World wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
World wool situation
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some issues combined.
General Note:
Description based on: WOOL-16 (June 17, 1929)
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 631804619
lccn - 2010229455
ocn631804619
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .A19
System ID:
AA00011233:00009

Related Items

Succeeded by:
World wool prospects


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Full Text
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S' M NTS EPT


n-a--
LU;1ED 3T..TS TEP A'T T 0 ARICF'JL'JE
US DEPOSITORY dur .u- :,f .Ayriclt'r.11l ::.nm-i.-


'00L-24 i-.r.:h ?19
S'7rr ,LD ''I, 'I J -'1

T R \D] T: "j -n "r T-'P 'I Oi7 lr .- F r ,-r 'F ,T-,I"'



f Lt~,rch 15 fcilo."in the fartV-- dj clir.: in for ic r ., t? b..t t- rmi'nr:'
.
h7, rOi s hiave rm: in,-'i st- -.j; rr.T M r l ''t lr., thn .'. 'h.'JCh

I r declined 3 cents con .- sC,:jLirc'ji basis. Pri a,'- i"n L,:',rd,:n, i La;tri i l ",.,l T,:-l 7

Zeal-n faiei to holi th: g'i is rr rl:- I n r-ia r:.' r. i cl in :,

cons id-r.r bl' ,lurinp I,.: lMrch. R.'.-c- :. bl. s in-rlca2 1 Cli .-5 l, n-arl," -i

Trim-r,, r .. Th, Uh.-.7 I -Z.l:- .iool .'1 s ".V- b. _n re.:um:id _in i ._.Co r'd-

inP t.I prsr--E'n t sch-edul-c th- -;s~r: Eh:ui. t -rminrt --il t. ':-- Milh.I:- o f

April.

Prices *of domeJ tic .J .ois d.c-lir.e;.i I ,,-t:,n frt'.-.I 1 to 7 ce' tIs

pound rn -a rer'r-- b sr si3 xxce'-.t for s' crt ". n ? r'4 ,':l r43 r 1 in-r an_ l

,70ols grd dine 46s Ad lo .--r 7hi'rc r:r.- ir.d urh~a':i Th- r .t.-st de-

clinas .'lre on 4bs-5Cs combine .oc.l :r,,1 F s l 'hir- i .'-.cl .'ich .'ore' 7,

cents lo: er on Marcn 1E than on F.-t.rar:,' If. Sh,:rt t ri'tory: 7-,1y rad-

( ir.g 64s arnd fin r l,:e ir:d 2 r-r. a ."- '. n r i ? r.:,ur i b- is, _: r- ',.'
r *
S s-r ctll: cobirg ':ccl :.' s 1 2c- t lo-'r, -c1 %t 'rr ilin r: 7 -il in. i from

2 t, 51 cents n ith the- rp '-i.-St i.lI r n tt. : -'r r ".'.- ls, ri 49- .- s

.vocls :.re 1 to 2.t- ,.ints lo.: r.

II.e:; -.alanrJ, Austrnl:n and Soati r ,r r-a: n .::C in b i.n L : bi torn,

./ere Lichange,.-d in pric: from P..bra r.,, i to M-irch 1i foli::'in,: th-- l.e v:."

declines of th- pr-v' ois month.



i ,









*7 CL-24


Receipts of domestic wools at Boston during Febru.iry were about 3

million pounds grK.-.tur than last year but 1 million pounds less than in

February 1928. Iri.orts of combing and cloth: i wools into the ports of

Boston, New York and Philadelphia from January 1 to March 15 were 2D

million pounds less than during the correopondlrf period last year.

Carpet v;ool imports '.ere 6 million Ipo1i-.is less than last year.

Domestic lool consumption declined considerably, amounting to only

44 million Iojuns, on a greaso basis, in January 1930 compared with 54

million r.-.ais in January 1929. Consumption :ias greater than during

D-*rr:mber 1929 but less than any other month last year.

-ritish and continental markets improved dur-rg February but

buyers became hesitant about placing large orders in March in th,. face

of the continued decline in the price of raw materials in primary markets

and the proximity of the London wool sales.

Stocks of tops in commission combing establishments in Eur)r. on

March 1, amounted to 50 million pounds or about 3 million pounds less

than on February 1 but about 2 million p:.ands more than on iMarch 1, 199,

althcl:gph the stocks of tops in Germany alone are 3 million pounds smaller

than th.-:, were last :, -ir.

,'rc.l I ror i; .tion in 19 countries which usually produce over per

cent of the world's 1ool clip, exclusive of Russia .nd China, is now es-

timated to be about 2,-'.3 million pounds or apl r.x-,.a'ei: t, same as

the large clip of last .:.ar.


- 2 -









.VOOL-24


L_ cn :.',;.;,; rr"_I s : ,1.'r**

The second series nf the 1930 gcol sales opened in London on March
8 with about 165,COO bales of nool available for the auctions. Merino
wools sold from 5 to 10 per cent belo-v the close of the previous sales
on February 6 and crossbred nools ,ere fr:fr. 10 to 15 per cent lower, ex-
cept secured New Zealand crossbreds and clothing '.cols of all kinds xhich
were urn.';'aed. Punta Arenas wools were 10 per cent lo/er. Some importers
are ;wi-jrs.'ng wools fr-,m the London wool sales but daily offerings are
only about 7f 0 bales below the original proTran,, according to a cable
received by the Foreign Service of the Department of Agriculture, frcm
E. A. Foley, American Agr!cultural Commissioner at London. Cn a scoured
basis vools were do:.n from 13 to 14 per cent, except 56s ;7hich were only
p8 per cent low-er and 70s which were 7' per cent lower than the previous
sales. Germany is the principal purchaser at the present sale and Arerica
is buying New .--aland slipes and some 48s-50s greasy New Zealand fleeces.

UNITED :1;50M: Prices at opening of the London wool auction
reported on basis of official standards of the United States


for grades of aool


(scoured basis)


United States
grades


70s .
64s .
60s .
58s .....
56s .
50s .
49s .
4'.0 .
44s .
4.s .
3's .. .

Cc'O.l:i id fromr
at L'ondon.


* .
r eprt
* :
* :
II .
. :







reports


Cents

87.2
81.1
77.1
73.0
71.0
f1. 7
47.7
46.6
44.6
42.6
42.6


: Cents : Cents


83.1
79.1
75.0
68.9
64.9
46.6
43.6
41.6
40.6
39.5
38.5


62.9
58.8
54.7
50.7
46.6
!39.5
36.5
35.5
34.5
34.5
34.5


: Cents : Cents


49.7
46.7
43.6
40.6
36.5
31.4
29.4
28.4
27.9
27.9
27.9


48.7
42.6
37.5
35.5
33.4
26.4
23.8
23.3
23.3
22.8
22.3


of E. A. Foley, American A,"ricultural Commissioner


e':** .Zepir :-l. ".'r, oi fa l.;?

About 21,000 bales of wool were oat'Ll--'r-?i and 14,000 bales were
disp*-.)1i of at the sales held at Invercargill on .- .-.uar!-y Competition
b et*'e-n the United :; ngi.-T- and the Continent vas fairly active. The sales
cl1sel .'vth prices fairly firm.


192?


Jan 18


Mar 8


Nov 19


1930


Jan 21


Mar 18


----


----


- 3 -







i00L-24


Prices of merino anJ crossbred wools were from par to 5 per cent high-
er at the runedin wool sales on February 5, compared with the Invercar.ill
sales. iBuyers from England, the Continent and America competed actively for
fine and medium crossbreds. Of the 23,000 bales cataloged, fully 75 per
cent were sold.

At the wool sales held at Timaru on February 8, 14,000 bales were
cataloGed and over 11,000 bales were sold. T.,,re was a lar-e attendance of
buyers and competition was spirited. rr- ord was chiefly interested in
crossbred wools. Prices of greasy crossbred wools were 1 cent higher and
greasy merino wools 2 cents hi"..-r than at the Dunedin sales on February 5.

Prices of crossbred wools were somewhat : i-,-:r at the Christchurch
sales held on February 12 but merinos were mostly .i.2Ian'- d. British conti-
nental and American buyers competed actively and about 20,000 bales of wool
were sold out of a total of 22,50C bales cataloged.

The Wellington wool sales scheduled for February :' had to be aban-
doned owing to the refusal of buyers to attend the sales unless at least
20,(-0 bales of wool were cataloged, according to a cable from Consul Gener-
al Lowrie.

The combined Wellington-Wauganui wool sales were held on :.':ch3 with
31,000 bales of wool cataloged. Cc,:..-tition between L'i.;.ers aas fairly keen
and Bradford purchased the bulk of the wools. The quality of the wcol is
r-p rted to have been below that of previous sales this year and prices de-
clined from 1 to 2 cents a pound compared with tht January sales. About
23,000 bales were sold. The New Zealand wool selling season is now sched-
uled to end on April I6.

Prices of 'iool declined 5 per medt ct trie l-'..i-r wool sales on
March 6 compared with the prices est-oolisn.d at tLe :ellington-'.aug~nui
salks on ""rch 3. Competition w,'s fairly kLen. J-rman buyers were quite
active but Bradford secured the bulk of the wools cold.

Auout 30 per cent of the 23,OC' boles of wool cpt ic..c... t Tunedin
on >iarch 14 were sold. Competition was gooa but prices continued to decline.

Tn" fifti :." li._. tc wool sal,- was h-id on a!arcn :2 and. per cent
of the 12,' 0 balcss offered were sold. or:adford w s quite active snd com-
petition w-s ;::ood within restricted limits accordi .- to a c-:ble received
from Consul 3 neril Lo'rie. Compared wit:i ti;e lst # tli '. ton ssle on
March 3, pric s of crossbr:ds and lamaos wool were down 2 cents nnd bellies
and i :ces were I cent lower. There was very little merino or supfr wools
offered.



Aout 16, 0 bles of wool ver catCloted at tne ._ i_' wool. ses
Fcbr l-:. 13. Prices were mostly m ed compared .itn Januar, n::c..t so:e
fine cr.L. crossbrei woo. : which sold aoit 5 "'r cent :.i: r.


- 4 -








V.OL- 24 -5 -


Tne Adelaide wool sales opened February 1) with a gooi attendance
of buyers. Competition was quite general and 90 per cent of the 2D,C''
bales of wool catzl-'-: were sold. America and. Ja:,:nr were both buying
super wools. Prices were about 10 to I.-1 per cent under the previous sales
in December but were about the same as tne prices rul' r. at Melbourne and
Syd:.-, during F:bruary. The next Adelaide sale will be held on :." 1 with
offeri.l, s of about 25,k bales.

During the period of the London wool sales which openol &Arch IS, the
Sydney wool sales will be limited to 3 selling days a week with offerings
of auout 26,000 Dales weekly, according to the Yorkshire Observer.

Approximately 20,'; bales of wool were cataloged at the Perth wool
sales and about 70 rer cent were sold, according to a caole received March 6.
A good selection of wools was offered. Competition was fair with Bradford
the chief purchaser.

Competition was good at the Brisbane wool sales on March 13 with the
Continent and Japan quite active.. Prices were generally lower but quotations
were rather irregular with the chief declines in the superior types of wool.
Average 64s were selli:.-; about 39 cents per pound clean basis at Brisbane
and avtr-,-' 70s were selling about 47 cents.

The 3r.tj. wool sales reopened on "arch 17 with falling prices and
only fair c.-.,',rntition according to a cable received from Consul General
Trelc.ll at Sydney, Australia.

South African wool sales

Combing wools are reported to be selling at slightly reduced prices
at Port Elizabeth. Prices are lower also at rurham. ranc-. and Germany are
the principal purchasers. bradford buyers are taking very little wool at
present. The supply of !omoing wool is reported to be limited and stocks of
fine clotri.irnf wools are very small.

Boston wool market more active

The wool market was considerably more active than it was in January,
according to R. L. Ilrr;s of the Boston wool office of the Bureau of Agri-
cultural '-:cnomriics. Early in the month m-Trnufacturers began to show a keener
interest in fine domestic wools. This development followed almost immediate-
ly the receipts of reports indicating a turn in the trend of foreign markets.
After the improv'r-.-nt abroad was maintained well into the second week of
February, manufacturers closed on a considerable volume of wool wnich they
had tied up with options during the prr':'ious week.

Demand throughout February was centered largely in 64s and finer
domestic wools. A fair movement was seen also of 48s, 50s offerings, but
5&', 60s wools were sluggish and hardly any demand was received on 56s
quality. Prices showed a further downward revision. Declines took place









,'.', L, I-24 6 -


on some lines of 64s or finer while all grades below 64s suffered declines
of one to five cents per pound, scoured basis.

Fine wools lower

Strictly coming 64s or finer fleeces of Ohio and similar lines were
slow witn a few sales of moderate quantities scattered through the month.
Prices on this type of wool were steaay at 33-34 cents, in the grease, or
78-81 cents, scoured basis. A fair defrrnd was received on French combing
64s and finer fleeces at 26-27 cents, i.--"se basis, or 72-75 cents, scoured
basis..

The oulk of the western 64s or finer wools moved were of Frcnrn, comb-
ing lern11.. Gr*ded territory wools of this group declined from 75-77 cents
to 72-77 cents, scoured basis. Slight declines book place in ori.ir.. wools
eerly in the month but toward the close of February some offerings were con-
siderauly firmer and estimated prices were one to two cents per pound, scourri
basis, higher than at the low point. Cr.oice line, of original bag 64s or
finer wools sold at 73-77 cents, scoured basis, with most early sales below
the 75-cent mark, while later sales were mostly at 75-77 cents. Av-:r--e
lines sold at 72-75 cents, scoured basis, and the short wools moved at -*.-71
cents, although the offerings of any kind of i c:r.li;-. 64s wool at 70 cents
or below, were very scarce at the end of the month.

?;-,<:, wools were sold quite readily tow-rd the latter part of the
month. Good to choice twelve months wools brought /7-.& cents, scoured
basis, wnile av r-,,e lines realized only around 75 cents. Very substantial
weights of these wools were taken out of tne market d..:'ig '.br;r'".i. The
market was fairly active on eight months Texas wools at 65-67 cents, scoured
basis.

Medium wool prices decline

A fairly active tr:-i..- was done on 4'-, 50s strictly combing wools
of both fleece and territory lines. While the sales were closed on a lower
basis than was quoted during the previous month, the decline represented
the establishment of a new level more in line with prices of ".)-:ip-'ini, for-
eign wools. After the new prices were settled upon, the trend remained
steady thro : .:,t the month.

Declines took place on ebs, 60s and ,-s droestic wools but the
quotr-tions were l:.; ely noiin.al in tnr 'bse_:ce of sales of sizable quantities.
The new level .if quotations of these -i.r nas ueen influenced to a ,-rLjt
extent oy tne prices at which .q ivaltnt .-. *i foreign wools cn be imported.
The lIck of demand from i i.-stic m:nifacturers ondl the o"rr- :c' .. of other
clip season tended to hrsten t.ie r -.~ ustm.t. The revised "-.ki prices
on offer of _:.., 60s show a br oier -I-: red fr.m prices of 64s or finer
thr was the c"se a m inth a Y ..








.id.L-24 7 -


Demand for foreign wools slow

A very limited amount of business wcs trSnsacted on foreign wools.
Orders for import bucame increasingly difficult to execute and '_u.- rs turned
to spot wools rather than follow the merrets abroad. Feir quantities of
Australian merinos were taken over oy mills at 60-63 cents, scoured basis in
u)or,d, for E,oud average 64-70s. Super warp Australian 64-70s br..u t 63-65
cents, while coinh;ig 60-64s sold at 56-56 cents, sc,ured basis in bond. A
fev sales were closed 'n spot crossbred foreign wools.

Pulled wool markets wepk

Declining demand end prices characterized the t"-- li: in most lines of
wo; is suitable for woolen manufacture. There was some movement of B grade
pulled wools but the business was done at successively lower ranigu of prices.

]TI,.l r piries nrci.4r, e

Demand fDr noils was very d:r;,y uut prices resisted pressure fairly
well. Prices were uin'..'.!r g. from last mn.th on most ufferiL.gs except 56s
and 48s, 50s grades which were slightly lower.



Tri. top market p ,--ered t( oe definitely better during the first half
.f Febru-'. : when interest was broader rnd. uotations were slightly firmer.
,il combed 64s that will spin 50s yarn h.ad been selling at $1.02-1.03 per
p..und. Business, however, apparently was c'mi.i, too slow at tnese prices
-,nd one of the topmakers offered to take orders at $1.00 for this type of
to'p. This precipitated a. lr.-: movement in which most all of the topmakers
ton i' part. After all the orders that could be taken care of within the time
specified for delivery were booked, qiu.tations were ndvancei to $1.03-1.05
per pound and remained firm at this r-.age throu-h the rest of the month.
ry,- combed short staple 64s had been selling at around $1.CO but did not
get below this fl~ire. Quotations were advanced to $1.02-1.03 at the same
tirme prices were marked up on oil combed tops. Little business was done on
6's top. Quotations have eased to 98 cents to $1.00 owing to lack of demand
and lower prices on wool. r.,js of 58s and the lower counts have been slow
wita, quotations tendin to esse. Deliveries have held up fairly well. Some
slowing up in deliveries was noted toward the close of tne month.








700L-24


8 -

WiOOL: Price per pound at Boston on specified dates,
October 192) .Iarch 1930


: 1929
Grade __
: Oct 5 : nov 9 : L-,


1930
7 Jan 4 : Feb 8 : .iar E'


.,__. :s. 80s (fine)
Strictly combin&r
Ohio and similar grease..:
Fleece scoured basis.....:
Territory scoured busis..:
58s, 60s ( blood)
j3tr- L ;
Ohio and similar graas3..:
Fleece scoured 'basis......
Territory scoured basis..:
{_s 3,/' t! ",l)
Strictly -____ :_ l
Ohio and si'.ilar gr as0..:
Fleece scoured basis....
r-rritory scour~r basis..:
46s (lo0 1/4 blood)
Strictly combirp
C .o and similar ,-r-*.?"..
:-lece scoured basis.....
Territory scoured basis..:


Cants :


38
90-93 :
88-93 :


44-45
93-96
93-96


45-46
85E-_0
88-92


38-39
63-66
65-70


C -rts :


72-37
E6- '0
87-9 :



42-43
88-92
87-90


44-5 :
85-87 :
5-90 :


38-39 :
63-65 :
65-70 :


Cents :


35-36
85-88 :




41-42
85-88
-fr :-


41-42
78-83 :
81-85 :


78-39
63-65
65-68 :


______ ~~nr C.f:n~s


34- 3F
83-C195
83-85



40-41
80- '3
80-83


40-41
77-80
78-80


36-37

62-67


'7-34
78-81




3--37
75-7e!
75-78


36-37
67-69
68-71


32-34
53-57
55-58


32-73
75-86
"5-6:.



34-75

73-76


34- 35
2-6,
65-"-:


31-'2

55-.7


Ci-r 1 1 from w*eely Maricot ITe:-s Reports of the Boston r'fice of the
Bureau of Agricultural Economics.


2 :' 7i" .r., c'-, I J. i_ I n: i,;s'.-

Ti' ". *- 0' _-, .- ,-_ ;.":- _}- .'h .;r

Ui- receipts of domestic ;iool at Boston during ; Febru-r r:' I', ~ate
tc F, 001, OC i-j !.!u s c',.. rrerd ith l,-.36,000 pours in Fabrur-ry i: Tr.-
total quantity of domestic 'ool :rrivir. at ?'ston from larch 1, l')2. :)
lMarch 1, 1.-'7 amounted to 212 million pounds or about 9 millions :-r -t.r 't.n
dur'i.- the stmo p riod last yLar but 8 :milion r:u .is loTss th-n in the .:>7
season. Th3 follo:i.-:: t'ble sho.vs monthly receipts ;' '.ool at 3''.on fr'.
JanJ-,r; 1i'.,..' to ." bruar?,- li'. .


~_ ~___


r









.:'L., DOsiBSTIC: PReceipts at .ston, by months, 1927-193C

..onth : 1'-7 : 1928 : 1920 l 1_
: 1 i, r'' o is : 1i, ', rr. 1 1, 00 ounls 1 _^^^ 1 tLls

Jar ........ 6,01 9,044 ,532 7,660
Fb ........: 6,577 6, ? 1,336 5,001
Mar ........ a 8,600 6,497 : ,738
Ar .......: 9,522 : 8,138 : 6,442
;:.,. .........: 17,9.-7 : 25,843 16,108
June........ 46,106 : : ,083 40,094
July........: 55,877 51,346 56,870
Aag ........: 29,891 25,802 .:,377
Sept .........: 11,799 7,156 16,233
S........: 9,033 4,598 9,171
Nov ........ : 8,972 : 9,.-.;: 8,202
Dec ........: 8,794 7,293 8,257

Compiled from veecly reports of the Boston 'Wool Office of the P.lr;'.ui of
Agricultural Economics.
I_/ Prolimin:iry.






____- ____ K "vit u- >' r


The report of th' Bureau of the Census on activity of rool machinery
during Januu:ry 19;.1 sho -.i considerable decrenses cemjpa:red .ith J~v.ir,.
19~..' both in the acta-1 number of hours that the machines -.ere in operation
anJ in the percentage of maximum single shift c'pcity. .Jool and vorsted
s::ni.les report only 604 million hoirs activity in January c;)mp:red with
7:, m-illions in January 1929. Looms other th.n c.:rpet looms ,,were active
rnl;. 7-8/10 million hours in January compared -.ith 10-5/10 million hours in
.Jrn-iry 1929. Cards and ool n spindles -era from 20 to 21 per cent less
LT''ve then lst :year, based on the maximum s'r..;io shift c'up'city. Combing
and -i*orsted spindles were 14 to 15 per cent loss active and looms from 13 to
16 rpr cent 1.ss active than in January 12:".. Thf follo-ing table compares
th, Lctivity of 7ool machinerv7 in the Unitei St'ats during Jrnuary 19'1-30
ri December 1929.


",' :,1OL-24


- 9 -








'700L-24


10 -

Wool machinery activity in the United States during
December 1';~1 and J-anru.r;: 1929 and 193 '


:Porcint::- of total: Percentage of
Total number of hours : machinery active maximum
4ool machines :ere active : :t som3 time during: single-shift
machinery : morth capacity
: Jan Dc Jan : D1 : : Jan : '-.
1929 : 19' : 1929 : 1L. : 1930 : 1929 : 1929 : 19. : 1929
:1,00 : 1,000 : 1,000 : Psr : Per : er : P3r : Pr :
Hours : .jrs : .- .- : cnt nt cnt c:t :. ccnt : er":

Cards.....: 1,293: 937: 894: 75.3 : 62.6 : 64.7 : 84.0 : 63.4 : 63.
Combs.....: 491: 436: 391: -'0.4 : '.7 : 63.6 : 03.2 : 77.8 : 71.
Spindles: :
WVooln...:416,129:03,'j97:289,479: 74.0 61.1 : 61.9 : 82.1 : 61.7 : 1.2
Worstod..:382,841:300,591:299,919: 64.6 : 55.8 : .5 : 68.5 : 54.9 : .
Looms: : : :
..'de 1/..: 8,1 -. 6, -: ,: 6C':; 6 .1 : 47.7 : 51.8 : 68.9 : 52.7 : .1.7
Earro7 2/: 1,919: 1,418: 1,449: 61.9 : 53.7 : 56.9 : 63.4 : f.l .
Carpet : : :
and ru : 1,127: 1,140: 1,163: 66.3 : 57.3 : 60.3 : 65.3 : 50.7 : .
Compiled from the PRports of Active and 111ie Wool :;. hirIry, issued mortal;:
by the i .rtment of Co.ozerce.
j_/ ider twan 50-inch reed space. 2/ 50-inch rood space or less.


T-l, -i 1 1 -r -1 ,- -.r

Imports of -0ool into the United States lar:i 1929 -:-rr considorrbly'
-r -,tor thnn last y .ar :,nd amountti to 277 million pounds compared with .
million r iu-,] l dirire 1928. Imports of cc,-.b1r.^ and clothinir' "ols *;ere 11
million pounds greater than last y '3r ;'r. carp t '-oo imports -ere .r million
pounds above 9.

Dur':.- January 1930, hoiv-r, :' i-s of combing and clothirg Jo'i
amounted to only 10,711,'3"" pounds c- -' r 1 pith ,' ~7 ,': pounds last :" -r.
Carp;t .ool imports :ere about 1 million pounds gre3:ter than last year. i
accomp.:-' tanble sho.s the :' -rts of combing, clothing and cirr -t Jo 1ls
into Th Unit3d States duri'..." Janu r' 1 .' -d I.' and th- total '"y-"'
of eool in 1.'..- and 1.':*..


7 .blc on folio r" '.* r .--


'I








- 11 -


Imports of :;ool into the United States during January 1929-1930
and total imports from January 1 to r;comber 31, 1925 and 1929

Jan ar 1 i'c 31
'"?o o !
1929 : 1930 : 1929 1929
: 0 : ,: 1,000 1: I,cO
: pound s :. r : I : ) found s

Combing ... 18,916 7:,701 : 2,27 : 3,71
Clothing ......... : 2,481 : 3,010 : 18,4 08 : 16,488
otl ....... 21,397 10,711 91,035 :102,198

Carpet . .. 14,7 15,612 149,? : 175,0(7
Total .. -36,65 26, 23 : 240,' i:1 277,205

Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.



According to statistics compi l: by the Boston Ofi'ice of the Bureau
of Agricultural Economics, im.rorts of .-ocl into the ports of Boston, HNewi
York and Philadelphia from Janaary I to March 15, 19-30 mounted to 53,168,659
pounds or 26 million pounds less than during the same period last year.
Most of this decline .as in ccrlb'in .;ools, imports of which h amounted to 18
million pounds this year compared *ith 30 million pounds from January 1 to
March 15, 1929. (:1rptt reools imports ,;ere also lo,.'r, amounting to 35 million
pounds compared ,with over 41 million pounds last year. Stocks of foreign
7vool in bonded .arohouses in Bostor on March 1 amounted tj 19 million pounds
includ':n about 5 million pounds of oarpot "'rools. Last year the stocks of
7ool in bonded .arehouses amounted to 35 million pounds including 5 million
pounds of carpet 7ool.



The consumption of -~ool in the United Stat's by mills reporting to
the Bureau of the censuss during January declined about 20 per cent compared
*:Itr. January 1929. Consumption of .osol in Janu-ary 19.'. an .:ntr- to 44
million pounds greasee equivalent) which .'as less than any month of I1;9
ex--?pt Decemuer .vhich amount..d to only 38 million pounds. About 55 per cent
of t'ie total .eool consumption reported in Doc mber .roas domestic combing and
lic~hing 'col. Sixteen per cent was foreign combing and clothing 5rool and
.9 per cent w-as carpet .0ol.







..L-2- 12 -

The quantity of comb!ri- and clothing ::ool consumed iurIng January
1970 mounted to 31,955,000 pounds on a grease basis compared ."ith 3.9,737,L00)
pounds in January 1929, 28,250,000 pounds in TI -'atr and a 5-::;r ,v-:-.re
for January 1924-1928 of .7,323, 00 pounds. The consumption daur':. January
;aas the smallest for any month since August 1928 except Decemb3r 'L?, ;ihich
rmountod to only 2P,250,C00 pounds. T':- foll- ,lr. table shovs the consump-.' n
of vool by grades during January 1929, 1930 :and Decnimbar 1929.

WOOL: Consumption in the United Stites, by grades,
for specified months j_

Official st nddrds of the Jan Poc Jan 1 D- e 31
United tt: tos for gr..des 0- 1929
of wool : 1929 : 197.,- 1629 1'.2 1929
of '.ool
: 1, 00 : l, : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000
: r-r' ir : r __!: : r 'ur.s : pour-s : pounds
Combing :n,' clottinp -aol : : :
O4s, 70s :nd s.........: 12,492 : 11,461 : 9.,177 : 11 ,099 :14 ,279
58s and s................: 6,236 : 5,862 : 4,.3 : 61,&7. : 64,.?5
56s ...................... ,869 : 4,377 : 4,3.~ : 6 ,019 : 65,895
46s and 50s..............: 5,35 : 3,837 : 4,109 : 1,273 : ,11
36s, 40s, 44s and i6s....: 2,673 :1,954 : 2,093 : 25,:, 29,7-i
Total combing and :
clothing -Ools......: 33,654 : 27,491 : 24,318 : .39,192 : 360,011
C:.rry :;ools ................: 1,135 : 11,19J : 9,081 : 135,826 : 156,1 :
Total :11 ools......... 47,789 M 58,693 : 33,399 : 465,018 : 516,113
Compiled fro:i data in the "'..ool Consumption Raports" issued by the -.r- u
of the Census.
_/ s are tot 15s of srI-:as-, scoured :nd pulled wools, as published b.
the 3... .A of the '~ ::-. and have not b-en r duced to a s'r se basis.




-' for- ing t- bl sho s that the consumption of comb'r!- and cloth-
ing :,ools incroe:sc d 31 million pounds dur"::- 199' comT)atrd *':th !::"I. r.h-
-r atst 'ncr *s' I-s in th. consumption of 'iomnstic 6.-s-80s zhich -as 28
million pounds tr tower th. n last ;:.-.r. 2h'j sonsum!tion -f foreign 58s-6(s
and 56s each increased vter 6 million pounds. Thoe i-gr test Idclire in
rorsnjmpti on .:;as in dorn.stic 48s-50s -vhich .:/as 7 mill' on I -.r is u~:iA"r last
yaar. Ocrsu-mpilon of carpet .eools *ncra- sod over 20 million i 'urs in "P.







- 1. -


:: Consumption in th; Unit .i State, by classes
Janu' rv 1929-Y 0 1
. _________ n -l ^ l n l -l^ ^ ,. ., ^ ., ^ lr l --- r -. -- -- --- ,- ^ ^, -- -- .- __ ----- -- ^ --- -, _______


Clothing :


C:-rpTt : Dom-istic : Foreign


..,n .....
S;-b .....

Ai-.:r .....
;!.,V .....
J. n .....
JA ly .....

.'pt .. ...
'ct ...

Dec .....

J-" n ....


: 1,000 ::
pounds ::

: 7,789
: 41,373 =
: 1,584 =
: 42,776 :
: .2,764, -
:' 38, :
' 42,1418:
:46,983 ::

: 11 :139 .

: 33,399 ::

: 38,6: .l :.


''7'.- r'lod fr ,: monthly reports of


the Bureau of the Consus.


_ i -.-se ro tot.:Is of grease, scoured and pulled .:ools, :.s published
by the Bur;sau of the Cnasus, arnd have not -be-n reduced to a grease
b--: s*.


Tr-. : '.ni consamntion: Foreirn



The 3r fordd Iool Iarkict is sli thtly mor-e ictlve -nd machinery
activityy has incr sod, exc-pt in the spinnirc arnd -,.vevig sections of
t}.- industry, -ce .r.ir:.- to a cable rocived :;- the Foreign 2'rvice of
the D:I-r.!rtmn'nt of Agriculture from Consul M'.c-tee :t Bradford. The
'nm i rity of minuf~acturers, hov;ever, are rofr-ining from heavy purchases
of tr.ps ind :yrns until after the results of the Lornon ,ool sales are
ir..-;n. There has b3n an imiprovemont in fin .:.orst-tds and hoavy -Toolens
but "any orders ar.r still bel-no normal. Th-e lonostic mareirt is quiet
..riA foreign orders :irt only moderate.

Th3 total .:J;ight of .iool and tops p..ssing through the Ar i'ford
Conditioning House during Fjbru ry wtas consider- bly gret it.'r than for
J .ru..ry. T, qu.antity of :;ool tops c onditioned :as about 246,000 pounds
more than last month -,.' r.mounted to 3,966,. '0 pounds compared .7ith
3,72:,000 pounds in Jaru r;- and 3,238,000 pounds in Dec ember 1.'29. The
qumttlty of *vorsted varn 7iC '.-i amnounted to 2,C',00-'l pounds, thi lowest
f r -ny month since Aauust 1929 .':ich rmountid to 110,000 pounds. The
toble on p'. 19 shos.s the quantity of -,ol tops ani yorns passing
thrrughh the conditionin- houses of Br-dford, Roubaix, Tourcoing and
Vcrvi-,rs for the prst six months.


1,000
pounds

7,(05
6,716 :
6,680
6,705
6,568
5,985
5,632
6,190
6,0865
7,450
5,339 :
4,363

5,58


1,'- : 9


26,69 :
21,318 :
22,416 :
23,188 :
21,962 :
*),954 :
23,990 :
27,292 :
25,662 :
29,365 :
22,562 :
19,955 :

21,933 :


1 ,C- :1P
::
prds ::

14,135 ::
13,39 ::
12,4 '-1 ::
12,887 ::

11,630 ::
12,526 ::
13,501 ::
12,712 ::
16,045 ::
13,558 ::
9,081 :

11,199 ::


1, CCO


26,6403
21,273
21, 7.7
22,659
21,482
20,638
24,122
27,083
26,213
30,569
22,604
18,972

21,2 .


1,000
... I-

21,149
20,100
20,217
20,117
21,:' -
17,901
18, ('"
19,9C..
13,. 1.
22.291
18,855
14,4'27

17, 410


-~-- ----


- ----------c-L~~


montht h \ Total Co-bing









.JOOL-2.x


''OOL, 2OPS DP YARIN:


1929


Jgn
F 30

Apr
LIa'
.June
Jaly
Aug
Sept
Oct

Dec

J-an
Fob
:er


2 .....:
26..... :

2......:


25 ..... :
2E ..... :
25..... :
25.....:
25..... :





21... ..:


Scoured
7001

C ,nt s


87.2
51.1
79.1
75.0
75.0
7- .0
68.9
66.9
56.8
62.9
62.9
58.F


49.7
*8.7
,* .6


-ri r pond t ord on-

Price p r pound at ~rw'Lford on


?ons

i r, 1s


97.13 :
91.2
)3.2 :
89.2 :
5.2
8.3.1:

77.0
68.9 :
"3.0 :
71.0


59.8 :
58.8 :
5..7 :


Jorst 3d
:- Srn
2--8 s
U--nts~


129.7
125.7
125,7

125.7
119.6
117.6
115.6
11E. 6
113.6
103.4
iO7.4
1C07. -
99. 1-

91.2
91.2
87.2


6c-urod
lool

Cants


51.7
48.7
46 .6
48.7
45.6
4-.6
42.6
40.6
39.5
'9.5
"?.5
n-', r,


29.4
9.4
26.4


Tops

C nts.


59.8

56.8
56. F
54.7
53.7
C .7
49.7
46.6
46.6
17.6


:6.5
76.5
I r-


11 Off ;ci,1 s ni .r io 4


:ool t -,T r .


-r Sports of rol r.i .- Ictar's from Grov Brit.in cr-'ssd i"'r.-
F-bru-ry, Lcc r ii'- t c bl, frotm 'sriculturi. Coilmissi nrir E. A. E -1 y
at Lonidon. Tr 3:':rorts of "ooln ini :/orst3. y"rns mrunto to 2,970,
S"i .rei -,ith ",710,100 p ouna l in Ji nu-r:- :Znid .2,3' O ) pon s 1.i'-.
Do in cr 1.' E:"! rts of '-,oon a: ': pnrt9l pia..3 gos a:re consi Ier bl:.
7r i-irinr;: o.brur:', '"oun rin to '! 3,X ),00O squir' y-ris e; prred *ith
11,)90,-0 s:' quar :"'rs in Jniua ry :i 11.10,.'000 "y .-. I:ls in -~.mb:r.

I: 1port s of ./10l into iGr. .-'t .r tn d.jrir l F bru .ry ~lmontedl t
bout F: million punis cU ) l'u'li i.th 95 t' lli n 'j: is l:ist itnth u3]
78 nillici iounls in Dec, cibr 1.. .r. fol l r.- t ble e .r the ',:r -r .
an'i1 : r .i .*'72ctJres fro "VT' d'r .'..' t :' brUar


* ii


.orstod
y:rn
2-12s
Conts


83.1
80.1
78.1

77.0
77.,
75.0
73.0
68.9
67.9
67.9
61.9

60.8
57.8
.8


;Ur.,o St :t;s f,-r vool anl!


---`--~


--


sT, ;cif~el ditiis 1~23-73















UNITED KINGDO:: Trade in .inol :,nd .jooi -. ..,i'acturrs,
Novarmber 12'.: FJbruc.ry 1930


1929 1930
Ezx .r's and imports Unit ---
SNo v : D.c Jan F.jb

: 1,00 : 1,000 : 1,000 1,300
SL: ..L: pouds : cir T : pn unjs
Exports -
ool . : pound 5,90 3,600 : 3,100 : 2,100
Y.-.is . 2,9 : 1,9 0 : 2,7CC : 1,800
Yarns, .'ool n : ; 670 : 480 : ? : 420
Yarns, :7irsted : : 3,450 :2,910 3 ,180 2,550
Tissues, -oolon : sq yd 7,60 : 7,840 9,700 : ,880
Tissue-s, worstsd : : 3,220 3,570 : 4,390 : 4,170
Flannels and delaines : 440 340 300 320
Carpets and russ 590 : 40 560 : 540
oils ........ : pound : 1,500 1,100 :1,000
Jaste ...... ..: 1,200 : 900 1,)00 700
Silen r gs : : 2,1"' 1,570 3,70 2,350
Imports :
ool : pound : 4,70 : 77,800 95,400 : 81,r '
Tops : 100 110 : 100
Jaste and noils 0 : 400 400 300
Yarns : : ,68 : 2,06 0 1,930 : 1,720
Tissues,. -oolon : sq yd 2,170 : 1,830 : 2,i ) : 2,120
Tissues, ,orsted :" 60 590 : 820 : 860
Carpets and rlz 690 : 790 : 700 : 720
dVoolan rags .. .: pound : 4,0'0 : 4,-80 : 4,030 ,140


Co.pi.led from Trade .nd lavigtion of tho Unitod Tingdom and cablol
reports from Agricultur 1 Cornissior.3r Fol'v "t London.


.'O L-24








- 16 -


The German "-iarret for ool -nd tops inprovad r:ri.;- Februa:ry .z i
there 7:s a fair intertnst in noils, ncccrdii: to Agricultural' Con'issioner
St -:re 't B3rlin. The i jprnovernt r :cnlI reported in industrial activity
hzs continued. Occu.~-tion is -1- in tho .:orstd section of the industry,
tith ticticit,., of .Inrstrc, spinrnrs rdri:- Jrnu' ry roportid as 96 pcr cent
compr-.d A iith 89 per cent last year. The d-prossion in th,' voolon spinn-
ing industr- continues.

Stoc<-s of tops in th1. cornm:rci:l combir; 3st blis'mants of Jrmainy
on ,.irch 1 vr':3 %bout 1 million roiunds less thIr. on Febru;ry .1, 19'0
but m7r3 pr cticnlly the s-nia is on Jonar;r '1. Stocks of ':;rino t-r"
on LIarch 1 -,iountd to 5,CO-,' *C poarus -nd crossbr4d tops mountedd to
6,312,(00 po unds.



.-J: Stocics holl by Contint:nt-.l com:nis:ion co-bing
,st .blish.innts, spjcifi di dates 1929-30


Loc:..tion -.nd :
description
of -.:oo


: 1, 0 1

3Bel -'.un -
H rino ........: 2,t05
Crossbr',d.....: 2,4:80
Tot-l .......: a,885


GOr .miny r
Ibrino ........:
Crossbred.....:
Total...... :


6,193 :
8,155 :
1-,6 8 :


1929 : .'


' Feb 1


;hr 1 :


1,000 : 1,000
rounds : punIs

2,158 : 2,108
2,26C : 2, 3'9
;,18 4 +, .7


7,218 : 8,591
6,312 : 5,73.
13,530 : 14-,325


'-.n1 b 1 I Zir 1

l, r)o : 1, 0 : 1,COC
pounds : r i" : r _,lr_

1,90 : 2,C, 1,84i 5
3,9 7 : 3,i : 7, .:
5,917 : 5,88 : 5, 01


7,0.39
11,378 :


7 6 5I
7,6. 1
12, .-'.


11,3 6


Fr .nc

Cr


*9 : : : : *: a
rrino.........: 10,77 : 12,19 : 13,514 : 13,7 : 1, : 1,,l-46
Iossbred.....: 1i, 6 : -12,6Y : 13,C. 16 : 1,916 16,826 : "1, :"
Tot -....... 2;,....- : 2., 7 : 24,5.3 : 30, 4 31,21 .,


It ?ly : : : : : :
:.rriro........: 667 : 769 : 866 : 9.6 : 1,05r : 9
Crossbr,d ..... 1,55 : .'' : 1, 2 : 2,11 : 2,i7 : 2
T t l....... 2,2 1 : 2,162 : 2, : 3, '* : 3,211 : 3,:

Co. pl, 1 fro c bl. r ports fro,- .1 r'cultur-.l Co 1i ss'n r .' :ro 't
3:rlin.


- --------





WC OL- 24


WOOL: Imports into Belgium, Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, Italy,
Japan, Poland, United Kingdoia and Urnitel States for specific.
months, 1923 .and January; 1930


: 1929 : 1930


Country and item


tElaium -
.0il, rE s... ............
Wool, scoured ............
Total .............


Czechoslovakia -

France, raw and on
skins .... ................... :

Germany -
Wool, merino, greasy .....:
and washed .............:
Wool, merino,
scoured ... .............:
Wool, crossbred,
LreaZ,- and
washed .................
Wool, crossbred,
scoured ................
Total ............. :

Italy -
iool, greasy .............
I1'o l, washed .............
Total .............

Japan -

Poland -

United Kingdom -

United States -
Wool, greasy and
washed .................:
Wool, scoured ............:
Total .............


Sept Oct Nov


.:


.:


1,Co< :
pounds :


7,049
241
7 ,; :. :

.1,649


25,282



4,700 :

1,209


5,025

1215 :
12,149 :


__


1,000 :
pounds :


10,866 :
246
11,112

2,976


26,602 :



6,153

1, C :' :


4,851

778
12,839 :


3,607
882
4,489

736

2,200 :

18,125



13,049 :
5,042 :
18,091:


Compiled from reports cable by the Agricultural Commissioners at Berlin and
London and reports from the International Institute of Agriculture at Rome.
1/ Not reported.


Dec Jan

0 ,1, : 1,000
ds : pounds :pounds


62 : 14,869
71: 390 :
33 : 15,. :

S: 1/: 1/


18 : 52,713 : 1/



71 : 17,919 : 33,632

76 :1,073 : 845


4 : 3,791 : 7,873

Cl: 855 : 771
2 : 25,638 :43,121


- 17 -


3,322 : 1,978 : ,228 :9,307
1,254 : 1,232 : 1,127 :1,257
4,576 : 3,210 : 6,355 : 10,564

2,851 : 4,475 : 1/ : 1/

2,116 2,125 : 1/ : 1/

21,997 : 48,724 : 77,800 : 95,400



14,214 :14,089 :13,743 :21,103
5,041 : 5,234 : 6,494 :5,220
19,255 : 19,323 : 20,237 : 26,323





S- 18 -


There was a :- -n-ral improvement in business in France during Febru-
ary, according to A.ricultural Commnissioner Steere. Industrial activity
wns good. Ti market for tops and noils improved and yarn sales increase-;,
esoecially for tne domestic trade. Prices of cross-bred 56s tops were uri-
c, ~1.-ed but merino tops advanced so that t-ne price on archh 1 was only
3 cents below that on January 2. Australia cross-bre'd noils declined
2 cents below the price on Feb..rui., 1 and Cape noils were 3-6/10 cents Ic.v-
er. Merino yarns declined 2 cents luring the month.


,4jJL, TOPS AJD YAi.: Price per pound in France, si-tified dates,
1929 -c 1930'


___ __ li:


Item


Tops, Australian -
Merino 64s warp .....:
Crossbred 56s .......:
To': Argentine -
Crossbred .-. ; .......:
Noils -
Australian merino....:
kAstralian crossbred
2C- ..e .............
Yarn -
Merino .............. :
Cheviot .............:


Oct 3
Cents

89.2
71.0

68.9 :

78.2
58.6



60.9


1


Nov 1
Cents

S '.1 :
64.9

60.8

71.1
49.8
76.4

104.4
80.9


Dec 5
Cents

77.0
61.8

67.8

69.3
4-.0
74.6


82.6


Jan 2
Cents

73.C
58.8



62.2
43.5
67.5

104.4
80.9


Feb 1 Mar 1
Cents :Cents

62.9 :71.0
50.7 :50.7

si.7 : 48.7

53.9 56.9
39.1 37.3
56.9.3

93.7 91.5
.'.4 69.1


Stocks of tops in commercial c.-biL.._, estamlisr.ments in France on
:-:'ch 1 were over 2 million pounds less than on February 1 and 1 million
*,'.1; less than on January 1. Stocks of merino tons on March 1 amounted to
14.0456,70 .- .,.s and cross-bred tops to 15,157,000 ro :i3.

The quantity of wool and yarns pasi::;. thro ..- the conditioning houses
at Roubaix and TourcoiI.. durir._ February were considerably less taun in JanJ -
S. The quantity of tops was merely 1 mnil'ion po nds .-*r -.cr than in Janu-
ary and about 3 million ,. ,i.lr, .'r- ter than dur'..: -': .-- er 1'" '.


*OOL-24







WOOL-24 19 -


WOOL, TOPS AND YAiRN: Anount passing thr-,u-h conditioning hcuzes
at bradford,Rouoaix,Tourcoing and Verviers,
October 10...' February 1930


~~______19.29


Location and class :


Oct


Nov


Jan


Bradford -
Yarn ...............


Co 'L.ix -
ool .............. :

Yarn .............
Tourcoing -
V';ool .............. :
T -., .............. :
Yarn ..............
Verviers -


ool .......
Tor .: .......
Yarn .......


1," C'
ponds



180

234
6,722
1,?, S

2,994
8,699
2,438

3,513
406
; .; '


1,G 0 :C
pounds

553
3, 76
274

_6 :
5,765
1,453

2,700 :
6,571
2,015

2,866

769


1,0CC
pou dis


3,238
2o6


3,404
1,446


2,251
203
873


i,COCO
pounds



242

265
4,226
1,543


6,347
2,1l6

2,399
187
747


Compiled from caused reports from Agricultural Commissioner
and Consul Ir.o.1:', at Bradford.
1/ Not reported.


