The hog situation

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Title:
The hog situation
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32 no. : ; 28 cm.
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English
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United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
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U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics
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Washington
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Subjects / Keywords:
Swine -- Marketing -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
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federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
HS-1 (Nov. 1936)-HS-32 (June 1939).
General Note:
Title from caption.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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oclc - 04752171
ocm04752171
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lcc - HD9435.U5 A25
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AA00011234:00003

Related Items

Preceded by:
World hog and pork prospects
Succeeded by:
Beef cattle situation
Succeeded by:
Sheep and lamb situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation


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UNITED STATES EFPARTIENT OF AGRICULTURE V
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
&ashington


HS-3 January 1937


---THE HOG SITUATION


Summary
u ..; i .; ;SiL *'',
.-- The-r Slbtsf te December 1936 pig crop report have changed some-

what the prospects for slaughter supplies of hogs for the marketing year

ending September 30, 1937. In the Hog Outlook Re-port released by this

Bureau in November it was stated that the number of hogs for slaughter in

1936-37 probably would be from 10 to 15 percent larger than in 1935-36. It

now appears probable that inspected hog slaughter in 1936-37 will be from

12 to 16 percent greater than in 1935-36. The extent of the increase in

hog slaughter in 1936-37 over 1935-36, however, will depend partly upon

prospects for feed grain production in 1937 and partly upon the proportion

of hogs going into inspected slaughter from areas outside the Corn Belt.

Following the drought of 1934 the fall pig crop that year was

sharply reduced. It was generally expected that a somewhat similar

situation would occur in 1936, since the effects of drought conditions upon

feed grain production were almost as severe as in 1934. The 1936 fall pig

crop, however, was 6 percent larger than that of 1935 and the combined

spring and fall crop, 20 percent larger.

Because of the short supplies of feed grains and the high prices of

corn in relation to hog prices, marketing of hogs were very large in the

first 3 months of the present marketing year, October to December. It is

probable that a larger than usual proportion of the spring pig crop was

marketed in these months, as has occurred in other drought years. Con-

sequently it is expected that slaughter supplies of hogs during the first





HS-3 2-

3 months of 1937 will be reduced considerably from the level prevailing

in December. Total slaughter supplies for the remainder of the marketing

year, January through September 1937, probably will be somewhat smaller

than those of a year earlier, with most of the reduction occurring in

February and March, and in late summer. Storage supplies of hog products

on January 1, 1937, however, were considerably larger than a year earlier.

The December pig crop report also indicated that the number of sows

to farrow in the spring season of 1937 would be about 5 percent smaller

than the number farrowed in the spring of 1936. Nearly all of this indicated

reduction is in the Western Corn Belt, where the estimated number to farrow

was 13 percent smaller than a year earlier.

Despite the relatively large marketing of hogs and other livestock

in December, hog prices advanced during that month, and in early January

the top price of hogs at Chicago reached $10.80, the highest since last

September. As supplies of hogs are reduced from the December level in the

next 3 months, it is probable that a further moderate advance in ho&- prices

will occur. Although slaughter supplies of hogs in the summer of 1937 will

be larger than was expected earlier, they probably will be somewhat smaller

than those of last summer, when considerable drought liquii-.tion occurred.

In view of the further improvement in consumer demand in prospect, it is ex-

pected that hog prices next summer will average hi-gher than in the summer of

1936.

Review of Re-cent Developmrnts

Packgrou.t The extremely low level of consumers' incomes
in 1932 and 1933 and the r i..ction in foreign demand for hog
products resulted in the lowest level of hog prices in more than
30 years. In 1934, -.o numbers were reduced Tharrly by' .iroufht
and the opicration: of the corrn-r.og adjustment program. Hog prices
rose moderately in 1934 and :.r,-irily in I'.3, as the effect of
reduction in nr.mbLIrs was reflectd-. on l-e-..hter supplies. Feed
crops were nearly normal in 1-JC', and conditions became more
favorable for hog br-clinrg. The fall pig crop of 1935 and the
-rring pig crop of 193,I, sphow,-d substantial increases. Expansion
in hog numbers was p..rtially checked, however, by the feed






shortage caused by the 1936 dro.ihtL With continued small
slaughter supplies and an increasing consumer demand for hog
products in 1936, hog prices averaged hiZj.-r than in any year
since 1929.

