World wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
World wool situation
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some issues combined.
General Note:
Description based on: WOOL-16 (June 17, 1929)
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 631804619
lccn - 2010229455
ocn631804619
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .A19
System ID:
AA00011233:00010

Related Items

Succeeded by:
World wool prospects

Full Text
NIV F FLOP


SUITED STATS. IPARTMBIT OF AGRICULTURE
S .S. DEPOSITORY Bureau of Agricultural Economics
U.S. DEPOSITORY
.Washi ngton
May 1, 1930
WOOL-25
.7ORLD .'OOL SITUATION

TRAIE A7TD COiTSU31.TIOU PRICES* STOCKS AI, PRODUCTION


Prices of domestic wools at Boston declined considerably from

March 15 to April 15. Ohio and similar wools declined from 1 to 4

cents a pound, on a grease basis, and from 1 to 6 1/2 cents on a scoured

basis. Territory wools were mostly 2 to 5 cents lower than a month ago,

on a scoured basis. The greatest declines were on 48s-50s strictly

combing wools which were 4 cents lower on a scoured basis and 36s, 40s

and 44s which were 4 cents lower on a grease basis and 5 to 6 1/2 cents

lower on a scoured basis.

Spot prices of Australian wools in bond at Boston also declined

considerably with good average 64s-70s wools .6 1/2 cents a pound lower,

58s-60s wools 5 cents a pound lower and 56s combing wools 7 1/2 cents

below prices on March 15. Declines in prices of New Zealand wools at

Boston were not so great but 56s-58s wools declined from 2 1/2 to 5 1/2

cents, 48s-50s wools declined 1 cent, and 44s-46s wools were 2 cents lower.

i South American wools however, were mostly unc-.anged in price from last month.

The London Wool Sales opened on March 18 with prices considerably

lower than at the close of the preceding series, but during the course of

the sales prices strengthened, indicating that the opening prices had fully

discounted the plentiful supplies yet available, and the unfavorable world

demand conditions. At the close of the series on April 9 prices were at

about the opening levels and below the best levels for the series. At the

sales in Australia and New Zealand prices have also sFren-thened and com-

petition is becoming more ceen. For the -resont at least it seems to be


A






WOOL-25 2 -

felt that the doclinos havo gone far enough and reports refer to specula-

tive as well as trade buying.

Although the strike at Bradford is interferin w.-Jith the British

trade, it is not affecting prices. The unsatisfactory British demand

coi1itions have, on the other hand, influenced wool prices for a considerable

length of time, but there is no indication that a short lived strike will

result in further adverse effects. The German and French tops markets were

quiet during :;arbh but improved slightly late in the month. In i:eoping

with the general business and textile conditions of the country, the German

wool textile industry has not been especially active, although German buyers

are reported to have been active at the recent wool sales. In France activity

is slowing down, due largely to low export demand, and French buyers were

notic-ably inactive at tio London Sales.

In the United States wool consumption continues lor and wool man':hi:.r3y

showed a lower per cent of activity in February th:c in JanT'cr. As was to

be expected with the low rate of domestic consurn :,ion, imports have been low,

the decreases in foreign wool prices being reflected in the 1.-:m'stic rarikt

rather glick~ly without large i..,'orts. Stocks of foreign wool in bor.i at

Boston are also low, being little more than half as 1rr.re as last :.c-:r.

Reccipts of d 'r.ctic wool at Boston have declined both as co:ar::d with

previous months and with last :--. Sales of the current clip in :. r -"

country aro rp:ojrt." as limited up to April 1 with a larco qua-t:ity bi:-.i;

rpo:lc-d and consigned.

Stoc,-z of :o0l re;nainirn; in pri;iary ..ar-3:ts wore about 38 er cent

lar.:r on A-ril 1 than a 'cear -:c. T:.' larcg part of theso accuulations

are in Australia N.::' Now Zealand and are due, at last partially, to th







VOOL-25 3 -


program of holding wool off. the market .during the period of decl i;n:

prices. .t prosont prices the w'ool cn undoubtedly be movod rapidly,

however, 'so that stock' will probably not be as much above last year when

the present season ends as they now are.

Countries of the Northern Hemisphero are now shearing their 1930

clip. Shoep numbers have boon increasing in the United Statps and Canada

but in European countries there have been some small. decreases. lst year

and the 1930 European clip outside of Russia :ill probably be no larger

than in 1929. Reports indicate heavy livestock destruction by Russian

peasants.

Pasture conditions in the principal wool producing countries of

the Southern Hemisphere are reported to be guenrally good, and for Austra-

lia and Argcntina particularly, are better than they were last year.



Prices: Foreign



London Wool Sales close steady


Prices at the close of tr,- London Wool Sales on 2Aril 9 were at
about the same levels as at the opening, and somewhat below the best level
for the sales, accor?.in.z to a cable received by the Forcign Service of
the Bureau of Agricultural Economics from E. A. Foli:', Agricult'ral Com-
missioner at London. The sales opened on Ilarch 18 with prices of marino
wools 5 to 10 per cent below the close of the previous series and with
crossbred wools mostly 10 to 15 per cent lower. Th-.re was some z.1arnco
in prices as the sales ,ro,-r-scd but at the close of the sales 70s, 56s
and E0s were lower than at the opening, '".hro. 45s and 40s wore higher
and other grades ,;ore the same. Gczri-r buyers wore the most active in
morinos and Bradford buyers were most active in crcssbr-ds. French buyers
wore the least active among thei ii:rtait consumers. Purchases for America
70ro mostly of ic; Zealand crossbrods.






WOOL-25


iJ ITED XIINGD0;:


Pricos at tho London V/ool Sales, reported


on basis of official standards of the United
for grades of wool (scoured basis)


States


: 1929 :1930
United States
grades : Jjn. 18 : lr. 8 : I!ov. 19 : Jan. 21 : ar. 18 pr. 9

: Conts : :t Cents Cents : Cnts : Cents

70s : 87.2 : 83.1 62.9 49.7 : 48.7 : 47.7
64s ... : 81.1 79.1 58.8 46.7 : 42.6 42.6
60s .... : 77.1 :75.0 54.7 : 43.6 : 37.5 : 37.5
58s : 73.0 68.9 50.7 : 40.6 35.5 : 35.5
56s ... : 71.0 :64.9 : 46.6 : 36.5 : 33.4 32.9
50s .. : 51.7 : 46.6 : 39.5 : 31.4 26.4 : 25.8
48s .. : 47.7 :43.6 : 36.5 : 29.4 : 23.8 : 24.8
46s .. : 46.6 41.6 35.5 28.4 23.3 23.3
44s .. : 44.6 : 40.6 : 34.5 : 27.9 : 23.3 23.3
40s ...... : 42.6 39.5 34.5 27.9 22.8 23.3
36s .. : 42.6 38.5 : 34.5 : 27.9 : 22.3 :22.3
Compiled from reports of E. A. Foley, nmorican Agricultural Commissioner
at London.


Lujtrgli'in "nd ZH-'.: cl-i".n sales Strenrithon


Prices at the various Australian and ;T-.: Zealand wool sales hold
irc-:i MaIrch 25 to april 10 have boon generally strungthoning. Prices in the
second wook of April ere mostly 5 to 7 1/2 por cent hi.bor than at sales
hold around the middle of March, although some declines ccc'urrcd on medium
wools and lambs wools wore lower. Competition was reported to be oeen with
.p;.cultors becoming active at some of the sales.