1: ,CC
: po.ids



: 157
: 7


4,775
1,214

: 2,75C
I K7
: 1,922

: 1/
S 1/
: /

Steers at ri:'lin


Production: Foreign

Prosplgects_ for _193;0

Present indications are for a 1'-.- world wool clip exclusive of
of Russia and China not greatly different from tne large clips of 1':.; and
1929. Seasonal conditions in both Australia and Argentina, which suffered
from drought in 1929, are improving while conditions in other southern hem-
isphere countries are reported as good with sheep numbers above a year ago.
Tr.-. number i:f sheep in Australia at the Deginning of 1I.' was estimated at
106 million, an increase of 5 .million over 1928 and was 2 million above the
nigh figure reported at the be,,.ii.._-; of 1. and 1926. The number of sheep
in INe' Zealand in April 1929 was 29 million or 2 million more than the 1928.
Estimates place the number of lambs in 1929 at 14,722,000 or 10 per cent
above the ccrre-s:.:,nlir.g figure for 1928. According to averages computed
for the last five years, the number of lamus estimated represents '.: per
cent of the actual number tailed or saved. Anolying this aver-se to the
present season, it would appear that the number tailed would be slightly
over 15, .),000 against an average of 12,800,000 for the four preceding
years.


1-1:1:1







NOOL-24 20 -


The number of ewes and te:,s in tin, province of nmnos Aires, Argen-
tina at tn-: oeginning of 1929 w s z02,Uu ooov 1928 and li.: .. r ti.n any
year since 1925. Sheep in Urugu y numoered about 19 million in 1929 com-
par d with an av.era-e of 14 niillion for the years 1-'L to 1925. In tlhe
Union of South ifricP wrooled-sheeo on June 30, 1'. amounted to 38,218,C00
or 6 per cent above 1928.

fool production in 1929

ool production for 1929 for marketing during the season 19J9-C0 in
12 countries wni-n usually furnished aoout four-fiftns of tne world's clip,
exclusive of Russic anii Ciin is now estim:.ted at 2,6963 million pounds or
aocut the same as the large clip of 1 :8. Tiie supply for tne selling season
1929-30, including production nnd carryo rer, from the 1928-.29 season, in the
primary markets of the southern hemisphere is .stimated at Pbout 12 per cent
aonve the preceding season. Incrmeses in production in 1. are reported
in Nw Zealand, Uruguay, the Union of South Africa, the United States and
Can'.de bout decreases are reported in Australia, Argentina and most i1,'ropean
cou tries.

Austrilia

Th: Acutrrli n offi-ial estimate of production still stands at
9 -,'3)J, )/ pounds, about the same ,s 1926, against 950,i. ,0C pon.i s in
19P8 with the ;inount to oe received into store for the season ,.s cS:-i.:t.
by the N.tionil Council of 'ool Selling Brokers 'e-:i:;!,,: unchanged at
2,5Z5,0j bals -.-ginst 2,690,000 ooles'for the preceding season.

Shipments of wool from A-ustrelin for the first f months of tne sea-
son, i.e..July-Tccmrnb-r 1920, as---.;-ted 344,0 ,000 pounds a decrease of
.12 .- cent compared with 192b ani 17 per cent c.: ir:'--1 with 1.': '. Tr.: bulk
of expcrt3 as as J>;. went to the United. Kingdom, the quantity aounti~ .;. to
i' ', i )>, Ji po nils, an increase of 5 per cant ovpr 19 ut iu per cent be-
low ,7. A.l cnhir entrieses tooa: less tin n luri,. ti.e sane period last
year al].t o -n 19-iinm took mjorc than in 1927. Japan took only 29,C ,C
ir.st 41, j) ,.F) in 1938 an1 48, "'1;,0. .) in .19.: for the same period.

iew Zcali ii

Th' condition of te iurro.it 7lio in '"cw ealc.nd now estimated at
2.j-, /J, ij o;nis or 6- :'cent aoove last year ... net (e so oOOu as
taet of i.st y;:ar on account of tre more or less wct winter and late spritr..
A propos, tr.at Nw ^alani wcol sales be : -: over the N.iole ,, .r did
not -eet, tr.e ;r:'.-val of the jority of buiyrs wit. tne result t;at the
<-i inrlton saes of wo)ol tt. to be ;t, :. for lack of attendance.



:rin. tre :.t y;Far conditions have ee n for wool .- ..:tion
anr te se lectior on th" r.ar .t is exC, lent. ocks ave been r..t: t:..
andi .ture fficient. Frodiction is estinatei at -v :..' or
S I i 1ii oii po nlai au ove 1. an i 19 1.ill1io1. i .... '; .: ter tear 1.,. .








w uOL-24


Sne p nunoers in I1/ 19 countries reporting at tre beginning or in t,.e
summer of 1. '" reached 267,21-,0rC against 257,628,C00' in 1928 and
2:i.,242,Ol' in 1909-1913. A reduction of 1 per cent is shown in the Euro-
r-e~r countries reporting, but important wcol producing countries of the
Southern hemisphere, the United States and Canada showed increases. Si;.-p
numbers in tne United States on January 1, 1930 reached 48, 13,000 i .L. iist
47,509,0'JJ in 1989 and 37,215,00O the average for the 5 years 1921-i925.
Srer-p numbers in tnis country nave increased stea-iily since 1922. In Canada
the number on June 1929 was 3,728,'0 an increase of 9 per cent over 1'.'-..
The number in that country has been incre, sins regularly since 1924 and is
now above the previous h.'ri figure reported in '1..il. In Australia sheep num-
bers at the bc iiir.r: of 1929 reached the high figure of 106,000,000 showing
an increase of more than-,i. .,CCO over ti.e number at the b..': i..,inr: of 19"'8
when they had been reduced by drought.

Argentina and Uru.i-.-, ootn important Nool growing countries of the
SoutLern iemispnere are not included in the above 16 countries due to lack
of estimates for recent yerrs. Unofficial estimates place the number of
sheep in Uruguay in 1929.at 19,358,CO0 compared with 14,443,000 reported by
the census of 1924. Reliable unofficial estimates place the number in Ar-
gentina between 36,(1-D,000 and 40,000,0CC. The decreases in the Province
of 3uenos Aires are believed to be offset to some extent by increases in the
southern provinces. Estimates for the province of Buenos Aires, alone, show
that at the b--i, ,:in of 1929 there were 12,446,C00 sheep in that province,
a slight redu-tion from 1iJ'.. The number of eAcs and tegs, however, was
9,686,000 or 62,000 aoove 1928 and was hkir.:' than for any year since the
be inr.iriL: of 1925.






1/ Canada, United Ststes, Fr. land and vlt-s, Scotland, North Ireland, Irish
Free Stnte, France, Sermany, I.-T.r',, Greece, Rum'nia, LStvia, o-
slavia, 7stonin, Al1eria, Tunis, :-' !-i, 1ustralia and New Zealand.




I









S..'- I : -. J-t i .or'ilA 'r' ,: i t:4: ti r -. s .r:',' r : '- 1'i5. ,
Sr 1 ., i -; i .L .v- .- 9 i .'


S. : : .
' ..-; "; :? L : ,: ,: : i
:j'[, I, ,
.I. .- ,- _,

S .. .... .: .. : 17 ): ,


: .. ...... : : :
0 _. c : -, :


7...! :.:~ !;-


4. I


I L..J t : : .
-Z .......-: .I .'- -..': '
i ,lr L


. ..9 ,.*'- : ':


4~ -


4 !............ -,
S . 4

r. L I .. : -L-





?1 J:iAl islands j/ 4,s-1:
Ot n r .......... : 5,00U :
Tot' 1 oatn
Am rim c : 537,103
Tot- l countries
r ort i in :


r
.5 ', .




3,061
5,000:


3,3-48:


Ot ., I L
4,077



56 1,1. 3


1. :

I .. :





' :


r

























r tLL c--<.: u4'
* o,u37c: KS


I -.. -
1 ,
i'i : 4.,O'r. 4

i .: 4




-7 .: __,5_


. 1 : 3. 44 '
6,5u,9 -
n I -

t *; -


._ .




., L )


5),CCC_

3 ^


- lL"


~I 2.


~'''
''


i


_I


:


'; -i ., u .:




- 23 -


*JJL: Estimete' world production in tne ,rease, aver- r 11<9-1913,
Annual 1985-19.9 Continucd


Country


Iceland ......... :
'United ir.. :," c/:
O r.I':v' ........ .:
S 'eden ..........:
L unmark ..........
Iietherlr nIs .....:
E l i um .........:
F'r;.r, ..........:
3 in ...........:
Fortugal .......:
I al,- ...........:
Svitzeriand .....:
J;-I rr' ,' ........:.
'istria ..........
Czechoslovakia ..:
S' I* r*:s .........:
iugoslavia ......:
r eP i ..........:
'Pilgari a .........
Rum? i "-, .........:
Li thuania .......:
L'tvia ..........:
Estonia ..........
Foland ..........:
Finland .........:
issia, L.. r--,"-
and Asiatic ..:


Total Eurone excL:
nussia ....... : 589,. ':
ftal count. re- :
porting in 1929 :
excl. .-. sia ...: 427,435:


AF.'I CA


!,orocco .. ......:
Algeria .........:
Tunis ...........:
Frzrcr. '*est Africa
E;, pt ........... :
.'..ion of Soutn
Africa _/. ......:
Soutn ie~t -Africa:
(Protectorate)..:
Ecssitoland b/ .... :


8,570:
35,221:
2,370:
570:
4,345:

157,6. :

(1 0):
9,450:


: '.-, : 1,27 : 1928 : 1929
_: : : :(Prelim.)