Prices advance.-Hog prices advanced sharply in December to the
highest level for the month in'10 years. The seasonal low point in hog
prices was reached in late October, and a moderate price advance began in
late November. With marketing in December the largest for the month in
5 years, the price rise was apparently due to increases in consumer incomes
and to the development of an active storage demand for hog products. The
fact that the hog processing tax was in effect 1 and 2 years earlier con-
tributed to the relatively higher level of hog prices in 1936 compared with
1935 and 1934, since prices paid to producers in the 2 earlier years were
lower than they otherwise would have been.

Prices of all kinds of hogs advanced in December, but the advance
was most pronounced in the prices of light weight butcher hogs. The price
increase for light butchers narrowed the spread considerably between these
and heavier weight hogs of comparable quality. The price of packing sows
shared in the upturn, reaching the highest levels of 1936, during the month.

Usual seasonal increase in slaughter.- Hog slaughter showed about
the usual seasonal increase from November to December. The peak of the
winter marketing probably was reached in December, since a sharp decline
in daily market receipts occurred in early January. Hog slaughter under
Federal inspection of 4,681,000 head in December was 9 percent greater
than that in November, and 63 percent greater than the slaughter for
December a year earlier. The increases in slaughter supplies continued to
be relatively greater in the Western Corn Belt markets than in other areas.

Utilization of grass crops, made possible by favorable fall weather
in many sections, has resulted in a material improvement in the quality and
weights of hogs marketed in recent weeks. The average live weight of hogs,
although considerably below that of last year and below normal, has shown
an earlier upturn'than that following the 1934 drought, and in both November
and December averaged higher than in the same months of 1934. Average weights
have been especially light, however, at markets supplied mainly from the
Western Corn Belt.

Hog slaughter under Federal inspection during the first 3 months
of the current marketing year, October-December, totaled 12,465,000
head. This was 68 percent more than that of the same period a year earlier,
3 percent larger than the number sl-.ugtered from October to December 1934,
and 9 percent larger than the 5-year average for the period.

Storage stocks large.-The accumulation of storage stocks of most pork
items and lard was large during December, influenced by the large slaughter
of hogs and the rising trend of hog prices. Cold storage holdings of pork
on January 1 of 665,000,000 pounds were 44 percent larger than holdings a
month earlier and were above average for that date. Storage stocks of
frozen pork nearly doubled in amount from December 1 to January 1, and
holdings of salt and pickled pork showed substantial increases. Storage
holdings of lard increased more than seasonally in December and amounted
to 146,000,000 pounds on January 1. These holdings were 23 percent above
the relatively large holdings on January 1, 2 years earlier, and considerably
above average for that date.


HS-3


- 3 -







Wholesale prices.- Whclesale prices of fresh and cured pork showed
only a slight net increase during December. The composite wholesale price
of hog products at New York was $20.34 per 100 pounds in December, compared
with $20.04 in November, and $23.28 in December 1935. Lard prices rose
more rapidly than hog prices late in December, and in early January advanced
to new hihs for the present marketing year. Some decline in lard prices,
however, occurred in the second week of January. Early in January there
was a considerable upturn in fresh pork prices, accompanied by some rise in
prices of cured products.

Larger pork exports.- Total exports of pork from the United States
in November amounted to 6,800,000 pounds, an increase of over 60 percent
from shipments made in October, but approximately the same as the amount
sent abroad in November a year earlier. A considerable increase in ship-
ments of hams and shoulders, largely to the United riir.,iom, more than offset
a decrease in the shipments of bacon. Shipments of fresh and canned pork
in N.i'r:.:,lr also showed a relatively large increase over the quantities sent
abroad in October and in November a year earlier.

November lard exports below October.- Exports of lard, amounting to
about 9,700,C ': pounds in November, were somewhat below October levels.
Total lard exports for the first 2 months, October-November, of the present
marketing year, however, were approximately double the extremely small
quantity shipped .in the same period a year earlier. The increase in lard
exports probably was partly the result of the increase in -laugh-ter supplies.
In early September the import duty on lard in Cuba was again reduced, and
the consumption tax on lard in that country was removed. These factors also
contributed to the increase in the 2-month total of lard exports from the
United States over a year earlier.

