit end Vegetable
Division, dSS, as of Jen. 8, 1955 qunUtities
of hon.y on approved Lxvlicctions for subsidy
payments umner provisions of the Section 32
Progrrm by the U. S. riep ertment of
agriculture wure as folows: Pounds
zExp-ort 28,709,U51
Domestic Diversion 718,000

Includes modifications of previous
operations
Iro.'r- m effective July 21, 1954 tnd
terminated ..ug. 30, 1954..


Washington 25, D. C.


- 7 -







SErJ-nAPThLY iHOrNY h.CyGnT VOL. XLXID. NO. 2
TL.LEGRJrHIC REPObTS FROM IPORT -NT iV.BIMTS
(1-rivrls include receipts during preceding two weeks. UFnless otherwise shown prices ren-
resent sEles or current quotations by brokers, local bottlers, or other receivers to
wholesalers, leree retailers, bikers, confectioners, or other large users. darrket condi-
tion comi..ents re-resert tre opinion of t-.e tr;de end ere ior t-e first hplf of JanuFry.
,.ll quotetions ire extracted unless otherwise shown. 60-lb. cEns ere on a pound basis
And sm-ller units of extracted nd other tyies of honev ere on Der case bfsis unless
otherw,4rse shown. Beeswax prices Ere per pbur.d.)


BOSTON: JrrivFis 7,940 Ibs. domestic. Decmnd
cood, market stuEdy.
White, Cloves, t, 5-1h, jErs 5.80
6, 3-lb. decanters 4.05
12, 2-11. jprs 6.25
24, 1-lb. jers 6.00-6.50
12, 1-lb. jars 3.30
12, 1-lb. servers 4.70
24, 12-oz. jers 5.25
24, P-o j-rs 3.55-7.95
mostly 7.8-Z7.95
CRkt.ED, 12, 12-oz. cups 2.60-. .65


CHICAGT : arrivals 262,800 lbs. domestic.
DcirnTA gooi, mFrkct slightly stronger.
6(-16. tins, iPU'ESUThRI:,
ihitt Clo"cr, mostly .16
some FEicy 'iisconsin .18I
some Utah f.o.b. basis .12,
Light -.mbr .bi5- .16
some .16;
whitee Clovter
Cartons, 12, b-lb. tins 11.80
White Clover, in jers
6, 5-lb. 5.80
12, 2-lb. 5.75
12, 1-lb, 3.05
24, 1-lb.(self-service containers)


6.UU
24, 12-oz 5 10
24, 8-oz.(self-serve cont iners)
3.70
36, 4-oz. 3.06
C &.ED.,12. 12-oz. 2.50


CINCINNATI: Arrivals 27,666 lbs. domestic.
-T emTn[ ood, mtrkct firm to slightly stronger.
White Clover, MIDWESTER-N, drums .16-
Light Amber ", .13
Uhite Clover 6')-ib.tins .16^..19
Light i-mber .142
White Clover, 12, 5-lb. jers 10.75
6, 5-lb. jers r.80
6 3-lb. decznter 4.05
12, 2-1b. jers E.50-6.25
24, 1-lb. Jars 6.50
12, 1-lb. jars 2.60
12, 1-lb. server jars 4.70
24, -oz. jrrs 3.85
12 8-oz. Jers 1.60
CBhijAD, 12, 1-lb. 6.50

DENV.R: Sunplies rather light. Demand moderate,
market ebbut steedy.
Swcetclover, COLO[R.' O,
12, 28-oz. jars 5.15-5.35
12, 20-oz. jers 4.50-4.70
12, 8-oz. 4Jrs 2,20-2.35
24 8-oz. jers 4.00-4.25
24, 16-oz. jars 6.40-6.60
12 32-oz. jrs 1t.25-6.50
12, 5-lb. tins 11.75-12.65
6, 5-lb. glss 6.60- 6.R0
CRT'iED, 24, 12-oz. cups 6.90- 7.00
12, 12-oz. glPss 2.80- 3.00


LOS .GJXL iS: Demand grnd.
7hite Uor better) Ori: iuc, Sege, Clover
6, 5-lb. gl.ss or tin 6.40
12, 32-nz. iErs 6.34-6.35
12, 24-oz. iCrs 4.85
12, 16-oz. Jrs 3.32-3.35
12, 12-oz. .rs 2.61-2.65
24, 8-oz. Ejrs 3.80
Light mbcr, Blnded Flevors
12, 5-lb. tins 9.10
24, 1-1b. jrs 5.40
Light hjmbrr, frxxed Flowers
6, 5-lb. tins 4.55
Extra Light .-mber, s.Ifalf&.
12, 5-lb. tins 10.20
Extra Iight Jmber, Blended I'levors
12, 32-oz. jars 5.16
12, IL-oz. ,1jrs 2.70
24, 8-oz. .jrs 3.20
whitee (or bet i) O)rnge
24, 12-oz. jers 4.87
White (or better) Buc-kwhcEt
24, 8-oz. .ars 3.80
White OrEnre-Clover
12, 1-1b bless servers 4.50
Chi-rED White (or better) Orango-Clover
12, 12-oz. cups 2.75
24, 12-oz. cups 5.50
CHUNK COrB whitee ,Orenge,Sage, Clover
12, 1-lb. jars 5.15
White (or better)Clover
12, 12-oz. packages 4.80
24, 8-oz. packages 5.50
BEESWAX: Arrivals by truck 4,000 lbs.
domestic. Demand good, market steady.
Purchases by local receivers delivered Los
Z.ngeles mostly .47
few DFrk low es .45
MjNNEiJOIJS: Arrivals by truck 60-lb. cans
n-n.T: Thite Swceetclov.:r 240; Light amber
180. Demand for small containers f.ir,
large containers slow.
Price to jobbers -
U. S. I&ncy Blended honey
24, 8-oz. jers 3.25
12, 1-lb. jars 2.60
12, 2-lb. J.erp 5.30
6, 3-lb. JFl'6 5-1b. tins$.-30 3.60
6, 5-lb. lers6, 5b 5.80
24, 7~-oz0. tumblers 4.20
12, 1l-oz. tumblers 3.95
12 11-oz. glass nugs 3.15
CldakD 12, 11-oz.gIass mugs 3.35
60-lb. cEns, per lb.
W ite Sweetclover .17
Light Ambeai .16
BEESiJ: .rrirv1a-ls-by truck 260 lbs. Isc add. )
rPl,'rnIJRGlI: .rrivEls by truck 19,050 lbs.
domestic. Pemend fair, market steady.
White Clover and Light amber
6, 5-lb. jars 5.80
6, 3-lb. jers 4.05
24, 1-lb. j&rs 5.50-6.50
24, 8-oz. jars 3.50-3.85
12 1-lb. server 4.70
jM L4t o T11lb. jars 6.50
_BIESWlW, Declcrs paying cash .38<


Washington 21, L. C.


handay, Janurry 17, 1955


s


.4tu


trnac




- 9 -


WasIhingtrn 25, D. C.


