The sheep and lamb situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The sheep and lamb situation
Physical Description:
30 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Sheep industry -- Marketing -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Lamb meat industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
SLS-1 (Jan. 1937)-
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with SLS-30 (June 1939).
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: SLS-24 (Dec. 20, 1938).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 01642958
ocm01642958
Classification:
lcc - HD9436.U5 A2
System ID:
AA00011235:00001

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Hog situation
Succeeded by:
Beef cattle situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation

Full Text

A lITE STATES DEPARTi.WF"T OF AC-RICULTIjLRE
Buri.r u. of Agricilt :,i Econ:c.i.a:


SLS-2 Fe rr...- ,- i .7


TiE EEhF JAUTL LAMPE SITUATIOIT





Pr'ospe- cts for jpp:lie: To-d pric-:-2 f te-p I D'll 1:J: ni-:e Ci:L_''i.

little since iss-uranc: of the J:..-i' r.y situi.:tl i rt :F L rt i r.imr th h.. The A.-

ai.nce iin l'-i"Ub ric ? in i te .Decriimber ritui e ri-i; Jr:n,.r;- 'ns faiiri;- well

rn tA.titjinreri iLrring the. r,-mqainiR Cr -.f J:.n_, r;' ar i,-i e.i Febr r.. IT :. pecte

slco.uij- t.r of heer ,j. i :;nb- in Jai.-i.-' v'". tr,- i.rf-st for the month onr

reco ri.

Altho_.ish the number -of heep :nd i :tb- o:n feed. on J -.iL..r-' 1, -'._., .'. F

slihtl:, s.ma ller thn ;--:: r e:-.rlier, the :LuKb'er o 'f sto2 : :hcp '7:.- : 1r,:R r.

The l .-rger nrmnber r.f -t.,.- '. h ep .7 5 t: r-.i. t of trhe i ..c n 1? 1: r i.ntb r i-

Tex-os, '-,ier- the tot:Jl nmf it.r of -.hCeJ. ni lJ-.,bs .on .T:.. .ry,- i re ..,-C .a. a !n-

nigh record -D In ii-e rl- li oti r St at- ti' ii'lb.-r .of 'toDk nee w:. s,0.11 r

tvirn r ;,' e r eirli. 'r.

In vi ew of the ? ll.:-rn r "u.-. r -jf .lant,. orn feedi 1 J-.r'.--r i .id the

l--a'rge -i:rk.-t upp.,lie: in J 4L'u.L-r;.., it i-. e:r-..-ctel. ttn:..t the iniube? o:f h--ee :'vild

lamrbs sIusht rei ii rede? ,- .-ice,' 'onii- .iu.rini- the rFmi .inier :f the I.'ii-r.7

fe3..-icrm' m.rketinc s s.aon (up to H.;. 1, l'2.-.7 .rnd will b-e sm ller th : ;-nr

,:.rlier. M'-,'.-tiig, of e'.; crop I1, i :. fro.r. C:alifornia ,prob.-.bl; .will be later

than usi..,i t i '- ;-e.r b.c.: of u.nf. i:or ble we :, t'er -'Iid feeding I cona i i'ui .

Howve'. r, a I r e ,r-r":et tlovemr, t of ctr.as -f, t ,e rl1 in-. from T'e:-:-- urin

April rrid MIa i; probably.

1.c-uISe of the erp.ected de re .:.- i:, i lAiu-hter s..pp i.ei of shi .:p :.d':

ler:ibe an"id the pros ect for co.t inued i.iprovrem t il t" iI :i :'

l.-irib, prices for lrnb. probably; will *-. e' .omc-whrit d ,.irn th 4-1et-' 5 t fl t .

U.S DEPOSITORY


- ----- ------------ -----~~e





SLSL2


Prices for sr.ring lambs in 1I?" will be supported by a stronger demand

situation than in 12bI, but the volume of such lambs to be marketed is

now very uncertain.

