World wool situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
World wool situation
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some issues combined.
General Note:
Description based on: WOOL-16 (June 17, 1929)
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 631804619
lccn - 2010229455
ocn631804619
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .A19
System ID:
AA00011233:00011

Related Items

Succeeded by:
World wool prospects


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


UNIV OF FL LIB
DOIMENT DEPT


-. UITEID STATES DEPART E:T OF AGRTCULTJRE
__ Bureau of Agricultural Economics
1. DEPOSITCIOR Washington

WOOL-26 7,
WORLD WOOL SITUATION

PRI CES TFRAE .cD C01iTUI.1'TICi S'. PLY


Su3im;mar;;

Domestic wool prices dcclinerI considerably at Boston from April 15 to

May 17 in spite of the strength displaced in foreign markets. Ohio .id iimoii-

lar wools declined from one to three cents a pound on a crease Zr:sis with the

greatest declines on wools grading 438 to 60s. Fleece wools, on i sr.i.redi

basis, 'ere mostly three to five cents lower but 56s and S --0i. clot..iir.

wools were si-: aind one-half centz lower, 1-6iC's Frer.ch corrbing wool ''/ z seven

cents lower 3nd 5Js strictly, coiLbinc wool was i -nt c.:ents UiLdCr t.'e rri1ce o

April 15. Te declines on t-rritor:, wools were not so great being mostl'

from one and onie-half to four cents a pound lower on n. scoured Las is, :lthosLh

46s strictly combing wool was six and one--half cents lower. -Puled wools were

mostly one and one-half cents lower but AA and ci-oice AA wools '.ci.re five and

one-half to six and onc-hlf cents lower.

Prices of Tew Zealand wools in bond at Poston were mostly unch.njged

during the month. Austr-lian wools eTrading cs to 64s were gener-lly, one

to two and one-half cents a pound lower buit the finer grades were u.nchianged.

Buenos Aires arid Montevideo wools were mostly unchanged except wools grading

40s to 48s which were one cent cheaper on a grease basis.

Foreign wool prices have strengthened appreciably in the past uonth.

Stead, to higher prices and active buying have been reported from the sales

in Australia, South Africa mnd London, in contrast to the lower prices and


ji
"* &*. ..'.*









WOOL-26


poorer buying of January, February and early March. A corrcsponiing im-

provement has occurred in the prices of tops and yarns at Bradford, and conti-

nental trade has improved. Some of the improvement in Bradford prices and in

continental trade may be attributed to the partial stoppage at Br-.lford but

it is significant that strikers are gradually returning to wor]-. If this is

due to increased business rather than to inability of strikers to hold out it

may signify a turn toward increasing demand. European buying power generally

has given little evidence of material change recently, but world wool prices

are 40 per cent to 50 per cent lower than a year ago and this should stimulate

consumption and trade.

Reports for the United States through March ir.licate that up to that

time, at least, wool consumption and activity in the wool textile industry

generally were still reflecting the current developments in the business

situation and domestic consumer buying power. Consumption was slightly lower

in March than in February and was below March last year. The principal

decreases in consumption were in 4r-j,dis raging from 48s to 60s. This is in

line with the usual response of mills to relatively high prices for these

grades.

Ecceipts of domestic wool at Boston are boi:ir.ini their seasonal

rise. In March they were distinctly low, in April they: increased to a level

above that of last year but were still v.',- moderate. Imports have been

considerably below last year. With domestic dcnand limited, domestic prices

have decli:ine quickly after each major foreii- decline without waiting for

la.ro imports to accumulate. T:is action of course leaves the domestic

stock situation distinctly better than it would be ot-hrwise.




4


- 2 -







WOOL-26


Stocks of wool in the foreign primary markets are larger than

last year and are diminishing slowly, but a sentiment has developed to move

them before the corning of the new clip.

There are more sheep in Canada and the United States than last year,

according to latest reports, and their condition is good. For other

Northern Hemisphere countries, except Russia, this sprints wool clip is

expected to be about the same as that of last year. In Russia, however,

sheep are reported to have been killed in large numbers and this nr:, reduce

Russia's clip materially. Most recent reports on sheep numbers and growing

conditions in the five important Southern Hemisphere countries point to

another large clip in 1930. These countries produce three fifths of the

world's wool outside of Russia and China, and their nar':etiLg season starts

in the latter part of the calendar year.


Prices: Domestic

Demand for wool was very slow during April and prices quite generally
continued the downward trend shown during the previous month, according to
Russel L. Burrus of the Boston Wool Office of the Bureau of Agricultural
Ecoromlcs. Manufacturers were reported to be carrying less than the usual
amount of wool, yet they showed no inclination to replenish stocks owing to
the unsettled conditions in the goods market. Business in the goods market
was reported to be so draggy that manufacturers could not determine what their
needs for various grades of wool would be. Under these conditions, the pur-
chases of raw wool were restricted to quantities sufficient for immediate
requirements.

Sentiment among members of the wool trade, however, tended to improve
as a result of strengthei-ing markets abroad. It was felt that higher prices
for foreign wools would ultirrately, give bu:'ers of cloth confidence in domes-
tic wool prices and that this would enicoura.ge the placi:-g of new business
with manufacturers. A few reports t.at n.ew business had been placed were
circulated through the trade toward the enil of April, but no appreciable
increase of wool bLiying was in evidence.

The bulk of the demarid for wo:.l durir, April was on the western grown
lines of 64s and finer qualities. Ori,-inal bag wools comprised the greater
portion of the aggregate although graded French combing 64s and finer
offerings received a fair call for moderate quantities. Prices were fairly


- 3 -






WOOL-26


steady on the original wools. The best offerings sold at 72-75 co-.ts, scoured
basis The wools selling at these figures contained mostly good French comb-
ing staple, and some offerings consisted of a fair amount of strictly combing
staple of 64s and finer grades and occasionally some 58s, 60s strictly combing
staple. Avers.e originil1 wools sold mostly at 71-72 cents, scoured basis,
while the lines consistir. of bulk short French combing nad clothing staple
64s and finer sold mostly at around 70 cents with the least attractive wools
going as low as 65 cents, scoured basis. Early shorn fine wools from western
sheep on feed brought 63-65 cents, scoured basis. There was very little call
for graded strictly combing 64s or finer territory wools d quotations ec.sed
1-2 cents, scoured basis.

Fleece wools of 64s and finer grades were mostly quit. Occasional
odd lots of strictly corMtbine Ohio and similar wools of this -rade sold at
30-31 cents in the grease. The demand for this t;ypo of wool was very restrict.
ed by the close of the month and remiainin- lots were Quoted at 30 cents, in
the grease, although few offerings were available.

A small demand was received on strictly combing 58s, 60s territory
wools at around 72-75 cents, scoured basis, luring the first part of April.
Demand then fell off and off-rings were quoted at 70-73 cents, scoured basis.
Strictly co-ibii.g 58s, 60s fleeces sold in sr.all quantities c-rl., in tie month
at 32 cents, in the grease. This business was followed by a c-:riod of dull-
ness when small sales were closed at 30-31 cents, in the grease. T..o shorter
wools of this grade were quiet because of the lack of demand frn, top.i -kers.

7:.c market was very irregular on 56s and -4s, 50s domestic wools during
April. Prices declined about two cents a po-unL, scoured basis, on each of
those grades of territory wools while fleeces of the correspo;.ii..- or-.des de-
clined 5-6 cents. The greater declines on fleeces than on territory wools
ap.cears to have been due to the depressed condition of the knitting trade which.
forms an important outlet for a lar.e portion of the fleece wools. Clothing
wools of these grr.des were very slow.