Fradf'orl tos -y.nd :.'rn Trics firm

Prices of tops and yarns at Bradford have declined about the same
amount as have wool prices in recent months so there is no material change
in margins. Recently prices have become more firm, .nlor.g with the firmness
.roted in the prices for ra' wool.

On April 19 it was estimated that 75,000 cmployecs of 400 firms 7vore
out of w'ori' because of the strike, but that 25,-'C0 Cn'lo; ofs 150 firms
were continuing at ,'or!< either at the old scalo or at the net roduc-dI rates,
according to a cable from Consul Macatoo at Bradford. A settlement was
anticil-atcod shortly after the Easter holidays.

Prices: Domcst.ic


B: t.o! 'i l r._r.:c-t dull


Business in the wool .ar.;:t', bogan doclinii-: during th first ..-ok
in :J-rch aiI rer-in.:i dull most of the month, ac.'rdJn; to R. L. Burrus of
the Boston wool f:fico of the BPr- r.- of Agricultural Economics. Scattorol


- 4 -*






/OO0L-25


sales of small quantities for immediato consumption wore reported through-
out IL-rch on 64s and finer wools and toward the latter part of the month
a little 58s,60s domestic wool was being called for6 Prices showed a
steady though gradual decline during the entire month. Unsettled markets
a.broad with quotations on cabled offerings to Boston firms losing during
a greater part of the time tended to shako confidence in world prices.
This situation caused hesitation in the goods market. Hills, failing to
get orders for goods and facing declining raw materials, stayed out of
the wool market oecopt to cover the limited quantities needed to complete
nrdors.

The decline at the London opening had little immediate effect upon
values of domestic wools for the decline had been to some extent anticipated
before the opening. Domestic prices continued to decline even after reports
from London indicated a firmer trend. This can be partly explained by the
fact that supplies of some lines of domestic wools were restricted and the
readjustment in prices had lagged somewhat behind the trend of world prices.

Pine wool prices decline

The bulk of the trading in domestic wools was on 64s or finer grades.
Prices on those lines eased moderately. Principally French combing wools
were wVnted. Graded Territory French combing 64s and finer wools sold in
the range 72-75 cents, scoured basis, as compared with 72-77 cents during
February. Original bag lines of these qualities, consisting of bulk good
French combing and containing some strictly combing staple sold at 75 cents
and slightly under, as compared with 75-77 cents during the previous month*
Average French combing original wools brought 72-73 cents, which was a
decline from a maximum of 75 cents in February. Short French combing style
original wools of 64s and better quality sold at around 70 cents, scoured
basis, with some sales in the latter part of the month at least two cents
under this figure. Most of the easing on those lines camo early in the
month and remained about steady until the close, French combing Fleeces
of 64s and finer grades sold at 72-75 cents, scoured basis, but later quota-
tions oased to 70-73 cents.

Strictly crmnbing domestic 64s and finer wools *wero very slow. A
little Ohio and similar wool of this class and grade moved at 32-33 cents
in the grease, or 75-78 cents, scoured basis, as enmpared with 33-34 cents
in the grease, and 78-81 cents, scoured basis, in Fobruary. Offerings wore
very light. Territory graded wool of 64s and fint r strictly combing staple
was very quiet and quotations on available offorings wore dropped. from
78-80 cents, scoured basis, to 75-78 cents.

A foew lots of Texas twelve months wool Wore moved early in March at
77-79 cents, scoured basis, The now lrizona wools began to come onto the
market during March. The best of those wools brought 72-75 cents, scoured
basis. .vorago French combing wools brought 70 cents and slightly above.
Some of the short staple unattractive Arizona wools sold at 65-70 cents,
scoured basis.


- 5 -







- 6-


:: I ~.LI .,,,'iz als-. lo.;cr

During the latter part of ;:arch an occasional request was r cciivod
for 58s,60s d-.orr.-tic wools. Some slcoz woro.cloZd -on b.-th Fleece and
Territory strictly combine wools of- this grade." Fl'ecos j'ou- :t 32 cents
in the :icelo, or 70-72 cents, scoured' basis, as c mpar-.l with tlh nomiu-ial
quotations in February of 35-36 cents, grease *basis, or 73-77 contc,
scoured basis. Territory 58s,60s showed a similar decline with sales :Ln
the r-.no 72-75 cents, scoured basis, as cor.pared with the previous nominal
quotations of 73-78 cents.

Both Fleoce and Territory 56s quality wools vwre neglected during
-iar.h and quotations declined nominally .1-3 cents, scoured basis. 3nall
sales wore closed on 48s,50s domestic -wools. Strictly combing FlPccos of
this grade sold at 32-33 cents, in the grease, or about a cent off. Terri-
tory strictly combing 48s,50s wools sold at 57-62 cents, scoured ba'-.r, 2s
ccr-L'-rod with 62-65 cents during February.

Domestic wools of 46s and lower grades wore quoted lower altlIouhj
there was prr.ctically no business on them. Supplies were very light an..
njuota. ions .voro nominal. The lower ranges of quotations reprosentced .ad.ust-
ments of ideas of value in line with the lower trend in foreign I).; grade
wools.

Sales of foreign vools very small

The market on foreign wools was at a standstill previous to the
London o-r.ni n. aftor the opening at London a few mills placec:d or.-ers with
brokers but the limits were low and only small quz.i-titios were secured in
primary markets against these orders. Unsettled conditions abroad caus-ed
mills to buy very cautiously and dealers were almost entirely out of the
market. The mill orders included both Australian merinos and some crossbrods
of both 7,..: Zealand and South -merican or:-';. Spot wools were vory slow
with only a few gnall lots sold for urgent Qr.c.cd. Quotations on spot wools
were lower on Australian and Now Zealand lines and rt aJ.y on South 2mcrican
wools.

?F-llc-d .::.-l r 1:ar:.t irre.'jl j

Dc.mand on woolen :.oo3ls was very irrc-.l1-r with brief yp.riods ,i' buying
follo-:ed by a slac:ening in activity. Se.1o scoured clcthir~g wools weoroe old
but eo..id, was mostly very li-ht and prices .aoro lower. A fair lc'~.:..l1 in
the a., r-.regato was received for 3-;nade pulled wools butI sales wore not sto-CJdy
ani each new movement was at a loier level of prices. These char-;',increase in
.lauit* or of :-.hce curing Fobruary was a vory important boariLz.. factor in the
market for ;:ull.e wools during :'aich.

I'':il 1 Il l- l].,. o-.,or

j,.. noil market was slow. Quotations showed a Ca.;n., tc..; gracdua
a-ci, r.; t1.:.'?:,':.. A little more inquiry; appeared: to? .r1 the end -:' the month
and quotations bocamo somewhat firmer.








VOL-25


Smrillr dolivories of tops


The top narkot X.-.s slov-z and prices irregular during March. The ad-
vancos medo in askicnr prices on 64s tops in Fobruary :.joro never firmly
cstablizhod. Follo-.:.in this .action on the part of tooppaltrs, spinners
slackCned t-cir activity in tahe market and after a rook or ton days they
voro able to secure concessions in prices from topi.iacrs. To'.-.rd the end
of the month some now business was placed on 64s and 60s tops. Oil combed
64s that ;ill spin 50s yarn sold at l1.02-1.03, -.:hile the dry combed shorter
staple tops sold as low as 95-97 cents per pound. Oil combed 60s sold at
95-97 cents per pound. Deliveries continued to decline during the greater
part of Larch' and only toward the end of 'the month woro there any indications
of an increase.


TOOL: Prico per pound at Boston on specified dates,
.Novemibor 1929 _.;ril 1930

S: 1929 : 1930
Grado 9 D
: ov 9 Doc. Jd. 4 o Fb. 8 : 1ar. 8 : Ar. 12

: Cents : cents : Cents : Conts : Cents : Cents
64s, 70s. 80s (fino)
Strict l. conibin : :
Ohio and similar grorao 36-37 : 35-36 : 34-35 : 33-34 : 32-33 : 30-31
Flocce scoured basis : 88-90 : 85-88 : 83-86 : 78-81 : 78-80 : 75-78
Territory scoured : 87-89 : 85-87 : 83-85 : 78-80 78-80 : 75-78
58s, 60s (- blood) :
Strictly combing : :
Ohio and si::ilar grease: 42-43 : 41-42 : 40-41 36-37 : 34-35 : 3-32
7leeco scoured basis : 88-92 : 85-88 80-83 : 75-78 : 73-75 : 69-72
Territory scoured basis: 87-90 : 85-87 : 80-83 : 75-78 : 73-78 : 72-75
56s (3/8 blood)
Strictly co,.:bi:ng
Ohio and similar groasc: 44-45 : 41-42 : 40-41 : 36937 : 34-35 : 32-33
Fleoco scoured basis : 85-87 : 78-83 : 77-80 : 67-69 : 62-67 : 62-65
Territory scoured basis: 85-90 : 83-85 : 78-80 : 68-71 : 65-70 : 62-67
46s (low 1/4 blood) : : :
Strict ly co.ibig : :
Ohio and similar grease: 38-39 : 38-39 : 36-37 : 32-34 : 31-32 29-30
Flooco scoured basis : 63-65 : 63-65 : 60-63 : 53-57 : 53-55 : 48-52
Territory scoured basis: 65-70 : 65-68 : 62-67 : 55-58 : 55-57 : 52-55


Compiled from 'veooly Market Nows Reports of the
Bureau of agricultural Economics.


Boston Office of the


- 7









Tr.-.do anc. coa-it ior Doc8stic

Rocc.iatc at Boston doclino .lu 'ina T[arch


Receipts of dorostic wool at Boston during iIarch woro 4,548,000
pounds co'.rprcf'. ;ith 5,001,000 pounds in the previous nonth and 5,738,OCO
pounds in March 1929. The total quantity of domestic vool arriving at
Boston from pril 1, 1929 to 'Larch 31, 1930 amounted to 210,963,000 pounds
which is 9 pillion.pounds above arrivals during the sarao period last year but
8 million pounds bolc;: the 1927 season. Thc following table shovls monthly
receipts of' ool at Boston 1937 to 1930.

!00L, DOiEJ3'TIC: Roccipts at Boston, by months, 1927-1930


Honth 1927 1928 1929 1930 j/

: 1.COO -ounIc : 1 00 pounds 1.,'000 'unds : 1.'1'00 *Junds
*
Jan : 6,081 : 8,044 4,532 : 7,660
Fob .... ..: 6,577 : 6,399 : 1,836 5,001
Iar. .. : 8,600- : 6,497 : 5,738 : 4,548
4?r 9,522 .:.. 8,18 : .. 6,442 :
May : 17,938 : 25,843 : :16,108 :
Juno .... : 46,10& : 50;083 4 40,09 :
July ... : 55,877 : 51,16 : 56,870 :
ug 29,891 : 25802 : 32,377
Sept 11,799 7,156 : 16,233
Oct .. : 9,03Z : 4,598 : 9,171
'v : 8,972 : 9,522 : 8,202 :
Doc : 8 794 : 7,293 : 8,257

Ci:..iled firoi '.;ooe:ly reports of the Boston Wool Office of the Bureau of
igricult-ral Iconomiics.:
I_/ Prolimincry.


U;ni t Str.tc. i...,ort; be:lo.; lr..t 'o-r"

Tctal i._-orts of wool into- the Unitoe. St:tos d'irirn Fobiruary 1930 woro
18 million clu-.s comiparod ,with 26 million po-~ds: i.Lportorl in January of tho
present year and C3. million poundss in-Fobiau:r.- 1929. Ir.T-orts of co='.i:-; ='.d
clotiil ;01 ool nr'ountod to:7,496,iC'I o..i:;.3 cy;:T,.-'.:i with 15,6973,C 0'u p.iL- for
February 1920. Oca'pot '.:ol imports ::orc 'nl: 10,730,01; pouzids co.: ardc: with
17,445,:$"J .o-r.ds last yoar. lThe'foll:i:'. t.rblo'shoiws in.-rts :z co.ibig,
clothing an*: carpot ,Jools duri:-. January 19.7C0 ad Fobruar l'.I,?-29 n.d 190 %with
yearly totls- for 19'28 and 1929.


JOOL-25


- 8 -







W'.OOL-25


*Imports of -Jool into the United States, annual 1928 and 1929,
monthly Jaunry 1930 and Fobruary 1929 and 1930

:Jan. 1-Doc. 31 : Jan. Feb.
Wool
S1928 1929 : 1950 1929 1930
1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,00C
1:'u'd: .ouis -"nn. z pounds pounds

Combing .. : 72,627: 83,71(: 7,701 : 13,857 : 4,824
Clothing . : 18,408: 18,8: 3,010 : 1,836 : 2,672
Total .. 91,035:102,198: 10,711 : 15,693 : 7,496

Carpet .. .. :149,326:175,007: 15,612 : 17,445 : 10,730
Totl :240,361:277,205: 26,323 : 33,138 : 18,226
Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic
SCon mrco.


c nording to statistics coipilod by the Boston office of the Bureau
of Agricultural Economics, iirports of wool into the ports of Boston, ITow
York and Philadelphia from January 1 to April 18, 1930 amounted to
73,C-.ir,000 pounds coryparod with imports of 113,079,000 pounds during the
sane period of 1929. The largest decrease occurred in inmorts of cob~ing
wools which zero only 22,166,000 pounds compared with 43,311,000 pounds
imported from January 1 to April 18, 1929. Imports of clothing wool during
this period amounted to 6,616,490 pounds compared with 7,327,428 pounds
last year. A largo decrease was also reported in the imports of carpet
tvool. Durin' tho ,rriod January 1 to April 18 there were 44,275,346 pounds
of carpAt wool i;i_ rtod into those ports ccir;-.-d 'ith imports of 62,440,645
pounds during the sane period of 1929. Stocks of wool in bonded warehouses
in Boston on April 1 amounted to 19,814,412 pounds, compared with 37,598,946
pounds on April 1, 1929.

Wooj. osonsur!,:.ti On count ~2inues lo::

The total quantity of wool entering into manufacture in the United
States during February 1930 as reported to the B- roau of the Census was 38
million pounds (Zroaso equivalent) cor,-rared with 44 million pounds reported
in January 1930 and 48 million founds rc,-errtod during February 1929. Of
the total quantity used by manufacturers during February 1933 about 55.5
per cent ::as domestic wool; and 44.5 per cent was foreign wool. Co.bing
wool accounted for 59.5 per cent of the wool consumed during February 1930,
clothing .iool accounted for 14.5 per cent while carpet wool made up the
re ;lair.in 26.0 per cent. The following table shows the consi,,ujition of
wool by -rados during February 1929, 1930 and January 1930.


- 9 -






- 10 -


W: L: Consumption in tec Urited Statoes, by gr-.7:s, for szcciii
mo-.ths 1/
nrr* th


uOitcilj standards of
United States for gr
S of wool


tAe 0 :
-d -s J-n. 1 Dec. 31. J n. Feb.
.:1928 : 1929 : 1')' 1172 : 1i30


:. 1,000 :1,000 : 1,000 :1,0'0 : ,0
: .[. .:.I, ,, .'. is _CL _- j: c'-'r.j 1 -',OY1. Is
Combing and clothi,,- wool : :
64s, 70s and 0s..........: 118,0 142,279: 11,461: L --: .,2.
58s and 60s ................: 61,535: 64,2?:: 5,.:, : -,4 '.: ,.
56s ........... .. .. ....... : 63,019: 65,895: 4,377: 0,. -5: 3,511
-8s and O0s................: 51,273: 58,181: 3,837: 4,321: 3,916
36s, 4~z, 44s and 46 ......: 25,266: 29,371: 1,.: 2,698: 1,748
Tot.l combing and : ,: : .
clothing wools........: 339,192: 3-0,011: 27,491: 28,033: 24,985
Carpet wools.................: 135,826.: 156,102:' li,10": 13,0: 8 8,76 3
Tot-il -11 wools ..........: 465,018: 513,.13:. 38,690: .41,372: 33,771
C:;. -ii f'rl .j.:t in- t I. "ool: Consum-ption Reports" issued by the Bureau of
the Census.
1/ Ti!:;s are the totals of granse, scoured and pulled wools, r.s p.lblis-ed b.'
the B-.9i of the Census, ,and have not boon reduced to a grease basis.


-7,CL: Coan:,.L.ptiic.i in the United States, by classes
Jrinuiary 1929 February 1920 1/


Ionth



1 9
Jan. .
Feb. ..
Ma.r. ..
Apr. .
'..;r .
June ..
July ..
A^ T
Aug .
Supt. .
Oct ..
Nov ..
Dec ..


F b ..


Total C... i
1,000 :: 1,000 :
jil-l uJ. :: pounds :

-7,789 :: 26,649
41,373 :: 21,318
41,584 :: 22,416
42, '7 :: 3,188 :
42,764 :: 21,962
L,5-.'" :: 20,954 :
42,148 :: 2,990 :
46,933 :: 27,..- :2
44,439 :: 2., :'
52, .' :: 29,365
41,459 :: ;:,562
:.,639 :: 19, ,1 :

38,6'; :: 21, 3.J,
33,',., : .,li -


Clot i.:

1,000 :


7, C'-
6,716
* 6, 0 :1
6,705
6,568
5, '" :.
5,632
6,190
6, -.: 5
7,450
5,539


5,558 :
4-,882


Carpet Domestic
1 Y : : 1 ,.. ) :
::

14,135 :: 4,040
13,339:: 21, 7'
12,-i :: 21,3 7
12,8.3 :: 22,..' :
14,234 :: 21,-. :
11,6'1 :: 20,638
12,6 : 24,1:2
13, 1 :: 27, 3 :
12,712 :: .',213
16,045 :: 30,569


91 ,. :: 1 ,

11,1 :: I, o :
6 ::-*> i ',:'c


Compiled from ,c...; ports of tno 3z.rca of ;.e Census.
1/ -:. are totals of grasc, scour i ....- .. ied wools, as '.I ;. L;, th.
Bureau cf the Cmensus, and :ave not becn :.i n:. to a gr-'e basis.


WOOL-25


rci&.n
L-reign S



21,149
20,1':
L:,217
2.,117
14,1 -- 7
17,?1_
1@,026
19,:.:0


1 1
18,;,50


17,410
15, '.4


)








r,









VOCOL-25


- 11 -


Trade and' consumption: Foreign


Bradford

Trade gcner:.llr has been slow reflecting the poor domestic demand and
low exports. The total weight of wool and tops passing through the Bri.;lford
Conditioning House during March was greater than that for February but was
below that of March 1929. The quantity of wool tops conditioned ac.s 1,353,000
pounds compared with 3,',:6,0) pounds in February 1930. Toe table on f-; 16
shows the quantity of wool, tops and yarns pcssing through the c:nditio;.ig
houses of Bradford, Roubaix, Tourcoing and Vorviers for the first three months
of 1929 and 1930.


WOOL, TOPS AND YARM:


Price per pouin' at Bradford on specified
dates, 1929-30


Date


1929
Jan. 26
Feb. 23
Mar. 23
Apr. 23
May 25
June 25
July 25
Aug. 25
Sept. 25
Oct. 25
Nov. 25
Dec. 23
1930
Jan. 25
Feb. 25
Mar. 25
Apr. 25
IT Official


SScoured
wool


.......:

.. .... :

eo......*:
. ......:
.......:
,.ee~oe:
,....el:
.......:

.....,:
.......:




st..d.rds
.......:*
.... ..:







strund-rds


Cents


87.2
81.1
79.1
78.0
.75.0
74.0
68.9
66.9
56.8
62.9
62.9
58.8

49.7
48.7
46.6
47.7
of the


64s 1/


54s 1/


: : Worsted : Scoured : : o.rsted
:Tops : yarn : wool Tops : yarn
: : 2-48s : : : 2-32s
nts ts nts Cents Ct Cets C : Cents


:97.3 : 129.7 : 51.7 :59.8 : 83.1
:91.2 : 125.7 48.7 56.8 : 80.1
: 90.2 : 125.7 : 46.6 56.8 : 78.1
:89.2 : 125.7 48.7 56.8 : 78.0
85.2 : 119.6 : 45.6 54.7 : 77.0
: 83.1 : 117.6 : 44.6 :53.7 : 77.0
: 79.1 : 115.6 : 42.6 : 50.7 : 75.0
:77.0 : 113.6 : 40.6 : 49.7 73.0
:68.9 : 103.4 : 39.5 :46.6 : 68.9
:73.0 : 103.4 : 39.5 : 46.6 : 67.9
71.0 : 103.4 39.5 : 47.6 : 67.9
: 64.9 : 99.4 : 35.5 42.6 64.9
: :
: 59.8 : 91.2 : 29.4 : 38.5 : 60.8
58.8 : 91.2 29.4 36.5 : 57.8
:54.7 : 87.2 : 26.4 34.5 : 56.8
:57.8 : 89.2 27.4 35.5 : 56.8
United States for wool and wool tops.







WOOL-25


British ctx orts dccr.:su

The exports of wool manufactures from Great Britin continued to de-
crease during March according to a cable from Agricultural Comnrissimncr
E. A. Foley at London. Exports of woolen and worsted yarns amounted to
2,970,000 pounds or the sane as those of February. Exports of woolen and
worsted piece goods were only 9,840,000.square yards compared with 13,050,C00
square yards in February.

Imports of wool during March were 100,500,000 pounds compared with
81,900,000 pounds in the previous month. The following table compared the
exports and imports of wool manufactures from December 1929 to M:arch 193l0.

IJUITED KI1TGDOM: Trade in wool and wool m-nuf-ctures, December
1929 March 1930


Exports and imports


Exoorts -
Wool . .
Tops .
Yarns, woolen .
Yarns, worsted .
Tissues, woolen .
Tissues, worsted .
Flannels and delaines
Carpets aril rugs .
Noils ... .
Waste .
o.len rags ......
Imports -


'-'ol .
1 -' *
'k: te and noils..
Yarns .. .. .
Tissues, woolen .
Tissues, worsted
Carpets and :.r.;s
.7o:len r-,,r 3 .


Unit






. :pound
S I


II



It
pou: -
S: sq. yd.









Sound
II
II
: I


S: sq. : .
If II

. no'.: Ld


1929 12830

Dec. Jan. : Feb. Mar.

: Thou- :Thou- :Thou- : Thou-
: s.rnds : ids : s-nds : s jads

:3,600 3,100 :2,100 : 2,800
1,0 : 2,700 1,800 : 2,500
480 : 530 420: 430
:2,910 : 3,180 : -,55 : 2,5-20
: 7,840 9,700 : 8,880 : 6,990
: 3,570 : 4,390 4,170 : 2,850
S340 : 30C : 320 : 60
: 480 : 560 : 540: 490
1,100 : 1,0_. : 80i : 1,100
: 900. 1: l,". : 700 : 1,400
: 1,570 : 3,470 : 2,350 : 1,900

:77,800 :95,4C : 81,900 :100,.00.)
: 100. : 100 100 : 100
400. : 40 ':." : 2C0
2,"60 : 1,930 :1,720 1,780
1,830 :2,040 :2,12 : 2,860
50 820 &: 0: 1, 30
7: 7.0 700 : 720 : 78C
:4,480 : 4,030 3,770 : 3,1-kI


C..,;i,iled from Tr-d: and Havidati:.n of the United ZiiiL
from Agricultural Commissioner F:'ley at London.


dont and cabled reports


__


- 12 -



r











WOL-25


Gc rrr--y],:

The Germn m-.rkct was rather quiet during Eirch but improved slightly
for tops at the cud of the month according to Agricultural Commissioner Stoerc
at Berlin. Occupation in the worsted and knitting yarn spii.fil:i sections of
the industry is declining while the position of the woolen spinning industry
'is reported as very unsatisfactory.

Stocks of tops in the commercial cdmbing establishments of Germany on
April 1 were slightly above those March 1, 1930 but were about 4.5 million
pounds below those of April 1, 1929. Stocks of merino tops on April 1 amounted
to 5,642,000 pounds and crossbred tops amounted to 6,060,000 pounds.


TOPS: Stocks held by Continental commission combing
establishments, specified dates 1929-30


Location and
description


1929


of wool Feb. 1 Mar. 1 Apr. 1 Fe

: 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000: 1,
: 2por.s r: founis : pounds': -,c,
Belgium -
Merino.......: 2,158 : 2,108 : 2,158 : 2
Crossbred....: 2,260 : 2,339 : 2,229 : 3
Total......: 4,418 : 4,447 : 4,387 : 5
Germany -
Merino.......: 7,218 : 8,591 : 10,042 : 4
Crossbred....: 6,312 : 5,734 : 6,146 : 7
Total .....: 13,530 : 14.325 : 16.188 :12


Fra- c
Me
Cr


b. 1

000


1930

SMar. 1 : Apr. 1

: 1,000 : 1,000


u.-.ds poi.d : pounds

,055 : 1,845 :2,213
,829 : 3,556 : 3,541
,884 : 5,401 : 5,754

,885 : 5,004 : 5,3-'2
,641 :6,312 : 6,060
.526 :11.316 : 11.702


e -
erino.......: 12,189 : 13,514 : 14,484 : 14,493 : 14,046 : 15,386
ossbred....: 12,698 : 13,020 : 12,886 : 16,828 : 15,157 : 13,823
Total......: 24,887 : 26,534 : 27,370 : 31,321 : 29,203 : 29,209


Italy : : : : :
Merino....... : 769 : 866 : 1,060 : 1,054 : 1,369 : 1,490
Crossbred.....: 1,393 : 1,424 : 1,349 : 2,187 : 2,229 : 2,052
Total......: 2,162 : 2,20 : 2,409 : 3,241 : 3,598 : 3,542
Compiled from cabled reports from Agricultural Commissioner Steers at Berlin.


------ -


- 13 -


- -- j


9


,


,1








WOOL-25


- 14 -


WOOL: Imports into Bclg-iuj, Czechoslovakia, Frence, Germany, Italy,
Japan, Poland, United Kingdom and United States
October 1929 to February 1930


Country and item


: N.1D9 19 30

: Oct. : Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb.
* : *


Belgium -
o,0,l, greasy .................
Wool, scoured...............
Total .................


Czechoslo

France, r

Germany -
Wool, n
and v
Wool, n
Wool, c
wash
,ool, c


Italy -
Wool,
Wool,


: 1,000
: pounds :


:7,049
241 :
7,290 :


1,000
pounds :


8,462 :
371 :
8,833 :


1,00 :C
pounds


14,869
3?0 :
15, }.9' :


1,C 0
pounds


19,198
372
19,570
f


: 1,000
: pounds


: 13,545
: 366
:14,311
-I


)vakia :1,649 :1,056 : 2,191 : I/ : I

aw and on skins........: 25,282 : 33,718 : 52,713 : 82,282 : 1/


merino, greasy
washed ................: 4,700 : 8,271 : 17,919 : 33,.32 : 18,734
aerino, scoured .........: 1,209 : 776 : 1,073 : 845 : 662
crossbred, -,reasy and
ed.....................: 5,025 : 2,244 : 3,791 :7,673 8,547
crossbred, scoured......: 1,215 : 801: 855 : 771: 711
Total..................: 12,149 : 12,0K : 23,-63 : 46,121 : 'S,c54


greasy .................: 3,322 : 1,978 : 5,228 : 9,C37 : 1/
washed ..................: 1,254 : 1,232 : 1,127 : 1,257 : 1/
Total .................: 4,576 : 3,210 : 5,355 : 10,56.4 :


Japan 2, : 4,475 :8,567 : / : I/

Poland 2,116 : 2,125 2,? : / :

United Kingdom :21,997 : 48,724 :77,600 : 95,4',: : 81,'"-,

United States -
Wj,:, gr,..:. and washed ......: 14,214 : 14,089 13,743 : 21,1 : 15,670
'ool, scoured ................: 5,041 : 5,234 : 6,494 : 5,..'f : 2,55
Tctal .................: 19,255 : 19,323 : 2C,_:.7 : ,3.. : L5,,226
Compiled from reports cabled 'l the Agricultural Commissioners at Berlin an:
London and reports from the International Institute of A :-iculture at noc'-.
I/ I::.t r ported.


I







.'OO L-25


- 15 -


j aJ;.i:ie3r' a: i v t:' e.' i. .s l iw

The report of the Bureau of the Census on activity of ,iool machinery
during February 1930 showed considerable decreases coni reC. with February
;929 and January 191.0 both in the actual n uibor o' hours that the machines
wore in operation and in the per cent of maxi:..mun single shift capacity.
Wool and ".J-:" tod s ic11eos re o-rta' only 561 million hours activity in Fetru-
ary colipared with 604 million hours in January 1930 and 708 million hours
in Februia'y 1929. Looms other than c.r .-t looms %:ere active only 6.7 million
hours in February compared with 7.8 million in the -revious month and 9.2
million hours in February 1929. The following table co.iL -cs the activity
of wool machinery in the United States during February 1929 and 1950 and
January 1930.

Wool machinery activity in the United States during
January !;- 0 and February 1929 and 1930

: Perce:iztge of total: PB rce:ta;.- of
T total number of hours : machinery active maim
S- machines were active at some time (c-.rini: sin le-shift
'ool : month capacity
machinery
SJan. : Feb. Jan. : Feb. : Jan. : Feb.

1: 0 : 1929 : 190 : 1930 : 1929 : 19O 1970i : 1929 : 1930


I,', 0O : 1,0"0C : 1,000 :
:.:'.rs : ,iours : hours :

Cards.......: 1.0: 1,1179 864:
Combs.....: .-16: 457: 458:
Spindles: : : : :
./oolen.....:C ':;,567:370,470:270,711:
Jorstci... :300,591:337,165:290,210:
Looms: : :
Wide /...: 6,344: 7,592: 5,607:
arro '. 2 : 1,418: 1,579: 1,047:.
Carpet : :
:1a rug : 1,140: 1,321: 1,021:


Per
cen :t

62.6 :
66.7 :

61.1 :
55.8 :

47.7 :
53.7 :

57.3 :


Per
cent

74.9 :
69.1 :

73.3 :
66.9 :

59.4
60.2

65.1:


Per
cent

62.0 :
66.6 :

60.1:
58.9 :

46.3 :
49.4

56.3 :


Per
cent

63.4 :
77.8 :

61.7
54.9 :

52.7
50.1

50.7 :


Per : Per
cent : cent

85.3 : 64.5
84.3 : 85.5

81.6 : 61.0
68.7 : 59.2

68.5 : 52.2
58.7 : 40.7

66.6 : 51.0


Co.:niled from t-:i, Rc 'orts of Active and Idle Wool I:.-. i~.r::, issued monthly
by the Department of Con.ierce.

ji/ Ier than f 5-inch reed space.
S50-inch reed a_:..ce or less.


--














F i;- --, 16 -

Business in tops and noils was quiet in France daring "!?rch but
irr.'-d toward the end of the month .-ccjriirng to Agricultural Cormnissioner
Steere. Occi.pation- in the weaving and worsted spinning industries is good
while woolen spinning industries show a sli,.,htly downward tendency-. Domes-
tic yarn orders are good but exports are limited. Prices of crrssbrod 56s
tops, Australian, were unchanged but declines were noted in 11 other tops,
noils uand yarns for April 1 as conmpa.red with March 1 quotatiox:s.

WOOL, TOPS .UTD YAR1i: Price per pound in Frr-nce, specified
dates, 1929-1930


: 1929


Item


: Cents
- -, Australi an :
Mcri:-o 64s warp ..........: 82.1
Crossbred 56s ...........: 34.9
Tops, Ar; :r.tine :
Crossbred 56s ..... ....: 60.8:
IToils : :
Austra-lian merino.........: 71.1 :
Australian crossbrei .....: .49.8
C p .... ...... ... ... ......... 76.4 :
Yc.ra -
Merino ...................: 104.4
Cheviot ..................: 80.9 :


1930


: if-v. 1: D ?--. 5: J.:-. 2: FV2. 1:


Cents :

77.0
61.8

57.8

69.3
48.0
74.6 :

106.2
42. .6


Cnts : C

73.0
58.8 :



62.2
-3.5 :
67.5

104.4 :
80.9 :


Dents

62.9
50.7

48.7

56.9
39.1
56.9

93.7
38.4


-;r. 1 Apr. 1
Cent Cenr.ts

71.0 : S6.
50.7 : 50.7

:b.7 : 46.6

6:.9 : 53.3
37.3 : 35.5
53.3 : 46.2

91.5 : 8,.0
69.1 64.0


Sto'-s of tops in coiaercial combing establishments ir. France on
April 1 were about equal to those of March 1 and were about 2 million pounds
Lr;-.tar than those of April 1, l',2-. Stocks of rmLrino tops on April 1
amounted to 15,386, X'3) )'pounli and crossbred tops to 13,823,00C po',nils.

T":e quantity of wool, tops r-in yarns passi.-g thru : h tr.e 2)nditicn-
ing houses at Roubaix cind Tour-oing during March was generall; lowcr than
in F-br-.,cry !' 3 and March 1929 with the exception of yarn at Rjubaix
which showed a sli'ght increase over the previous month.


---^------


--


!.0,L-25


- 16 -







.i00L-25


7O00L, TOPS


.- 17 -


J.1D Y'i.RT: .jount passing tireough conditioning houses at
Bradford, Roubaix, Tourcoing and Vorviors,
January to March, 1929-30


Location and :1929 1930
class : Jan. : Fob. : Iar. : Jan. : ?eb. : liar.

: 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 1,0C0
: jo.mlds : ':-ar, : ou"a nds : pounds : pounds : pounds
Bradford :: :
Wool .. : 722 : 749: 832 : 630: 716: 754
Tops .. : 4,386 : 4,357 : 4,619 : 3,720 : 3,966 : 4,353
Yarn ... : 162 : 136: 144 : 242 : 157 : 171
Roubai:: -
Wool ... .. : 245 : 172 243 : 265: 185: 159
Tops : 5,310: 4,142 : 5,243 : 4,226 : 4,775 : 4,268
Yarn : 1,636 : 1,192 : 1,314 : 1,543 : 1;214 : 1,237
Tourcoing :
Wool ... : 2,445 : 1,929 : 2,407 : 2,690 : 2,350 : 2,218
Tops : 6,667 : 6,270 : 7,747 : 6,347 : 7,297 : 5,670
Yarn : 2,105 : 1,911 : 2,092 : 2,196 : 1,922: 1,916
Verviers : : :
.,ool .. : 2,842 : 2,396 : 3,159 : 2,399 : 2,403 :
Tops : 595: 456 : 443 : 187 : 317 :
Yarn ...... : 776 : 657 : 813: 747 : 639 : .


Comp.iled from crabled
Berlin and Consul


i reports from agriculturall Commissioner Steere -ot
Thim.ison at Bradford. l/ ITot reported.
lool supply situation Lpril 25, 1930


The 1930 wool clip is now being shorn in most countries of the
northern K;..;i 3j re. Indications based on the number of h'o) eon hand
in Canada and the United States point to slightly larger clips this year
then last. In Europoan countries, oc:cluding Russiq, the clip will probably
not differ greatly from that of last year. Seasonal conditions in the
import-ant wool growing countries of the Southern Hemisphere arc reported
as very favorable, the situation in 'Astralia and .'gentina showing a
groat improvement over a year ago so that another large clip may be ex-
pected from these countries. Although there were sheep losses in 1929,
caused by the drought, they wrre reported to be less than formerly under
similar conditions and there have been no reports of serious ihic:p losses
in the last foe months. With improved growing conditions the weight per
fleece nay be 0::pccted to be greater.

Stoc!:s in pririary markets of the Southe-rn Honisphero the first of
April woro considerably heavier than a year ago. Those larger stocks are
in part a result of the policy of limiting offerings earlier in the season.
Hoavocr, as this policy is now boing discontinued there may be a substan-
tial reduction in stocks before the next Southern Hemisphere clip comes
on the market in 2Agust or Soptoimbr.







0OOL-25 -.18 .-


ITorthom H1cr.n isrlh:.re. c,,ntri's

Shoop numbers in the United States and Canada according to latest
estimates wero 3 per cent Lr. 9 per cent respectively above proceeding
figures. In 13 a/ European countries sheep numbers in the early :part of
1929 wore 1 per co2it below 1l ZS with brcodirg- owcs in 8 b/ Europoea coun-
trios t as arcr:etd s rc::i...atly the sa:ne as the prccedi2n year. W0ool
sales and contracting in the .:stern prt of the United States were re-
ported as very limited up tQ the first of wiril with a largo quantity of
wool being Col- and consigned.

It seems probably that the noxt livestock returns for Russia will
show: reductions in.most classes of animal due to the -wolosale destruction
of livestoc-i by peasants r-eportc- from all parts of the country. L- Soviet
official recently stated that in comparison with autuiDi last year the number
of sheep in Russia proper, (ezcludimnj ,.Tito Russia, Ui-'ai'nd and Trar.sc'uczsia)
had d(i linlicd by 23 per cent.

Australia

Conditions are rcport.,l as satisfa6tor'" in shoop areas. Hea'v rains
over the interior of Qu:csland., io-.:: South Wales n:i South unstralia hr-vo
b.ou1:-t relief to all drc-i.? t areas, :.ccodli:.: to the Yor::zhiro Obs:rvr.
Rains in the Queoosla pa pastoral districts aro reported by't-ic Ptstoral
Rovieor as the best in seven years. It is probably that thore have been
larger ].illin,:= of soeop th.-ln a year ago altioug: no reports of heavy
liquidation of shoc'c are at hand. Shipments of lazb and miutton carcasses
overseas from July 1 to January 30 n mborod 1,766,000 a:-d -;ro 5 per cent
above last season for the sano period.

. ,:v nt -'.

Since the bogi;-in3 of the year rgcntina h:as -ad very favorable
otherhe. SCuiaror (Docemnbor-Febi-uary) rains wore more general than usual
and over 80 -_~i' cent of the country is in a .-.tizfactory condition. There
is no z;:rt:.ro of grass an i aalefa. E. -po_-rts from t-'. south of the country
state that largo l m-bors of shoop arc lie;:ly to to slr:, jht:r' in the
different wori:s operating in .ng;::tina and Chilean territory, according to
the Roview of the Ri-vor Plato. It is g-i.r.-1r y con sil' t' :.t consid-
orablo ,cr'cer.t:.o of plain ;ua'lity animals will be handlod as many or.ors
have boon forced to sell I:."rt of their 1".:-. stock in ordor to ;in.-.nce
thomsolvos on account of low returns fr':.i wool cli-p.


/ ';-. 1v.i and ;allos, Scotli::Cn, North Iroland, Irish Irco St-.t, :'r-.:cc,
,. .a>:-, Y-uL..,^'z, Yu,_oslavia, Greece, 3lria Runia, Latvia,
Istonia.

../ Er.,.;l-..L and ...ls, Scotland, I,.-rt;. Ireland, Irish Prce State, Franco,
Gorn iny, Hung-'r, R ..:'..; -t-..






WOOL-25


- 19 -


Union of South Africa

Pastoral conditions in this country are satisfactory. In the
greater part of the country rains have been good, and in some districts
they have been excessive, although sheep and lambs have fallen off, in
condition in some cases. As a result of too much rain their condition
is good on the whole.

Receipts disposals stocks in primary markets of Southern Hemisphere

Supplies a/ of wool awaiting disposal in the five principal primary
markets of the Southern Hemisphere during the remainder of the current
season b/.are estimated at approximately 38 per cent above the quantity
awaiting disposal on the first of April last year. Almost half of these
supplies were in Australia, the remainder being distributed among the
other countries. At recent sales in these countries competition was strong
and it seems probable that the supplies carried over into the next season
will not be as heavy as indicated by the figures available up to the first
of April.

hir-.cants from these countries so far this season appear to be
about 17 per cent below the preceding season with stocks on hand at most
selling centers, especially in Australia, considerably above a year ago.

Receipts of wool into store in Australia during the first nine months
of the current season i. e. July 1, 1929 April 11, 1930 are estimated at
733,000,0,'J pounds compared with 786,000,000 during the same period of
1928-29, a decrease of 7 per cent. Production in 1929 still stands
officially at 925,000,000 pounds or 3 per cent below 1928. Disposals
during the first nine months of this season are estimated by the National
Council of Wool Selling Brokers at 519,000,000 pounds and are 25 per cent
below last season for the same period. Stocks on hand April 1 were heavy,
amounting to 701,000 bales or 214,000,000 pounds against an average for
the four preceding years of 209,000 bales. Stocks at the present time are
also considerably above the large quantities on hand in 1924-25 when the
carryover into the next season amounted to 506,000 bales. The rearranged
sellir. program for Australia will bring the season to a close in Juno
instead of August 15 as previously decided, according to the Wool Record
and Textile World.


a/ Includes the comparatively small quantities of wool already sold for
local consumption in countries other than Australia. The amount
used locally, however, usually constitutes a very small percentage
of the total clips grown in these countries,
b/ Season in Australia, New Zealand and the Union of South Africa ends
on June 30 and in Argentina and Uruguay, September 30.






700L-25


- 20 -


Shipments from New Zealand this season up to March 1 are unofficially
estimated at approximately 127,000, .,-:') pounds against 144,000,000' pounds
last season, a decrease of 12 per cent. The final sale was fixed for
April 10 instead of the 14th as announced earlier.

Fales for the first eight months of the season i. e. July 1 T.'arch 1
reached only 285,000 bales against 426, .i'J bales for the same period of
1928-29, states Vice Consul W. P. Cochran under date of March 25. With-
drawals have been fairly heavy and one of the large local wool brokers
estimates that 150,000 bales or about 50,000,000 pounds will be carried
over into the new season unless the sales are extended. Last season the
carryover was 27,500,000 pounds.

Receipts and shipments of wool in Argentina are both about 25 per
cent under last season up to Karch 27. Stocks at Ccntral Produce Larket
on .larch 26, however, were 13 per cent below a year ago. The Argentine
clip for 1929 now estimated at 324,000,u00 was 8 per cent below the 1928
clip.

It is reported that more than two-thirds of the large Uruguayan clip
of 150,000,000 pounds had been sold by the end of :arch with most super
wools disposed of, according to a cable to the Wool Record and Textile
"'.rld. Shipments up to March 27 arrcgated 73,000,C'(, pounds, a decrease
of 8 per cent co r.l:-Lred with last season. Stocks at L:onte'.ideo on Fcbruary 26
were unofficially reported at 30",u'"'i,000 poundr with no comparable estimate
for the same date a year ago. Stocks on hand a month later last year i. e.
on April 11, 1929, however, were reported as 16,000,000 pounds.

Shipments from the Union of South Africa from the beginning of the
season to April 5 are unofficially estimated at 255,000,000 pounds or
4 per cent above a year ago. Stocks on hand at selling centers officially
estimated at 37,:.,, pounds on February 1 were 32 per cent greater than
at the June date of 1'.29. By the first of February over two-thirds of the
clip of 302,00,000 pounds was reported as sold, according to Consul C. C.
Macy, stationed at Port Elizabeth.




I00CL-25


Receipts, disposals and stocks 1923-3J, and 1928-29 clips in
primary markets with comparisons


Country, item and period Quantity


1929-30 clip

Australia: 1/*
Receipts: From July 1, 1929 to April 1, 1930 ..........
Same period 1928-29 .........................
Disposals: From July 1, 1929 to April 1, 1930 ..........
Same period 1928-29 ........................
Stocks on hand, April 1, 1930 ........................
.Same date 1929 ....... .....................
New Zealand:
Shipments: July 1, 1929 larch 1, 13u ................
Sau e period 1928-29 .........................
Argentina:
Receipts at Central Produce Harket -
July 1, 1929 to'March 26, 1930 0 ...............
Sare period 19.'6-29 ............ ................
Shipments October 1, 1929 to :March 27, 1930 .......
Same period 1928-29 ...............................
Stocks at Central Produce liarket -
March 26, 1930 ....................................
Same date 1929 ........... ........................
Urugu a :
Shipr.onts: October 1, 1929 to Etrch 27, 1930 ..........
Same period 192c-29 .................................
Union of South Africa:
Shiprin'its: July 1, 1929 to April 5, 1930 ...............
July 1, 1928 to April 1, 1929 ...............
Stocks: -obruary 1, 1930 ............................
&aao .latc 19229 ............ .............
I' : -L9 clip
Australia: 1/
Receipts: From July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 ...........
Same period 1927-28 .. .....................
Disposals: From July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 ..........
Same period 1927-28 .........................
Stocks on hand June 30, 1929 ........................
Same d t- c I'V2 ...... ..... .................
Argent in:
RecLeipts at Ccr.trLl ?rodLce roc .-, Buenos Aires -
Searon Jul;' 1, 19)-E to JunLt C, 1923 ..............
Sar. r1period 1927-' ............................ .
ShirpmuntL: October 1, i t. to 5cptcrn;ber 30, 1929 .....
S.iTmo period 1.27- 6 ..........................
StocKs inr Argonti na on bScptoie:uL-r 3,, 192.............
S I: d tec, 26 .........................
Urug-u-.:/:
Receipts: Up to Fobru-r-,, -;, 1928 .......................
February 6, 1929 ..................
11-arch 1, 1929 .............. ..................
April 1, 1929 ...............................
Shipments: October 1, 1928 to SBptomoer 30, 1929 .......
,Sane period 1u27-26 ......................


: 1,


: 2/








3/





















4/


















:5/
5/
:

:
:


)00 pounds


732,702
785,522
518,866
694,200
213,836
91,016

126,540
143, E.2


63,007
85,382
146,363
194,395

9,570
11,056

72,539
79,398

255,000
244,000
37,364
28,318


834,051
743,921
820,317
733,961
13,734
9,860


99,646
91,905
317,186
298,654
25,002
18,520

119,000
121,000
126,841
128,275
127,530
131,468


Continued -


- 2,1






3 1262 08861 7211
Receipts, disnoc sls d stock 1929-30, and 1928-29 clips in
primary markets '.'ith comparisons Contd

Country', item and period Quantity

1928-29 clip Contd : 1,uuO pounds
Uruguay Contd:
Stocks: April 16, 1926. StucKs for disposal small
April 11, 1929 ................................... : 15,872
May 6, 1929 .................................... : 5j 10,912
August 31, 1929 .................................. : 5/ 8,928
Union of South ,frici:
Exports: July 1, 1928 to Juno 30, 1929 ................... : 8 2?83,0i0
Same period l'27-2 ............................. 73,
Stocks of u old ..o : Junc 0, 12 ..................... : 9,149
Sam 1 .t. iJ.8... ........ ........... ....... 6/ 6,940
New Z.jala-nd:
Shipments: July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 ................ 244,110
Same period l -27-2.' ........................ : 226,455
Stocks: June 3'.,, 1929 ................................... : 27,510
Same d-te 1 ?2 .................................. s18, 800
Auctralia: Season 1928-29 Estimates of rational Council of Wool SE.lling
Brokers, Consul General Arthur G-rrols, Lelbourno, July 10, l-29. Weight per
bale from Country Life and Stock and Station Journal, July 14, and Dalgety's
Annual Review, 1927-28, page 19. Season 1929-30 VWeekly Wool Cha-rt, April 10,
1931'. Weight per bale, Country Life and Stock :r.d Station journal, March 14,
1.3-'. Argentina: Receipts, shipments, stocks at Central Produce L:arket, Review
of River Plate. Total stocks in Argentina, cable from Buenos Aires Branch First
National Bank of Boston. Uruuay Season 1925-2$, receipts, monthly y Review,
arch, Bank of London and South America, Ltd., and Servicio Informativo para el
Exterior, March and April 1929. Stocks, April 11, 19292, and : 0.. 1929. Wool
Record lnd Textile "'lorld, April 11, 1929, Eay 9, 1i29 and October Review, Bank
of London and South America, Ltd., shipments, Servicio Informativo parn cl
Exterior, October 1, 1929. Season 1.29-30 Shipments Review of the River
Plate. UnioTn of South Africa': Stocks, Ulonthly Bulletin of Union Statistics.
L-:'ports, Crops and M:Tarkets of Union of South Africa, August, 1929. 1l29-30,
Wuc l Record and Textile World, April 10, 1930 and official sources. New Zea-
1'-nd: Shipments -1927-28 and 1926-29 Consul General W. L. Lowrie, Wellington,
July 29. Stocks, Monthly Abstract of 't-tistics, August 26, 1929.
I/ These fi:urrc concern only the clip of the season designated.
P2/ Have used average weight of bale for July-February, 1929-30 as estimated by
the National Council of Wool Sellir.n, irr:crs. l:o later cztir: te available
as yet.
3/ '-nverted to pounds by using avera-e weight per bale as reported by Dalgety
for the l'929-30 season.
4/ Converted to pounds by using: estimate of average weight per bale f 310
round: as furnished by the National Council of Wool Lclling Brokers cf
Australia, Jul;.'-Junc 1''-2i, compared with an avcr7.rc of 3u4 pounds fjr
p':rirod July 1 to Juno 3U, 1l 2-2; .
. ::'.: ~.curre-r..p dii.; estimates for .,rceudi;.g year availi'lo.
/ r'coured wool hang-,c d to grease on basis cf 6,., per cent loss in scLuring.
7/ Pr'rtically all inferior sorts.


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