Recent Developments

E:l-.rojnd.- The trend of prices of sheep and lambs
has been uopward since 13 '. The level of prices in 19'?6 was
more than 50 percent hi h. r than in 1932. Thc rise in prices
the pait 4 years has been due chiefly to improvement in the
demand for dressed lambs and anvr:..ci:g prices for wool and
pelts. After having been maintained at a relatively high
level in the first half of 19-,'6, prices of lamb declined
steadily from July through November. A sharp rise occurred,
however, in late December and early January.

Recent adv-ace in lamb prices fairly well m'aI.t Li.ied.- The advance
in the price of slaughter lambs wvnich began in late December continued through
the first half of January. After declining slightly in the third week of
January, lemnb prices recovered at the end of the month, and in the second
week of February they again reached the high level of mid-January. The top
price of $11 for lambs at Chic.go, paid during the week ended Janu:r;: 16 :Aid
again during the week ended February 13, was the highest since July and
nearly $2 above the low point of late November.

Prices of slaughter ewes strengthened almost steadily during Januar;,
and for thu first time in several months prices of both slaughter lambs and
ewes at Chic-ao were hi.--,r than those a year earlier. Prices of feeding
lambs at Omaha in January aver-.e-d 1a.:- tr than in December but they were
still somewhat below the level of the corresponding month a year earlier.
Wholesale prices of lamb carcasses also rose in January following a decline
in December.

Slaughter supplies of lambs large.- Inrpe.ited zsr..a-hter of sheep -.nd
lambs in January was the largest for the month on record. The slaughter fcr
the month of 1,700,000 head was 8 r..rcent larger than that for December cnd
10 percent larger than that for the co:'):.rcml~ndinI :month a year earlier. T.:e
receipts at seven markets for the 3 weeks ended February 13 were less then
the Iaverage for other recent weeks and for the comparable period in 1396.
The bulk of the suiply in January consisted of fed Vestern lambs as is u.u?.l
for this time of year. :. ;~t of thesu w+7re of good to ci'.cice quality. T'.,
court i'.ue-d scarcity'of native lambs at most markets reflects partly the decrease
in lamb feelin:; in the Western Gorn clt wnich was occasioned by the se.vre
dr:ou-. t in that area in 1936.

The percentage of sheep in the total sla.ultei' in December ;as smaller
than in November and smaller than in IDez.--mber a year earlier. For the ye:.r as
a whole, however, this perccrAt _e was the largest in more than 10 years. The
averr.'e live and dressed wei,.;to of sheep and lambs slaughtered in December
were considerably heavier then in November or in December 193S, and the hervie
for the month on record. Some reduction in aver-je we i_-Lt and a further de-
crecse in the percent-.- of sheep in the slau -u.tor supply was reported in
Ja ri,..L r;: .


- 2 -





SLS-2 -3-

Stock sheep on farms January 1, larger than year earlier.- As reported
in the January Situation the number of sheep and lambs on feed January 1 was
4 percent or 200,000 head smaller than a year earlier. The estimated number
of stock sheep on farms January 1 however, was 1.6 percent or 760,000 head
larger than on January 1 last year. The larger number of stock sheep this
year than last was the result of the much larger number in Texas where the
total number of sheep and lambs reached a new high record. In nearly all
other States the number of stock sheep was smaller than a year earlier.
The numbers of stock sheep on farms and sheep and lambs on feed January 1,
1937, with comparisons for earlier years, are shown in the accompanying
table.





Number of sheep and lambs on farms January 1, 1935-37


Sheep and lambs on
Geographic Stock sheep : feed 1/
division : : : 1937 : : 1937
1935 : 1936 2/: 1935 : 1936 2/
: Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou-
: sands sands sands sands sands- sands

North Atlantic ......: 958 930 930 50 50 50
North Central .......: 11,108 11,423 11,100 3,342 3,297 2,712
South Atlantic .....,: 1,305 1,251 1,200 --- -- -
South Central,
excluding Texas ...: 2,141 2,130 2,059 175 50 50
Texas ............. 7,092 7,234 8,750 60 125 170
Western .............: 24,030 23,423 23,111 1,984 2,114 2,444

United States ......: 46,634 46,391 47,150 5,611 5,631 5,426


1/ Includes sheep and lambs in feed lots on feed for market.
2/ Preliminary.