Atnniey, Januf.ry 17, 19F5


SEMIT-.NTHLY HC.1Y IY_PRFT VEUI.._ XI NL. 2


N1.'4 YO'(K: JLrrivels by boEt, 25 ctns. nen'lEr d;
-19' s Holland; 60 Brs. Gu'temala, 25 ars.
kvxice; unrcu-orted for PDcomber S0,1Ct ibs.
for -;Jlif. uipl1es lightL. Offerings light.
Demend mc3drte, market strong. SEles and
nomihiii qUOtEtions -
I1TOhM' r ex dock New York City duty paid
tqXICO, drums .13-.14
GU.T'I.'JA drums .14
Ex warehouse end ex dock 60s
lII,_STKEN and INTEfJI. UNTIIN
Bfkers Blend .159-.l16
NEW YORK, Buckwheat .16
LigHF. imbcr Clover .16
Lomeirstic Whnit+. Clover
6, 5-lb. tins 5.75-6.60
24, P-oz. 3.60-3.95
24, 1-lb. jars G.9t-6.90
12, 2-1b. jars 5,70-6.60
12, 1-lb. Qars 3.20
24, 1-lb. Jars 6.40
24, 1-lb. tins 6.90
Domestic Light Aimber, lhiied blowers
24, 8-oz. jers 3.35
24, 1-lb. Irrs 5.16-5.80
12, 1-lb. ,ars 2.90
12, 2-lb. JErs 4.92-5.60
6, E -lb.tins 5.55
2q, 1-lb. tins 6.20
12, 5-1b. tins 11.10
Domestic, Ooi-agc, 24, 8-oz. jars 3.95
12, I-lb. jers 3.45
12, 2-lb. jers 6.60
24, 1-lb. tins 6.90
c', 5-b. tins 6.60
NLW YORK Buckwheat, 6, 5-lb.jers 5.75
6, E-lb. tins 5.90
B'_SWiAX: Arrivals by bot 33 bags Cubb;
77 bfgs,171 pks. apvpt; 114 b gs Dr.mjnijn
publici; 37 bras SuF twlc; 16 b ps i' xico;
275 bags '.'resb kfrica; unreportLd Itce. Calif.
24,520 lbs. Oreg. 5,120 Ibs. Offerings
light. Firrket stror.ger, wide rrz.,e prices,
mostly nominal quotations -
ARICA .59- .61
CEIMTPJ ijiFRICA, Light .65- .67
Darker .60- .62


WES.T IND~IES
SOUTH A-ERICA


.60- .65
.68- .70


FIJLEI1PHI,.j: Arrivals 90,600 lbs. domestic.
By bcEt drums Gutcm? la 37; Puerto Rico 10.
DemCnd good, m,-rket irm rid slightly stronger,
60-1b. tins, Domestic, Buckwheet pt.r lb..16I
Impnorts white e CJover .17"
J" Light tmber .16
kDomestic White Clov.r, 12, 5.-lb. end
6,1,1-1b.tins 11.50
24, I-lb. jars 5.75- 5.9h
24, 8-oz. JIrs 3.3 r-.A.45


Blended Sweet and Whito Cl
6, 5-lb. jars
24, 1-lb. ,-jrs
24, B-oz. Jbrs
36, 4-oz. J;rs
CJLR.ijFl 12, 12-oz. j, rs


over


5.80
6.50
3.8 B
3.06
2.65


1I'WIj_-F. CIT.: .vriv:.T.s J00_ 6a Ih. U.- I .,t, L.port
nyw.- v'l,-*it 1 c .r. M:rk*.. D(4 ,,V.
6. 5-1b. jr.s 5.r5-5,75
1', 2-1b ja.rs 5.00-5.30
24, 1-lb. jc.rs 3.40 .;oQ
soiro brcmnd. hior.


ST. LCUIS: market sta-dv.
-0ib. tins COLOL,'0O end r NOi[d'.F;
White Clover 16
Light amber .144-1.
White Clover, 6 5-1b. titis 6.
White Clcver &nA li0xed flowers
6, 5-lb. 5.65-t;. -'
mostly 5. P8-C.25
12, 2-1b. ,irs 6.10-6.2E
mostly 6.25
24, 1-lb. jirs 5.40-6.50
mostly 6.25-6,E0
24, 12-oz. jars .25.25
24, ?-oz. J-rs 3.25-?.85
mostly Z..-3 8.,
C1i, tl-iD I2, 12-oz. peck.ges 2. 5
SjN FlRi.CTSUi: irrivFis 32b cins. Tkwend
moderFte, me ket about st--hdy, Iomtstic,
Light amber (or better) UrEnge, Clover,
Sage, Thistle and some blended I'lrvors -
24, 8-oa. ji-rs 3.05-.560
24, 12-oz. Jzrs 4.70-5.40
24, 12-oz. .irs St.gc with
cut comb 7.50
12, 8-oz. jars 1.34
12, 12-oz. jcrs 1.88
12, 12-oz. JLrs S&ge, with
cut comb 3.00
12, I lb. j,-rs 2.40-3.04
12, 1 -1b. jtcrs 3.20-3.b3
12, 2-1b. jars 4.75-5.64
12, 5-1b. cL.ns 8.45-9.24


SEG.TTLE.: Arrivils 15,886 ibs.
-iTrFEet steady.
Sweetclover-.-IlfE 1fe Light
12, 5-1b. tin ppils
12, 2-1b. ,j.rs
24, 1-lb. jrs
24, 12-oz. jars
12, 24-oz. Jtrs
24 8-oz. jrs
CRIMD 24, 1-lb. cups
24, 14-oz. cups
24, 1l-oz. cups
24, 6--oz. cups


Demand slow,
nmb r
10.25-10.80
5.50- 6 10
6.00- 6.50
5.30
5.00
3.95
6.25
5,50
5.40
3.00


DPETCIT: ArrivEls 68,210 l',s. domestic.
T mind good, m:irket firm to slightly stronger.
Mixed Flowers,mostly White Clover
6, 5-lb. 5.45-5.75
12, 2-lb. few 5.10
24, 1-lb. 5.20-5.35
24, 8-oz. 3..CO-3.25,
few lower
r)i''Ij.ND: .irrivlIs none. Sup; lis moderate.
Jmi-.nd moderate, mxrkot st.i dy.
Light kab>r, .lf.lfl-Swuctclover
12, 5-lb. tins 0180-11 .00
showing grE.nulk tion 10.25
12, 24-oz, jars 4.PO- 5.00
24, 12-oz. Jirs 5.30- !-.40
24, 8-.oz. 3.95r 4.00
Bulk 5 gcl.ctns Light -mb<-r ,16/- .I7
rtek .14 .15
C e, rew crop, ID.lac
24, 12-oz. Inc{ 7.75
10-oz. Nc. 6.25
C(TfL.iE-)D White Clover,
24, I-lb. cups 6.25
B!,.I.-:.,.X: iLe l trs p e ying
T. u lshor hvs de .45





hrnday,January 17, 19E5.


- 1C -


Sb l -,NPLSY KO iY hi u =-T VO1._ .k:.IX NC. 2

BRIET REVIEW _01 MARKETING HONEY 1A0D BEESWAX PULING CAIEN DR YEAR 1954


HOWEY PalCz. TO 1PFODCEHS; Iroduceis' sales of
-arge Fulk- lots of-extr.cted honey to bottlers
or nther large users during the calendar year
"954 ranged from a low of 50 to a high of 160
per lb. The better table gredes moved mostly
witl.in the rrnge of 10t--14 per lb. There was a
noticeable strengthening in the market for White
Clover honey in the northern tiers of Stetes
during the est few months of the year. Pricey
during 1953 ranged 9-160, with most trading Il0-
12-o per lb.


I'ORTS OF HONEY. Imp rts of honey into the
United Strtes during the first 10 months of
1954 amounted to 8.3 million lbs. This comparus
with imports of 9.8 million lbs. during the
calendar ye'r 1953 and 8.4 million lbs. during
the calendar ear 1952. Princi &l ori inating
countries in 1954 were Mexico, Cuba Eun
GuEtcmelE with lepser quantities from Canmda,
El SE lvedor, Costa Rica Fard a number of other
countries.