Recent Developments in Hog Situation in Foreign Countries

Great Britain.- Contracts with producers for delivery of bacon pigs in
1937 under the British Pigs Marketing scheme have been terminated by the Pigs
Marketing Board, according to a report from C. C. Taylor, Agriultural Attache
at London. It was stated that action terminating the 1937 contracts was
taken by the Board because the number of bacon pigs contracted for delivery
in 1937 was not sufficient to give an economic basis for bacon factory output
during the year. The number of pigs contracted for 1937 was smaller than
the estimated requirements of 2,200,000 head by more than 300,C(0 head.

The program for increasing hog production in Great Britain by contracts
of the Pigs Marketing Bo-rd with producers for the delivery of bacon pigs was
initiated in 1933, following the establishment of import quotas for b:corn and
hams in late 1932. In .g.;ntral, the program of .T-otas was d:'.;inTicd to limit
supplries of bacon and hams from foreign countries, thereby permitting- dio-etic
and Empire producers to secure a larger share of the British bacon market.

The pi;-- marketing scheme was develorci to assistrpi; producers and
bacon curers in Great Britain in their efforts to increase the c:..to-t of
British bacon. Frc.r, the begiri.ning, the Pigs Marketing -'crd has encountered
considerable difficulty in securing contracts for the required n:rC'" .:-f
bacon D:l._. During most of the period in which the trI :. r.;r-:cting scheme
has been in effect, the price of pork pi.s, which are outside the er. -e,
has been .i-. cr than the contract price of bacon ri;.


HS-3


- 4 -







According to a recent announcement, the British bacon import quota
for the first 6 weeks of 1937 was fixed at 69,054,000 pounds, a 6 percent
increase over the quota prevailing for the same period of 1936. The share
of the United States in this quota will be continued at 8.1 percent.
Developments with respect to the bacon quota during the remainder of 1937
are uncertain, nor is it known whether any other scheme for the marketing
of bacon pigs in Great Britain will be adopted.

Canada.- Hog prices in Canada rec :.'v-red somewhat in December, after
declining seasonally from August to November. The average price of $ ..3
per 100 pounds for the 4 weeks ended December 31, was about 68 cents i!her!
than for a similar period in November, but 20 cents lower than in December
last year. The decline of about $1.65 in C-aiian hog prices from August
to November apparently was due chiefly to the larger-than-usual increase
in marketing.

Marketings of hogs in Canada, as measured by gradings of hogs and
hog carcasses, were 76 percent larger in November than in August. :Marlk --tings
in December were not greatly different from those of November, but they were
44 percent larger than in December 1935. In the 3 months, September-
November, marketing were about 55 percent larger than in the corresponding
period a year earlier. The increase in marketing in this period compared
with those of 1935 probably reflects the increase in the spring pig crop in
Canada as well as early marketing due to the shortage and high prices of
feed in the late summer and fall,

Present indications are that there will be a decrease in Canadian
hog marketing in the early part of 1937 as compared with a year earlier.
Hog numbers in Canada on June 1, 1936, were estimated at 4,139,000, an
increase of 17 percent compared with a year earlier, but marketing from
June 1 to December 31, 1936, were 43 percent larger than those of the
corresponding period of the previous year.

Exports of bacon from Canada in October and November 1936, totalling
30,062,000 pounds, were 65 percent larger than a year earlier. About 98
per.cnt of the total was shipped to Great Britain. Exrorts of pork, other
than bacon, were more than twice as large as a year earlier, but the total
quantity was relatively small. About. 70 percent of the total pork, other
than bacon, was shipped to the United States. There was also an increase
in Canadian imports of pork from the United States during these 2 months.


- 5 -


HS-3







Th,: Pig Cro) Report of December 1. 1936


P-lck rc ir.d Both spring and fall pig crops in
1934 showed sharp reductions from those of 1933 as a result
of the corn-:h.'- adjustment pror.- and drought. In the
sprir.n of 1935 the .pig crop also was reduced, but in the
fall of 1935 and the spring of 1936 increases occurred,
with more plentiful feed supplies and a favorable hog-corn
price ratio.