Domestic wools of 46s and lower qualities declined somewhat less than
56s and -8s, 50s, largely owing to the restricted supplies of the c;c-se ..rade.
of domestic wools and the increased firmness abroad on wools of corresponding
quality.

Texas wools were quiet until near the end of the month when a few sales
of twelve months staple were closed at prices in the range 75-80 cents, scoured
basis. Choice offerings were reported soli at 73-80 cents while the average
staple moved at 75-77 cents, scoured basis.

Mills continued to buy Australian merino wools of 60s and higher grades
in the pri:'.ar-.- markets until the prices in Australia began to ad-ance. This
t-,dael to slow up buying abroad b.- dor.-_stic a-nufacturers since some dealers
who had purclascd at the lower prices in Australia could offer spot wools at
fi.jrcs below the inportin; level. Super warp Australian 64-70s sold at 60-62
cents, scoured basis, in bond, w:-wile ood average 64-70s brouah.t 54-57 cents,
in bond. Cor.birin 54s cold mostly at 53-56 cents, scoured basis in bond. A
few lots of spot South American and Now Zealand crossbreds sold at about stead
prices as co-pared with March levels.


I


- 4 -







WOO L-26


Donand for wools suitable for the woolen trade was lmoderato. A large
portion of the demand was on off sorts and stained medium er-.r pulled wools
although there was some call for the offerings of the clear and pure white
wool,3. Fine pulled wools were mostly quiet. Prices on all grades of pulled
wools shown.d some decline. Scoured shorn wools were slow.

Iboils were slow and prices were irregular during the first half of
April, but later a demand aprearred on 58s, 60s and finer gr.-. ~ and tended to
increase with prices growing firmer toward the end of the month. More in-
quiry was received on 56s and 48s, 50s noils around the last of April and quo-
tations were firm owing to the 'rather small volume of offerings. The market
ias been sustained by the low rate of production of noils resulting from cur-
tailed operation of combs.

The top market was very slow during April -nd quotations were somewhat
irregular. As!kin prices held fairly steady on 64s, oil combed choice staple
tops, at $1.00-1.03 with most bids under $1.00. Short staple dry combed 64s
were quoted at 97 counts but some business was taken at 95 cents. A limited
amount of tCs oil combed top was sold at 95-97 cents per pound. The market
was very wea~ e on 56s and 50s tops. Deliveries of top showed a slight improve-
ment over March, but the volume was disappointing for this season of the year.

Wcol: Price per pound at Boston on specified dates,
1929 and 1930


Grade


1929


1930


:::.r. 9 :Apr. 13: May 11: Mar. 8:Apr. 12: :-. 10


64s., 70s, 80s (fine)
Strictly combing
Ohio and similar grease
Fleece scoured basis
Territory "
8s Os ;; blood)
Strictl." co iifi ;4
Ohio and similar grease
Fleece scoured basis
Territory "
G5sj; (/8 blood)
Strictly ,- comling
Ohio and similar grease
Fleece scoured basis
Ter-i tory U
46s (low ~ blood)
Stri ctl,' combing
Ohio and similar grease
Fleece scoured basis
Territory ?"


: Cents : Cents : Cents : Cents


: -4 : :
: 44-45 : 4:?- :
:105-110:100-105:
:107-110:104-107:


: 50-51 : 48-50
1:1 '-105: 100-104:
:102-107:100-105:


: 54-53 :
S5.-102:
:1,': -103:


: 4--49 :
90-32 :
: 80-5 :


50-51
92-95
3C-98


- .r- 15
73-77
75-78


40-41
97-102:
100-1i0:


45-46 :
97-100:
98-1C.':


46
84-86 :
87-91 :


-*1-43
70-75 :
72-77


,2-.-3
78-80
78-80


34-.55
73-75
73-78


34-35
62-67
65-70


31-32
53-55
55-57


Ccnt : Cents


30-31 30
75-78 : 73-78
75-78 : 73-77


31-32 : 30
69-72 : 68-71
72-75 :70-73


32-33 : 29-30
52-65 : 54-59
62-67 : 60-65


29-30 : 27 -2
4--52 : 45-48
52-55-: 48-51


Compiled from Werekly Ilarket lews R-ports of the Boston Office of the Bureau of
Agricult it.'rl Economics.


- 5 -


I







WOOL-26 6-

Prics: Foroigp

T.'lLonn oc prices advance

The third series of the 1930 London Wool Sales opened on May 13
with about 143,200 bales of wool available for the auctions. Sales at the
opening were brisk with prices in many cases at hi- gher levels than at the
previous closing while other values remained unchanged. WithdrawMls amounted
to 2 or 3 per cent. Greasy merinos sold at 10 per cent above the close of the
previous sales on April 9 and scoured combiiig merinos were 5 per cent higher
while all other merinos remained. urchC.jgeiLd. Greasy combing crossbreds were
7..5 per cent higher and lambs wool 10 to 15 per cent i,-:.er with no change in
scoured. Sliped crossbreds showed no change except for blanket descriptions
which were 10 per cent higher. Cape wools were 5 per cent higher and Punta
Arenas 10 per cent higher. The Continent, chiefly Germany, purchased merino
wools mostly while Bradford bought nearly all crossbreds.

United Kinrion: Prices at the London Wool Sales, reported
on basis of official standards of the United States
for grades of wool (scoured basis)

: 1929 1930
nite States 2nd series :3rd series: 2nd series :3rd series
United States
grades :Open : Close Open Open : Close Open
SMar.8 : Mar.21 : Mey 3 : Mar.18 Apr.9 : ., 13
SCCents ents : Cents Centts Cents Cnts

70s .. : 83.1:83.1 81.1 : 4.7 47.7 52.7
64s ....... : 79.1 : 77.0 : 75.0 : 42.6 : 4Z.L : 48.7
s : 75.0 : 72.0 71.0 : 37.5 : 37.5 : 42.0
58s : 68.9 : 64.9 60.8 35.5 : 35.5 : 37.5
56s . : 64.9 60.8 58.8 : 33.4 : 32.9 : .
50s : 46.6 : 44.6 44.6 2 2-.4 : 25.8 : 29.9
48s .: 43.6 : 42.6 : 40.6 : 23.8 : 24. : 28.4
46s . : 41.6 : 41.6 39.5 : 3. 2.3 : 26.4
44s .. : 40.6 : 39.5 : 32. 23.3 : 3.3 25.3
-s .. : 9. : 38.5 : 37.5 : 22.8 : 23.3 : 25.3
36 .. : 38.5 : 37.5 36.5 2 22.3 : 22.3 2 .3
Co:.i 1 from reports of E. A. Foley, Aincrican A.C:iciult:r l Comissioner at


N"' *-ian. prices above pr-vio.Ls aslo

Strong ?cr.ietition anl .aa excitci market lr :ci the opening of the
ninth ~'rics of wool sales in C:.-.l;-c;' on A'nril 2P and prices have re:-iaine
fim, ...; .ri-:, as omn.:ard. v:.h th the last sales closing rates (April 3)
were 1to 12.5 per cent higher for .t fine eirinos, 10 per cent hig e-r
for a: -:.,:- and inferior 7mrirl:io, 7.5 to 10 p'r cent hichPr for comr.nacks
zand 10 -;.r cent h-i 1 .-r for fine Re:;+. '*. J:- r. a '' ''-r were v.eported


for fin





-7-


to be opoeatila heavily with i'iancJ, Germany7 and Englani.- also buying. Offer-
ingsr w.rer c :.-Ct.I to total 171,:,'0 bales. The series will close on TI: 28.
Comnj'ltition was ?rn- ral at the Molbourno opening and tho market for comebacks
an:. cro .,srLraJi generally was 5 to 10 per cent Li. .r than the closing rates
of ti.o last series on April 1, while rates for morinos were 10 _-r cent 1ilh;r.
The improved prices wcre woll maintained, through the early part of the salo.
Aaicrica, Japa-n and the Continent w~oro reported to be buying freely with :.od
su';x:ort 'rom YorkzT'iiro and local manufacturers. The public sales in Australia
will be carried on until July 2C.. The now season's sales are to begin on
Soptc.n'.br 22.