,EIS1AX IWOORMS _ND PRODUCTION: Imports of
Producers sEles of section comb honey to re- cr7u e 'eswaa I n Pui OIt.efTrCstO.10 months of ]954
tFilers ranged $7.00-11.00 per case of 24 sect icI.s totaled 3,664 thousand lbs. or an average of
with occasional svles of poorer quality lower. 366 thousEnd lbs. per month. Im-ports during
Prices during 1953 ranged $6.00-10.80, with the cE lider ytar 1953 mounted to 5,040
occasional sales lower, thousand lbs. or en aver.ge of 42C thousand lbs.
HONEY PRICES ON. W......t .. rl .....W io per month. Principal I criginrting countries
HONEY PRICES_ ON WHLOSJE t'RKETS: Wholesa.le were .ngoe., Cub' British E st Afric-,Ethinpir,
prices ot domestic honey in 15 lrge cities were E t, Chile, Frrnce, Dominic-n Republic,
slightly higher during the calender year 1954 ;izmbue, Arczil, ngloa-g:,ptian Sudn, eand
thEn du-ing 1953 ar.d 1952. Price ranges and Gut temc rce.r, a nd


simple averages in 15 important cities for a few
containers were es follows:
Price range Simple average
60-3b. cans, extracted per 15.
1954 13-18< 15.40
1953 11 -17h 15.20
1952 11 -17 14.30


5-lb. containers,
1954
1953
1952
I-lb. containers,
1954
1953
1952


extracted pur doz.
$8.45-15.50 $10.88
9.50-15.60 10.70
7.80-13.20 10.70
extracted., 24s
$4.56- 6.85 $5.83
4.56- 6.61 E.75
4.40- 6.61 5.57


CRULE BEESWAX PRICES: Crude beeswax prices pFid
beekeepers f.o.hb. shipping point held rather
stationEry during the tirst 8 months of the year
Et mostly 42-44 per pound for light lemon color.
with everbge or darker color discounted 2 paer
pound. Prices rdvEnced during the list four
months End in December were mostly 47-49j per
pound for either the. light or average (derkVr)
colors.
HONEY PRODUCT'ION: Production of honey in the
!Tnited Stetes for 1954 was estimated ot amountto
214 million lbs. by the Crop Reporting Board in
its preliminary estimate released on October 12,
1954. This was 5 percent less then the Droduc-
tion for 1953 end the smallest production since.
1948. Yields in 1954 from 5,452,000 colonies
averaged 39.2 lbs. per colony as compared with
L,537,000 colonies in 1953 avtraging 40.5 lbs.
.rer colony. The finEl estimate Tor the 1954 crop
will be released on Januery 25.
EXPORTS OF HONEY: Exports of honey from United
tEttes during the first 10 months of 1954 con-
tinued at a hervy rate, averaging approximately
],8 million lbs. per month, and amounting to 18
million lbs. for the 10-month period. Export data
for the lpst two months are not yet available.
Record exports in 1953 totEled 3, million lbs.,
for --n average of 2.7 million lbs. per month.
Principal receiving countries were West Ge-mruny,
Aether-l-ds, CrTede, Belgium ud Tuxpembonrg,
SwitzerJ;rd ard rrrce.


Production of beeswax for 1954 hes nnot yet been
estimated. by the Crop Reporting BoErd report
is due to be rcler.sed on J( nuary 25. In view
of the fFct th.t thec prclizzin -y honey produc-
tion forecast in October iTdic'Lteod E lighterU.S.1
production of honey fcr 1954 thrr in 1957,
production of beeswax wr-s iso probably smaller.
Production of beeswax in 1953 wEs estimated to
totel 4.1 million pounds.
Prices for imported crude beeswvx adv.anred dur-
ing the y>ar Lt, New York City. South America.
crude beeswax prices in January ranged 55-560
per lb., and at the closes f the year had ad-
vanced to 59-620. CentrEl american and West
Indios beeswax prices in Jenuz ry ranged 50-554,
and in Decemb-.r 58-62o. African beeswax prices
in Jajnuery rEnged 49-520, and in December
55-570.
FRICL SUPPOTIC C-OR HONEY: Mandatory price
support under the Agriculturel Act of 1949 pre-
vailed for honey during the marketing of the
1954 crop, making the fifth consecutive year of
" mandatory price support. The level of support
for 1954 was 70 percent of parity the srme as
for 1953 and 1952, end as compared with 60
percent of parity for 1951. Methods employed b
the U. S. 1). a. to carry out support for 1954
were similar to 1953. Producers of honey cnuld
place boney under farm storage loans nr deliver
honey to the Commodity Credit Corporption uxdaer
Purchase Agreements. These operations were
under the supervision of the Wage, Price rnd
Commodity Irog m Branch SugEr Division,
Commodity Ste iliz&tion Service, U.S.D.A.
Subsidy payments with Section 32 funds were
agE in made to exportBra for honey exported. tand
payments were also mEae to packers who sold
honey into domestic diversion outlets approved
by the U.. S.D.,. These operations were urAer the
supervision of the Speciality Crops Branch,
Fruit ,and Vegetable Division, AgriculturpF
fiarketing Service, U.S.D.A.
Support prices, per lb., for the 1954, 1953, EU
1952 seasons, respectively, were as follows:
Mlntna Wyoming, Cclcrado, New M1exico e-id
States west thereof; White or lighter honey



i.


Washiniton 25, D. C.





Washingt.on 25, r. C,


- 11 -


Monday, January 17, 1955


-cmi .-Xu___ ax 1O R!_Q. =. X.LxxIX -_Ng,2
(C~oEtiosied)_E IJLIEF) :.JT SJTI aRZI'iN-OE il R T BEThiJ. E15G_C^ I3Xaa-12SA.
D_ M2S.CE BSi S^ FS QE L PTD P'IT rsB.Y E I!ThS.l.U-LLJG C.lk.IL.YI 194- XBECTED-. -_
.._ rlJ'Tr rL. iceneryally.d.J.iv.r.aQd- O-ttlxejs.in. CaifEpa iek. ,o9 1 ..
14IbTH Or.ge : r~n~. : Alfalfa .Cotton a :Buckw.'-cat- Thistle Sage :Eucalyptus
White :Lt. -umber -Lt. Amiber YCotton- : Sago :Zx. Light :Lt. Ambcr :Lt. Amber
: or or or :Alfalfa 4Lt. imbor : kmber : to : or
better "Extra Light :Ex. Light :Lt. Amber i to : or Wator -Ex. Light
_---_-- ar_ -- ser_ ___i te While-_ t_ _' M jbhc _
Jan. :14-15 .11-13 :11-11 3/4 11 10 :13 -
Fcb. : 11 :11 1/2 : :14
r. -- : :10 1/2 :9 1/2-10 -
r. : 1 r 10 :9
ay :10 12-1 :10 12 :10 1/2 : 8
Juno :11-13 1 4 :10 1/2-11 : :10 :11-12 112 :8 1/2
July :12-13 1 : :10-10 1/2 :12 1/4 10 : :10-1 2 1-
.ug. 12- 1/2 :11 :9 1 /2-1r : 10-1Q 1/2 :10 1/2-11 9 1/2-10 :11 1/2-13 -
Sept. :11 31-12 :10-11 12 :10 1/2 :10 1/2-11 9-10 1/2 12 1/2 :9
Oct. :11 1/2-14 :11 1/2 :10- 1/ :1 /2-11i :11 :9-11 2 :11 -
Nov. :14 11-11 3/4 9 3: 1 0 1 1 /2-1 -
Doc. :12-14 -122 10ZiO1 1/2-133y