:
:
:


25, :
45,73,:
4,69C:
1,330:
4,360:

....- >,. 61 :


11,7:-':


34,-- ~ :
39,270:
5,70 :
1,420:
4, ,73 :

2,49,1o9:

440:
12,10, :


a20,820:
36, CI0:
2,760:
1, 460:
4, 0C:

273, 000C:

940:
12,900:


Avrope :
1909-
1913 a/:
1,000 :
l 2 ,O :

2 080:,
.-':. 4,021:
5,150:
3, : -
3,488:
3, f. -E
1, 360:
81,600:
77,970:
5 '. :
51,000:
355:
43,893:
1,323:
5,818:
16,842:
35,500:
20, "10:
29,100:
45,6 00:
3,690:
2,690:
1,409:
7,1 .
4, )

f/330, 11:


~----


I, ,J 1: 1, _) 1 ,000 :
pound s : :,..nJ : -:ounds : +

1,250: ,'... : 1,62C:
1..,853: 114,567: ilb,537:
5,940: 6,. -: 6,246:
2,87 : 2,560 : 2,260:
1,490: 1,36C: 1,560:
5, 4"': 6,CC(: 3,960:
840: 775: 775:
44,974: 46,olD7:/ 50,180: /
90,U20: lj5,792: 104,5C0:
6,557: 5,720: 6,,: O:
57,C)0: 5E5,80: 55,8(00:
410: 3'7 : (37 ):
50,160: 41,8 0C: ;,'.' e/
(2,90) 1,".:0 1,430:
(3,90 ) 3,79 (3,50 ):
13,234: 13170: 11,760:
28,643; 28,789: 2 C,004:
18i :, 14,500: 17, 700:
25,450: 25,400: 22,050:
54,940: 53,100: 55,69C:
4,66C: 5,030: 3,77C:
3,19<,: 3,110: 3,51c:
.:o, : ,065: 2,C0 :
4,40o: 4, (0 : 4,3CC:
5,220 -' 4,960:

31 ,C ': 551,0 0: 3 9,C'CO:


543,986: 549,615: 5- c,54:


L'6 ,836: 339,. :,: 361,529:


i, LC. 1, CCO
j..- 1 : : : ,* ,

1,6 ,30:
[19,6:': 117,869
5,420: 5,640
1, : ---
1,5.C: ---
3,"-C: ---
8CC: ---
49,840:e/ 48,550
1I '0,0 : ---
6,32O : 5,1 6
49,500: --
(370):
33,6C0:e/ 31,900
(1,400) :
3,290:
11,5CC: 6,150
27,9350 29,000
16,625:e/ 17, :1
41,49C: 22, -'.
,C06(: e/ 52,480
4,06C: 3,.w'
3,270: e/ 2,700
2,028:e/ 1,4.-'
9, ,.. ---
4,83C: ---

.:.,OOC: 397, C00


533,583: ---


354,853: 345,154




21,630:
38,760: ---
3,1 : ---
1,570: ---
4,7 : ---.

8.,000: 302,000


12,700:
Continued -




c ~1


WOOL-24 -
"<..L: Estimated p'):.rl: pr i -ction in theI sresse, aver?:. 19'9-i i3,
ac n.ri i i -'.. -1 '.:? :.,ntin .ed


Aver-:
Coun try : 19 : i *' .* : :'. : i .-. :.' i 1....
: 1: I Pre in.
: 1 .. .. : ,, : I .. : 1 ,1 '.. -
:_,,_JJ_'._,,__ _.r.__ _l: *L. 'r ..,Lr. .L r, t., : :,c, -,

A.RICA, CONTI1,FJEBD:

Madagascar ...... :, ,:. .": 1. : 1, ---
Other ...........A
Total Africa : 2. : : .L :


Total count, re-
porting in 1929: 15 .

ASIA s :/

' ,'key .. ........ 1 1 ,. :
Iraq Mesopotamia : 1., -1 .: i,
Palestine .......: .
Persia .......... 5 ,
Syria ...........: : .
Af&anistan ...... 1 .,' .
India ...........: 6 .
Ctina / ..........: 3 ,. : .
Other ........... .
Total Asia eKcl.
Ru.ssia & Cnina: 16- 4.
Total countries:
reporting in
1929 exclud-
ing Russia anid:
Crina ........: 8 '




Australia .......: ...
Iew Zealand .....: 17 .
Other ........... : 1i li :


I.'I
K.



*L .




lC :


11, :



1.-, .








1 .. ,. 4











.: :

ilv


* I I.














.- --


Total Oceania .: 90,751: ,C4,044:1,12d ;97. :117,1 i,9:1,.89,1- ---
Total countries:
reportig in
19 9. .........: 907,6.51:1, 0: *-7:1,l t,"0'-.:1, 117,,1 ,- 't ,. _,
Total all coun-:
tries r-: .:rt- :
inr or-, ar to
1' xcl ..1 r.. : :
Asiatic coun- :
tries and
Russia ... .., : : 5 ,
estimated world :


tot c: 1 : : :
S.: C.ina: :
I .. .. :2 .* ':2,.: 9L '.CC ':3 ,C- -:',(C :3 ,. :3 .. ..


--


~' 1


Es





AC'O 'L-24


- 25 -


"',L: Estimated world production in tne grease, avri-r ge 1909-1913,
annual 1925-1929 Continued

Compiled in the Division of Statistical and Historical Research. TLis
table includes wool shorn in the spring in the northern hemisphere and that
shorn in the last few months of the same calendar year in the southern
h-e.isprere. Fi-gures in parenthesis either interpolated or carried forward.
a/ A--r:-.-e for years 1909-13 whenever available, otherwise for any year
or years within or near this period for which estimates are available.
b/ Estimates based on e-nr.'rts alone or eoxorts stocks and domestic consumo-
tion. c/ I:timates furnished :. cable from the Inter ational Institute of
Agriculture in Rome. d/ Estimates of th- Yorksrire Observer. -Trese fig-
ures have teen used instead of official estimates as comparable estimates
are available up to 1929. e/ Estimate based on sheep numbers at date near-
est searing. f/ Year 1916. '/ Estimates for Asiatic countries rc.-,
approximations only. (See note i/). h/ r.. 'rts of sheep's wool only.
i/ Totals subject to revision. Few countries publish official wool produc-
tion figures. In the absence of official fi- !"..: for most countries various
estimates have been used. Some have been supplied by ;- -.ernnent representa-
tives abroad, others are based on sheep numbers at the date nearest shear-
ing time. For some principal exporting countries, exports alone, or exports,
stocks and domestic c,. r...ition :ave oeen used as represent :i-' production.
In tne case of some Asiatic countries rousn commercial estimates have been
used while tne figures of the United States Pepartment of Commerce or the
--ational association of Wool Manufacturers nave Deen used for some countries.

Sources: For orinciwpl countries, other sources and methods of estimati.-7
not polished for lack of space.

Unitted States Fleece aver,.- ; 190(9-1913, annual 1925-1929, pulled. wool
avraese 1909-13, annual 19:2-1929 official estimates of Bureau of Agrical-
tural Economics.
-,-: :. Average 19' --!2, estimated ;y assuming the average yield per
sneep to be 7 pounds and per 1lmb 4 pounds as furnished -. the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics for recent .. rs. As no separate statistics were
given for sneep and lambs, tlhe percentage of lambs has been assumed to be
the same as the average for the years l.'. '' .'-, ;yers 1925-1929 official
estimates of the Dominicn Bureau of Statistics.
UTnited Kingdom Ave .:-e 1.9'-13, yarJ 1925-19.-9, estimates are those
of the Yorkshire Ooserver since .ore recent figures are available from it
than from other sources. Tne figures of tne Ministry of Agriculture ani
Fisheries are as follows: Average 19,'2--13, ]P,0, )',' '' pounds; 1923,
99,J. n,) pounds; 1924, 19c3,000,0 71 pou.-ds.
Frgnce Aver-ae 1.'-^ 13, ye-rs 1923 and 1:' official estimates
published in the Annuaire St tistique de 9l Fr :,:'- 1926. Year 1927, 1.:'.
and 1. '. see note e/.


- Continued








OOUL-24


- 26 -


,30L: Estimated world production in the grease, average 1909-1913,
r-:nui l3~5-1 'l2 Continued


"'3T Continued

xermany Average 1909-13, 1924 estimated on basis of number of sheep
multiplied by average weight used by the Verein Deutscher '.llkaemmer und
Kammgarn-Spinner. 1925-1927 Acting Commercial Attache Douglas Miller, Feb-
ruary 2, -1927. 1928-1929 Assistant Trade Connissioner A. Pouilas Cook,
January 31, 192o, february 1, 1929.
Argentina Average 1909-13 estimates furnished by Consul Henry
Robertson quoted from "La Prensa" of August 18, 1919 figures are based
on exports and domestic consumption. Years 1926, 1926 and 1928 estimates
of Buenos Aires Branch of First National bank of Boston published in an in-
tensive study entitled ','-.l Growing in Argentina. Estimate for 1927 based
on exports, October-Seotember, stocks and local consumption. Year 1929 see
note c/.
S Av-r,.-e 1909-13, annual exports years 1910-14, Annuario de
Estsdistica Agricola. No estimates of stocks or domestic consumption
available. Year Il1 :' Commercial Attache L. B. Clark, January 3, 1927.
Years 192;3 and 1927 Vice Consul iatv.rn Scarrett, October 19, 191:. i- '
Consul General C. Carrigan, June 14, 1929. For 1929 sec note c/.
~Jstralia Average 19 0-13, official estimates calendar years 1;.''-11,
years ending June 30, 1913, 1914. Years 1925-1927 revised official estimates
wnich are on the average about 5 per cent above tne unrevise- estimates. In
these figures the discrepancies in the returns by land-holders compared with
those obtained by taking exports plus local consumption have been eliminated
- Quarterly Summary Australian Statistics, September, I..' Year 1929 Inter-
national Institute of Agriculture.
_. .-'. -1-i. Average 1,' *-13, 1925 to 1928 estimates of PTali.-t' and
C': Year I':2 see note e/. The official estimates as publishe- in
New Zealand are for sheep shorn on farms only and cre as follows: .,
165, 913,6,c4 :..i.s; 1924, 1: .,030,545; 1925, 173,402,764; 1i.. 1 ',497,: -;
1927, i94,8S7,5s4; 1928, 210,699,663.
Union of South Africa Avert-re 1909-13, exports October-September.
Scoured wool cnar.-c 3 to grease on basis of 60 per cent -i.-.-:>.--e. 1925 to
1323 Croi) a-nd Markets of the Union of South Africa, Ak, :t 1- '9.
Aussia Year 1916 ZT.:...m[c Life, December 13, 1928. elementt
published by the Government cr.r.-.ization called the Workers F-.. :.t !I:-e'--
tion. Years 19; -1, 9 figures published by the State Planning .Irs:d in the
publication entitled"Controlling fi -res:'


- "', i'tinued




VOOL-24 27 -
Receipts, disposals and stocks 1929-30, and 1928-29
lips in primary tmr' ts with comparisons


Country, item and period
1929-30 clip


1,0
.lu


,uantity
'00 pounds


Australia: i/
1.c.:ipts: From July 1 to Feoruary 1, 19J0 .............: 2/ 716,262
Same p rtd 1929 ........................... 764,36
Disposals: From July 1 to February 1, 1930 ....4 ........ : Jf,014
Same i: -riod-1929 ............................ : 486,073
Stocks on hand, r'Febrtry 1,;1930 ....................... 330,630
Sano date 1929 .... ... ............. ...... ,292
Arg. ntina:
Receipts at Central Prouucu M arkut -
July 1, 1929 tb January 29, 190 ....................... : 56,100
Same period 1929 *......................... .... 74,286
Shipments October 1, 1929 to January 0, 1990 ........ : 82,136
Same period 1929 ................... .... ....... : 115,394
Stocks at Central Produce Ularl-et -
January 29, 1930 ............. ...... .............. : 21,030
Same date 1929 .................................... : 9,445
Uruguay::
Shipments: October 1, 1929 to Janu ry jO, 1930 ......... : 31,194
Same Duriod 1929 .................................... : 6P,805
Union of South Africa -
Ship:ionts: July 1, 1w'29 to r'..-rury 1, 190 ............ : 107,000
Sane. period 1929 ....................................169,00U
Stocks: Decembt;r 1, 1'29 ............................... : 36,3
December 1, 1928 ............................ 20,860
1928-29 clip
Australia: 1/
Receipts: From July.1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 .......... 3/ 834,051
S:Lm.i period 1927-28 ........................ : 743,821
Disposals: From July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 .......... 820,317
Same period 1927-28 ........... .......... : 73,961
Stocks on hand June 30, 1929......................... 13,734
Same date 1928 .... ................... 9,860
Argentina:
Receipts at Central Produce Ilarkut, luenc.; .irus -
Season July 1, 1928 to June 26, 1929 ................. : 99,646
Same period 1927-28 ............................... : 91,905
Shipments: October 1, 1928 to September 30, 1929 ....... : 317,186
Same period 1927-28 ...................... : 298,854
Stocks in argentina on S(;pt-cmbjr 30, 1929 ............. : 25,002
Same date, 1928 ...................... ... : 18,520
U rguay::
Receipts: Up to February 4, ..................... : 119,000
February 6, 1929 ...................... : 121,000
March 1, 1929 .......................... : 126,841
April 1, 1929 .................. ..... : 4/ 128,275
Shipments: October 1, 1928 to September 30, 1929 ....... : 127,530
Samu period 1927-28 0 ................... 131,468
Stocks: April 16, 1928. Stocks for disposal small ..
;.ril 11, 1929 ... ........... ............. 15,872
T!ay 8, 1929 .............................. / 10,912
August 31, 1929 ........................ 4/ 8,92


-- 1 --'-


----




IIlri.'E SIv't C.F FiORIDA

II I I lIII I I I IIIi llllll llll Ill
3 1262 08861 7229
00- 2 -

R-c 'pTs, d -ispo r-. c -n n st,-,.cs i92i9-7: r.An 192P-29.
clir. in pri'-r- .r-IS ith coir-rison o Contd


Country, ite* ard p,-'rio-,d Qunintity

: 1. L O0 l r _1o rds
Union of South Africa:
Exports: July 1, 1928 to Jun-j 3', 1'C3.............. : 283,...0
Sime period 1927-. ........................: 273,(-0C
Stocks: Of unsold ./ool Jun: .30, 1;,9. ............. :' 9,1-9
Of unsold -ool Jirn- 30, 1928................: 6, ,0 (
!:: Zesl-nd: :
Shipments: July 1, 1928 to J.m.: 3(, 1.29 .............. 21;,110
S,:no period 1927-28..........................: 226,F.5
Stocks: June 30, 1929............................... 27,53A
June .30, 1928 .................. ...........: 18,800

Audsr.lia: Su:.son 1.E-29 Esti-1t -F of "':tion-l Cou cil of ool oSlling
Brc..-'rs, Consul G-ner:.l Arthur G-.rr -1, ;l1boirr Jil"' 1', 1929.
eight ry!r b:rlo from Country Lif; r-i 6tccK .Ti St tion Jourr.-.l, July
11, -nd DR.lc..ty's iAn u:..l Rovi ', 1927-28, rp-.'- 13. Se -r lr 129-3C -
Yorkshire Obsurver, Febr.irry 11, 1,-r .-ig:-.t r.r b.1.e, Coutntry Life
and Stocc :and St tion Journ:.l, J n.ir: 17, 1I30. ,r *:r.tir T: Rqec-ipts,
ship.:ients, .stocKs ..t Centril rn.-1,ic :.r .- t, v .vi of Riiver Pl te.
Tot.il stocks in .'r"r tin:., c'ol.- fr r, 3 :r,-is Aiir -.? .r nrC rFirst '-tioni l
B'" n of Boston. Ur A :..:': Se son l -29, r-c -i] s, ".ont' r.:-viui.,
*Iarch, B-.n of London :.nd South ,,: rc ., Ltd., u- 1 o rvicio Irforr.mtivo
par, el E::t rior, II.rch .rJ April I1i9. 6toc.-:, .-ril 11, 1929 -nd :;1a;.,
86.1929. 'wool Record and Textilc '.orll, April 11, 1929, ::.:* 3, 1929
and Octobar Revi~c! B nkc of Lo -.in !.d Sojth ..:ric i, LtI., ship-1':nts,
Sorvicio Inforiitiyo p:.r" 31 Ixt>rior, October 1, 1929. S -son 1923-10I -
Shipm.nts R-vir;: of the Riv r Pl t -. Uninn rf Sril't 1ric2a: StoCcs,
'onthly Bullotir. of Union St-.t-:tics. E:-r.rts, Crinp n,1 "-r-'ts of
Union of Soith tfric", ki'.'t,- 192'. 192.-S, ".'' .ol R cori -ini T'.til?
.'prld, Febru ry 6, 19'7. T -1n- : `2-iyr 'nt 1927-28 .nd 1928-29
Consul Gorer'rl 7. L. Lo-ri ', .'lin-tnr, 'ul:- 29. St c-:,C "'ntHly
Abstr-ct of St-tistics, August 2:, 1929.

1/ These figures concern only t) cl ip of t' ; -.r 'i-...t' .
2/ Havj us.d ov r- :ight of b 1. f'or Taly-D :b r, .12, .s jsti1-.tjd |,
by th: N..tion;l Council of .*-ol llii : Jro<.r T: 1 .t :r sti nt
av il blo :.s y t.
3/ Conv.rtod to pounds by usir.! -:ti ..t. of .vr** iht r b 1' or
310 pounds .s furnished b:. t.I..- :::.tir.,l CoAuncil o:' .Joon b-llir.
Brr:'rs of Austr:.li', Jal;'-.Jr.. 1.26-. c, co .- r I .':th .n :.v:r.-n .
of 3Ol pounds for p1;riod .Jil:. 1 t,:, Jr.. ;31, 1lJ7- .
./ No corri:.Jor n: :-sti'.:lfos for :-r in;- .', r v il.blo.
5_/ Jcoared .rool ch -1 'to gnA :.- nr -sis of r.r c :nt lcs 'in so-irir.g.
6/ Pr-.ctic lly '11 inferior .orit.


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