The June Pig Crop Report of 1936 indicated that a
further increase in fall f~rr"..iings was probable, but the
dro-.::.ht which occurred after the survey was made changed
the outlook considerably. Instead of an increase in fall
farrowings, a decrease was generally expected. The results
of the December 1 report, therefore, were somewhat surpris-
ing, indicating that an increase had actually occurred,
altho'~:.h not as large an increase as that indicated by
breeair,c intentions on June 1.


T-.e results of the December 1 Pig Crop Report issued D.ce-.ber 23
indicate that there probably will be a greater number of hogs marketed in
1937 than previously expected. The report shows an increase of 4 percent in
the number of sows farrowed and 6 percent in the number of ri.z saved in the
fall of 1i'95 compared with the fall of 1935. The number of mni saved per
litter was the hi. _-hst ever reported for the fall season, --ver?- i-. 6.14
compared with 6.03 in the fall of 1935.

The June pig cron report indicated that the number of sows to farrow
in the fall of 1936 would be 14 percent larger than the number farrowi.-. in
the fall of 1935, on the basis of reported brci r.:; intentions as of June 1,
but the relatively heavy marketing of bred sows which accompanied the
summer droti.,bt resulted in a sharp curtailment of farrowi:nig in the T-.;tern
Corn Belt States. The number of fall nigs saved in that *rea, where the
effect of the dro-..ht on feed grain production was most severe, was 16 percent
smaller than a year earlier. F,: the 2,stern Corn Belt States, however, an
increase of 16 percent occurred. As a result the 1 '.7 fall pig crop in the
Corn Belt as a wholo was 2 'orcr at sr-.' ller than that of i J. In areas
outside the Corn 3 :it the r.niai of f,.ll 7-i-s saved were 19 to 20 percent
la:r--r than tl ce ::'ed a ear C .rlier and wore s.'-:.tantially tie same as
indicated by the Jun ni -ci '. r jrort.


iulli i:, saved in the North Central States and in the United S' tes,
r e 1939- annual 193 -.:

r ,on : ,c 1-93:V 1936

: .. "..' A.. s 7 ds : .:
North Cential States ..: 19,785 i0, :: 14, 14, *:1
-' ted States ......... :: ,. : 17, .. 22,75 .5, I1


HS-3


- 6 -





- 7 -


For the country as a whole, the 1936 fall pig crop was still
considerably below average in numbers, although 3 percent larger than
that of 1935 and 40 percent larger than the unusually small fall crop of
1934. In the Corn Belt States the number of fall miis saved in 1936 was
28 percent below the 1929-33 '.er- n, and for the United States, 16 per-
cent below.

The total of both spring and fall pig crops combined amounted to
65,700,000 pigs in 1936, which was 18 percent below the 1929-33 average,
but 15 percent larger than the combined spring and fall oig crops in 1934
and 20 percent larger than the total pig crop of 1935.

For the spring of 1937, a reduction of 5 percent from the number
of sows farrowed in the spring of 1936 is indicated by the breeding
intentions reported about December 1. The greater part of this indicated
reduction is in the Western Corn Belt States, with only a slight decline
in the Eastern Corn Belt States. Moderate increases are anticipated for
other sections of the country.

The Outlook

In the Hog Outlook Report released by this Eur .u in November it
was stated that the number of L:,'s slaughtered in the marketing year 1936-37
would be from 10 to 15 percent larger than the number slaughtered in 1935-36.
This estimate was based on indications that the 1936 fall pig crop would
be considerably smaller than that of 1935 and that the total pi- crop
for 1936 would be about 10 percent greater than that of 1935. The estimate
of the fall pig crop which became available in late December, indicated
that the total 1936 pig crop was 20 percent larger than that of 1935.