IcI .._ -o- -- in_-.. _AI _i -!tCNc _
MITm : Clover : Bucwhoat : Manzanita :Vary& Mixed :Llfealfa-bsyitc- Clovero-Vetch-
: xtra Light : Light Amber : Light Aibor :Flowers Light : Cotton :Fircwcod, Light
: Amber : to : to :.amber to Mxtre :Extra Light timber : .Jiber
: -hii- -.brimr IBht :A-iof _. '.4 -;.- .- fTA br .- _- i- :_ e -
Jan. : -: :11 : 12
Fob. 10 : 9 10 1/2--11 1/2
Mar. 11 1/2-12 : : : 8 -10 : 11 -
. : : : :9 -10 : -
y : 10 -10 9 :13 1/2
June :9 1/2 :8 1/2-10 i7 -11 10 -
July 9 3/4-11 :8 1/2-11 15 1/2-9 1/2 :7 -1 : 10 34 -
Aug. : 11 ,:91/4 :8 1 2-10 1/2 : 10 4 10 3/4-11 1/4
St. 11 3/4 10 12-12 :10 8 1/2-111/2 :10 3 :12 12 1/2
Oct. : :11 1/4 -:9- 11/2 :10 34-11 :11 131/4
Nov. 11-1 12 11 11 1/2 :8- 11 : :11- 14
Dec. : 10 1/2 : : 9 11 11



-'I- a T _S__S_ UT_ : w_ .__ __ S
KDIMTR Clovor : xod : : Clo2vr z Various
White : Flowers : Various : hit : Flowers
or Light : or T ht
.. .. POblootr__ -.. _-__
Jan. :10 1/2-13 '9 1/2-10 :9 1/-2 1 / :10 172-13 3/4 :9 11
Feb. :10 1 2-12 1/2 9 1 /-10 1/2-10 3/4 :11 -15 :9- 12
Mar. :10 1 2-15 9 1/2-11 : :11 3/4-14 :10 12
r. 10 1/2-13 :9 12-12 :12 13 :10 1/2-,11 1/2
10 1/2-12 9 1/2-10 :12 :11 13 :10-11 1/
Juo :10 1/2-11 :9 1/2-10 :10 11 :12 12 1/2 9 11 1/2
July :10 1/2-11 : 9 1/2-10 : :11 12 :11-12
Aug. :10 1/2-13 :9 -,10 :12 :, 11 13 :10-12
Sept. 10 13 :9 1/2-10 : 9 1/ 12 1/2 11 -4 :9- 2
Ot, :10 1/2-14 :9 1/2-10 12 34 :11 1/2-14 :10 1/ 2
Uov. :11 1/4-14 : 10 :10 1/2-13 :11 112-14 :10 1/2
Dcc. :11 14 9 1/2-10 3/4 .10 1 2-13 11 3 -14 -
: _-- -- ------_-_------------_:_






SMI-i NUILY H .TEY ?RMOT VOL. XXXiX NO.2
IPI:F REVIEW OF IP' MFiKETJCG OF HOiEY! AJD BEESWAX RINGUG CAL5f3R TZAR 1954 (Ccntinued)
PROIJCEKS' SALES OF EXTRACTED HOE TO BOTSLEPS BY EIITHS IHERIG CALSME YEAR 1954
Month _- NOP EEU... ISCEIVAL-sTAT1 -- MIZAEiSAS
S white, : ht Amber : : White, : Light Amber :
C losxe Mix~i l_ WrL i. _Bcikwhe.t._ __ Clvr M_ .iz esE : .J ee _
b. i 60 lb. cans Cents p-r pound
Jan. 1D 3/4-14 10-124 10 12-13 10-11 93-11
Feb. 12-14 10-132 12-16 15 15
Mar. 12 10 13 -
Anr. 11-14 10-14 10I-11 1 -


June
July
Aug.
Se.t.
Nov.
Dec..


32-14 9-12 12 -
12-12 11-11 10 -
11-12 11-12 13 -
11- 12 9-11 -
11-14 10 14-15
1+-13 20- 14-15 13-14
11-34 fw 16 11 3-14 12 15 11 -
12-14 kew 16 11-1i few 15 11 15 -


Month :-_----- -LI- -I_ _L- !S -LZA_
: Whi te-Light A b: AAnbers : : :
_ _-l-re -- :J'ali.EdFl.we-xs_ .. ._ :_ _- Clavnr. :.. -Cv.vr_ _
Drums Fi rished by Buyer Per Pound : 60s Per Lb. Drums Per lb.
Jan. 10 4 .-o10 13 12 11
Feb. 10 3/41 9 1/2 -10 13- 11 1/-12 1 1 12-11
max. 10 3 4-11 1/2 9 1 2-10 11 l1/-l 14 10 3/4-11
10. 111 9 12-10 13 1/2 11 10 1/2
SlO- l 9 1/ 1 .
June 11-11 2 -10 3/4 12 1/2-15 11 10-10 1/2
July 11 1//2 9-11 13 1/2 10 3/4 10
Aug 11 1/2 9 1/2-11 13 1/2 11 10 /44
Sept. 11 1/2 9 1/2-9 3/4 13 1/2-16 10 1/2-11 10-10 1/4
Oct. 11 1/2 9-10 14 10 1/2 10
Nov. 11 1/2-12 10-11 10 3/4 10 1/4


- 13 1/2 10 3/4-11


10o-10 1/ 2


W1.LESA.LE PRICES OF I!:CM AT L4PORIEAT i~AKETS, BY KIUTHS. 1954
(Price range of high and low, regardless of State of Origin)
60-iPCJU CA.TS OF EXTRACTED HCNa
NIEW OERK CITY
kth* -- --1DQCSS-M E -- --A L -A-I E- -.N--
:White or Extra Ligt : Light Amber : : *- .
.lighter, Clov-: Amber var- : variouss : : Orange : E.L.A.-White : S e
-_ _- a- ...- ... ls wow1 n F31,ers__ _: 3ix-- -ha.. :_ -.rae_ -.
StCant.3*!r olmd-
'Jan. i 12-17 1/2 15 1/2-16 1/2 15-16 2 -
Feb. 16-17 12 15-16 1/2 15 1/,4 -
Mr. 16-17 1/2 15-16 12 151 -
Apr. 16-17 1/2 15-16 14 16 15 -
JAy 16 1 2-17 15-15 1/2 14 16 15 4 -
Jle 17-18 15-15 1/, 14 IS 1/,-16 15 14 -
July 17-18 15-15 1,2 14 15 1/2-16
Aug. 17-18 ,-15 I/2 14 -
Sept. 18 14 1]/-15 13 1/2-14 15 1/2-16 15 1/2-16 15 1/2-16
t. 15 3418 15 1 -16 1/2 14 1/315 14-15 S 15 1A-16 1/2 s15
ov IS 3- 18 1 3 -16- 11 1 -16 1/ 1


Dec. 15 34-18 15is


3 -16 11 1 -i; -.- 1-


Dec.


Washington 25, D. C,


hcndey, Jmrurry 17, 1955.


- 12 -





:Wpsair.torn Z5, D. C.