The season is closed in IT-..n Zoaland.

3".j. 1.:. -i a t Syih African 3l:.s

Competition for wool at Fort Elizabe'- is re-ported keen with demand
general. Arrivals have been hea',' with 10,000 bales offered in the week of
lay 8. The supply was expected to dc.li.e after the middle of May.

Bral.f r.d [iisr% t i:n-.r :'.yes

Tic, tone of the top and yarn market at Bradford has improved within re-
cent weeks in spite of a continuation of the strike. To the week ended Iay 10
.rices of FI-zs and yarn had advanced from 1 to 6 cents a pound since the i in.-
nidg of the present rise in prices whic; started during the week ended A,:ril 4.


Wool, tops and yarn:


Price per pound at 2radford on


specified dates, 1929-1930

64s / 50s 1/

Date Wo Scoured: Scoured : : Worsted
: ool : s : yarn wool : Tops : yarn
: 2-48s : : 2-32s
: Ce:-t3 : Cents : Cents Cents Cents : Cents


Jan.
Feb.
LIar.

:ay
June
J-..l

Sept,
Oct.
i;:-v.
Dec.


.*........:


----..o...:
.o.....o...:
o..o.e...o:
C* C* C ... ...
.i




***.....:
*.........:
.ooeeooooo




..o.....:
..... ....:
... ... ..:


87.2
81.1
79.1
78.0
75.0
74.0
68.9
66.9
56.8
62.9
62.9
:38. 8


97.3
91.2
90.2
89.2
85.2
83.1
79.1
77.0
68.9
73.0
71.0
64.3


1930 .
Ja:. 2 ...........: 49.7 59.8:
Feb. 25 ..........: 46.7 58.8
iLar. 25 ...........: 4 .6 54.7
A:r. 25 ..........: 47.7 5: 7.8
'O 24 ..........: 52.7 60.8
I/ Official sta.''at-irds of the United States


129.7 : 51.7
125.7 : 48.7
125.7 : 46.6
125.7 : 4.7
119.6 : 45.6
117.6 : 44.6
115.6 : 42.6
113.6 : 40.6
103.4 : 39.5
103.4 : 39.5
10,3.4 39.5
-PA.-L ?7..

91.2 : 2.4
91.2 : .4

9.2 : 27. 4
92. 30C. .
o' r : ol id ..:.ol


5
5
5
5
5
5
5
4
4
4
4
4

3
3
3
3
-7


9.8
6.8
6.8
6.8 :
4.7
3.7 :
0.7
9.7 :
6.6 :
6.6 :
7.6 :
2. :

6.5 :
6.5
4.5
5. :
7.5 :


83.1
80.1
78.1
78.0
77.0
77.0
75.0
73.0
68.9
67.9
67.9
54.9


57.8
FtC..C 8
56.8
58.8


tops.







W00L-26


C:'r.tin -nt-1l Euroeo

uiropo'a trade and industries became more confident -J d the price
level and business renerallyr increased during April, according to a cable
from Agricultural Commissioner Steere at Berlin. Conditions in Bremen show a
good improvement and p-iicos are finlm F:-r.cc reports a steady improvement in
noils and to.p, -zc.ccially nerinos .nd fine cros'oreds.

Tocol, tops and yarn: Price per pol.u-Ld in France, specified
dates, 1'-:":-1930

: ~9 ____1930
Item
: Mar.4 : Apr,3 : :: 3 : Mar.l : Apr.l : M.!- 1
: Cents : Cents : ,::t.- : Cents : Cents : C- ts
Tops, Aust rli i :
Merino 64s Warp .....: 107.5 : 107.5 : 107.5 : 71.0 : 68.9 :69-71
Crossbred 56s ........: 91.2 : 91.2 : 90.2 : ..7 : 5.7 : 53.55
Top z, -': lt. in- :
Crossbred 56s ........: 83.1 83.1 : 32.1 : 48.7 : 46.3 : 49.51
Noils :
Australian merino ....: 89.7 : 89.7 : 90.6 : 56.9 : 5.. : 53.55
Austr-,ln11i crossbred .:: 75.5 746 : 75.5 : 37.3 : 3.5 : -1.,6
Cape .................: 90.6 : 90.6 : 92.4 : 53.3 : -C.2 :: 4E-C'
Yar ::
Merino ...............: 1i..3 : 19.-7 ; 126.6 : 91.5 : 3..0 89.8
Cheviot .............: 83.9 : 89.7 : 91.5 : 69.1 : 6-1.0 : 67.1



Tr-de 'nl1 conr.s -rtion: romncstic


R~Qce-tiS o:g _E ozton show s Lsonr:l r~1-.:.-e

Rec.i..ts- of domestic wool at 7cston cLiri.-i April were about 7,774,1CC
pounds cr. -.red with 4,543,nri poun-ds in the Iprcviozs month cr.nd 6,I-:,-- CLC
pounds in .; :il i '23. The total qi.-.tity of dor from Janua:ry 1 to April 30 was 2-4,'.- .,' 0 pounds conmprce with IIL4. ,00C
pounvs received 1-inrg the same months of 1'29 nd 29,078,0C r'ouu dz in 1928.
;ic frollow:.G table shows ron:il.r r.ceits of wool at Boston 1927-135:.


- 8 -







WVOOL-26


Wool, domestic: Receipts at B-3ston, by months, 1927-1930


I;onth : 1927 1928 1929 1930 I/

:, o a r .,-: l-C_ r_ -. r...:.:i:.. ,..*.j: '.000 -_p pounds

Jan. .. : 6,081 : 8,044 : ,532 7,660
Feb. .... : 6,577 : 6,399 : 1,86 5,001
Mar. : 8,600 : 6,497 : 5,738 : 4,548
Apr ..... : 9,522 : 8,138 : 6,442 : 7,774
Ia;, .. .. : 17,938 : 25,843 : 16,108
June : 46,106 : 50,083 40,094
Jul : 55,877 : 51,346 : 56,870
Aug. : 29,891 : 25,802 : 32,377
Sept.. ... : 11,799 : 7,156 16,23 :
Oct. .... : 9,033 4,598 9,171
Nov. .. 8,972 9,322 8,202
Dec. ... : 8,794 7,293 8,257
Com iled from weekly rep'frts of the Boston Wool Office of the Bureau of
Agricaltlural Econ o ics.
I/ Preliminary.


United Stntes i-'.;lrts bel.y lo t -":'


Total imports of wool into the United States during Tcrch 1930 anr,-o-ted
to 19,984,000 pounds cc:.pared with 18,226,C00 pounds imported in February of
the present -year and 32,625,000 pounds in I.-rch l1-29. Inmorts of combing and
clothing wools were 11,414,000 pounds compared with 14,420,000 ipoundz last
year. Carpet wool imports were only 8,570,000 -ounls compared with 18,205,000
pounds last year. The following table shows imports of combing, clothing and
carpet wools during February 1930 and March 1929 and 1930 with yearly totals
for 1928 aii 1929.