SLS-2


Outlook

Backiround.- In the January issue of this report the
following conclusions were stated with respect to the outlook
for sheep and lambs:
(1) A considerable reduction in the slaughter
supplies of sheep and lambs from the level prevailing in
January is expected during March and April.
(2) Demand for dressed lamb will be somewhat strong-
er in 1937 than in 1936.
(3) Wool prices and pelt values in the first half
of 1937 probably will be maintained at a level considerably
higher than last year.
(4) A further seasonal advance in prices of lambs
is expected to occur during March and April.



The prospects for supplies and prices of sheep ard lambs have changed
very little since the issuance of the January report. On the basis of
the relationship which has prevailed over a number of years between sheep
and lambs on feed on January 1 and inspected slaughter of sheep and lambs
for January through April, it appears that the sl ,ihter for the January-
to-April period in 1937 will be smaller than that of a year earlier. The
large slaughter in January compared with a year earlier, therefore, gives
f .rt-i-r indication of a reduction in slaughter supplies in the next 3
months.

As was indicated in the January report, the number of lambs on feed
on January 1 this year in the late marketing areas of Colorado, [lobraska,
and Wyoming was about 23 percent smaller than a year earlier. Consequently
a decrease in the marketing of fed lambs appears probable during March and
Ajril. Marketings of new crop lambs from California this year will
probably be later than usual because of unfavorable weather and feeding
conditions in that State in the last 2 months. Reports from California
indicate that early lambs have made a poor start with considerable death loss,
The Eastern market movement of the California lamb crop occurs largely in
A.ril and May.

Reports indicate, however, that there has been a large carry-over of
1936 lambs in Texas and the number of stock sheep in that State on January 1
was the largest on record. If feeding conditions continue favorable, a large-
market movement of grass-fed yearlings from Texas is probable during April
and May. This will offset in part the probable smaller marketing of fed
western lirints and California lambs.

In view of the expected decrease in marketing of lambs and the
prospective continued improvement in the demand for dressed lamb, prices for
lambs are likely to advance somewhat during the remainder of the fed lamb
marketing season (up to May 1, 1937).








THE WOOL SITUATION 1/

Because of the limited supplies of domestic wool now on hand and
the relatively strong market abroad, prices of spot wools in the domestic
market are expected to remain near present levels for the next few months.

Supplies of wool in foreign countries probably will continue
relatively small at least until the Southern Hemisphere clip becomes avail-
able in the early fall. Demand conditions for wool abroad also are expected
to continue favorable in the next 6 months.

Prices of spot domestic wools at Boston are now considered to be at
a premium over prices of foreign wools and over prices for pre-shearing
contracts for similar wools from the new clip. Although some readjustment
in these price relationships probably will occur when the new domestic
clip becomes available, this readjustment should not materially affect
prices of wool received by producers.

Stocks of apparel wool held by dealers and manufacturers in the
United States on December 31 totaled 128,134,000 pounds, scoured basis.
This represents an increase of 10 percent as compared with a year earlier.
The increase was entirely in stocks of foreign wool, since stocks of
domestic wool reported on December 31 were 10 percent smaller than a year
earlier.

Consumption of apparel wool by United States mills showed a further
sharp increase in December which was contrary to the usual trend for that
month. After adjustment for usual seasonal changes, the rate of consumption
in December was the highest reported for any month since January 1920.
Consumption for the reporting year 1936 was only 8.4 percent smaller than
the unusually high consumption in 1955. Mill activity is expected to continue
at a relatively high level for the next few months.


1/ Summary taken from February issue of The Wool Situation, a monthly report
of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics.