- 13 -


lndi y, January 17, 1955


SFErJ.1-NTHLY HOYEY REPORT VOL. MZIX NO. 2
BRI5.I REVIEW OF h RKETING HONEY ~Md BEESWMAX DURING CQJiEIMhR YEL 1954 (Centinued)
WHlES PRICES_ OF HONEY iT IkOlJ1 .6 kITS BY fOVTHS,_1954
(Simple price range ofThigh and Tow, regFrd1ess of State of Origin)
A_---_.EO UMFO CLiS 0F _ETE STELj HONiE (Cents erlb ..)
NEW YORK CITY IMPOIS1
~T '-~ ~ ~ ~ ^ i3 's ~ ~z c ~ ^ "rx 3 ^ n ^ ^ frj a r ~ hT:L r u E K 'j T ( O ~
'^'".C- ^iml :_ ~in __ Z^ag. _:ij~s_5pn: Sajn. _Ti~s_ __ E1 S _- anU:


Jan. 11-12
Feb. 11-11 1/2
iM-1. 11-11 1/2
.apr. 11-12
F y 1 1 2-12
Junell 1 2-12
Julyll 1/2-12
r.ug 11 1/2-12
Sert 11 1/2-12 13
Oct 11 1/2-12 13
Ncv 11 1/2-11 3/4
Dec 11 1 2-11 3/4


13 1 /2
13 1/2
13 1/2
13-13 1/2
13
13
13
13
1/2-14
1/2-14
13 1/2
13 1/2


12 1/2
12 1/2
12 1/2
12 1/2
12 1/
11 1/2-12 1i2
11 1 2-12 1/2
11 1/2-12 172
12 1/2
12 12
12 i/2


14
14
14


13
13
13
13-13
13-13


15-15


15
15
15
1/.2 15
1/2 -


1/4


11 1/2-12
11 1/2
11 1/2
11 1/2-12
11 1/2-12
11 1/2-12
11 1/2-12
11 3/4-12
11 1/4-12
11 1/2-11 3A4
11 1/Z-11 3/4'


13
13
13
13


1/2-14 1/2
1/2-14
1/2-14
1/2-14



13 1/2
13 112


#DominicEn Republic


-0-POLIL CS OF EXTR .CTD HONEY ( ents per lb)_
-- P-_T S ogR -_ T "Ir -CCGr
: : LigT -: c.e-t c- --I --- -s -x_ -: :-
: White : mber : '-in- :Prtc -Rico: CuatETal: :Exio White :Light -faber
month : Clover : Light :Light 4mb.:1 Extra Clcver Var. Flowers
: : : : r :Extr Light Light
S. : : : :-mber : mjer : -


Jan. 15 1/.2
Feb. 15 1/2
MBx. -
jpr. -
*y
June
July
Ug. -

Nov.
Dec
i7Dominican Depublic


14 1/2
14 1/2


15
15

16 1/2
16 1/2
16
16 1/2


14 1/2
14 1i2
14 1/2


16
16
16
16
16
16 I


15
15


14-14 1/2
14
S14
14-14 1/2
14 1 /2-15
14 1/2-15
S14,i6 /2
A 14-1le6
3/4 1-15
14-14 1/2
145-15 1/2
15-17 1i/2


13-13 1/2
13-13 1/2
13-,13 12
13 1/2-14
14,14 1/2,
13 1/2-14 1/2
13 1/2-14 1/2
13 112-14 1/2
13-14 1i/2
14 1/2
13 1/2-14 1/2
13 -15 1/2


60-POU1D CGJS O EXTrf.Q1)iiD,.t&YCf'ents per 11L.)
-C INI-2T -:?AI .. :-M15 I --
S" ght"ht : e Lihht : .Lt.." b.
honth: White :White :-iber : White : Light :ber : er : Dark :Sweet- :Pepper-
: Clover :Clcver:i'ixed : Clover; Mixed Flowers; fixed : hixed ;clover, :mint
: :F-owe- : -,_- -l A f F!e_- :lw .lfL _I _


16-17 1/i
16-17 12
16-17 1/2
16-17 1/2
16-16 1/2
16
16
16
16
16
16
16


15-15 1/4
15-15 1/4,
14 12-15 1/4
14 1/2-15
14 1/2-15
15
15
15
14 1/2-15
14 1/2-15
14 1/2-15


14 1/2-15




16 1/2-17
16 1/2-17
16 1/2-17
16 1/2-17


.3 1/2-14
.3 1/2-14




15
13 1/2-15
14- 15
14- 15


Jan.
Feb.
Miar.

June
July
.
Sept.
Nbv.
I *:


16 1/2-17
16 1/2-17
16 1/2-17
16 1/2-17
16 1/2-17
16 1/2-17
16 1/2-17
16 1/2-17
16 1/2-17
16 1/2-17
16 1/2-17
16 1/2-19


1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1


16
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17


1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
12


J





14 andAey,Jenuary ,
v-Lshington 25, D. C.
_S.M-S3LL Ip.L BERSOL-JQL..I1X NO 2
BRIEE BUnD"oE z E n . W)1saSJM B9 OFE _a0og JMaOlM TJa SIr P ISyj.1 54_
(Price range of k4gh and law, regardless of State of orgin)

JF ,tQrrER3JY.Si--$ S%~DR _EBFiS .ULpxres aonvetat ouio ruf...-pL 12 -b .otaigpnl -


1'01j j. I L -BQ21 -
Jan.: $10.90-11.50
Feb. : 10.90-11.50
Mar. 10.90-11.50
r. 1: 0.90-11.50
:y 10.90-11.5r
June 10.90-11.5C
July : 10.90-11.5C
.ug. : 10.90-11.5S
Sept. : 10.90-11.5(
Oct. : 10.90-11.6(
:Tov. : 11.6(
Dcc. 11.60


_.J_ l 0 EO L
S::: $10.90-12..80
: 10.90-1,080
: 10.90-12.80
: 10.90-12.80
: 10.90-12.80
1: 0.90-12.80
: 10.90-12.80
1: 0.90-12.80
: 10.90-12.80
: 10.90-12.80
: 10.90-12.80


? $10.50-10.96: $10.90-11.10
: 10.50-10.90 10.90-11.10
10.50-10.90 : 10.90-11.10
1: 0.50-10.90 10.90
10.50-11.90 : 10.90
10.90-11.90 10.90-11.10
10.90-11.90 : 10.90-11.10
10.90-11.90 10.90-11.10
10.90-11.90 1: 0.90-11.10
11.60 11.10-11.60
11.60 11.10-11.60
11.60 11.10-11.60


*-a-------


-a---


S IiETIDIT
: 9.50-10,30
9.50-10.00
9.90-10.30
9.90-10.30
9.90-10.30
9.90-10.50
10.00-10.50
10.00-10.50
10.00-10.30
10.00-10.60
: 10.30-10,90
: 10.60-10.90


W; TiU.00-10.90
: 10.00-10.90
10.00-10.90
: 10,00-10.90
10.00-10.90
: 10.00-10.90
: 10.00-10.90
: 10.00-10.90
: 10.00-10.90
: 10.00-11.60
1: 0.00-11.60
: 10.60-11.60


- *- -


--- TrUCTR ECH =i _w-bm 13-Ia p~.lcas-cAnPoCrtatd_tn. aits nfjk-lb.,-a--. on.. ita4tozox -.