As indicated in the table which appears on page 12 (table 8), the
relation of changes in the pig crop to changes in inspected hog slaughter
is not a constant one. Inspected slaughter in 1935-36 was unusually large
in relation to the pig crop in the Corn Belt because of the drought
liquidation of sows and pigs in the summer of 1936. It now appears,
however, that inspected hog sl- 1i.ter for the marketing year 1936-37 will
be from 12 to 16 percent greater than that of 1936, instead of 10 to 15
percent as previously stated. On the basis of past relationship: of hog
slaughter to the pig crop, inspected slaughter in 1936-37 :Aight range
from 35,000,000 to 38,000,000 head, but it seems probable that the figure
for the year will be near the lower end of this range.

There probably will be a considerable increase in the number of sows
bred to farrow next fall, if corn crop prospects in 1937 are favorable.
Under sich conditions, it is also probable that a considerable number of
butcher hogs will be withheld from the market supply next summer and
marketed in the fall, after being finished on the new corn crop. Both of
these factors would tend to reduce slaughter suuplies of hogs in 1936-37
from the level which would otherwise prevail. It is possible, however,
that the proportion of hogs which enters inspected sl---iiter from areas
outside the Corn Belt will increase in 1936-37. The increase in the 1936
fall rig- crop over that of 1935 in these areas was fairly large, whereas
slight reduction took place in the Corn Belt as a whole.


HS-3







If the total slaughter for the current marketing year is in line with
the estimate indicated above, the number of hbigs slaughtered in the re-
mainder of the 1936-37 marketing year will be somewhat smaller than that of
the same period a year earlier, with most of the reduction occurring, in
February and March and the late summer. It should be recognized, however,
that the increase in storage supplies on January 1, 1937 over those of a
year earlier is equivalent to the products of about 2,700,000 ho-i:s of average
market weight.

A table on page 12 (table 9) shows the distribution of inspected
slaughter by seasons for years in which conditions have been somewhat similar
to those of the current year. In most of these years the slr-ighter in the
winter season, October to A-pril, has constituted a relatively large -roportion
of the totpl for the year. In view of the large slaughter in the first 3
months of the current winter season it is probable that the winter supply
this year also will represent a relatively large proportion of the total
yearly sl-ughtcr.

On the basis of such indications as are now available it r"-ears that
slaughter supplies next summer (May to September) will be smaller than those
of last summer. The number of h-. -s sl-u .htcred in the summer, however,
depends upon several factors, among which are (1) the pig crop of the pre-
ceding fall; (2) the proportion of the nig crop of the -prcZce.:'-i- year,
slaughtered in the winter season; (3) the -roportion of the -ig crop of the
preceding year which is held over for slaughter in the next marketing year;
(4) the number of hogs from the spring *,i-; crop which are marketed in the
following summer; (5) the number of brood- sows which are sold r'.irLng the
summer.

As already indicated, the proportion of hogs from the pig crop of the
preceding year withheld from the summer supply this year may be large if
feed grain production in 1937 is about normal. Since conditions affecting
the various factors outlined above may chan :e considerably in the next several
months, an estimate of sui.ner slaughter T-:c at this time may have to be
cl,:-'ed as the season pr-.res-.s.

The domestic demand situation for 1937 probably will be more favor-
able for hog producers than that of 1 7-3. Alth.:.u;L 1937 ope:ici with some
labor disturbances, industrial activity and payrolls are expected to be
greaterr than in 19.:-., with consequent improve::.ent in consumers' income and
in the demand for meats. It is now estimated that national income paid out
in 1937 will be about 10 percent greater than that of 13.51:.

.Hog prices are expected to continue to rise l'ring the next 2 or 3
months, since slaughter supplies will be reduced materially from the'
December level. In view of the i- -r:.vc''.cr.t in consumer demand in early 1927
comparc with a :,C-r earlier, it seems -probable that hog prices in the re-
"-,i.idr of the winter marketiri season will average ..i-:-r than i'n the corre-
spondirng -eriod last year. The improvement in dc:-.an. conditions pro'bbly
viill result also in a ~i .hicr -.'.-r-- e of ".: prices in the summer months of
1S37 than in the corresmor.-'ii-" months of 19.7-.


- 8 -


HS-3





HS-3


Table 1.- Average price of hogs per 100 pounds of packer and shipper
purchases at Chicago and seven leading markets, 1934-36

: Chicago : Seven leading
Date markets,
1934 1935 1936 1936
: dollars Dollars Dollars Dollars
Month -


Sept. ...........:
Oct. ...........:
Nov. ...........:
Dec. ............:
Week ended I/ -
Dec. 5 ......... :
Dec. 12 ..........:
Dec. 19 ..........:
Dec. 26 .........:
Jan. 2 (1937) ...:


6.82
5.60
5.66
5.89

5.69
5.71
5.86
6.66
7.39


10.95
9.83
9.31
9.57

9.75
9.62
9.39
9.63
9.36


9.89
9.55
9.48
9.96

9.73
9.89
9.94
10.09
10.34


9.66
9.27
9.20
9.73

9.50
9.66
9.73
9.85
10.12


1_1936: corresponding weeks in 1934 and 1935.


Table 2.- IHumber of hogs slaughtered under Federal inspection,
october December, average 1928-32, annual 1934-36


Average
MAonth : 1928-32 1934 1935 : 1936
S1,0 head 1,0 00 head 1,000 head 1,000 head
Oct ......... ........: 3,688 3,545 2,135 3,492
Nov ..................: 4,195 4,312 2,422 4,292
Dec. ..................: 5,096 4,197, 2,875- 4,681
Total, 3 months ...: 12,979 12,054 7,432 12,465


Compiled from records of the Bureau of Animal Industry.


Table 3.- Average live weight of packer and shipper purchases of
hogs at seven leading markets, August- December 1933-36

Month : 1933 1934 1935 1936
Pounds Pounds Pounds Pounds

Aug. ............: 256 241 251. 256
Sept. ............: 255 236 250 232
Oct .............: 240 218 242 212
Nov. .............: 230 207 232 208
Dec. ............: 224 202 231 (214)





HS-3


Table 4.- Average price of corn at Chicago and hog-corn price ratios,
specified locations, average January June, by months,
July December 1936

:Average price : Hog-corn price ratios based on 1/
:per bushel ----------
Month : of No. 3 : Chicago :North Central : United
:Yellow corn : : States farm : States
prices
at Chicago : prices : farm prices
Cents Bushels Bushels Bushels
Average Jan.-June 62.2 16.2 18.2 15.8


July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.


85.8
113.5
112.1
106.6
104.7
107.2


11.4
8.9
8.8
9.0
9.1
9.3


12.0
9.5
9.5
9.6
9.2
9.5


11.4
9.5
9.2
9.4
9.2
9.5


1/ Number of bushels of corn equivalent in value to 100 pounds of live "hos.



Table 5.- Stocks of pork and lard in cold storage on January 1,
average 1932-36, annual 1935-37

:Jan. 1
Item : average : Jan. 1,. Jan. 1,. Dec. 1, Jan. 1,
S93236 1935 1936 1936 1937 1/
:1,000 1,0j0 1,000 1,000 1,000


: pounds pounds pounds pounds
ounpL_


pounds


Pork -
Frozen ...........: 132,490 230,866 58,270 144,308 284,237
Dry salt, cured
and in process of:
cure ............: 75,486 68,841 54,837 43,710 64,9'3
Pickled, cured and:
in process of
cure ............: 331,662 387,856 213,670 275,382 315,942

Total .......: 539,638 687,563 326,777 463,4"" 665, 7

Lard ................: 79,129 118,107 52,718 108,765 145,522


I/ Preliminary.


-10-




HS-3


Table 6.- Exports of pork and lard from the United States,
October November 1936, average 1924-28, 1929-33,
annual 1934-36


It em and


Average
month : 1934 : 1935 : 1936
:1924-28 1929-33
: 1,000 1,C'O 1,000 1,000 1,000
: pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds


Pork 1/ -


Oct. ...............: 29,522 13,949 8,641 4,656 4,249
Nov. ..............: 27,940 17,633 14,058 6,885 6,822
Total, 2 months...: _57,12 31582 22 ,699_ 11,5_1 .11,071
Lard 2/ -
Oct. ..............: 54,042 52,415 27,096 2,769 10,536
Nov. ............: 51,521 49,631 _19,965 7,988 9,063
Total, 2 months ..: 105,563 102,046 47,061 10,757 20,199

Compiled from records of the United States Department of Commerce.
1/ Includes bacon, hams and shoulders, and fresh, canned, and pickled pork.
2/ Includes neutral lard.