'Toc1: Imports into the United States, animal 1928 and 1929,
monthly, February 10:-0 and March 1929-1930

: 1928 : 1929 : 193 : 1929 : 1930
ool : Jan. 1- : Jan. Feb.:
eb. Liar.
: Dec. 31 : Dec. 31 : : :

: 1,000 : 1,000 :1,000 ,CCO 1,000
: riU;L : --- : -: .nll ; t "~s i S: :-'.'ldS

Co:bing : 72,627 : 86,~10 4,814 : 11,29 :9,099
Clothing . : IC,.LC : 1,488 : 2,62 : 3,151 :2,315
Tot2-1 : 91,07. : 102,198 : 7,;96 : 1.1,420 : 11,-14
Carpet : 143,326 : 17r,',7 : 10,730 : 18,205 : 8,570

Total :11 e..ools : 2-i',31 : 277,205 : 5 18,26 : 3,625 : 19,98-1
Corpiled from official record of t-e Butreau of Foroign andi Do'mestic Co':..ierce.
*


- 9 -










According to statistics co..rmilod b- t..ou BEton Ofi'ice- of t'c. Bzru-au
of Agricultural Ec.co::o.'ics, ior; c ..r i nto: tho por' of Bocton, Yf'
York and Philadeilphia from JanurL tL 1. C' 1" t 8 .i: u.itod to 8,723,C:'0
pounds compaerodd With imiT.'-rts of lcP,l 1,Cl, pou-nds during tile -. a-,e period
of 1929. The imports.of all cl.r-:ez ar:. belofC t :-ijo f last o:'r. Inmports
of cL,'Thingi wool'from Januart. 1 to lirf" 10 *.;.re 27,C0CC3,C'CO ;oundr com?-'.ed
with 48,697,000 Loud:, last -r. Im':rt: of clot]hi:ng :col .urin- tiLs ,iod
were 7,386,000 pundis-, coinpared 'it: 8,1e 7, .,'0 0 ion.ilds Is-t ;c'" :,:ilo carpet
wool imports declined to 49,9,1,,CJ, -:.u:c.. c o.nar:d '.1ith 7l,l.7,000 i:ou'l:d
last ;e'oar. Stc:i-:. of foroin.'":.ol in bonn:l.d ws.rohoucs .'.t PBtcn cn ia;- 1
3nounted to 21,011,378 pounds, co.:.c'-rd ..i ti 377,0C7,1-73 pounds on i:'; 1, 1929.

Wool nu? :ii-tita-i rem:rin: b:1*a l-a::t ot ar

The total quantity of wocol ,1tLrinr into mrLr'Icturc in the 'rJtod
States during Larch, as reported to t;ie bureau of the Ccnscus .; '1. '0 ,mai-'fc-
turors, was 37 million pounds (gr.:= cquivac,1'nt) co-,r,'rcd .:iti 38 million
pounds roe:c-tcl by 449 m.nufac :vr.r.-rs in FLbru-..a 1930 a nd .18 million 2ou.ndcs
reported by 4-73 manufacturers for ::'-c;i :-'. Of the total qiantit:y uzo5i ;
manufacturers in IMarch 54.1 por cent .:-.c -,.':1:tic '.cl and .15.9 per c.::t *-as
foreign wool. Combing vool acc:c.unt:l for '.[.2 p.cr cent of the; '.1ol consumed
during Mkarch, clothing tool acou.t:c*i for i _.3 ,r ccnt ;.'hilc carp3:;t :'.o.?l
made u.p the rom:.jnin~I: 27.5 )pr cc-;.t. T.:i ollo'vin table chow~r the conrun;p-
tion of wool in the United St-at-: b-- r.-:dc': aznd b-" classsc for O-)pcified
periods.


'ool: Consumption in ti L' Unito; St:.tat:,
spoci;fi'd ,:ints j


K r.i:K,2:


Official standards of the
United States for grades
of wool



C.:-li:t.; and clothing wool
64s, 70s and 80s .
58s and 60s .
56 . .
48s and 50s .
C.'.:, 40s, Gs and 46s .


1920 1q29


: J-'. 1-
: D:c. :1

: :,"_, :



: 61,53"
: 3,"19 :
: C1,2?7 :5
: 2L,26' :


Totcl combing and : :
clothing wools : 229,12 :
Ca.rpt .l .: 135.,616 :
Totr.1! -.1 *..*or..C.: : 4-6.,01C :


Co~-r~ilcd :r :7' '~.'. 21 t2- '~/:.~1 iT or.:.~r.'


Corpilod fr:.: : ".'.":. Lu t:.-- o,.-.l Corir. '
the Conu:r..
./ 2' .;o0 : '. ..' ..1 "-r.. -C o
tho 3 i -..... "..


J-.1. 1- :
Dec. 21 :
1,C0,C :



6,,2CE :
65,895 :
5e,161:
2y,371 :

.7, ,011
1i6,102 :


: 1 29 :


19c0


.:ar.


1 ,'O : 1 (,000 : 1, '0


1O,: '1
5, 016
5,77'





12 ,--89


11,261
:,516
3, 11
5,916
2.:, '96

--9-
0 756j
9** S


in 'F'o
3,9'.
3,217
3,6 t,,3
2, 27 (


L16o,113i : I,.... : 3'.,7i71 : .2.,73


'.:i : R.. ::'t." i: uod o,- t.: Bur3 .u 'f

.'tl .i ,:; 1.il,' d .?1 : .-; abli :..:'d b"
.2 i-.._:.t.. b-j.n "" ?, iuc .2i t,_o :I .: '_. .. b'.-.-i J.


-1r


.JOOL-26


- 10 -


*









Wool: Consumption in the United States, by classes
January 1929 IMarch 1930 l/

: : Domestic and foreign
Month Domestic : Poroi-n :
...... C.ombing. Clothing Caroot Total

S1,O : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 1,000
.OU.. pounds .:'s': ou:'l' .' :: u Ldf: ounid
1929 : : :
Jan. ....: 26,64:0 :21,149 26,649 : 7,005 : 14,135 : -7,789
Feb. .... 21,273 : 20,100 : 21,318 : 6,716 : 13,339 : 41,373
IMar. ....: 21,367 :20,217 : 22,416 : 6,680 : 12,488 : 21,584
Apr. ....: 22,659 : 20,117 : 23,188 : 6,705 : .12,883 : 42,776
Ha, .... 21,482 : 21,282 .: 21,962 : 6,568 14,23,4 : 2,764
Juno .... 20,638 : 17,901 : 20,9.4 : 5,985 : 11,600 : 38,539
July ....: 24,122 : .18,026 : 23,990 5,632 : 12,526 : 42,148
Ag. ....: 27,083 : .19,900 : 27,292 : 6,190 :.13,501 : 46,983
Sept.....: 26,213 : 18,226 : 25,662 :6,065 : 12,712 44,439
Oct. ....: 30,569 : 22,291 : 29,365 : 7,450 : 16,045 : 52,860
Nov. ...: 22,604 : 18,855 : 22,562 : 5,339 : 13,55: 41,459
Dec. ....: 18,972 : '14,427 : 19,95E 4,363 : 9,081 : 3,399
193 :* : : *
Jn. ....: 21,280 : 17,410: 21,9 5,558 : 11,199 : 38,690
Feb. ....: 18,738 .15,03 : 20,104 : 4,882 : 8,786 : 33,772
.:'.. ....: 17,695 : .15,035 : 19,036 : 4,694 : 9,000 : 32,730

Compiled from montf.ly reports of the Buroeau of the Census.
l/ Those aro totals of gre'u?, scoured. and pulled wools, as published
by the Bureau of the Census, and have not boon reduced to a grease
basis.