?'iNW;2LS_ __


$10.00-11. or
10.60-11.60
10.60-11.60
1i.6V-11. 60
10i.60-11.60
11. 6-11.60
1.60-11.60
1C.6"-11.60
10.60-11.60
1C.60-11.60
9.50-11.6r"
10.60-11.60


- STftIs W_ 1E I.S.CITY


$ 10.90
10.90
10.90
10.90-11.00
11.9-11.'n


1"0.9-11.0"C
11.0 -11.60
11.00-11.60


$ 9.50-11.60
9.70-10.40
9.50-10.8C'
9.50-1".80
9.50-10.8"
* 9. 50-1".8"
9.50-10,8
9.1P-10.1C
9.-10-".10
10.50-10.6C
10.5'-11.50
10.50-11.50


: $11.60-12.40 :
: 11.55-12.45
11.55-13.00
: 11.55-13."P :
: 11.55-13.00 :
11.55-13. I
: .nr-13.C0 :
: .0r-12.4r :
: 11.50"-13.2C :
: 11.50-13.0C :
11.55-13.00


$10.31-15.60
9.90-13.20
9,90-13.20
9.9' -13. 0
9. o"-12.8n
9.0 -12.8'
9.r -1.2.8
9.rn-12.8"
9.10-12.8r
9.10-12.80
9.1-.12.80
9.10-12.80


-_ -- -- -- a -- --------- -


- 3r 3SDfiTY_-. S ji 72 its Lllpri oavazA jo_ 14 &la] cJntAa -


tjs._St1.FEiiC.ICJsO _TCn 1ul .* JET iID g'gl- 1
t $ 9.90-1C.60 $ 10.90 u$ 10.85-11.00 $ lC.25-1.60
S 9.90-10.60 : 10.90 : 10.85-11.00 : 10.25-10.80
: 9.90-10.60 10.90 : 10.85-11.00 : 10.25-10.80
: 9.90-10.60 : 10.90 : 10.85-11.00 : 10.25-10.80 :
9.90-10.60 : 10.90 : 10.dS-11.00 : 10.25-10.80
: 845- 924 : 10-90 : 10.85-11.00 : 10.25-10.80
S 8.45- 9,24 : 10.90 : 10.85-11.00 : 10.25-10.80
8.45- 9.24 10.90 : 10.85-11.00 : 10.25-10,80
: 8.45- 9.24 10.90 : 10.85-11.00 : 9.70-10.50
S 8.45- 9.24 : 10.90 -11.60 : 10.85-11.00 : 9.70-10.80
2 8.45- 9.24 10.90 -11.60 10.80-11.00 10.25-10.80
8.45- 9.24 1: 0.75--11.60 a 10.80-11.00 : 10.25-10.80


Jan.
Fob. :
lAr.. :

Jun :
July
.aug.
Sept. :
Oct. :
Nov. i.
Dec. :


----A __ .8 _


Jan.
Feb.
Mar.

Juno
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.


*


J
)
)
3
3
D
o
o
o
o


_-_-.-*-* ^





W

- 15 -


Monday, J&nu ry 17, :..* .


RTvL. rsmmnr_FO =. f.7C..QPjAj a10J-


sea Fx ICES-OF EQaM BL ILQrs TJFf S.BI ]TLA-5.19.S4
-rice:range of high and low, regaXdless of State of Origin)
ats Hcare.. -j SUegIFf71 CtlTirITS .LA .i covaei ininiso 24 1--A- -rtfza ine') ----
*05132 26-YOK CITY : I-/T--:- -L- -IA. tM OIT :-- -

Jan. $ 5.45-6.2r 7.00-9.30 $ 5.16-6.60 $ 5.50-6.25 9.30 $ 5.25-625 $ 4.5 5.10 $ 6.10
Feb. : 5.45-6.25 7.00-9.30 : 5.16-6,60 : 5.50-6.25 9.30 : 6.25 : 4.75-5.10 : 5.00 6.10
Mar. : 5.45-6.25 7.00-9.30 5.16-6,60 : 5.50-6.25 9.30 : 5.25-6.25 : 5.00-5.10 : 5.00-- 6.10
Apr. : 5.45-6.25 7.00-9.30 : 5.16-6.60 : 5.50-6.25 9.30 : 5.25-6.25 5.00-5.10 5.00 6.10
:ay 5.45-6.25 7.00-9.30 : .16-6.60 : 5,50-6.25 9.30 : 6.25 : 5.00-5.10 : 5.00 6.10
June : 5.45-6.25 7.00-9.30 : 5.16-6.60 : 5.50-6.25 : 5.45-6.25 : 5.00 : 5.00 6.10
July : 5.45-6.25 7.00-9.30 : 5.16.6.60 5.50-6.25 5.45-6.25 : 5.00 : 6.10
:ng. 5.45-6.25 7.00-9.30 : 6.00 5.50-6.25 : .45-6.25 : 4.85-5.00 : 5.30 6.10
Sept. : 5.45-6.25 7.00-9.30 : 6.20-6.60 : 6.25 9.30 : 5.25-6.25 : 4.85-5.00 6.00- 6.10
Jet. : 5.45-6.25 : 5.16-6.40 : 5,50-6.25 9.30 : 5.25-6.25 : 4.85-5.25 : 6.00 6.80
Nov. : 6.50-6.60 7.00-9.40 : 5.16-6.70 5.50-6.50 9.40 : 5.45-6.25 : 5.00-5.40 : 6.00 6,80
Dec. : 6.50-6.60 7.00-9.40 : 5.16-6,70 : 5.50-6,50 9.40 : 5.45-6.60 : 5.15-5,40 6.00 6.10
_ --------------- --------- --------A..

- _I2I7ACT^_mNE! -_ -J _Fa _kCikfilFLIA1JxaJie. .eonvaeted. j0 s..oi Zo 24 1-2^. cytainess1e Z -- -
: CIfCI1iTI MIW3MEkOLIS S 1. IIS : IEANSAS CIT Y IEvERs :
S_ _--_ __ ------------------
Jan. $ 5.70-6. :$ 5.80-6.20 :5 5.25-6.25 :$ 488 5.40 $ 6.60-6.85
Feb. : 5.70-6.25 6.20 5.25-6.25 : 4,88 5.60 : 6.60-6,85
a.r, 5.70-6.25 6.20 : 5.25-6.25 : 4.90 5.60 : 6.20-6.30
pr. : 5.70-6.25 : 6.?0 : 5.40-6.25 : 4.90 5.60 : 6.20-6.30 :
y : 5.70-6.2.5 -- : 6.20 : 5.40-6.25 : 4.90 5.60 : 6.20-6.30
Jue: 5.70-6.25 6.20 : 5.40-6.25 : 4.90--.5.60 : 6.20-6.30 :
July : 5.70-6.25 6.20 : 5.40-6.25 : 4,90 5.25 : 6.20-6.50
Aug. : 5.70-6.25 : 6.20 : 5,40-6.25 : 4.90 5.20 : 6.20-6.50
Sept. : 5.70-6.25 5.60-6.20 : 5.40-6.25 : 4.90 5.40 : 6.20-6.50 :
Oct. : 5.70-6.25 5.60 : 5.40-6.25 : 5.20 5.80 : 6.00-6.35 :
Nov. : 6.25 -9.30: 5.60 : 5,40-6.25 : 5.20 5.80 : 6.00-6.35
Dec. : 5.20-6.50 9.JU-9.40: 5.20-5.60 5.43-6.50 : 5.20 5.80 : 6.00-6.50 :


WK i _'. _T,_2n T2/ -4, -l-, -1 .- .-. ._-

I: : s, :
Jan. :$ 4.56-6.70 :$ 5.-14-5.90 :$ 6.16 :$ 5.65-6.15 $ 9.30 :
Feb. : 5.40-6.70 : 5.44-5.90 : 6.16 : 5.85-6.15 9.30 :
Ia.r. : 5.40-6.70 5.44-5.90 : 6.20 : 5.85-6.15 9.30 :
AVr. 5.40-6.70 9.00 : 5.44-5.90 : 6.20 : 5.85-6.15 9.130:
:e 5.40-6.70 9S00 : 4.80-6.08 : : 5.85-6.15 9.30
Jun : 5.40-6.70 9.00 1 4.80-6.08 : 5: .85-6.15 9.30 :
July 1 5.40-6.70 9.00 4.80-6.08 : 5.5-6.15 9.30 :
Aug. : 5.40-6.70 9.00 : 4.80-6.08 5.85-6.15 9.30. ,
Sept. : 5.40-6.70 9.00 : 4.80-6.08 : 0 5.85-6,15 .S30. :
Oct. : 5.40-6.70 9.00 : 4.80-6.08 .. 6.00-6.5' -
Nov, : 5.40-6.25 a 4.80-6.08 : : 6.0-6.50 -
Dec. : 5.40-6.70 9.00 : 4.80-6.08 : : 6.00-6.50 -:

.J Speci- l ty'e jFrs.