SLS-2


- 5 -





SLS-2 -

.u1 r-l nen11t ?ir; L'tq

,ble 1.- Slaughter ard market supplies of shcotP and lambs, 1.-'6 with con-
parisons, December 1936, -1id January I';.7 with comparisons


: :Year : Month
: Jan.
Item : Unit .Average 9. 3. :arap .,Jan. .Dec, .5n.
1924-37 193 1.3 *"36. *IT7
.194-3 194- -33 l


Inspected slaughter:l/ :
Sheep and lambs .....:
Receipts at 7
markets 2/...........:


Th"~r.: 14,737 17,644 17,216 1,219 1,540 1,573 1,''0)


" :3/15,241 12,312 11,8923/1,188


944 796 1, 00.


: Year
:Average
1 4-55': 1935 : 1936
1 1-35


Ins,; cted slaughter:
Lambs and yearlings :
)ui.irb r ..... ...... : :
Percentage of total:
sheep and lambs... :Percent:

Number ............: Thous.:
Percentage of total:
sheep and lambs.. :Percent:

Average live weight.....: Pounds:


13,678 16,40C'

92.81 92.0f:

1,059 1,244


15,6

90.8

1,5
90*


7.19 7.05 9.1

81 84


Average dr ess"- weight.: 39 40

Total dressed weight...:Mil.lbs: 569 701


47 1,117 1,242 1,401 1,447

39 9'.''3 90.75 90.75 91.99

C69 85 127 143 126

1 7.07 9.27 9.25 8.01

C5 84 87 85 83

40 40 40 40 41

180 47 55 61 65


Bureau of Animal Industry.
Chicago, 'ai~sas City, Omaha, Denver, St. Joseph, Sioux City, and St. Paul.
AvBrage 1929-33.


Iionth


: Dec.
:average,
:1924-33


:Dec.
:1935


: No 7.
:1956


*1 DC






LS- 7 -

Table .".- rice ner 100 pounds of she..e :-:i 1 i'irl, by r.ionths, l.."ciber-JTinuary,
1934-35 to 1936-357


i93--- 5 : 1i925-.,.3 : 1i ,_,- ..7


Classic ficat ion


Dec: .: .. : 1". : Dcc. :Jn. :Iov. : J: J.
1.0v. Dec.. J .I iro',. Dec.c Jn. :ov. Dec. Jan.
: : : : : :


.-bnbs, Chicso: :
Go:d .nd choice ...
Co :;:ion '1. cldi.;r. .. :
'7es, Chicnj : ::
Gooi. and choi ce .... :
,Co-. 'ion p.n, :c,.i 'T.
Feedinr- la-f.s, O. aha: :
Goold n.i choice ....:
IvcrT-e rice .'.id by :
rmac'.ers: :
Shee') and 1 i-..s ... :
Lver'i--e -rice received:
by fa-rirs: E
Shece ..............:
La-ibs .............. :
"aib, hITe, Yo.rk:
th le sale,carce3z _/:
Choice ........... :
Good ............. :
:;e i 4 -.1 ... ........:
Retail, co.; : s i te :
price
G-, ............. :
killedd .0ools, 7oc-,rn zJ
Choice AA ..........:
Choice .ilte I ..... :
Shee) ? .elts, T.p.ic. rs' :
she rlin s, 1.,. 1, :
each _/ ............


Dol- :
lars


5.1:
5.79:


2.C39:
1.70":

5.16;


6.10:


2. 5:
'.3. 10-;'


: .
4.-.4:


13.31:
12..53
11. -2:




53.
; 9.5E-
* .: *
6.5. :


D. l- : 01o-
lars : lars


7.9: 9.81
6.57: 7.51 2

17: 1
.7, : 4.1,0


:7 22




.i7: 4.
..:-. : 7.22







5.01 .: ..1l

I'!;. : 3 ;'. 1 ',

1i .3- 17. '
13.4J :1..8 ^


-'r.,. 54 : 4.:55

75.2 :74.C
57.0 :'57.r '


.*:9?4: .710: .325


: l?rs


10. .30
: ,.. : -.