TIachinr:,- -ctivit;- cont .in'.:c tto 13.cli-.o


The report of the Bureau of the Census on activity of ~wool machinery
during lanrch 1930 showed further .ccreases con --rod with the previous month
and with the corresponding month of last y3ar. Woolon and worsted spindles
reported only 530 million hours activity in March comr. .r-d with 563 million
hours in February 1930 and 764 million hours in T--cl. 1929. Looms other than
carpet looms woro active only 6.3 million hours in March compared with 6.7
million in the previous month and 9.6 million hours in larch 1929. Decreases
woro also shown in the percentage of total machinery active and in the per-
centage of maximum single shift cc.p:.city. The following table cormparos the
a.ctivit; of v:ool r.iaclilnc;2 in the United States during March 1929 and 1930
and Fcbruar, 1930.


!00L-26


- 11 -








r!OOL-26


- "12 -


Wool machinery activity in the United States during
February 1930 and :T.rob 1929 and 1950

Percentage of total: Perccnta.o of
STotal numbor of hours : :achincry active maimum
'oolI machines vore active : at some time during: singio-shift
machinery :month : capacity
: 1930 : 1929 : 1930 : 1930 : 1929 : 1930 : 1930.: 1929 : 1930

: Feb. : liar. : Mlar. : Feb. : iar. : Mar. : Feb. : Mar. : Har.
: 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 :Per : Per : Per : Per : Per : Per
: hoirs : ours: hours : cent : ent : cent : cent : e : cent

Cards.......: 864: 1,254: 856: 62.0 : 75.9 : 61.3 : 6-.5 : 86.0 : 60.8
Combs.......: 458: 460: 358: 66.6 : 71.4 : 61.0 : 85.5 : 81.9 : 64.
Spindles: : :
Woolen......272,711:406,534:272,890: 60.1: 74.6 : 59.7 :61.0 : 82.7 : 57.8
Worsted....:290,210:357,147:257,519: 58.9 : 66.7 : 52.6 : 59.2 : 67.7 : 49.6

Wide /....: 5,607: 7,902: 5,253: 46.3: 59.6 :43.8 52.2 : 66.6 46.3
Narrow 2/ : 1,047: 1,737: 1,059: 9.4 : 59.4 : -8.1 : 40.7 : 59.6 : 39.2
Carpet : : : : : :
and rug... 1,021: 1,441: 999: 56.3. : 65.9 : 55.1 : 51.0 : 68.7 : 48.5


Compiled from the Reports of Active and Idle
by the De :artment of CoL.merce.
L/ VWider than 50-inch reed space.
2j 50-inch reed space or less.


Wool Machinery, issued Lonthly






WOOL-26 13 -

Trad? anin cor. ...ption: Fo rein

British trade decree;zcs

Total exports of wool and wool mLan.LUctures from Great Britain during
April show a decrease as compared with exports for March 1930 and are also below
-the exports of April 1929 according to a cable from Agricultural Commissioner E.
A. Foley at London. Exports of woolen and worsted yarns, however, were 3,022,000
pounds or 52,000 pounds above the March -.:p:orts. Z:Iports of woolen and worsted
piece goods were only 6,984,000 square yards compared with 9,844,000 square yards
in March.

Imports of wool during April were 85,600,000 ;'ou1i"s compared with
100,560,000 pounds in the previous month and 118,558,000 Tounds in April 1929.
The following table compares exports end imports of wool and wool manufactures
for April 1929 and 1930 and March 1930.

United Kingdom: Trade in wool and wool manufactures for stated
periods 1929 and 1930

: 1929 1930
Exports and imports Unit :Jan. 1 to: Apr. Mar. Apr.
__: : _Dec. 31 : :
: : T: .-iou isds: ThousandsThousands: Thousands
Exports -
'ool . pound :51,984 : 3,804 : 2,806 : 2,600
Tops ... .: :32,737 : 2,355 : 2,526 : 2,400
Yarns, woolen ... : 7,899 : 525 : 426 : 347
Yarns, worsted : 8,803 : 2,474 : 2,544 : 2,675
Tissues, woolen ..... sq. yd. : 108,185 : 6,647 : 6,995 : 4,999
Tissues, worsted ": 47,280 : 2,866 : 2,849 : 1,985
Flannels and delaines .: 4 ,056 : 268 : 257 : 181
Carpets and rugs .. : 6,481: 475 : 488 : 384
Noils . pound 17,101 : 1,708 : 1,139 : 1,100
Waste . .. : 15,402 : 1,479 : 1,424 : 800
Woolen rags ... ..... .: : 33,444 : 3,703 : 2,000 : 2,016
Imports : : : :
Wool .. .: pound : 813,628 : 118,558 : 100,560 : 85,600
Tops . : 1,776 : 143 : 151 : 200
Waste and noils ... 4,264 : 408 : 287 : 200
Yarns . .. 20,502 : 1,905 : 1,778 : 1,335
Tissues, woolen .:sq. yd. : 30,303 : 4,170 : 2,857 : 2,187
Tissues, worsted .: 7,106 : 1,373 : 1,027 : 867
Cairp:ts and rugs ": 8,239: 667 : 776: 700
Woolen rags ...... .: pound :52,989 : 3,529 : 3,144 : 2,688

Compiled from Trade and Navigation of the United Kingdom and cabled reports from
Agricultural Commissioner Foley at London.








- 14 -


Ger..:-;,-; nor.: o tr -.ir.i tic

Conditions improved in Brinei during April and the enerral feeling is
more optimistic according to a cable from Agricultural Conmissioner Steere at
Berlin. Occupation in the worsted and knitting yarn sections of the industry
has improved with new busiLessa and orders are being pljce.i a considerable time
ahead. Stocks of tops in the commercial combing establishments of Ger"--.' on
May 1 were almost a million pounds below the stocks of April 1 and were more
than 6 million pounds below the stocks of -1, 1929. Stocks of merino tops
on '.;r 1 amounted to 5,040,000 pounds and stocks of crossbred tops were
5,734,C: J pounds.

Fr..L .. '_-_o ts._i.rovement

'r:_,Ace reported a steady: i,',prveile;it during .1pril in noils and tops,
e:. .ciall; mrlerinos and fine crossbreds, according to Agricultural Commissioner
Steere. Shji,.?zs the second half of April was very Lo:.d. Industrial activity
was satisfactory during the month with new yarn sales important ?-.l an increase
in export business.

Stoc':c of tops in commercial "onr. establishments of Fr::-co on May 1
were about 3 million pounds below the stocks of April 1 and about 2 million
pounds below the stocks of :.: 1, 1929. Stocks of merino tops on May 1 were
15,143,000 pounds and stocks of crossbred tops were 11,400,000 ;p-uias.

The quantity of wool and tops rassing through the conditio.ni:g houses
of Roubaix, T.:urc-l.-. : and Verviers during April was hi '' r than in 1Mrch with
the exception of wool at Verviers i whic. showed a 'slight decrease compared witf?
the previous month. Thii q:r ntity of' yarn ssing through the co:litioning
houses of Roubaix and Verviers in April was below' that of March while Tourcoing
reports a slight increase.* See Table at bottom of page 16.

Italy

The buyi:.i of wvool -id tops in It-ly. showed a general Ir r,?ven-ct durin
April and altho'.:, still somewhat hesitant, the con'fde:ce in the :,rice level
has been restored. New orders for worstoe and woolen' industries have im-proved.






WOOL-C6 15 -

Wool: Imports into Bcl~ii)r., Czechoslovakia, Fr:_ncc, G.rr.-Ln; Italy,
Japan, Poland, United Ki-.,dor,. iad United States
N1ovcmbor 1929 ::-rch 1930

19.9 : 1930
Countrv and i .m


Belgium -
Wool, r ..s .............
'ojl, scoured ...........
Total ........ ....