SEMIMT E HOEYfl REKET VOL. XOIX= No. 2

BRIEF REVIEW OF TEE M&IKETING OF HTEYr AND BEESWAXZ URIG CALERDAR YEAR 1954 (Continued)

WHOLESALE PRICES OF HONE AT IlTBEOANT yARTEMS BY M2flMS 1954
Z'rice range of high and low, regardless of State of origin)
SECTIOiT COB HONEY PE CASE OF 24 SECT IOS
MIC- : PTTSBURt : : KETSAS CITY : F)RELAJ

Clover : Clover : Various Flcwers
S- -..... 1O_ozx cti.S c iaZ _:_ Oz. ctiLon A up-_ _:_ -1 -_ 11s z- 1i0. -


Jan.
Feb.

Apr.
May
JunP
Jtfly
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
ilov.
Dec.


7.70
7.50-7.70
,


10.00
10.00
10.00


8.0C-8.75
8.00-B.75
7.50-8.25
8.00-8.25
5.00

8.25-8.50
8.25-8.50
7.75
7.75
7.75


6,75-7.00 :$
6.75-7.00

I
-i



:


6.50-6.75
6.50-6.75
5.75-6.25





6.25
6.25
6.25


CBEITED HC1MY CASESS OF 24, 1 POULID CCQTAINERS


- 16 -


PITTSBURGQ

6.25
6.25
6,25
6.25
6.25
6.25
6.P5
6.25
6.25
6.25-6.50
6.50


: KANSAS CITY


6.65

6.65
6.65
6.65
6.65-6.95
6.95
5.75


: ~QEAiD : SETTLE


:$ 6.CO-6.25


6.00
: 6.00
:6.00
6.00
6.00
: 6.00


6.00-6.25
: 6.25


:$ 600
6.00
6.00
: 6.00
: 6.00
: 6.00
: 6.00
: 6.00
: 6.00
6.00
: 6.25


.... 1EEStso -FT0 -osDET -EAIR -911
- ---- ------- --P- -C-R--S'__L-,-S -__- E-LTIO O-_B'-:-Y_T _A-M R------------
N PACIFIC : PLAlTS : : SCUTIr CMTR&L,
: : a : N HESTE SG:U'-EASTERI
M :' EDUTRIDU."fTA CfITRAL AREA

Mostly Mostly Mostly : Mostly
_. -Clce.1 __ -Closer 1.Er._ .__ _CloseC
Per Ca_2p catieas-------
Jan. :$ 8.00-8.40 :$ 7.9c-9.60 : $ 9.00-10.00 :
Feb. 8.00-9.00 : 7.70-10.32 : 9,00-10.50 : $ 8.00-9.00
Mar. 8.00 7.20-8.75 : 8.00-9.00
Apr. : : : 9.00 8.00-9.00 2
May 6.00 : 9.00 : :
June : 9.00
July 8.50 : 9.00-10.50
Aug. 7.20-10.90 9.00-10.50
Sept. : 8.00-8.40 : 7.20-10.90 9.00-11.00 7.00
Oct.. : .40 5.28- 8.65 9.00-10.50 8.25
ITov. 7.80-8.40 7.20- 7.68 7.50- 9,00 7.50
Doc. : 9.00-11.00 7.50 :
-- ------- ----- ---- -.-.-.....-


Mr-IM BOSTLCI1


Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
Wlay
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.


5.75-6.25
5.75-6.25
5.75-6.25
5.75-6.25
5.75-6.25
5.75-6.65
5.75-6.25
b.75-6.25
5.75-6.25
5.75-6.25


MInday, Janmay 17, 1954


Washington 25, D. 0.





- 17 -


S-rJ-f'.ONTHLY HO1-EY .hPtFLRT VOL.J Q L_-_NO._2
BaIS. ViblW OF TPPR. .<.i.ETING OF HO1.Y ._Ji, SB 'Si_ 3Jl IiG C. ENLR__Yr_ 1954 (1:nt inued)_

C RU D 1 B E S W1l.X- E1 IB_.


,ONTII : South Anmrice.


Jrn.
Tcb.
apr.
imy
June
July
hug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.


56 0
57
57
62
61
62
62
59
61
60
62
62


1'OMM S.PLES ^5F. 0..B._'.L YORK CITY_ _
: Turkey : end
---------- ----_----- -W _&s.Indies
52- 54 : 50 55 0 0
53- 57 48 54
S- : 54- 57 48- 54
: : 54- 58 : -


53
53


: 55
: 588
: 54
: 54
: 57
: 56
: 56
: 58


tD'-'?STI' F.0.B. SIPFPIi:G YOINT RICE TO PRODUCERS


Light Yellow


- -nge
37 50 #
35 50
35 50
35 50
35 44
42 45
42 50
35 50
40 51
35 50
38 49
38 53


costly -
40 44
42 441
42 44
42 44
42 44
42 44
42 44
42 44
42 45
45 49
15 49
47 -19


: .-verrge or Darker Colors
* nge : gstly
: 37 48 38 42
35 48 : 40 .42
35- 48 40- 42
35 48 40 -,42
75 42 : 40 42
: 40 43 40 42
: 35 48 40 42
: 35 48 : 40- 42
38 49 40 43
S 35 48 43 45
: 78 49 43 49
: 38 53 47 49


11.400, 1).v0Oe pjd 11.500
terle honey 9.6a, 10.000 17
teble honey end otler trbTe
end 9.50o ./.
Jali Stptes Epst of Iiontene,
rr.d New '-xico: White or li1
13.400, End 12.25,4. F.xtra I
honrey 10.80s, 10.904 I/, En
+.able ernq other table honey


Extra Light ,mnber Producers had plEced 705,750 lbs. under purchase
end ll.00 1/. lo.-.i reements. During the 1953 season 4,146,350
honey 0.40, 8.50( 2/,pounds were placed under loan or purchase egree-
ments, of which approximately 512 thousand lbs.
were delivered to CCC. The quantity of honey
Wyoming, Coloredo, from the 1952 crop delivered by producers to
Ehter honey 11.300, CCC under the loan and purchase -gr,-,ement
ight e- er table programs amounted to approximately 7.1 million
1 11.750 9/. Non.- pounds.
9.30G, 9.400 27,end


10.254 .2 The quantity Fpproved for export subsidy pay-
ments under Section 32 during the pest three
Export subsidy prices, per lb., paid to exporters seasons were es follows: 1954 (as of Dec. 31,
were es fellows: 1954 crop from July 21 until 1954) 28.7 million lbs.; 1953 24.1 million Ibs.;
k-ugust 30 when progrFm was termineted 2.50 per ib.Fnd 1952 29.? million ibs.
1953 crop 4.0 from start of season until Sept.
25; 3.6 from S-pt. 26 until Oct. 16 when progrE-m The quantity approved, for domestic diversion
was terminpeed. 1952 crop 4.5? entire marketing payments for t e past three years were ES f
season. follows: 1954 Es of Jfr,. 8) 716,000 lbs.;
1953 816,500 lbs.; and 1952 230,000 lbs.


domestic diversion payments to packers were ES
follows: 1954 season 3.750 rer lb.; 1953 season
4.00, er.d 1952 season 4.50. 1/
Underr provisions of the Price Support Program as 2/
of Deceiziber 15, J954 loers to prodiiners for the
1954 season tuotled 1,394,617 lbs. of which ]oa ,s
were. still outstanding on 1,J20,459 Ibs.


Darker than white table honey.
non-teble honey.


52 0
54
54
56
56
57
57
58
57
56
57
57


Fe'b.
4r.

June
July
i'Lug.
ST.
Oc .
Nov.
Dec.


dkGhirngton 25, D. C.


honday, January 17, 195b.


PRICL SUFORT "O hOrLY: (CO,'iNUED Or, P. LE 10)






SEIJ-rD.nTHIY HONEY REPORT VOL. XXXIX NO._2
ARiJlF LiVlIE.W OF TITLE _ARKTING OF HONEY aND B _ELSWA_ DU-hIrG C,! ENDAR YEaR 1954 (Ccrntiuud)
L;O0TO1 S OF BkE..S: HOY[Y YIELD PER COLONY; hVE]u-.GE PRICE RECEIVED BY BEEKEEFERS FOR .LL hONEY,PEF.
P01)In); i'ij)JTiJ'f(rm ~1I)INE.Y; STOCKS HOI-Y ON HAND FOR SALE BY PRODUCERS IEC.15;r'PORTS OF HONFY IRTVS
U.S.; SIiil'r.Mj'; OF iH0l.Y FLOM PUETO PRICO aiTJ HaWAlII TO U.S.;EXJFORT OF HONwY FROM U.S. ;.ND IPC1J,"
]JUTJF.S 0l IlDN.Y I-TO 11.S. T0R C,2 LWDliR YTE'sS 1939-1954

:i!G. OT i~.-: L.V7: :. -STUS-OT: IMPORTS: SHIPMENTS OF HONEY EXPORTSS: ON HONEY
:COLONIS: YIELD:PHICE: TOTJ :I.ND LOR HONFY :: HIOEY : INTO
YEAR :OF LBET : PER PER : PR- :S-LE BY : INTO : ITU, S._ I FOM" : UNITED
S IN :COLONY:POUND: DUCI ION :PP1OIUCEjiS: U. S. :TRUM :1RM : U.S. : SfATES
UNITED : : AJ: :DEC. 15 : :PUERTO :HiW;ALL
: GTTES : :HONEY: : : :lICO :


-E -- -_._ _2.
(Thou. (- bs. -(Thous ad (Thussnd I -
ends) lbs.o lbs.)
1939 4,422 40.8 6.7 180,74 -- 271


5/0, 512
5131,301l
26,237
27,133
10 ,787
62,408
70,862
83,204
83,365
71,416
77,299
53,408
6/80,723


-478
3,337
20,049
36,654
23,633
19,654
18,823
19,329
8,520


8,963
12,018
8,174
8,483
9,785
8;?89 8/


2 s. -
-Thiousend lbs. -


1,324



1,139
372
470
844
533
832
7b9
323
685


1,006



1,081
934
634
698
658
720
3/7254
3,725


703
* D


-,- -L 7 ( lb.) -

2,561 1 1/5d lb.]
from Cube ; li/
from ell
ether
Countries
3,363 Same as above
530 "
335 "
5q "
177 "
197 "
198 "
1 ,292 "
11,108 1 1b.from all
Countries
1,212 "
9,433 "
12,670 "
0z 379 7r H


32,850 "
18,035 8/"


'I II
F, F,


/ Frcm reports of Crn, erjorting Brard. 27 From reports of Bureau of Ctsus. / Coniling of
his data discortn, fd n ay 1947. 4/ Copiling of this dEta discontinued in 19l. 57 1.s o0f
No-,;mber 15. 6/ Fr of Sent. 15, 1954. 9 / UrnavEilalle at tii.e of release. 8/ 10-monfh period
Jn. thru Oct. 9/ nil 1954 data prolimiTnary.

B.ESWnA U. S. PRODIJUCTIuN: jJVERLGE U. S. PRICE FER LB.
Ir.FOERTS INTO U. S.; ZIIPti.ETS FROh PUERTO RIC .NMD 1- k.alII TO U. S.;
JIOn T JLUTY 01 BtESwJ, 1IYTO IRTIPFD STATES
f.lJ.,.ND.R YEzJS 1939-1954
I TTTflmEFr1 7-VEIfJ T/~: flS)I? TAN-:h T0m Pj -:.~ r :TO7Ff'TY TW'
TI'~i : PLtOLiJCTION I/ :PPICE LB.rectd.: UNITED S1', TKS ?- TITTfi ~-~ "-TR UNITFO .3T,'iS
by fters. U.S. / _:PIEWO RICO : H WnII ClUTIT
(1,000 lbs.) (1,0i00 Ibs.) 27 2b7 .2/
(1000 lbs.) (1o00 lbs.)
1939 Unavailable Unavailable .-,667 33 61 Free
19J4J Unaveilable 22.5- 4,746 27 10 "
1941 3,495 35. 6A, 6,750 40 54
1942 3,244 40.3d 5,282 20 14 "
1943 3,743 41.,4 4,419 15 22
1944 3,921 41.54 4,220 23 11 "
103.5 4543 41.3. 7,365 25 18 "


4,381
*;,500
4 ,044
4,275
4,705
4,093 ,


44.40
43.8
43.24
37.6.
42.8 R
50. 4
43. 1
41.0 '
5/


5,349
3,459
4,637
3,910
5,733
5.066
4,370
5,04.0
3,664 S/


6
31 14


F: I'M triW rop I-I r-tI.sq r.i Crn- lit .Pt i rig Hoard.
ZI k'rnm lep'o-Ls of AOivtrui A ('e sus.
I, Corri la tionr. diLconti rnied ir. Pay 1947.


4- / %oniTll iatn iiL m l Ut-iiietd in 19s1.
5/ tnavailbblc et time of rPlh.sL..
6/ 10-mionth r.riod ,hkn. thbu 'ct.
el'ort for 1947 for 4 moeiths unly.


rl]r-se.1 J;n. 20, 1955 ocb


4,350
4,47?
4,893
4,887
5,217
5,460)
5,767
5,916
5,724
5,591
,612
5,559
5,507
5,532
9/5,452


17.3
'9.6
36.3
38.9
36.2
42.7
36.9
38.6
36.0
40.6
41.5
46.4
49.5
<0.5
39.2


6.J]
7.2,4
13.80
16.80
17.7,
18.64
24.4;
24.9g
17.90
15.0$
15.3,
16.0O'
16.20
16. j


205,767
221,959
177,672
189,867
188,917
233,070
213,814
22P,582
206,305
226,978
233,013
258,116
272,641
224,126
213,658


1940
1950
1351
1952
1953
1954


- 18 -


,1-nday, ,Tenupry J?, J"'!. .


WVpshpnt an 2?, D. C.









UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Agricultural Marketing Service
Washington 25, D. C.


OFFICIAL BUSINESS


Penalty For Private Uee to Avoid
Payment of Postage $300



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

IIIII0881 i 81111111111111111111111111111111 I
3 1262 08589 5810 1


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