: 4.71









: .2?
: 7 3-;





79. 1:7
: 5.5
.: l








:24.4


Dol- :
Lnrs :


1. ?2:
1'.4:

4.75:
4.' :

I.7 6:





- -i :



1.15 :



1I. '2:
17..14:





91.5
719..5:


1. 130:


LI Thirty-eight pounds down.
_/ Cents per pound-, scoured basis.
./ Bureau of La'oi. Statistics.


/ Thirty-eight pounds down.
Cents per ?ound, scoured basis.
/ ureau of Lal;o Statistics.


Dol- : Dol-
l-rs : lars


10.43: .9,(
9..32: ?.1

4.: 7 -
-3. 3:

















5.43: 7.3.9'
:
4.34 '.: j.'








: .
1.150: 15.1'


*
*


3:










1:]





.1


D-l- :Dol-
1irs :1-rs


-..?7 :10.29
7. 6 : .6

4.10 5. 24
2.7, : 3.85

7.14 : :'.7C6


,.. 1 :


3..2.5 : 4.24
7. '76 7. ''.2




13.:7 :15.05
.'..0 :14. 12


?3.07 :33.85

.07.6 :118.6
95.1 :104.2


1.315: 1.463









Table 3.- Price per 100 pounds of good and choice iambs at Chicago,
and slaughter of sheep and lambs under Federal inspection,
by months, avorigc 1924-33, annual 1935-37


Average pr-ice I1/ : Slaughter of sheep and lambs 2/
Month :"-r.e: : : :Average:
:1924-33: 1935 : 1936 1937 :1924-33: 1935 :1936 : 1937
1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
:Dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars head head head hcad

Jan. 12.11 8.81 10.48 10.29 1,219 1,345 1,540 1,700
Feb. : 12.17 8.54 10.00 1,0o6 1,137 1,314
Mar. : 12.49 8.17 9.90 1,159 1,374 1,374
Apr. :12.44 8.11 10.98 1,165 1,483 1,267
May : 11.68 7.60 10.26 1,192 1,584 1,213
June : 12.68 3/8.56 3/11,44 1,216 1,421 1,309
July : 11.71 7.96 9.94 1,219 1,546 1,352
Aug. : 11.27 8.68 9.53 :1,297 1,665 1,395
Sept. : 10.98 9.34 9.38 1,380 1,549 1,593
Oct. : 10.72 9.23 8.68 1,417 1,764 1,742
Nov. : 10.81 10.30 8.90 1,184 1,407 1,544
Dec. : 11.11 10.92 8.87 1,202 1,369 1,573

Average..: 8.85 9.86
Total....: 17,644 17,216


1/ January 1924 June 1930, 84 pounds down; July 1930 December 1935,
90 pounds down; January 1936 to date, lambs, no weight specified.
Beginning January 1933, quotations based on owes and wethers.
2/ Compiled from records of the Bureau of Animal Industry.
3/ i'.. r.': price of spring lambs.









SHEEP AND LAMBS: PRICE AT CHICAGO AND FEDERALLY INSPECTED
SLAUGHTER, AVERAGE 1924-- 33, AND 1936 TO DATE


DOLLARS
PER 100
POUNDS



12





10





8





6
THOUSANDS





1,600





1,400





1,200





1,000


I
PRICE OF LAM













/937 fj
I '/


1924 -33


-4 4--


BS, GOOD AND CHOICE*

SAverage,








$ U

1936
/936 i


- I
*. 'I-'


--o-- CHANGE TO SHORN BASIS
--- CHANGE FROM OLD CROP TO NEW CROP BASIS


JAN. MAR. MAY JULY SEPT. NOV.
*JAN. 1924 -JUNE 1930, 84 POUNDS DOWN; JULY 1930 TO DA TE, 90 POUNDS DOWN
,j i LT -E TMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEG. 21571 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

FIGURE I


1924, -33




iluIv ERSil OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08861 4952