World wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
World wool situation
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some issues combined.
General Note:
Description based on: WOOL-16 (June 17, 1929)
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 631804619
lccn - 2010229455
ocn631804619
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .A19
System ID:
AA00011233:00008

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World wool prospects


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Full Text

I OCUME08 NT) N PT

... .a f.
UI LIMITED SIME3S E P.'RTh7ErT *'F :LRIICULU'RE
US DEPOSITORY Buro.su of ,agricultural EC nomics
Wlashingt on

VOO L-23 F --br-.iir:- 2~',193 0

WORLD D "'OOL Si ?TI.J 'L7IO

TR' ,'J:D COI'SU.:ITIO!: PRICES PRODUCTIOr

&Dor..: stic "'ool pric: s ma-ie further i-:clin's -luring J.Lnu r::, follo.ling

tha .7.i,:oninf in for3iign mar.c-ts but have r-n.minri- stai.-d' during Februnr;.,

except fnr :.ools grading -.Gs knd lo.:-r whichh -ave continued to a.-cline.

Prices in Bradford -ar.n Australia import ed to 'ard the clos-. of the London

Wool S-.Is on Febra-'ry 6, follo-'in, thr- d'.'islnn to extend the .ustralian

selling s-.STson into August. Recent cables indicated? improven?:-nt in n'nrly:

all primary "ar:ots. The 17T'i Zealarni sal.:s hav, been postnpcr..d n .ring to

the refusal of buyers to attend unle-ss at l--:st 20,i00:0 balcs ..re to be

of fe red.

Prices of domestic .ools d.clinod at Boston frol. 1 to 2 cmnts a

pound on a grease basis for 6-is :nd fie.or -ools and from 4 t) 7 cents a

pound on .aicls grading 60s and lo.7vr. The gr-i'test d-clir-:' .' rn 1/4

blood clothing ool "which .;/s 7 cents 1o.,C-r in the :.:e-k anied February 15

than on Jinuary 4. Fine uools dclir.'d. from 2 to 5 c .nts a pound on a

scoured basis, half-bloods (E--6(s) .vire 5 to 7- certs lo..-r, ind tools

S grading 56s ind lv/ur t-eclin.rd fro..i 7t- to 15 cents .:ith th? grrate-?t

decline on i4-50s clotl.ing iools.

;le-. Z,:larnd ;ools declined 7 to 14 c-nts a pound .nd Aistrrlian

ools ac-re mostly 5 to 10 cents lover at Boston on February 15, rn a

scoured basis. South ,Aerican .iols at anston T7or 4 to cnts loaer

on a grpasn basis.






'"**









WOOL-23 -

Production of wool in the United States daring 1929, including

pulled i0ool, -vas 8 million pounds greater than last year. Most of this

increase was in the states of Texas, Montana and California. Receipts

of wool at Boston during Janmary ,'ro about 3 million prunls gr.*ater than

last .:-ir but slihtly-less than during January 1928. Imports of comb-

'ing and clothing wools into the United States during 1929 wore over 11

million pounds greater than last y.vr although the imports for the month

of December were 2 million pounds.. less than last .--ar.

Domestic consumption declined consiiderbly amounting to or.:. 3

million pounds, on a grease basis, in December conpnired with 47 million

pounds in ITovember and 59 million pounds in October.

British and Continental sool markets ,',:ro quiet during January with

bu;.':rs hesitant about placing orders in the face of the continued decline

in price of -raw materials. Recently there has been more optimism and Brad-

ford importers are buying slightly larger, quantities. !:e.a orders indicate

expected improvement in fine worsteds.and heavy woolens.

Stoc :s of tops-in commission combing establishments in Eur 1-e on

Feb trury 1 amo-un.t-d to 53 million pounds or about 8 million pounds more

thin on Febr.dr:. 1, 1:29 and about 2 million pounds more than on Januiary, 1,

19.3'. StocKs of tops. in France are over 6 million pounds heavier than

last ;'-r.

WVool production in 19 countries -hiLh usually pr)du ce over 83

p'r cent of the world's ;ool clip, exclusive of' Russa and China, is es-

timated to be about 2,-i7 milllion.pounds or about 9 million rouris .'r'C'or

than the lar., clip of last year.







- 3-


1WOOL-23 Prices! DonTstic

The volume of Jool sold during January Sas very moderate and '-as
rostri':ted to imrndiate requirements, according to R. L. Burrus of the
Boston ,'ool Office of the Bureau 'of. Agricultural. E.2'con 'i s. A fairly
heavy volume of trading during the latter part of December apparently
.?as in anticipation of January requirements and the trading during the
latter month :as quite .distinctly of a piecing out character. January
is seasonally a dull ronth because of the approach of openings of new
lines of goods. Conditions this year have not been favorable to the policy
of buying n:ool in anticipation of future needs. Wool values abroad were
ste dil:,. declining and this situation was reflected in a continuous do.n-
ward road lustment of quotations on domestic wools. Unsettled business
conditions was a further incentive to the conservative policy of buying
rTa materials.

To.vard the close of January, foreign wool, markets showed a steadier
trend. This iiprorv.:-rnent, however, had little effect upon the purchase of
domestic :.ools. It did tend to create confidence in the current level of
prices and manufacturers covered the most pressing needs a little more
free ly.

Fine .ool lc '..'er

The bul.: of the trading in domestic ,-ools was on 64s and finer
qualities and by: far the larger portion of the domestic fine wools sold
were of the westernn lines. Prices, however, showed steady declines during
January but have been steady during the first two weeks of February. The
best original big lines that were bringing around 81 cents at the end of
December, sold before the close of January at; 75-77 cents, scoured basis.
Original w.ools of bulc French combing staple of 64s and better quality that
mere selling in the range 75-78 cents, scoured basis, declined to the range
73-75 cents. Sore of the short combing .vools of this grade moved at 70
cents and slightly below. Graded strictly coibing' was mostly quiet with
scatterei sales as low as 78-80 cents, scoured basis. Graded French comb-
ing declined from around 80 cents to the range 75-77 cents, scoured basis.
Chicie strictly cr-mbing offer-ings of 64s or finer Fleece ;vools declined
mc'derate,2y1 but this class .seemed to resist the pressure somewhat better
than the westernn :.ools, partly because of more limited supplies. Ohio
and similar .Jools of this class and grade sold during the month in the
range 33-35 cents, grease basis, vith the average scoured basis price
around 80-91 cents.

Medium vool prices decline

Denmnd :ias rather slow on 58s, 60s wools. Territory strictly
combing of this grlde declined from 80-83 cents to 77-79 cents, scoured
basis, and sales .-re very moderate in Volume. Little business was done
on Floeec-e ools of this grade.




SM11


W1n1 L-23 -

Quotations eased steadily on .-s and 48s, 50s grades of domestic
wools. Scattered sales were report'j on both Territory and Fleece lines
of these grades. Scoured basis prices declined -pproximately six to
ten cents per pound during the month. These declines gere largely due
to the extremely weak condition of foreign markets for crossbred wools.
The declines of domestic 7o6ls, however, tended to lg behind the declines
on equivalent grade 7ools abroad and domestic values aere generally con-
sidered above the level at which foreign Tools could be imported. This
price relationship was maintained through the noiterately limited supplies
of domestic medium wools and the limited'offerings of spot foreign wools.
The policy of bu,;ing only -for immediate needs enabled holders to command
a premium on spot sools and this reacted favor:-bly on our domestic mod-
ium grade wools.

Texas 12-months ,ool was fairly stoT.:.'. The last sales reported
were around 80 cents, dhich was but a slightly lower figure than -.s ob-
tained for the best offerings around the end of December. The supplies
of choice Teoas wool of a full year's growth is reported to be quite limited.
The situation in these lines is relatively much better as far as supplies
are concerned than in January last year.

Li ttl- dI--rnd fonr impr -r.i r 'nls

Business in foreign lines *:es very slo-:i, However, moderate quan-
tities of spot wools, including Australian Merinos and South American ndi
Nea Zealand cross breds were sold at steadily declining prices. Good 64s,
70s Australian wools sold as low as ".-63 cents, and good combing 64s sold
at 60 cents, scoured basis in bond. Small quantities of Ne. Ze 48land 48s,
50s SuLp-r .vools sold at 39 cents, scoured basis in bond. Spot .eools com-
manded a premium over offering', for import during the entire month. Orders
for import'were limited and for the most part covered only known requirements.

Pul -led ::.rls in Icss .- land

The market on aools suitable for voolen manufacturee -as quite irrer-
ular. A fairly heavy volume of business in December had brought a firmer
trend in prices. Demand failed to be sustained, hoz:ever, during Ja-nuary
and prices yielded to pressure especially after the decline at London.

IT.'.i ,ar('t -.rr'.""' s

The noil market was fairly active at times and prices nere fairly
s'.y. 'Y situation in noils had been improved so-mo.;hat by the incre.sed
d.-imar.d and decreased production dhro'j-gh declines in c ibinrt activity toward
the close of last :.'.-r. eoil prices had sa:ffered a much more Irstic de-
cline during 1'.'. than the i; rril level of wiool prices.