Czechoslovdkia -

Fr-,iCJ, raw and on skins ...


Germmany
Wool,
and
Wool,
Wool,
and.
Wool,


Italy -


merino, -rr:z.o
washed .............:
merino, scoured ....:
crossbred, r-e :; :
washed .............:
crossbred, scoured..:


:Nov. Dec. Jan. : F:. : Mar.

1,( ') : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,C00 1,('"'
pounds : pounds : 'i. i: ar ?


8,432 :14,869 : 19,.198 :13,945 : 14,224
: 371 : .'; : 372 : 366 : 306
8,833 :15,259 : 19,570 : 14,311 14,530

: 1,0 : 2,191: 3,364 : 1/ : 1/


33,718



8,271
776

2,244 :
801


Total .............: 12,092 :


52,713



17,919
1,073 :

3,791
855 :


82,282



33,632
845 :

7,873
771


77,167 :



18,734
662 :

8,547
711


15,630
683

9,413
-' 35


23,638 : 43,121 : 28,654 : 26,361


Tiol, greasy .............
*Iocl, washed .............
Total .............


1,978 : 5,228
: 1,125 : 1,127
3,210 : 6,355


: 4,475 : 8,567

2,125 : 2,965


Poland -


9,307 : 14,545 : 8,792
1,257 : 997 : 1,026
: 0,564 : 15,542 : 9,818

11,671 : / 1/

5,549 : : 1/


United Kingdom : 48,724 : 77,-, : 95,400 : 81,900 : 100,560

United States -
.-col, greasy and washed ..: 14,089 :13,743 : 21,103 : 15,670 : 18,167
0'o1, scoured ............: 5,: : 6,494 : 5, 2.- : 2,556 : 1,817
-T
Total .............: 19, .3 : 20,237 : 26,323 : 18,226 : 19,984
Compiled from reports cabled by the Agricultural Commissioners at I~rlin and
Lornionr and reports from the International Institute of Axriciulture at Rome.
1/ Not reported.


,:







Tops: Stocks held by Continental commission combing
establishments. specified dates 1929-30

S1929 : 1930
Location and
description of wool Mar. 1 :Apr. 1 : My 1 : Mar. 1 : Apr. 1 : My 1
:__ : : :


: 1,000
: pounds


Belgium -
Merino ..
Crossbred
Total ..


U ermany -
Merino ...........
Crossbred ........


1,000
pC'rn-" 3


1,000 :
pounds :


,:0 : 1,000


pounds :


so~unid.


..........: 2,108 : 2,158 : 2,258 : 1,845 : 2,21Z
..........: 2,339 : 2,229 : 2,379 : 3,556 : 3,541
..........: 4,447 : 4,387 : 4,637 : 5,401 : 5,T.4-


..: 8,591 : 10,042 : 10,148
: 5,734 : 6,146 : 6,841


Total ............: 14,325 : 16,188 : 16,989
F rrL.: .


: 5,004 :
: 6,312 :
: 11,316 :


: 1,000
S: pounds


: 2,330
S3,424
S: 5,754


5,642 : 5,040
6,060 : 5,734
11,702 : 10,774


Merino .............: 13,514 : 14,484 : 15,792 : 14,046 : 15, 53' : 15,143
Crossbred ..........: 13,020 : 12,886 : 12,990 : 15,157 : 13,823 : 11,400
Total ............: 2,534 : 27,370 : 28,782 : 29,203 : 29, .9 : 26,-43
Italy .


Merino ............ : E, :
Crossbred ...........: 1,424 :


1,060 : 1,528 : 1,369 : 1,490 : 8
1,349 : 1,515 : 2,229 : 2, 5'2, : 1,845


Total ............: 2,290 2,409 : 3,043 : 3,598 : 3,432 : 3,22:
Compiled from cabled reports from Agricultural Coemissioner Steere at Berlin.

Wc..1, tops and yarn: Amount passing through conditioning houses at
Bradford, Roi.Ti::, Tourcoin,: and Verviers,
February April 1929 and 1930


Location and class


~P" icord -
Wool .......

Yarn .......
Roubaix -


,,:,l ...............:
7Y ri. ................:
Y" r. ..............


Y 'rn ............. .
Y' ......... ....:


Feb.

1,000


749
4,357
136

172
4,14 :
1,1.2 :J



1,911 :


Verviers -
L' ............ ... : 2,.J3 :
... ...... .......
Yarn ... .... ... ..... 7 :

C,-r,,i'L od. from cab od -.. I,,rts from
a'., Consul Thomson at 3r:- ford.


1929 1930
Mar. Apr. :Feb. : Mar. : Apr.
1,000 1,C' 1, 1,000 1,OCO
rI-:rl n : pounds : pounds : EIr.dcs : pounds

832 : 716: 754: : 2
4,619 : 4,670 3,9tc : 4,353 : 3,782
144 : 173 : 157 : 171 13:


243 : 243
5,243 : 4,'-1
1,314 : 1,3


2,407
7,747
*n .yl'O


2, 'i


1i85
4,'.75
1,214


7,2c7
1,922


317
39'


159
4,268
1,237

2, 1
5,E-
1,916

2, t-',-
1%:'


151
5,401
2, Z



1,.'



454


#Ri~ c'-ii tv~.-; iral~ ('ornw si gjontrl Stccl'e at~ ~~1 ir.


WOOL-26


- 16 -


. :






- 17 -


Wo:1l cuij.l -: tuiat ion

The present supply situation is characterized by a further gr.,.dual
reduction of the heavy stocks of the current season's wool held in pril.ir.r,
markets of the southern l;-irisp~ .Sellers are showing. a disposition to
meet the market rather then carry over large supplies to the next marketing
season begi-aLnifg July 1 when another large clip is expected.

The 1930 clip is being shorn in northern hemisphere countries, with
some of the wool already on the market. The 19C0 clips of the United States
and Cn,:.da are expected to slightly exceed last year's production. In
L>.ro.p.:n countries, exclusive of Russia the clip is not expected to differ
gr-atly from that of last year, ju.-L;cd by the latest estimates of sheep num-
bers. Production in Russia will prob:.blI show a decrease due to the slaughter
of sheep by the peasants.

The 1930 wool clip of the southern h.m-isrp-.re countries which starts
to market the latter part of the calendar :.-'r will prob..bl:r show no material
ch~a-ji.- from last year's 12-rge clip especially in view of recent reports showing
no effectss now \f sheep losses in Australia from drought during 1929. Seasonal
conditions, in th Australia and in Argentina are now in.ch better than at the
tame time a year ago, and, with continued favorable r'r-7wing weather, the yield
per sheep ac -- be expected to show an increase over last season. Conditions
in other southern hemisphere countries art reported' as good with se..:- numbers
in New Zealand, the Union of South Africa Iand Urui-ay reported as- above a .'.-.r
ago. These five countries of the southern hemisphere furnish ab~ .;.t three fifths
of the world's clip exclusive of Russia and China.


l!a:,t.,cro Ho...m a :r,3 ,co--mtries

United States

On January 1 sheep numbers in the United States were 3 per cent larger
than a year previous. The condition of sh-ep on May 1 w:as better then at the
same time a year ago.

Canada

Far~n flocks in Ontario, the pri.-cip.l -sheep raising province of Canada,
are in good condition and the lambing season has been very fair according to
the Ontario Department of Agriculture. Tne report expresses some surprise.
that more sheep are being kept considering the fact that wool prices are so low.
United Kingdom

L.imbing in England, Scotl.-.i ci-.i Irelaiid w; i. t re.ortedi ..Cre;- ei:.-. satis-
fact:'rily, t..e nuri 'er of lambs being sli:ntly above avn.-rge ari losses less
th_,L uz.3'~Li. Sheep numbers in these countries last June w;-re below the 192S
fi'.il'r s.