Table 7.- Estimated number of pigs saved and sows farrowed, fall of
1936, and indicated number of sows to farrow, spring of 1937,
by geographic divisions, with comparisons


F
Fall pigs saved Pi
(June 1 to Dec. 1) say
PC
________ lit
S : 1936 1/
: Per-
: cent-


Sows
farrowed
in fall
(June 1
Dec. 1 )


:Sows to be farrow-


:ed spring 1937
:compared with
:spring 1936(Dec.l
:to June 1)
: 1937 2/
: :Per-
: ;: cent
:1936 :Total:age of


:1935 :Total :age of: 1935:1936 :1935 : 1936 : : :1936
:1935 : :
:Thou- Thou- Per- Num- Num- Thou- Thou- Thou- Thou- Per-
:sands sands cent ber ber sands sands sands sands cent
North Atlantic: 656 781 119 6.31 '6.56 104 119 120 130 108


E. N. Central : 6,562 7,584 116 6.43 6.44 1,020 1,178 1,720 1,689 9
W. N. Central : 7,976 6,657 84 5.97 .6.10 1,336 1,092 3,403 2,961 8
Total
N. Central..:14,538 14,241 98 6.17 .6.27 2,356 2,270 5,123 4,650 9
South Atlantic: 2,292 2,760 120 5.74 5.8 '399 469 520 556 10
Central : 4,135 4,885 118 5.69 5.85 727 835 1,018 1,050 10
Mts. & Pacific:
(West)........:._ 95~L _j ,148 _120 5.96 6.18 160 186 247 265 10
United States :22,575 23,815 106 6.03 6.14 3,746 3,879 7,028 6,650 9
Compiled from the United States 1936 Fall Pig Crop Report as of December 1, 1936
Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
/ Preliminary. 2/Number indicated to farrow from breeding intentions reports.


7


1
7
3


7
5
,


Geographic
division


V1


-11-





HS-3


Table 8.- Annual pig crop and slaughter of hogs under Federal inspection
in corresponding hog marketing year, average 1924-33,annual 1924-36


Insnoected


Pig crop nspecteua saugnuer as
:slaughter : percentage of pig crop
Year North : of hogs North
SUnited : Central :(year begin- : United : Central
SStates : States : ning Oct.) : States : States
: 1/_________
: 1,000 1,000 1,000
: head head head Percent Percent
Average 1924-33 : 77,991 59,370 45,362 58.2 76.4


1924............:
1925............:
1926............:
1927............:
1928............
1929............

1930 ............:
1931............ :

1933 ............
1934 ...... .....
1935 ............
1936............:


74,065
70,310
75,444
81,246
78,682
76,125

74,135
83,176
82,525
84,200
56,766
54,955
65,699


57,640
53,388
57,132
60,251
59,356
58,476

57,906
64,537
61,323
63,692
40,470
37,957
45,282


46,289
41,150
43,087
47,371
48,956
45,542

43,558
46,655
47,103
43,911
30,680
31,022


62.5
58.5
57.1
58.3
62.2
59.8

58.8
56.1
57.1
52.2
54.0
56.4


a


00.3
77.1
75.4
78.6
82.5
77.9

75.2
72.3
76.8
68.9
75.8
81.7


1/ Compiled from records of the Bureau of Animal Industry.



Table 9.- Proportion of total yearly inspected hog sltu hter by
quarters and periods


Quarter or :1901-02 :1913-14 :1916-17 :1924-25 :1930-31: 1934-35
period
:Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent


Oct. Dec.
Jan. Mar.
Apr. June
July Sept.

Oct. Apr.
:' y Sept.


32.9
27.4
22.7
17.0


30.2
27.1
24.2
18.5


: 66.9 64.5
S 33.1 35.5


34.9
29.0
22.0
14.1

70.8
29.2


31.8
29.6
21.6
17.0

68.0
32.0


27.9
29.9
23.3
18.9

65.8
34.2


39.3
24.6
7 .1
15.8

71.2
28.8


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