':700L-23


Delivery of tops heavy, prices lower


The top market vas only moderately active during January. Speci-
fications for pri.opt delivery accompanied practically all new orders,
signifying a very, conservative bu:.ying policy on the part of spinners.
Prices on 64s top declined at least 5 cents a pound. Oil combed 64s that
will spin a 50s yarn gas quoted at 41.10 per pound at the end of December,
out after the decline in wool at London and a sympathetic decline in domes-
tic .ools, prices began slipping until less than $1.05 was being offered
and only most pressing requirements aere being covered at this figure by
the end of January. Dry combed 64s sold as loa as 91.00 per pound in
January although early in the month a fair volume of business had been
placed at 41.02-1.05 per pound. One encouraging feature of the market was
the heavy deliveries. Spinners were taking deliveries very freely and in
some cases tnp-akers' deliveries were heavier in volume than normal for
January. Unfilled orders tended to decline as a result of heavy deliveries
and slow placing of new orders.

7WOOL: Price per pound at Boston, October to December
1929 and January and February 1930

: 1929 1930
Grade
: Oct 5 Nov 9 : Dec 7 : Jan 4 : Feb 8
: Cents : Cents :Cents : Cents : Cents
64s, 70s. 80s (fine)
Strictly combing: .
Ohio and similar gre.se.......: 38 : 36-37 35-36 : 34-35 : 33-34
Fleece scoured basis.....,....: 90-93 : 8890 85-88 : 83-85 : 78-81
Territory scoured basis..,.....: 88-93 : 87-89 : 85-87 : 83-85 : 78-80
58s, 60s (- blood) .
Strictl': conbing *
(hio and similar grease.......: 44-45 : 42-43 : 41--2 : 40-41 : 36-37
Fleece scoured basis..........i 93-96 : 88-92 : 85-88 : 80-83 : 75-78
Territory scoured basis.......: 93-96 : 87-90 : 85-87 : 80-83 : 75-78
56s (3/8 blood)
Strictl:. c ribin: :
Ohio and similar grease.......: 45-46 : 44-45 : 41-42 : 40-41 : 36-37
Fleece scoured basis..........: 85-88 : 85-87 : 78-83 : 77-80 : 67-69
Territory scoured basis.......: 88-92 : 85-90 : 83-85 : 78-80 :68-71
46s (low 1/4 blood)
Strictly combine :
Ohio and similar gr-.se.s.....: 38-39 : 38- : 38-39 : 36-37 : 32-34
Fleece scoured basis.........: 63-66 : 63-65 : 63-65 : 60-63 : 53-57
Territory scoured basis.......,: 65-70 : 65-70 : 65-68 : 62-67 : 55-58
--------------------_ L. ____ 5 ____ .__________. ____


Compiled from weekly Market News Reports of the
Bureau of Agricultural Economics,


Boston Office of the







U00L-23


The London Colonial wool sales


The first series of the 1930 wool sales onr~.. ed in Lcnjon on Janu-
ary 21 -with about 165,000 'bales of wool available for the auctions. Merino
wools sold from 15 to 2' per cent below the close of the previous sales on
December 4, and crossLred wools were from 30 to 25 per cent lower. With-
drawals of wool from the sales were very heavy and it was decided to close
tne sales on February 6 instead of on Februar; 11 as originally announced.
Toward the close of t:.e sales competition improved. The wool sales close
on February 6 with.wools grading 64b and 70s selling 3 cents above the low
point of the sales. rlools grading 568 were 1 cent higher, 56. and 60 were
'.i.Jhanied and wools grading 50s and lower were about 1 cent lower than a'
tne opening of tihe sales on January 21.

LO:;Ji ..jj00L SALES: Prices at closing of the wool auctions reported
on basis of the Official Standards of the United States for
-rles of wool (on scoured basis)

: 1929 : 1930
United States :
trades : Jan 30 i Mar 21 : May 15 : July 23 : Oct 4 : ie' 4 : Feb'
: ::


Cents ; Cents

79.1 :71.0
73.0 -4.9
66.9 : ,1.8
60.8 :56.8
56.8 52.7
43.6 40.6
-t0.6 : b.5
39.5 7.0
39.5 34.5
38..5 : 38.5
27..5 37.5


Ce ts :t

58.8 :
53.7 :
48.7 :
46.6 :
44.6
L6.5
:5.5 :
34.5
34.5 :
33.4 :
3-.4 :


Cents : Cents

59.8 : 52.7
56.8 :49.7
54.7 : 43.6
5'.7 : 41.6
47.6 : 36.5
38.0 : 3. 4
36.5 : ,..4
35.5 : ?~.4
35.5 : .4
34.5 :6.4
34.5 : 26.4


Tauilated from
at London.


reports of


E. A. Foley, United States Agricultural Commissioner


Approximately 94,",:.': bales of wool were'sold chiefly to fraiforl ani
the Continent compared with 19',C'r oales in December. A few bales of cross-
brel wools and slips were reported sold for American account but there were
no American orders for merino wools. About 65,,.,- bales of Coloniia. 'oos
were neld over for ti;e next series of sales'to be held on .:arcr. li. 'ne
ioll.-ili,, t0ble snows the quantities of wool available at tne first sales in
1: .iand 1?^., and :..so for iae sales'in Decemoer 1:'~J.


?0s
64s

58s
56s'
-)s-
48s
46s
44s
4 '
36s


Cents

87.2
80.1
75.0
69.9
66.9
50.2
-6.63

42.6
41.6
40.:6


Cen t .

83.1
77.0
72.0
64 9
60.8
44.6
42. 6
41.6
39.5
38.5
37.5


- 6 -








400L-23 :-


LOIDJ'NJ CuOLONIAL dOOL SiLES' .uantity of wool catal.-,-z'- and
sold at London


Country


Wool cataloged by:
Austrelia
New So:th 'ales ...... .........
Victoria ........................
%u'ensland ......................
Vest Australia ..................
Soutn Australia .................
Tasmania ........................


Total .......
New Zealand ....
Cape............
South American .
All other ......


..................
. ... .. .
............. .
.... ............
..................


Total .........................


S 1929 : 1930
SJan 30 : Dec.4 : Feb 6
: ales : Bales :Bales


: 27,257 : 27,700 38,928
S 12,700 : 15,CC : 17,102
15,824 16,870 17,2r,.
: 11888 : 10,600 : 12,632
: 5316 5,600 5,610
:92 100 : -

S 73,077 :.: ...~4,870 91,478
S 23,829 : 47,550 : 26,312
: 3,527 ,: 4,050 : 3,057
1,039 : 4,CCO : 2,729
S 1,386 : 6,530 : 3,588

:102,858 137,CCO : 127,164


Nool sold to: .
Continent .................. ..... : 49,000 : 59,500 : 51, :
United Kingdom .................. : 31,000 : 48,500 : 42,0(. :
United States ................... : 2,000 : 1,000 : 1,000

Total ......................... 82,000 : 109,COO : 94,C C 0


Trade and Consumption: Domestic

Receipts at 3oston are jiiher.


Tne receipts of domestic wool at: Boston during January 1930 amount-
el to 7,660,0..j pounds compared with 4,632,000 pounds in January 1929.
Trhe total quantity of domestic wool arriving at Boston from March 1929 to
February 1, 1930 amounted to 207 million pounds or saout 6 million greater
than during tnYe same period last year but 7 million pounds less than in the
1927 season. Tne fol owing table shows monthly receipts of wool at Boston
from January 1927 to Jsnu ii 1,93.0.


'':. '- ,:iiS,l:


- 7 -




.JJ5L, O'u:ST IC: Receipts 8t Toston, by months, J u:. ',, 19P7-'L-1,0


Month


1927 : 1928


: 1929


S 1930 I/


:1,000 pounds: .Yi' 0 pounds :1,000 pound-s 1, iC00 pounds
Jan : 6,01 8,044 4,532 7,E66)
Feb 6,577 6,399 1l,.
Mar : 8,600 : 6,497 5,738
Ar. ........ .. : '9. ,'522 : 8,138' 6" : 6,442 ......"
May : 17,938. : 25,843 : 16,108
Jilne 4-"--- "C 46;106"" : "'0,083 ', 4C";',9 "
July : 55,877 : 51,346 : 56,870
Aug : 29,891 : 25,802 : 32,377
Sept 11,799 : 7,156 : 16,233
Oct 9,033 4,5'9 : 9,171
Nov. : 8,972 9',322 8,202 "
Dec8,794 : 72 .. 8,257
Compiled from.weekly reports of the Boston Wool Office'of the Bur,-u- of Agri-
cultural Economics.
1/ Preliminary
Machinery activity much lower
The report of the Bureau of the Census on activity of wool machinery
during December 1929, showed considerable decreases compared with November
1929 and December 1928, both'in the actual-number of hours that the machines
were in operation and in the per cent of maximum single-shift capacity. W3"clen
and worsted spindles reported only 589 million ours activity in December com-
pared with 653 million in:November, 817 million in October 1929 and 709 mil-
lion hours in December 1928. Looms, otner-than.carpet.looms, were active only
7.7 million nours in December compared with-8.3 million hours in Nover.iber and
9.5 million hours in December 1928. The following table compares the activity
of wool machinery in the United States during November and December 1'29 ani
December 1928.
Wool machinery activity in the United States during
December 1928, and November'and December 1929


Total number of hours
machines were active


macol h
machinery :


: ov


: Percentage of total: Percentage of
: machinery active : maximum
Sat some time during: single-scift
: month capacity
Dec : ov : Dec : 10


1928 1.929 i 129
:1,000 :1,06J0 1,0L
o A rs rho-irs : h -urs
Cards...... 1,187: c94 1,023:
Combs......: 399: 391: 439:
Spindles: :
*'oolen.... :371,9:4:289,479:321,690:
.vorsted...:337, '.1 :299,919:330,850:
Looms:
Wide 1/...: 7,9'.: 6,2: 6,.o30:
:Inrrow 2/.: 1,625: 1,449: 1,746:
C-,rp..t
and rug..: 1,270: 1,16: 1,375:
Compiled from the Rports of Active
the Department of Comnerce.
1j Wi'ler than 50-inch reed space.


196 :
P,;r :
cent
77.4
63.0 0

75.7
65.1

62.1
63.7


1'39 1929 : 1926: 1923 : ':.:'9


Ptr : P r
cent :cent
64.7 69.5
7-.8 : 67.4

61.9 : 65.8
58.5 : 64.1

31.8 : 53.9
56.9 : 66.7


r
68.3 : 60.3
and Idle Wool


Per :
Scent:
6 3.45
: 73.5:


P--r
cent
13.2
71.5


0.3: 61.2
66.1: 57.2

68.9: .4.3
53.2: 52.0


Pctr
Scent
S3.5
: 81.7

: ,:,.3
: 65.4


: 4.9


: u5.9 : 62.1: 55.1 : 54.?
Machinery, issued monthly by


2~/ 1 -ineh reed srace or less,


_ __ _. II


T~V-9i41 ::











Imports greaterr than last year

Imports of wool into the United States during 1929 ;were considerably
greater than last year and amounted to 277 million pounds compared with
240 million pounds during 1928. Imports of combing and clothing .ools
were 11 million pounds greater than last year and carpet wool imports were
26 million pounds above 1928.

During December, imports of combing and clothing wool nanunted to
4,499,000 pounds c-omparcd Hith .6,701,000 pounds last year nnd 5,194,000
pounds in November 1929. Carpet ;:ool imports .vere about 2 million pounds
greater than during December 1928. The accompanying table sho;:s the im-
ports of c.mbing, clothing and carpet wools into the Uni:.e States during
December 1928 and 1929 and the total imports of aool in bo-h years.

Imports of i dol into the United States during December 1928 and 1929
and total imports from January 1 to December 31, 1928 and 1929

: Dec Jan 1 Dec 31
Wool
: 1928 1929 1928 1929

: 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 1,000
*: runis:: pounds : pnunds : riur.is
3 7
Combing . ... .: 5,437 : 3,443 : 72,627 :83,710
Cl-thing ... .. 1,264 : 1,056 :18,408 : 18,486
Total .. :: 6,701,: 4,499.; 91,035 : 102,198
Carpet .... .. : 13,534: 15,738 : 149,326 : 175,007
1tal .'. : 20,235 : 20,237 : 240,361 : 277,205

Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic
'CoTimrce.



7'.ool consum-:-ti.-n much lnner in Dece-'ber

The consumption of .*ool in the United States by mills reporting to
the Bureau of the Census during December declined nearly 8 per cent com-
pared .vith INovember. VWrl consumption during December amounted to 38
million pounds (-grease equivalent) compiariel ;rith 47 million -punds in
November, 59 million pounds in OctOber and 46 million pounds in December
1928. About 57 per cent of the total rool consumption reported in Decem-
ber ,as domestic combing and clothing wool, 16 per cent was foreign combing
and clothing Rool and 27 per cent was carpet wool.


- 9 -


WOOL-23








'V/OCL-23


The quantity of combing and clothing -owl consumed during December
amount -.l to 28,2-0',000 pounds compared -with 32,163,00 pounds in November,
42,53M,000 ,..i;,ids in October md a fivo year average for December 1924 -
1928 of 3p,316,0C' pounds. The consumption during D:'cember -ias the 'small-
ost for any month-since June 1925 except May 1926 .vhich amounted to
2;,968,000 pounds. Th: followir.:r table sho.vs the consumption of wool by
g-ades during Novembor and December .ith totals 1928 and 1929.

W700L: Consumption in the United States, by grades,
for specified-mnnths, 1928 and 1929 1/


Official s-nda:rds of the: Dec : Nov Jan 1 to Dec 31
United States for grades: 1928 1929 1929 1928 1929
of :Jool
S1,01,000: 10 1,000 11,000 : 1,000
: nrunl : pounds : piur.is : punis : r.unis

Combing and clothing wool: : :
64s,'70s and 80s.......: 11,617 : 9,177 : 11,373 : 118,099 : 142,279
58s and 60s...........: 5,104 : 4,583 : 5,128 :61,?.7 : 61,285
56...................: 5,240 : 4,356 4,684 : 63,019 65,895
48s and 50s............: 4,038 : 4,109 : 4,728 : 61,273 : 58,181
36s, 40s, 44s and 46s..: 2,271 : 2,093 : 1,988 : 25,266 : 29,371
Total combing and :. :
clothing ools... ..: 28,270 : 24,386 :' 27,90- : 329,192 : .0,011
Carpet sools.............: 12,204 : 9,1 13,558 : 135,826 : 156,102

Total all wC7ols.......:: .;i474 : 33,3.99 : 41,.i5.9 465,018 :516,113

'7! iled from data in the '"; )ol C :r.s-,pt ion Reports" issued by the Bureau
of the Census.
1/ Tr-se are totals of .-ras., scoured and pulled wools, as published by
the ?-Ar au of the Census, and havo not been reduced to a grease basis.


Thr for r-in~ table shos that thr consumption of c.jmblng and cloth-
ing wnools inc-'*Lsil 31 million 1..un1s durin.- 1:323 c)raried with 1928. The
.:r-.test increase was in the c. nsn-rttion of domestic 6;.s-0is -hich was 28
milli n i -.ins greater than last year. The consu-:t ion of forehi(n rPs-6,'s
.in r-As each incr:-.sd over 6 million I "unls. The gr-'atest declire i: con-
r:! .ion -as in 1 -mstic 48s-50s which was 7 million r anis unier last year.
Consumption of carpet wools increased over 20 million I-,ur.'d in 1929.


- 1D -







- 11 -


00L: C.r *.' .tiL.; in t,; ::iitcl States, bvy classes,
January DIVcamber 1929 1/


Month


Total Combing Clothing


: 1,000 1,000 1,000
S: rounds pound ds

Jan -. .. .: 47,789- 26,649-: 7,00
Feb ..: 41,373 : 21,318 6,71
Mar'-.-. .' ,: 41,584 : 22.416 : 6,66
Apr 42,776 : 23,188 : 6,70
May .*.: 42,764 21,962 : 6,56
June : 38,539 :20,954 : 6,98
Jul." ..: 42,148 : 23,990 : 5,63
Aug .'. .: 46,983 : 27,22 6,19'
Sept .'. .' .: 44,439 : 25,662 : 6,06
Oc't 52,860 : 29,365 : 7,45
Nov .: 41,459 : 22,562 : 6,33
De .: 33.399 : 19.955 : 4.36


SCarpet Domestic Foreign


1,000
I tiT, S

14,135
13,339
12,488
12,883
14,234
11,600
*12,526
1., 601
:12., 712.
16,045
13,558
*9,'-'P1


5
6
0
5
8
5
2
0
5
0
9
3


1,000
runs :

26,640 *:
21,273
21,367
22,659
21,482 :
20,638
24,122
27,083
26,213
30,569
22,604
18,972 :


21,149
20,100
20,217
20,117
21,282
17,901
18 .026
.. 900
16,226
22,291
18,855
14,427


Compiled from monthly r.epnots of the EBir-,ru


qf th-? Census.


l_/ The-se are totals of .grease, scoured ani pulled .y:ols, as published
Sby the Bureau of the Census, and have not bean reduced to a grease
basis.



Strc'k~ o.f 7ol t -.r and n.ils

Stocks of wool, tops and noils held by dealers and manufacturers in
the United States on January 1, 1930 amounted to 318 million .oiunis (grease
equivalent) compared .ith '10 million pounds on January 1, 192. and 370
million pounds on October 1, 1929. However, the stocks of combing and cloth-
ing wools were nearly 11 million pounds less than last year, amounting to
209 million pounds co'ipared to 220 million pounds on the same date last
year. Combing and clothing tops and noils, however, were nearly 4 million
pounds grinter than last year. Stocks of carpet wools vere about 10 mil-
li n pounds heavier than on Janunry 1, 1929.

The following table.shows the hl6dingi of grease, scoured and pulled
*7r.l, tops and noils in the United States by grades, for January 1, 1929
and 1930.: In.using this table it should be.noted.that the item "'Grle
not statai" amounted to 15.nillion.pounds in 1929 and 20 million pounds
in 1930. This item includes aool in original bags, or uni'rio-d or mixed
:;onls on which the dealers reporting could not accurately specify :,r'-ies.


'VOrCL-23


-







700L-23


Stoclcs If *-?vnl, tops and roils hbli by dealers and manufacturers
in the Unitel Statos on Janaaay 1, 1929 ani 1930


: : : .
Janurar,' 1 : 3r.isse :Scourei: Pulled : T ..;s : .ils : Ttal

S00: 1, .1.0:.100 : 1,0CO: 1,000 : 1,000 1,000


r.. binLi: nL1 Cl tb'nc :
C' .1 tb :lm

Fine (64s,70s,~i s):
1929........: 73,341:
1930........: 58,200:
blood (58s,60s)
1929.,....... 21,215:
190 ........: 20,560:
3/8 blood (56s)
1929........: 16,986:
1930........: 17,514:
blood (48s,50s)
1929........: 16,935:
1930.........: 17,000:
Low (36s to 46s) :
1929........: 17,004:
193k ........: 14,767:
Grade not stated
1929........: 15,050 :
1)7l'........: 19,580:
Total combing and:
clothing
1929........: 160,561:


1930........


Carpet eeool
1929........ :
19" ........ :


1-7,621: 20,993: 14,752 : 13,661' 10,252: 2C7',,279


1,f-71:
51,887:


1,544:
2,414:


1,391 :
1,484 -


1,018:
Cr. :


350:
236:


F,6,174
56,576


; tal iool stocks:


YlL,432:

l9"j,5O8:


S**- stic: 1 *. ... .
197......
Fr I -r: 1.*:9 .....
19 '.....


1 ....


118,233:
116, 1.:
84, 1.,':


:
1.* ',?- (::


22,0 21:
23, 07 :


16,014:
17,157:
5,977:


,0 43:
*t 814:


15,134 :

16 ,2.3" L


10,T :P
12, "' :
4,r26 :


20,19'J
21, .; :


I f N reporte]t '.ratnly.


261, .3

26 ,,15f


144,885
145,9.3
'9 ,,7(*2
1Th", "
~. .


-P,972:


poUn4ds





1,810
1,480 :

2,504 :
2,648

5,411
7,386 :

2,905
2,271

1,113
966


1



13,743


ouurlds:





5,310:
4,592:

2,148:
2,600:

2,123:
2,525:

1,653:
2,762:

1,214::
1,582:





12,448


4,573:
S5,019:

3,619:
2,856:

5,368:
6,413:

4,893:
4,852:

1,915:
1,570:

110:
283:



20, 77


nrpunds:





.2, C7:
4,501:

1,511:
2,312:

1,707:
1,748:

1,225:
1,305:

389:
-387:






7 --- C
---


V Ci.ii l s





87,841
73,792

31,027
. 30,976

31,595
35,586

27,611
27,790

21,635
19,272

15,160
19,864



21i1 ,863


15,980: 7-17,f- .,6
21,;. 36: 317,978


13, .,4i 7,990:

14., 6: 10,518:


1. 1.. ..... .. .


I


--d | L


~----


--


--~-


+;


- 12 -







OOL-23


Tr-u'o '.I C -n- -' r I ) : P r --n


Bradfonrl s'h.Kvs slic:ht lri-rne-ernt


The Bradford wool market is slightly more active and machinery
activity has increased except in the spinning and weaving sections of
the industry according to a cable received by the Foreign Service of the
Department of Agriculture 1'rnm Consul Mac.tee at Bradford. The majority
of manufacturers, however, are refraininig fri- heavy purchases of tops
and yarns until after the effect of the Australian control of wool supplies
can be determined. New orders indicate expected improvement in fine
worsteds and heavy woolens.

The total weo:ht of wool and tops passing throu-h the Bradford Con-
ditioning House during Jrnni-ry j;as considerably greater than for December.
The quantity of Jool tops conditioned was about 500,000 pro~ljs more than
last month and amounted to 3,720,000 pounds compared with 3,238,000 pounds
in December and 3,763,000 pounds in November 1929. The quantity of Norsted
yarn weighed mounted to 242,000 pounds which is the highest for any month
last year except Unvenber which was 274,000 pounds. The table on page 18
shows the quantity of wool, tops and yarns passing through the conditioning
houses of Bradford, Roubaix, Tourcoing and Verviers for the past six months.


".00L, TOPS A'D YARBN:


Price per pound at Bradford on specified


dates, December 1928 January 1930


64s 1/ 50s I/

Date :: Jorsred : Worsted
: Scoured s yn Scoured ops y
.Tops yarn Tops yarn
Swool : 2/48s wool : 2/32s
: Cents. : Cents Cents Cents Cents :Cents
1928 :: :
Dec 24........: 89.2 97.3 127.7 52.7 :57.8 : 82.1
1929 : :
Jan 26.....,..: 87.2 : 97.3 : 129.7 51.7 59.8 : 83.1
-Feb 23........:. 81.1 :91.2 : 125.7 48.7 56.8 : 80.1
Mar 23........: 79.1 : 90.2 :125.7 : 46.6 :56.8 : 78.1
Apr 23........: 78.0 89.2 : 125.7 : 48.7 : 56.8 : 78.0
May 25........: 75.0 85.2 : 119.6 45.6 :54.7 : 77.0
June 25.........: 74.0 :83.1 : 117.6 44. : 53.7 : 77.0
July 25.......: 68.9 79.1 115.6 : 42.6 50.7 : 75.0
Aug 25........: 66.9 : 77.0 : 113.6 : 40.6 : 49.7 : 73.0
Sept 25.....:..: 56.8 : 68.9 103.4 39.5 : 46.6 : 68.9
Oct 25......... 62.9 : 73.0 : 103.4 : 39.5 :46.6 : 67.9
Nov 25..... ...: 62.9 *: 71.0 1(3.4 : 39.5 : 47.6 : 67.9
Dec 23........: 58.8 : 64.9 : 99.4 35.5 :42.6 : 64.9
19.3 : "
Jan 25........: 49.7 59.8 : 91.2 : 29.4 38.5 : 60.8

1/ Official sandards of the United States for wool and wool tops.


- 13 -









WOOL-23


- 14 -


British exports increased


The exports of wool manufactures from re-at Britain increased during
January according to a cable from Agricultural Commissioner E. A. Foley
at London. The exports of woalen and worsted yarns amounted to 3,710,000
pounds compared with 3,390,000 pounds in December and 4,120,000 pounds.dur-
ing November 1929. Exports of woolen and worsted piece goods were consid-
erably higher during January, amounting to 14,090,000 square yards compared
with 11,410,000 square yards in December and 10,820,000 square yards in
November.

Imports of wool into Great Britain during January amounted to over
95 million pounds compared with 78 million pounds last month and 49 million
pounds in Nov'1-ber 1929. The following table compares the exports and im-
ports of wool and wool manufactures during November and December 1929 with
January .1930.

UIITIED IPD'X1.1: 'rade in wool and wool manufactures,
November and December 1929 and January 1930


S1929 1930
Exports and imports : Unit :
: : Nov : Dec Jan

: 1, 00 :1 ,OC. : 1,. 3
: ounis : pounds : r:unris
Exporr s :- :
...... : pound 5,900 :3,60 3,100
Tops .. ......... : : 2,90I : 1,900 : 2,70?
Yarns, woolen ... .. : 670 : 480 : 530
Yarns, worsted ..... : ": : 3,4 : 2,910 : 3,180I
Tissues, woolen : sq yd : 7,600 : 7,840 :9,7C"0
Tissues, "vorsteed ... 3,220 .: .3,570 4,390
Flannels and delaines : 44 : 340 300
Carl,.ts and rugs ...... : ." :. 590.. 180 : 560
Noils. ..... ... .. : pound : .1,EC.C: l, 1,CCO
Waste. ..... ... : 1,200.: 900 : I,(C0
Woolen r(;s .. ... : 2,1C0 1,570 : 3,470
Imports :. :
W1ool ... o p fl : 48,7C : 77,80CC : 9. 1:,4 0
Trs. ......... .. : 100.:. 100 : 100
..'~ate and noils ... 400 4C0
Yarns .. :. 1,680: 2,00 : 1,930
Tissues, woolen :sq yd : 2,170 : ,830 : 2,(40
Tissues, .vorsted ........ :' : 360 : 590 : 820
"-ir tS and rugs ...... 690 : 90 : 70
oolen r.i c .. .. :. : 4,030 4,4 0 : 4,:'

Compiled from *,!- ani Navigatiion f to ~ nit 1 ":r.p1'm and cabled re-
l.'r's from 1.ricultural Commissioner Fol-'- at Lo.don.








- 15 -


Germany

The German market for wool and tops was quiet during January but there
was a fair interest in noils, according to Agricultural Commissioner Steere
at Berlin. The improvement recently reported in industrial activity has been
followed by a slight lull in trade. Occupation is still good in the worsted
section of the industry but new orders are lacking. The depression in the
woolen spinning industry continues.

Stocks of tops in the commission coibirin establishments of Germany on
February 1, were about 1 million pounds more than on January 1, 1930 but were
about 1,500,000 pounds less than on December 1, 1929. Stocks of merino tops
on February 1, 1930 amounted to 4,885,000 pounds and crossbred tops amounted
to 7,641,000 pounds.

TOPS: Stocks held ty Continental commission combing establishments


Location and
description
of wool


Belgium -
Merino ....
Crossbred..
Total ....
Germany -
Merino ....
Crossbred .

Total ..

France -
Merino ....
Crossbred..

Total ....
Italy -
Merino ....
Crossbred .

Total ...


1928
.Dec 1
1,000
:pounds

: 2,46
S 2544
5,00


1929


Jan 1,:
1,000
pounds:

2,405:
2,480:
4,885:


I


1
]


Feb 1

L,000
sounds

2,158
2,260':
4,418


Dec.l

1,000
pounds

1,914
3,966
5,880


Jan 1
1,000
pounds

1,980
3,937
5,917


1930
Feb 1

1,000
pounds

2,055
3,829
S 5,884


: : :
S6,409: 6,493: 7,218 : 4,747 : 4,339 :4,885
8,708: 8,155: 6,312 : 9,469 : 7,039 : 7,641
15,117: 14,648' 13,530 14,216 11,378 12,526


10,622: 10,778: 12,189 : 12,348 : 13,470 : 14,493
S12,983: 13,446: 12,698 : 16,413 : 16,916 : 16,828

23,605. 24,224. 24,887 28,761 30,386 31,321


615:
1,501:


677:
1,554:


769
1,393 :


S 2,116, 2,231. 2,162


785 :
2,249 :


3,034


946 : 1,054
2,114 : 2,187


3,060


3,241


Compiled from cabled reports from Agricultural Commissioner Steere at Berlin.


@


-------


j:

3:







V00L-23


- 1 -


A 'J'L: Imports into 3el.! i., Czechoslov':kia, France, Germany, Italy,
Japan, Poland, United Ki. -. m and United States for specified
morntes, 1929

Country and item : Aug Sept : Oct : Nov : Dec

1 %\f S ^ f l S nr


1,0UUU


.,UU' .,UVV
PO.IJ ____


IUU
* pou~llns


, uuu
p,: u YL J s


Belgium -
Rool, greasy .........
o-'1 scoured ........
Total .........

Czechoslovakie -

France, row Pnd on
skins ................

Germany -
Wool, merino, greasy
and washed .........
Wool, merino,
scoured ...........
,jol, crossored,
greasy and
washed .............
.-Al, crossbred,
scoured ............
Total .......

Italy -
.'o 1, greasy .........
dool, washed .........

Total .......

J-n -

Poland -

United Kin.;o'a -

United States -
ol, .:-. 3s.' and
washed .............
.1;,1, scoured .......


14,204 : 10,866 :
419 : 246 :
14,25 : 11,112


: 1, : 2,976


:30,766 : 26,602


.: :
11,706 : 6,153

1,307 : 1,057 :
: : :

9,659 : 4,851

.: 1,160 : 778
23,832 : 12,839



6,255 : 3,607.:
S 789 : Z-2 :
.: 2,044 :4,489

: 3;801 : 7 :

: 2,026 2,:'J :

: 32,772 : 18,12 :



.: 12, : 1 ,0-, :
.: 3,:27 5,042:


16,631


7,049 : 8,462
241 : 371
7,290 : 8,833

1,649 : /


25,282 :33,718



4,700 : 8,271

1,209 : 776


5,Cl0 : 2,244

1,215 : 801
12,149 :12,092



3,322 :'
1,254


4,576 i:

2,o5 1 1/

2,116 : /

21,9 7 :4 o,,..




14,214 14,.-8
5, *. il 0,Ci'


~1


1,': ,,091 :


1- -d from r...rts cabled by the A.ricultursl 2:::,ii:.i..rs at
. rlin rnd :." .:n and r..:.rts from the Int-r.:-ti.'r.nl Institute -f A~riculture
at :- ..
j/ ,*t reported.


14,869
390
15,259


-








.


77,800




1l,7-i.o
6, :-7.


---


S. /


17,919

1,C73


3,791

855
23,638


t







WOOL-23


France

The market for tops and noils continued quiet during January accord-
ing to Agricultural Commissioner Steere. Industrial activity was good but
declining slightly and new orders- were very scarce from both the domestic
and the export trade.

S Prices of crossbred 56s tops declined 8 cents and merino tops de-
clined 10 cents during the month. Australian merino and corssbred noils
declined 4 to 5 cents below the price on Jenu-r:,' 1, and Cape noils were
10 cents lower. Merino' and Cheviot yarns declined 11 to 12 cents during
the month.

WOOL, TOPS AND YARN: Price per pound in France, specified dates,
1929 and 1930

: 1929 : 1930

Item :Aug 29 Oct 3 : Nov 1 : Dec 5 : Jan 2 Feb 1


S:: Cents
Tops, Australian-
Merino 64s warp ..... : 93.3 :
Crossbred 56s ......... 74.0
Tops, Argentine :
Crossbred 56s .......: 70.0
oloils- '
Australian merino ...: 80.9
Australian crossbred.: 57.8
Cape ....... ........ 85.3
Yarn -
Merino ..............: 112.0
Cheviot .............: 86.2


Cents :. Cents

89.2 : 82.1
71.0 : 64.9

68.9 :60.8

78.2 :71.1
58.6 :49.8
76.4

103.1 : 104.4
80.9 :80.9


Cents : Cents

77.0 :73.0
61.8 : 58.8

57.8 : -

69.3 :62.2
48.0 43.5
74.6 67.5

106.2 : 104.4
82.6 : 80.9


Stocks of tops in commission combing establishamsate.i France'-on
February 1, were nearly 1 million pounds greater than on January 1, 1930 and
about 2 1/2 million pounds greater than on December 1, 1929.- Stocks of
merino tops on February 1, amounted to 14,493,000 pounds and crossbred tops
to 16,828,000 pounds.

Tne quantities of wood, tops and yarns passing through the condition-
ing houses at Roubaix and Tourcoing during January were somewhat greater than
last month. The quantity of tops was nearly 1,400,000 pounds greater than
in December and the quantity of yarn weighed was over 1 million pounds greater
than last month.


Cents

62.9
50.7

48.7

56.9
39.1
56.9

93.7
68.4


- 17 -




9 '1


- 16 -


06jL, TOPS .:TD A "'R': E,- nt p1ssin- tnrir-. n c-rnaitionirig n. m ses
4t r: lf" rd,R aou,/D ix,'T:.jrc( ini fi-oid V rv',iers, 1929-19130


L -caci.on and
ci-ss


uI.S


Sept


S.Oct
Oct


i 1930


flojv


rec


Jan


.C.rcI-If ..Pi -
io: l ......
Tops .......
Yarn .......
Roubaix -
vool .......
T:,p- .......
Yarn .......
Tourcoing -
.dool .......
Tops .......
Y-rn .......
Verviers -
- 0ool .......
*Tops .......
Yoarn ... ...


1, C :


644
3,617
118

214 :
5,044
1,299

2,478.
7,831
2,277

2,083
211' :
: 747


1, '0u :


771
4,120
165

245
4,506-- ..
1,007
:- ---- -;
* 2,319
5,873
1,976

S1,351
* 124 :
: 296


1,'I000 :
I ; .'. idS :

878
4,337
180

234
*,7.22--. -;
1,583

2,994
8,699
2,438


3,513
406
820


1, 0 s0 :


553
3,763
274

276
5,765. :.
1,453

2,700
8,571
2,015

.2,886
522.
769


1,CCC


1, OC :
p .-unds

563
3,-238 :
236

203
3,404
1,446

2,496
5,797
1,202 :

2,251
.203
873


1, 0'C'
p. unds

630
3,720
242

265
4,226
1,543

2,690
6,347
2,196


1/
1/


Compied fom caled~eport ~ron Agic~u omsinrSer


Compiled from cabled.reports from Agricultural Commissioner Steere
at Berlin.and.Consul Thomson at.Bradford.

1/. Not reported.

: : Production: United St tts .

Production in United States increased


.The amount of wool shorn in the United St.tes in 1929 amounted to
309',million' pun-s and to 304 million pounds in 1928, .cc-riing to the
revised es'timte's of the Department of Agriculture. The increase in wool
production is largely due to increase in sheep numbers as the average
wucitht per fleece in the United States was slightly less in 1929 than in
1928. Texas, Montana and California showed the largest increases in w-:l
production over 1928 and Utah showed the largest decrease.

The fUll..ving taole shows the number of sheep shorn,' the averayre
wi.='.t per fleece and tae quantity of wool shorn in the United States and
in all States ,,rl ciig over 5 million pounds of wool 'in 1929. Irn quantit:,
of pilleld wool produced in tne United States in i9.:9 amounted to 5-; 1/2 mil-
lion .... iiss or nearly 3 million p,-uin -s more tnan was pr..Jc'.ed in 1-2'o.








WOOL-23


Wool production in
producing over


the United States and in States
5 million pounds, 1928-1929


' :.' gueIThminr : W '; : Wei 'ht
S Z' sheep shorn :. 'pr'ef 1.eece
.1928 .. 1929 1928 : 1929


W ool prod action

: 1928" : 1929


Thou-:
: : s~nds":a

Texas........... .. : 4,500:
Mont an ............: 3',096:
Wyoming...'.. .. ...:. 3,0.10
California........: 3,500:
Utah.......... ..: 2,4;80:
Oregon.............: 2,210:
Idaho. ............. 1,944:
e: Mexico......;...i 2,138:
Ohio... ... ....... 1,802:
Colorado. .........; 1,310:
Michigan............ 1,065:
Nevada............. 1,144:
Iowa ...... ...... .....: 745:
South Dakota.......; 724:
Arizona............s 960:
Missouri ..........: 828:
Minnesota..........: 590:
Vlashington.... .... : 527:


Thou-' :
sanis :

4,859:
3,341:.
3,130:
3,770:
2,347:
2,271:
2,026:
2,147:
1,781:
1,386:
1,100:
1,031:
813:
785:
1,020:
845:
651:
560:


Pounds .: Pound's

8.5 .: 8.5'
S 8.-6 8.6
8.8. :' 8.3
.; 6.8
8.9 : 8.1
9.2 : 8.3
9.2 : 8.8
6.4 : 6.8
S8.2 :8.1
7.6 : 7.2
'8.0 7.8
7.5 : 7.2
8.0 : 7.9
: 8.3 7.7
S 6.0 : 6.0
7.2 :. 7.1
7.9 : 7.9.
10.0 : 9.0


Total............

All other States...:

Tot .1 United States;


32,573: 33,863:


6,1624:

38,735:


6,562

40,- :


8.1


*6.4.

7.8


Pulled wool........ ---


7.9 ': t 264,540 : 267,444


S6.3 : 39,175

: 7.6 : 303,715
: --- : 51,900


Total wool pro-
1duction. ........:


*' ---.-


355,615.:


363,447


Production: Foreign


Fros:pects f.r 1930

Present indications are for a 1930 world wool clip, exclusive of
Russia rand China, not greatly different from the large clips of 1928 and
j293. Seasonal conditions in both Australia .Pnd Argentina, which suffered
from drought during 1929, are improving while bonditiohs in other southern
hemisphere countries are reported as zood,' ith sheep numbers'aboye a year
ago. The number of sheep in New South '.ales which produces over h:;lf the


State


1,C.C'O :
pounds

38,200
26,626
26,488
23,800 :
22,072 :
20,332 :
17,885 :
13,683 :
14,776 :
9,956
.8,520
8,580
5,960
6,009 :'
5,760 :
5,962
4,661
5.270


1,000
, unls

41,300
28,733
26,000
25,636
19,011
18,849
17,829
14,600
14,426
9,979
8,580
7,423
6,423
6,352
6,120
6,000
5,143
5.040


41,303

308,947
54,500


I


" '


-~~---- ------ --


- 19 .


--- i. Irr~







WOOL-23


wool in Australia at the b'ginr ing of 1929 *was esti' .ated at 52,700,000 an
increase of 8 per cent over 1928 and was only 4 per cent below the high
figure of 54,630,000 reported at the..bjginninfr of 1927. Owing to unfavor-
able seasonal conditions during most of 1929 sheep numbers in this State
on January 1, 1930 will probably sho.: a reduction. *Other countries of-
the southern hemisphere report satisfactory lambing percentages. In New
Z'-li tnd breeding evres in April 1929 numbered .16,608,0.00 'or 7 per cent more
than in 1928. Estimates place the number of lambs in 1929 at 14,722,000
or 10 per cent above thj corresponding figure fo'r 1928. '-Acordi.ng'-to -
aver*,ges computed over the last five years the riumber of 1-ambs estimated.
represents 98 per cent of actual number tailed or saved.- Applying -this
average to the present season it -7ould app. that the number tailed 7ill
be slightly over 15,000,(00 against an average of 12,80C,000 for-the four
preceding years. : .

The number of ewes-and legs-in the Province of Buenos Aires, Argen-
tina at the beginning'of 1929 vas 62,000 above 1928 and higher-than any
year since 1925. In the Union'of South-Africa wooled sheep on June 30,
1929 numbered 38,218,000 or 6 per cent above 1928.

The number of breeding. ewes-in _/ 8 European countries for which
figures are avRil~ble were estimated at'31,335,000 in 1929 or approximately
the same as in 1928. 'In the United St::.es the number of breeding-ewes 1
year and over on January 1, 1930 was estimated At 32,602,000 against
31,530,C00 a year ago.

World production in 1929

Wool production for 1929 for marketing during season 1923-30 2/in 19
countries which usIally furnish about four-fifths of the world's clip,
exclusive of Russia ;nd China, is no.v ostiated at 2,687 million IpoLunls
or about the same as the large clip of 1928. The supply -for'th' selling
season 1929-30, including production and carryover from.the 192F-29 season
in the primary marlkts of the southern hemisphere, is estimated at about
1 p.r cent above the proc;:-ding: season. Increases, in production in 1'.9
are r.1cl'rted in TI.- Zealand, Ur-iru.L:', the Union df South ,'rica, the
United St.:tes ani Canada vith decreases r'-port%:d for Australia, Argentina
and most EuropIenC countries.

l/ Entgl-rin and Wiales, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Irish FPo' tt!:;, F r:'c?,
Germ'in-', Hungary and Rumania.

2/ Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, Jrujuv:-, Union of n*-t Afric-i,
United States, Can!adn, United :im.;-.1, 'rc., G.r-'.,H r:
i3r.!c.u, Rnm_uI, Latvia, Estonia, 17raray, 'u,-.sl-.via, .-.l- ri'a r i
Lithuania,


- 20 -









WOOL-23


-. 21 -.


Australia

The Australian official estimate of production still stands at
925,000,CCO pounds against 950,000,(CC'l pounds in1.928 with the amount
to be .received intb store for the season as estimated by the National
Council of Wool Selling Brokers remaining unchanged at 2,585,000 bales
against 2,690,000 bales for the preceding season. It .was reported
earlier that a change would be made in this estimate, but at the Novem-
ber meeting of the National Council of Wool Selling Brokers, after a
careful review of the matter it was decided to adhere to the original
estimate. Taking into account the decrease in the average weight of
bales this year of about 9 pounds for the first 5 months of the season
compared with a year ago the receipts of wool into store in Australia
. .- from the beginning of the season up to January 1, 1929 aggregate
697,500,000 pounds, a decrease of 8 per cent compared with last season.


New Zealand

The condition of the current clip in New Zealand now estimated
at 255,000,000 pounds or 6 per cent above last year may not be so good
as that of last year on account of the more or less wet minter and late
spring'according to the Pastoral Review. ,A proposal that Now Zealand
wool sales be spread over the whole year did nbt meet the approval of
the majority of buyers,


Argentina

Increased arrivals of wool on the market show that the selection
in Buenos Aires leaves much to be desired. Owing to inferior color and
the larger quantity of burrs, there would appear to be practically no
super crossbred wool available, Concordia end Entre Rios second clip
wool are now coming on the market and the season's clip is good. The
total Argentine clip is estimated at 3?0,000,000 pounds for 1929, a de-
crease of 4 per cent compared with the'preceding year.


Uruguay

During the past year conditions have been good for wool produc-
tion and the selection on the market is excellent. Flocks have been
healthy and pasture sufficient. Production is estimated at 150,000,000
pounds or 8 per cent above 1928.









VOOL-23 .- L2 -



Sheep numbers in _/ 19 countries reporting at the beginning or
in the summer 'of 1929 reached 267,215,OCCr against -257,628,'00 .in 1928
Sand 250,242,0CO in 1909-1913. A reduction of 1 per cent is shown in
the European countries 'reporting, but important wool producing coun-
tries of the Southern Femilsphere, the-United States and Canada showed
increases. Sheep numbers in the United States on January 1, 1930
reached 48,913,000 against 47,509,000 in 1929 and 43,235,000 the aver-
age for the 5 years 1909-1913. Sheep numbers in this country have
increased steadily since 1922. In Canadc the number on June 1929 was,
3,728,000 an increase of 9 per cent over 1928. The number in that
country has been increasing regularly sir~ce 1924 and is now aboveo the
previous high figure reported in 1920. In Australia sheep numbizs
at the beginningof. 1929 reached the high figure of 106,000,0'C' show-
Sing an increase of more than 5,000,000 over the number at the.beginning
of 1928 when they had been reduced by drought.


Argentina jnd Uruguay, both important wool growing countries of
the Southern Hemisphere are not included in the above 16 countries due
:to lack of esti -ates for-recant years. Unofficial estimates place the
number of sheep in Uruguay in 1929 at 19,358,000 compared with 14,413,C'00
reported by the census of 1924, Reliable unofficial *isti-r.tes place
the number in Argentina between 36,(00C,000 and 40,( 0,CO0. The de-
creases in the Province of Buenos Aires are believed to be offset to
some extent by increases in the southern provinces. Estimates for the
province of 3uonos Aires, alone, slow that at the beginning of 1929
there wera 12,446,000 sh.;e-p in that province, a slight reduction from
1928. The number of ewes and tegs, however, ;;as 9,686,000 or 62,0CC'C
Above 1928 and was higher than for any year since -the beginning of 1925.




l/ Canrda, Uni-.d Stnt,-s, ETl~ird and Wales, Scotland, North Ireltri,
Irish FPr-e State, 'Frnrc ', GCrm-n:T, Hungary, Gr.-cc, Rumania,
Latvia, Yugoslavia, Estonia, Algeria, T'nis, Upnnda, Australia
and INew- Z- -l-nd.








- 23 -'


ER EDIUI' ECS: Trend in numbers.-in certain countries, 1924-1929
f


: Country: :..at ,;.. 19a4 ...1925 : 1926 : 1927 :


.I .


1928 : 1929 : 193C


United States .'.
*New S. Wales 1/ .
South Australie 2/'
Western Auistralia 2/:
New Zealand ....... :
Iceland ...... .. .. :
England and 4 als -. :
Isle of MpaJ ......
Scotland .....;.....
North Irelpnd ;....
Irish Free State ..
France 1/ 2/..:.....
Germany lf2/ f... :
Czechoslovakia.2/.,
Hain ry 1/......,...
Rumania 2/.......,,
Yugoslavia .........
Poland i/...........
Spain 27...... ......
Larger tini .
Prov.. of Buenos
&Ai.res 3/ ........ :
Uruguay 17........


Jan.
June
Jan.
Jan'.
Apr.

June
June
June
Jun
June

Ja.n.
Jan.
Apri
Jan.:
Jan..

Jan.:


June


: Tnhou-
sands'
1 ':.l -l
30: 21,67.0

: 3,516
30:13,076
... 42X
.5 .'9 9 '
34
:2,992
226
:1,236
6,11 5


L 1 995
S9,273
: ,356



:
:10,170
:, 8,115.


:' Th u-:, Thnu-: friau-: Thou-: Tnou-: Thou-
: L.-..is:. sands: ssjids: sands: sands: sands

:25,769:26,459:27,704:29,591:31,530:32,602
:23,040:25,920:27,770:26,262:


S3,.179: 3,389:
'3,377: 3,529:
:13,715:13,948:
379: 393:
'6,397: 6,755:
: 36:' 39:
:3,056::3,115:
: 216:' 234:
:1,224: :1,284:
6,256: '6, t; 93:
: .... :.2,907:
: ::612:
: 1,08-: ;1,037:
S9,894; :9,461;
: 5,0b0: :5,032:

:10,813: :


:9,682: 9,516:


3,605: 3,699:
3,800: 4,309:
14,832:15,534:16,608:


6,962:
40:
3,239:
264:
1,344:
6,635:
2,542:

963:
10,019:
5, C(' :
1,492:



9,6:23:
: *


6,847:
40;
3,275:
277:
1,392:
6,610:
2,379:

925:
9,780:






9,686:


6,712:

3,246:
289:
1,670:
6, -?.,;
2,262: 2,185

919:
9,764:


Algeria 4/,.......... : : : 3,570: 3,93.9: 2,9'84:-
Japan 2/........... :June! :. 11: 12; 13: 16: 14:
.: ,
Compiled from official sources and the International Institute of Agriculture,
1/ Estimated number. of breeding eweb 1 year and over.
2/ Estimates for countries :rertii,, as of December have been considered as of
January of the following year.
3/ Ewes and tegs.
4/ EAes and ewe.lnmbs.-


'00L-23





____I_______________




' O0 JL-23


4


- 2.. -


Estimated productio-n in tne grease, ?verge 1909-1913, annual
1925 1929


:Average : : : : 1929
Country :1909-1913i: 1925 : 1926 : 1927 : 1928 : Prelim-
: 1/ : : : : : inary
':1,000


SC80UTJiEiJ HEMISPrhE:

Australia .........
New Zealand ........
Argentina .........
Uruguay...........;:
Union of South Utir'
Total 5 Southern :
Hemisphere
countries ... i


1,000 :
pounds

727,709:
179,942:
332;321:
133,101:
:157,690:


,530,76301,


1,QO :
pounds:

833 739:
200,205:
319 000:
116 000:
235,081:


704,025:1


1 ,000
pounds :

924,Al4:
202,386:
363,000:
129,000:
249,159:
:


.1,000 :
pounds :

:888,130:
228,960:
"331,000:
131,000:
273,000:


,867,956:1 852;090:1,


1,000 : 1,000
pounds : pounds

950,000:2/925,000
239,000:3/255,000
343,000:2/330,000
139,000:2/150,000
283,000: 302,000


954, C000:1,962,000


:J0j.THER~iJ H-EMlISPHHKE:


United States
Fleece .........
Pulled .........
Total ......
Canada ...........
United Kingdom and
frish Free
: tat; /.... ....
Norway ...........
France .........
Germany ......'....
Hungary .........
Yugoslavia .......
Greece ... ...... ..
Eulgaria .........
Rumania ..... ..
Lithuania ........
Latvia ...........
Estonia ..........
Total 14 ntorth-
ern nemispnere
countries .....
Total 19 South-
ern and North-
ern Hemisphere


99








99


272,248:
41,400:
313,648:
13,188:


:136,021:
S5,150:
81,600:
:43,893:
* 16.,842:
S35,500:
20,010:
: 29,100:
45,600:
3,690:
2,690:
1,409:


748,341:
748,341:


245,562:
46,800:
292,362:
15;553:


109,853;
5-,940:
44,974:
50, 160:
13:,234:
28, 643:.
.18&,000:
25,400:
54,940:
4,660:
3,190:
2,235:


669,144:


I I

9 C I


260,976:
49,600:
310,5' :
17,960:


114,567:
:6,200:
46,517:3
41,830:
13,170?
*28,783:
.14,500:
25,4CO:
53,100:
5,030:
3,110:
2,065:


682,80b:


281,914:
50,100:
332,014:
18,673:


118,537:
6,246:
50,180:3/
35,900:3/
11,760:
28,004:
17,500:..
20,050:
55,690:
3,770:
3,510:
2,062:


303,715:
51,900:
355,615:
19,611:


119,690:
5,420:
49,840:3/
33,600:3/
11,500:
27,950:
16,625:3j
21,490:
53,060:3j
4,060:
3,270:3/
2,028:3j


703,696: 723,759: 724,890


countries ......:2,279,104:2,373,169:2,550,764:2,555,966:2,677,759:2,666,890
Est. world prodac-.
tion excl.
nassia and
Chi: .5/ ........ : ,7' 2, uJ: 2,903, uuC:3.089,000:3,087,0C ,: 31 06, 0'0:
RA3sia ........... :o/ Ct ,O1 : 15,UJ: 351,C'': 369,0 ''u: j 5,0CC: 397.000
Cr.ina, exports ....: J?,616: 5 ,817: j7,791: 48,u37: 64,845:


Includes wool shorn in the spring in the northern hemisphere and that shorn in
the last few months of the same calendar year in the southern hemisphere.
See pages 25 and 26 for source and notes.


308,947
54,500
363,447
21,234


117,869
5,640
'.48,500
31,900
6,150
29,000
S17,790
22,690
52,46C
3,550
2,7CC
1,460


~~- ----


--


--







WOOL-23


Estimated production in the C're?se, ver.',ge 1909-1913, annual
1957- .7 Tontinued

United States.- Fleece avrae-e 1909-1913, a-nual 1925-1929, pulled wool
average 1909-1913, annual 1925-1929 official estimates of Bureau of Agri-
cultural Economics.
Canada Aver-.ge 1909-1913, estimated by assuming the average yield per
sheep to be 7 pounds and per lamb 4 pounds as f-ur-is.ed by the Dominion
Eureau of Statistics for recent.years. As no separate statistics were given
for sheep and lambs, the percentage of lambs has been assumed to be the same
as the averae for the years 1920-1925, years 1925-1929 official estimates
of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
United Kingdom Average 1909-1913, years 1925-1929, estimates are those
of the Yorkshire Observer since more recent figures are available from it than
from other sources. The figures of the Ministry of Agriculture nnd Fisheries
are as follows! Average 1909-1913, 126,C00,000 pounds; 1923, 99.C ..,000 pounds
1924, 103,000,000 pounds.
France Average 1909-1913, years 1925 and 1926 official estimates pub-
lished in the Annraire Statistique de la France 1926. Year 1927, 1928 and
1729 see note 4/.
Genna&y Averat&e 1909-1913, estimated on basis of number of sheep
multiplied by average weight used by the Verein Deutscher Wollkaemmer und
Kammgarn-Spinner, 1925-1927 Acting Commercial Attache Dou6las Miller, Febru-
ary 2, 1927, 1928 and 1929 Assistant Trrde Commissioner A. Douglas Cook,
January 31, 1928, Feb. 1, 1929.
Argentina Average 1909-1913 estimates furnished by Consul Henry
Robertson quoted from "La Prensa" of August 18, 1919 figures are based on
exports and domestic consumption. Years 1925, 1926 and 1928 estimates of
Buenos Aires Branch of First National Bank of Boston published in an intensive
study entitled Wool Growing in Argentina, -Estimate for 1927 based on exports,
October-September, stocks and local consumption. Year 1929 see note 2/.
Uruguay Average 1909-1913, annual exports years 1910-1914, Annuario de
Estadistica Agricola. No estimates of stocks or domestic consumption avail-
able. Year 1925 Commercial Attache L, B. Clark, January 3, 1927. Years
1926 and 1927 Vice Consul Nathan Scarrett, October 19, 1928. 1928 Consul
General C. Carrigan, June 14, 1929. For 1929 see note 2/.
Australia Average 1909-1913, official estimates calendar years 1909-
1911, years ending June 30, 1913, 1914. Years 1925-1927 revised official
estimates which are on the average about 5 per cent above the unrevised
estimates. In these figures the discrepancies in the returns by land-hold-
ers compared with those obtained by taking exports plus local consumption
have been eliminated Quarterly Summary Australian Statistics, Sept. 1929.
Year 1929 International Institute of Agriculture.
niew Zealand Average 1909-13, 1925 to 1928 estimates of Dalgety and
Company. Year 1929 see note 4/. The official estimates as published in
New Zealand are for sheep shorn on farms only and are as follows: 1923,
165,913,624 pounds; 1924, 183,030,545; 1925, 173,402,764; 1926, 185,497,864;
1927, 194,887,24; 1928, 210,699,663,


Continued -


- 25 -






WOOL-23


Estimated world prodi:ction in the grease, average 1909-1913, annual
1925-1929 Continued

Union of South Africa Average 1909-1913, exports October-September.
Scoured wool changed to grease on basis of. 60 per cent shrinkage. 1925 to
1929 Crop and Markets of the Union of South Africa, August 1929.
Russia Year 1916 Economic Life, December 13, 1926. Supplement
published by the Government organization called the Workers Peasant Inspection.
Years 1925 to 1929 -'estimates from the publication of the State Planning
Board entitled The Controlling Figures of the National Economy of the U.S.S.R.
1929-30.



1/ Average for years.1909-1913 whenever available, otherwise for any year
or years within or near this period for which estimates are available.
2/ Estimate furnished by the International Institute of Agriculture.
3/ Based on official estimate of sheep numbers at date nearest shearing
time.
4/ Estimates of the Yorkshire Observer.
5Totals subject to revision. Few countries published official wool
production figures. In the absence of official figures for most
countries various estimates have been used. Some have been supplied
by United States government representatives abroad, others are based
on sheep numbers at the date nearest shearing time. For some princi-
pal exporting countries, exports alone, or exports, stocks and
domestic consumption have been used as representing production. In
the case of some Asiatic countries rough commercial estimates have
been used while the figures of the United States Department of Cornerce
or the National Association of wool manufacturerss have been used for
some other countries.
6/ Year 1916.


- 26 -







WC''L-.i3 -2


Receipts, disposals, stocks in prirr,~', markets of the
South'ern_.Kemii sr'ere, 1929-30C season.

Receipts of wool into store in Australia an& Argentina from the
tbe'i:,i.ii, o. tne season up to tie first of Jar,.sr;, show a falling
off of about 9 per cent compared with the preceding season. Ship-
ments for tne current season up to January 1 show a reduction in
Australia, New Zealand and Argentina compared with the sane period
of tne prece'lire_ season, while shipments for Uruguay and the Union
cf South Africa were greater.

Shipments from Australia for the first six months of the 1929-30
season i.e. July to Decemoer, 1929 are estimated at 1,120,000 bales,
a decrease of 10 per cent compared with the prrccdinr.- season. The
average weight per bale for the first five months of this season is
estimated at 310 pounds against 319 pounds for the same period last
season. The decrease in exports from New Zealand for a similar
period is estimated at 6 per cent, i. e. from 142,0(.) bales to 133,000
bales. Shipments from A'-rentina for the first three months of the
season, i. e. October 1 to December 31 were approximately 42,-':',0(.
pouiris against 59,000,00'pounds a year ago, a decrease of almost 30
per cent. Since the end of the year, there has oeen a dispute
between exporters and consignees at Central Produce '':'r:et Buenos
Aires which closed the market for a while, however it was reported on
-.January 3 that it had opened again and that sales were taking place
with transactions very small. ExIorts of the current season's wool
from the Union of South Africa up to Decemoer 24, 1929 a-gri-eted
approximately 152,000,000 pounds, grease and s'.coured wool, an increase
of 17 per cent over official exports for the last half of 1928. Up to
January, 1929 total sales are reported at about :: 0,000,000 pounds or
two-thirds of the current clip. Of the ren~inri,- third of the clip
to be disposed of about 50 to 60 per cent is short or lamb's wool.
Snipments from Ur:4-a1, from October 1 to January 1 reached about
16,'" ,",000 pounds against 12,000,000 pounds last year, for the same
period.

It is estimated that the amount of wool in primary markets of
the Southern Hemisphere for disposal 1/ during the first g or 9 months
of 1930 according to the season in the different countries, is about
8 per cent aoove last year. Stocks at sellinr- centers in Australia
on January 1 estimated at .3 ,..i,00 U pounds were 6 per cent above a
year ago. In Argentina, stocks at Central Produce Market iuenos Aires
where about one-third of the total Ar.-i:rntina clip has been disposed of
during recent years were 4 per cent above a year ago. Sto-ks in the
Union of South Africa were officially reported at 36,000,,:.0 pounds on
December 1, an increase of over 70 per cent of a year 3ao.

} This may include some wool in Argentina, Uruguay and New Zealand
which has been sold but not yet snipped.


- 27 -





SO'L--233


Australia: 1/
Receipts: From
Same
Disposals: From
Same
Stocks on hand,
Same


Country, item and period Quantity

1929-30 clip : 1,CO' pouids


July 1 to January 1, 1930 .......
period 1929 .....................
July 1 to January 1, 1930 .......
period, 1929 ....................
January 1, 1930 .................
date, 1929 ......................


Argentina:
Receipts at Central Produce Market-
July 1, 1929 to January 1, 1930 .......
Same period, 1929 .....................
Shipments Octooer 1, 1929 to January 2,
Same period, 1929 .....................
Stocks at Central Produce Market-
January 1, 1930 ......................
Same date, 1929 .......................
Ur i&iy:


.......,: 2/
........:
........:
........:
........:
........:


................:
................:
1930 ..........:
................:


Shi::menrts: October 1, 1929 to January 1, 1930 ...........:
Same period, 1929 .................................... :
Union of South Africa-
Shipments: -July 1, 1929 to December 24, 1929 ....,......
July 1 Dec. 31, 1928 ..................................
Stocks: December 1, 1929 ................................ :
December 1, 1928 ................................ :


1928-29 clip
Australia: 1/
Receipts: From July 1, 1928 to June 30, 192 ...
Same period 1927-28 ..................
Disposals: From July 1, 1928 to June 30, 19-. ...
Sar, period 1927-28 .................
Stocks on hand June 30, 1929 ....................
Same date, 1928 .....................
Argentina:


........:3/
........:*
.c......:
........:
........:
........:


Receipt: at Central Produce Market, z-ue,os Aires-
Season July 1, 19.l to June 26, 19'9 ..................
Same period i 7?-2. ....................................
Shi,,r.,,ts: October 1, lI'y to S.pt~.,ber 30, 19 9? .......:
Ssme -riod, 1"27-28 .........................
Stocks in Ar:- :-L n
On 3St -c'.! r 30, 1929 ................................ .
Same date, I.1 ........................................
Ur.eci : to F bru:rv .... ....


e mbruary 6, 1 .."s ...............
Marcn 1, 1929 ..................
April 1, l... ........... ........
October 1, 1 I. to S-epembner 30,
Same period 1 '-J.: ............


.......:

....... /
.. :


697,500
756,923
307,520
389,786
3c9,980
367,105


49,218
63,142
41,812
58,765

19,68,7
19,052

15,937
12,016

152,TC(
130,000
86,398
20,860


834,051
743,821
820,317
733,961
13,734
9, .,6C


99,646
91,9C5
317,16
29.', -.5

25, 0C
le-,520

119,. l<
i 1, .-'.
12c ,41
Ci ,.C.
1 -^
127, 5C*
1il, 48


28 -

Receipts, disposals and stocks 1929-30 and 1928-29
clips with comparisons






WOOL-23


Receipts, disposals and stocks 1?29-30 and 1928-29 clips
with comparisons Cont'd


Country, item end period Quantity

: 1,CCO pounds
Stocks: April 16, 1928. Stocks for disposal, small
April 11, 1929 ............................... : 15,872
May 8, 1929 ................................. :4/ 10,912
August 31, 1929 ..............................:4/ 8,928
Union of South Africa:
Exports: July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 ................: 283,000
Same period 1927-28 ..........................: 273,000
Stocks: Of unsold wool June 30, 1929 ................. :5// 9,149
S June 30, 1928 .................:5/ 6,940
New Zealand:
Shipments: July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 ................: 244,110
Same period 1927-28 ..........................: 226,455
Stocks: June 30, 1929 ................................: 27,500
June 30, 1928 ................................; 18,800

Australia: Season 1928-29 Estimates of National Council of Wool
Selling Brokers, Consul General Arthur Garrels, Melbourne, July 10, 1929.
Weight per bale from Country Life and Stock and Station Journal, July 14,
and Dalgety's Annual Review, 1927-28, page 19. Season 1929-30 Yorkshire
Observer, January 11, 1930. Weight per bale, Country Life and Stock and
Station Journal, December 20, 1929. Arge't ina-: Receipts, shipments, stocks
at Central Produce Market, Review of River Plate. Total stocks in Argen-
tina, cable from Buenos Aires Branch First National Bank of Boston.
Urguann,: Season 1928-29, receipts, Monthly Review, March, Bank of London
and South America, Ltd., and Servicio Informativo para el Exterior, March
and April 1929. Stocks, April 11, 1929 and May 8, 1929. Wool Record and
Textile World, April 11, 1929, May 9, 1929 and October Review, Bank of
London and South America, Ltd., shipments, Servicio Informativo para el
Exterior, October 1, 1929. Season 1929-30 Shipments Review of the
River Plate. Union of South Africa: Stocks, Monthly Bulletin of Union
Statistics. Exports. Crops and Markets of Union of South Africa, August
1929. 1929-30 Commerce Reports December 9, 1929. low Zealait: Ship-
ments 1927-28 and 1928-c9 Consul General W. L. Lowrie, Wellington,
July 29. Stocks, Monthly Abstract of Statistics, August 26, 1929.

1/ Tnese figures concern only the clip of the season designated.
2/ Have used average weight of bale for July-October, 1929 as
estimated by tne National Council of Wool Selling Brokers. No later esti-
mate available as yet.
3/ Converted to pounds by using estimate of average weight per bale
or 310 pounds as furnished by the iitional Council of Wool Selling brokers
of Australia, July-June 1928-29, compared with an average of 304 pounds for
period J1ly 1 to June 30, 1927-28.
4/ No corresponding estimates for preceding year available.
5/ Scoured wool changed to grease on basis of 60 per cent loss in
scouring.
6/ Practically all inferior sorts.


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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


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