~-I-- ------ -







WOOL-26


- 18 -4


ITorthern Hemisphere countries (Continued)

Russia

The recent slaughter of sheep by the wealthier peasant as a protest
against Soviet agricultural policies points to a considerable reduction in
numbers in that country. This may result in an increased demand for foreign
wool on the part of Russia next season.

Southern Hemisphere countries

Australia

A preliminary official estimate gives the number of sheep on January 1,
1930 in New South Wales, which supplies over half of the Australian clip, as
50,740,000 head compared with the revised figure of 50,515,000 for January 1,
1929, and 48,920,000 on January 1, 1928. It seems, therefore, that the reported
sheep losses in the western district due to drought were compensated for by the
natural increase during the year. Since pastoral conditions are better now
than a >yar ago it seems probable that the 1930 wool clip from hew South Wales
will at least equal that of 1929 now estimated at 414,573,000 pounds a decrease
of 7 per cent compared with 1928. The yield per sheep last year was only 7.7
pounds against 8.8 the preceding season while the number of sheep shorn or re-
served for autumn (March, April, May) shearing during the season July 1, 1S29
to June 30, 1930 was 53,334,000 or 6 per cent above 1928-29. The bulk of the
clip in New South Wales is shorn during the last few months of the calendar
year. In addition to the reduced yield per sh'-ep the 1929 clip, marketed during
the current season, i. e. July 1, 1929 June 30, 1930, reflects the adverse
season in quality, length and condition, states Consul Hudson. As a whole the
clip was much drier and finer than a year ago. As a result of the severity of
the drought in many of the principal merino ram breeding districts during a '
long extended period there is a probability of a considerable shortr:c of rams
this year states the Pastoral Review.

Argentina

Conditions in Argentina are much better than last year at the same time.
Rain has fallen frequently and czenps have improved in general. Sheup slaughter
since the beginning of the year at freezing and chilling establishments is
estimated at 1,139,000 or 9 per cent above the same months of 1929. Including
the slaughter at the Liniers market Buenos Aires, the number killed was
1,252,000 or 9 per cent above 1929. This is the heaviest slaughter for the last
six years and probably shows some disposition to liquidate or cull flocks, due
to low wool prices.

U-ion of South Africa

The condition of sheep in the Union, with the exception of the Trensvaal,
gave little cause for complaint according: to the Union Crops oand Mar.:cts. In
the Tr-l svaal shoep were in poor condition on account of excessive r-.in which
caused losses aror.n lambs. In other parts of the Union the autumn l-ibing was
progre6sing f-.vornbly es,'ccilly in the Karroo, Wooled s'.ecp in Ju-ce 1929
nujr.hner:1. 38,213,0'.7 an increase of 6 per cent over 1928.






;700L-. 2,


Recel-:t, dit. sDosals and stacks in -.irlar-- nmr'-r ts

There have been no uLexpected developments in the ;.ar':etling of the
1929-30 Southern Hemisphere wool clip since our last r.2i:':.rt. Stocks have
been slowly diminishing but are still cc.rsiderably above a year ago in most
countries. In Areitina, ho'.::.ver, stocks at the Central Pr,:.iuce Il.arket,
Bueinos Lires on Ipril 24 were .below last year's figures by 27 per cent. Dur-
ing recent years approximately one third of the Lrgentine clip has been dis-
posed of at this market, but, .;...i;l to the ab:-.r.aality of the present season,
it is probable that more wool has remained in the hands of growers than in
previous years altho- .g. it is reported that stocks are not excessive. Receipts
at the Central Produce :lar'-et so far constitute only about 74 per cent of
last year's entries. Shipments for the season up to IAril 17, r.:-r. -ated
168,000,000 pounds or 23 per cent below a year ago. T..- clip for the season
was estimated at about 8 percati below that. of t;he preceding season. It is
estimated that this year-a little over half of the clip, including the carry-
over, had been s,:hi-.;d by April 17 compared with about three fifths last year.
This does not include wool sold but not yet shipped.

Shipments from Ur-ugeacy for the s :a on up to April 1' a., :re-ateI
86,000,000 pounds or 1 per cent above last season for the same period. By the
end of .:arch more than two thirds of the clip had been sold, as previously re-
pcrtcd, and the season was practically over as far as super wools raere concerned.
Shipments from the Union of South Africa from July 1 up to April 19, 1930 a:,;re-
gated 2 ^-1,000,000 pounds and exceeded last year's chiI. ints up to the end of
the same month by 8 per cent. By the end of March the long wool season was
practicc.lly over according to a report of the Standard Bank of South Africa, Ltd.
Eighty per cent of the season's.wool had,been shipped. Price fluctuations for
the next few months are therefore of comparatively little importance to South
African gro :ors. Stocks of unsold wool on ha-nJ at the beginning of 7arch were
estimated at 25,000,000 pounds, an increase of 12 per cent over the same date
a -car ago.

Disposals of wool in Australia and New Zeala.nd were still considerably
below last season according to latest, reports. Ait the beginning of *,pril dis-
posals in Australia were 25 per cent under the same date a year ago with ship-
ments from :;-.; Zealand at the beginning of April, 12 per cent belcTr last season's.
The Australian Wool Gro;or' s Council and national Council of Wool Selling Brokurs
have decided to discontinue the policy of restricting offerin;i; of the current
clip until the end of July in order to avoid a heavy carryover into the 19,.-31.
selling season jbegimnin Scptor .ibr 22.

The quantity of wool offered in New Zealand for the current season up
to iarch 1 was 340,611 bales and the quantity sold, 285,081 bales car.in-z 458,533
bales offered, and 426,096 bales sold in 1928-29 up to tlh same date. An impor-
tant wool buyer made the informal estimate that 150,000 bales of wool were being
held by gro ors annd approximately 60,000 bales by speculators, states Consul Boyle.
It is rumored that an addiiioniil.sale will be held to take care of the .toc.cl on
hand.


I _


- 19 -




- 20 -


Rocoipts, disposals und stock 1929-30 and 1928-29 clips
in primary mnarkots with comparisons


Coi-utry, itcoz and p riod


* Qwntity


2/








%I


1929-30 cli- :
jlstrralia: L
RocAipts: From July 1, 1929 to 4pril 1, 1930 ...........:
Soce period 1928-29 ....................:
Disposdl s: From July 1, 1929 to Pril 1, 1930 ..........:
Sance period 1928-29 ......................
Stocks on hand, Ap)ril 1, 1930 ..........................:
Sano date 1929 ..............................


July 1, 1929 4ril 1, 1930 ..............
S.mo period 1928-29 ............ ..........:


Shipments:


Jr "nt iini,, :
Receipts at Central Produce Iarkot
Jull 1, 1929 to April 9, 1930 ........................:
Samne ~oriod 1928-29 ................................:
Shipmnnts October 1, 1929 to -pril 17, 1930 ...........:
Siuo period 1928-29 ........................ .........:
Stocks at Central Produce I.irkot
April 23, 1910 .......................................
Saino date 1929 ......................................
Uru -i .r
Shii.:rnts: October 1, 1929 to Aprill 17, 1930 ...........:
Sano period 1928-29 ......................:
Unicn of S:...th .fifri .:
Shipments: July 1, 1929 to Aprill 17, 1930 .............:
July 1, 1928 to :.-ril 30, 1929 ............:
Stocics: iarcl 1, 19 0 ................................
Same dato 1929 .................................
1928-29 -1 s
.iustralia: 1/
Roceipts: From July 1, 1928 to Juno 30, 1-29 ...........:/'
Sno period 1927-28 .........................:
Disposals: From July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 ...........:
SaLm pe-,riod 1927-28 .... ............. .....:
Stocks on a..nd June 30, 1929 ............................:
Seno lato 1928 ........ .......... ...........:

Rocoipts at Central Pro tuco ::ar.:t, Du:Ln'C liros
Season July 1, 1928 to June 26, 1929 ..................:
Sane --:iod 1927-28 ......... ......... ... .. ........:
3:.p~nents: Octobor 1, 1''2 to So to icr 39, 1929........:
SzQo period I'27-28 .................................:
Stocks in Argontina on Scpto ..-r j0, 192. ...............:
Sno date, 1928 ............c..................... ...:
U.-.

coobruarts: Up to r .........................::
Iarch 1, 1929 ....................... .....:
ril 1, 1.21 ........ ...c....... .... .c... :0'
S.: ...,:n s: Oct. j.;:- 1, 1928 to S-:.3c .: jcr 30, 1929 ........:
S~me Dor;:.1 419J7-28 .........................:
Coi


732,702
785,522
518,666
694,200
213,836
91,0.6

146,000
187,000


65,192
88,360
167,e?57
219,4146

8 ,320
11,356

85,619
84,417

264,000
21-4,621
2-1,8 04
22,125


834,051
743,821
820,317
737,961
13,734
9,860


99,6-"6
91,905
317,186
296,95,
25,C02
18,520

119,CCO
121,CO 0
126,.841
128,275
127 ,53)
1'31, .8
t i nuo d


VWOOL-26





OOLL- 6


Rocoipts, disposals and dtocks 1929-30 and 1928-29 clips in
primary markets with comparisons, continued

Country, item and poriod : Quantity


Ur1u3-7 cli- cnnt'd
U.il,-D 29 c L.mt, c r t_:

Stocks: April 16, 1928. Stocks for disposal small .
4pril 11, 1929 .......... ............. ......... : 15,872
I.ay 8, 1929 ...................... ................:6/ 10,912
AZigust 31, 1929 ......... ........ ...... :.. / 8 ,s
Union oif S3ui :i iaric-' :
Exports: July 1, 1928 to Juno 30, 1929 .................: 283,000
Same period 1927-28 ........ ............... : 273,000
Stocks of unsold wool: Juno 30, .1929 ..................: /8B/ 9,149
Sa date 1928 ............................. :.:/ 6,940
IIow o"al-.nd:
Shiprmnts: July 1, 1928 to Juno 30, 1929 ................: 24,110
Sane period 1927-28 .......................... 226,455
Stocks: Juno 30, 1929 ................................: 27,500
Same date 1930 ............ ..............: 18,800
Co mpiled as follows: .usttrr.lfn: Season 1928-29 Estimates of I:r.tional
Council of Iool Soiling Brokers, Consul Gonoral Arthur Garrels, eolbourno,
July 10, 1929L. Weight per balo from Country Lifo and Stock and Station
Journal, July 14, and Dalgety's J.nnual Reoio'7, 1927-28, page 19. Season
1929-30 Wookly TWool Chart, April 10, 1930. Weight per bale, Country Lifo
and Stoc: and Station Journal, .larch Dr, 1930. Argontina: Roceipts, ship-
monts, stocks at Central Produce Iarkot, Rovio;- of River Plate. Total stocks
in Argeontin, cable from Buonos Aires -Br-...ch First National Bank of Boston.
Urugua: Season 1928-29, receipts, Monthly Roview, March, Brn' of London "nd
South nmorica, Ltd., and Sorvicio Informativo para ol ::x 1929. Stocks, April 11, 1929 and Ity 8, 1929. Wool Record and Textile ':.Crld,
April 11, 1929, May 9, 1929 and October Roviewo, 3ank of London and S;uth iuorica,
Ltd., clipments Sorvicio Informativo para el Exterior, October 1, 1929. Season
1929-30, shimrlen:ts, Roview of the River Plate. Uiini.nL of South .;.ic": Stocks,
llonthly Bulletin of Union Statistics. E:..-prts, Crops and Harkots of Union of
South Afri;c, Aigust 1929. 1929-30, Wool Record and Tc::tilc World, April 24,
193U aind official sources. ,r.; Z7 -l-nd: Shipments 1927-28 and 9l-t-:3 Consul
General W1. L. Lourio, Weollington, July 29. Stocks, Monthly Abstract of Statis-
tics, August 26, 1929. Season 19L9-,0 shipments, Dalgoty & Company quoted in
Yorkshiro Obsorver .4pril 30, 1930.
._/ Those figures concern only the clip of the season dosiLi-:.tod.
2/ Have used average weight of balo for July-February, 1929-30 as estimated by
the National Council of 'Wool Selling Brokers. Io later estimate available
as yot.
J/ Converted to pounds by using average voight per bale as reported by Dcr.l1t:
for the 1929-30 season.
/ During recent years about 1/3' of the national Argentino clip has becn disposed
of at this market.
5/ Converted to pounds by using estimate of average weight per bale of -10 pI:uni
as farnished by the national Council of 7Wool Selling Brokers of Australia,
J.l-r-Juno 1928-29, compared with an av rage of 304 pounds for period July 1
to June 30, 1927-28.
~/ ic: corr:cspnding estimates for preceding year available. 7/ Scoured \rool cha.Dd
to grease on basis of 60 per cent loss in scouring. 8/ Practically all inferior
sorts.


- 21 -







!700L-26


- 22 -


Sheiip :.n:v'mJ t in Nc7w Zol.-nd 1925-1929


Season La; 1 ipr. 30
Itom
1924-25 : 1925-26 : 1926-27 1927-28 192-29

*: : : :

Flocks at beginning : .: :
of ;'-yr .............: 23,775.8: 2-,548.0 : 24,9050: 25,649.0: 27,133.8
Lambs tailed ........: 11;467.1: 11,435.8: 12,070.0: 13,179.0: 13,856.0
Total .... ..: 35,21-2.9 35,983.0: 36,975.0: 38,828.0: *0,99.8
Sla3. hit. .r wings 1/ .: .
Luiabs .............: 4,968.4: 5,206.3: 5,544.9: 5,980.8: 6,197.3
Shoop .............:. 3,906,3: 3,570.0: 3,810.7: 3,703.4: 3,507.8
Total ..........: 8,84.7: .8,776.3: 9,355.6: 9,684.2: 9,705.1
Tct figure ..........: 2,,3163.2: 7,2r7..: 27,19.1: 29,1 3.8: 31,2681.7
Flocks at end of yoac : 24,548.0: 24,905.0: 25,649.1: 27,133.8 29,051.1
a)ppOront losses during: : : :
yoer .............: 1,820.2: 2,302.4: 1,970.0: 2,010.0: 2,233.3
Porccnt.ge loss ratio : 7.5: 9.3: 7.8: 7.6: 8.0
Incroaso over 12 r.t;,Ti-: 772.2: 357.0: 744.0: 1,-8.8: 1,917.6
Porcontago incroaso...s 3.3: 1.4: 3.0: 5.8: 7.1
Compiled from tho iTow Zcaland Yearbook 1930.

L/ At abattoirs during year April 1 to IHarch 31.
2/ Total of flocks at 'c.Snnig of year and Isnbs tailed minus total
slaught rings.


---------------0--------------


UIVER PSiTY r ,F" FLORIDA

liI niwiI1262 II0II2 I i1 II
3 1262 08728 9012


i-~:l Zo~l'!d




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E47MNUPD0_UK5EU7 INGEST_TIME 2012-08-30T16:10:07Z PACKAGE AA00011233_00011
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES