World wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
World wool situation
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some issues combined.
General Note:
Description based on: WOOL-16 (June 17, 1929)
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 631804619
lccn - 2010229455
ocn631804619
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .A19
System ID:
AA00011233:00007

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Succeeded by:
World wool prospects


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1 T IF r STTS P PRTP .T"3T OF ,'TRI iCULLTURE
JS DEPOSITORY 3urear of 'gric.ltrl Eco ,nomics
",'ih in 'rt on

'.T00L-22
.'ORLD .'OOL TirU .\I,1: December 16, 1929



PRICES TR .JE D CO i;J; E IOI: SUPPLY

DomSstic .-ool p.ric-Js made furtrr d C cl Ines- d rir;n the Ia-t jcnnth

following t-e .'ea.-nn in in foreign arets.in Br:dford nd .ustr alia

had ndvancrdl r'pidl,, after tr,. anro .l cfrl ot ,, t-he 7.7 i:er cent cu rtailment

in .australian offering s but b:,' D3ec .n-i-r 4th prices ha.i r -ced.d slightly.' in

London ani Sustralia -lthi h the:z .':er t still m m st l;' abov,- Octob.-r levels.

Iewv Zealand :.oIl p.1rices also decl in.-d it the '.'ilinato.n S d, s.

Domrrstic .vools iealine'.], 1 to I conts -. pound-. on ia ,-.re3as. basis at

Boston and from 1 to 6 cents cn scc.zir.'d basis lurin.n thr- month, vith most

of the iJccline taking pi ce .- rir, the lirst .e-:< of De-mnb.tr. Th gr.:-atst

decline .v:Ls in 3/6 biteld strictly. comnintg which ..as 3 cents lo v-r on -a grease

basis nd, 6.5 c3nts lo.v-r on :, scoa-rd b:,sis. Tihr-,-e rights blood clot-ing

.v)ols dilclined F cents on a: scO r,-ed basis.

ICew Zealr.nd Tools at; Boston d.clin,., from 2 to F.1 c?-nts :- poLund ex-

cept E6s to 58s nh-ich declined 7' counts mnd Ss .vhich :t-re 11 cnts belcw

the price on INovembir 2. .i.stra.lin 'ools .-re mostly unchanged at Boston

except 64s to 70s whichh -adre from 1- to 3- c:nts higher _-nd 56s whichh de-

clined 1-c conts during the month. South i :-rican ..'ols dJ-clln.id 1 to 3

counts a pound greaso basis.

Rlcipts of .1ool at Boston d.iring .::ov:mb;r :a r? -bout 1 million

pounds less th::n last ',,ar. Fron Janiary 1 'to D:-c2-mb)r 1 r -ceipts tot-led

197 million pounds compared *rith 203 million last :"a:r mi J20 million


- ---- ---- ----








WOOL-22 -2 -

pojnis in 1927. Imports of ci-ting and clothing ools eoro over 1 millior

pounds groator than last yu'ar for tho month of Octobor and 11 million pounds

grreater for t-F period J-ir % r 1 to October 31.

Dem.stic consumption of .,ool on a grease basis amounted to 59 million

pour.ls in October cc.m!i ar.l I ith El million pounds last year and 50 million

pounds during Septembor i.:-.. The quantity of combing and clothing .iool

consumed duringg October .J;s tih highest for -any month since 2I-,y 12.'.

ContinentA.l :f-irkats wver- active during the first half of November

especially tops and noils but :~ore loss active during the latter h ilf of

the month. Stocks of tops bold in commission combing estaiblishmonts on

Docea.nb3r 1 amounted to 52 million pounds or about 7 millions less than on

November 1, 1929 -nd about 6 millions gre- ter than on Doc)mbr 1, 1.LB.

..Pol production in ten countries which h .s i. lly, rrouc:- 3/4 of tho

Norld's clip exclusive of Russia and China, is estimated as about 2,488

million r.a. -rI. or -bout 5 million pounds -r,; tter than tho lurge clip of

last year. Suiplios for this s? .on, including carryover in prirnir::

m:arcots, ire ,stiu.ted as about 1.5 per cant greater than last :,'r-r.


Pri : To- '. c


ITov)mbnr 7i:s i quiot month in the ::'ol miret, iccorl'!- to R. L.
Burrs, of th: ston 7Ol O ice of the D.-.r'tmnt of .'icltue.
Early in ti.o nonth tore :3as somei scattorl trAir.; on firT; l: i: ... .: -
tities of fln> :;ools but most 'i the transactions .ere -.l-,rate tc smnl.
Practically all of the busino*s .:zs restrict I to ~ i..l'ities n'edod for
piAecing out stocks for orldurs -; til y:rns or cloth on th3 booss.
month closod .*t1 ;thJo r.r ct dull L.d v.l1,.. unc Mrtain. ,Jct:tions at
the close J S er3 1 r." ly nooRin l o ir:-.- t th3 I.bseri.C of tr .i 1.* or !.r .'r;.






.700L-22


Fine wools uiciihaned

The buli: of the business on domestic wools transacted during Uov..:mbcr
was on the 64s and finer qualities. Fleece wools of this grade were very
quiet. A f.ew Imall lots of Territory 64s and finer strictly combing have
becn sold during the month at 87-90 cents, scoured basis. Most of the demand
was on the original bag western grown fine wools. The bulk of the offerings
of 64s and fin,-r original bag lines moved at 80-85 counts, scoured basis, for
bulk good rrench combing staple. An occasional line cont.-ining some strictly
combing staple reulizod slightly above this range but on the other hand there
was a cons ido!rr.bl.3 volume of short combing fine original bag wools that
rculisc.d less than 80 cents, scoured basis. Several sales of Texas 12-months
wools wure closed at prices in the range 83-85 cents, scoured basis, for the
choice staple. Very little 58s, 60s wool of either the Fleece or Territory
lines h.s becn noved during November except in the case of Territory original
bag lines t.ht contained some staple of this grade. The market values of 58-
60s, 6-4s and finer have been about on the srame level and fairly steady.

medium "-.ools lo:.'er

The narl:cz on 48s, 50s and 56s domestic wools has been slow and values
have been vk ry much unsettled with the tendency :f quotations steadily down-
ward. Actual sales on these two grades have really buen too few and of
quantities too small to use as a basis for quotations. Prices quoted rcy'ri-esntod
in most cases figures owners hoped to obtain, or in some case, figures at which
the 'oolis eiure actually available. Very few buyers, however, wrero interested
in purchasing during this period even at the lower figures quoted.

The unsettled markets in South America have boon a large factor in
the laclk of interest in domestic medium wools. The selling season in South
America app,.:.rs to have boon slow in getting under way and demand from the
European countries has been rather lighter than usual. The opening quotations
hae been much lo.fer than a year ago, but this factor as yet seems to have had
little influence in.stimulating demand. A few orders, most of them small,
have been placed by domestic manufacturers for import of South American cross-
bred '.ools. So-me of the orders wero filled but brokers were unable to execute
many of the orders because the limits were lower than South American holders weul<
accept. Spot offerings of South American ;ools on this market were very light
and there ans only a very small demandd for those wools at prices somewhat above
the Ievol quotca on offerings for import.

Little interest has been shown in offerings of Australian wools for
import. A fc.'e orders have been placed on merino wools both of Australian and
South African offorings, but the business has been smaller than usual.
Private cable report to members of the wool trade have indicated, however,
that the maricets .n fine wools abroad have beon somewhat firmer.


- 3 -








-4 -


",J L-22

:,rke- fI;r :.ul"tLd :..i- s u,:1

rmn mrarkut on :,oolen wools h:s boon mostly dull. A little business
was transacted on B p;ulld .dools but prices waoro weak. :'ii.taticns on all
grades of pulled -wools w"ere lower at the close than at the ., i"in. of the
month. Very little business was transacted on scoured -I thi'l.s wools and
quotations h:i.vu eased steadily.

.egl'l.- ri :.'i-, st, :.dic s

The noil marrk't has been quite unsettled during the greater part of
IuI'.'.- r U'Li during the close of the month conditions showed a somewhat
steadier tendency. A few inodcratt quantities of fine noils were taken out
of the market.

T, ^_J _"h,- f'...I ,*1 m.i'_

The volume of new business on tops has bcon very small and quotations
showed a further decline. The bulk af the business placed was on 64s and 6Cs
counts. Cil combed 64s of good staple declined to (;.10-1.12 from the previous
selling price of around 1.15. A similar decline took pl.cc in prices on
65s oil conbed tops with selling prices at the close of the month in the r-nt-;o
11.lCl-1.12 per pound. Little demand /as received during the month on the
short staple dry combed 64s top. Although new business on tops has been very
slow, almost negligible in volume, deliveries on old contracts have been gocd.
The volume of deliveries, ho-iever, has shown soen recession.

7.' L: Price per p.uI L, at .-ston, Deceubur l'2J aud October
ITovur..bur and D.. couber 19,9

: 192 : 1929
Grad e :o Dec 6 Oct 5 : 9 Dec 7
: r ents Con ts : '. L'

S t, rrt -- .
,f"i ,-l : : : :fr a

Ohio and similar grease : -. : 368 -.*'-7
Flc ece scoured ............15 1- : -3 : 3-9C : --
Torritorv: scoured .......... : 11.-115 :2 : 7- :' : 85-87
S.1 : : :

Ohio ;nd similar grease ;: : 4 -4' : 44-4f 41-42
"-_ce scoured ........... 100-1 -88 : 7-- .
C r-ritery sacoar3j ......... : i->' -'*-92 ;"-9
* ; : 1_l :
f:^r:'- .--..W'-
Chic i -." ilar -r,.:..o -: .i 49 : -' .' : *'.*-' : ;' ,
Fleece scoari.l ............. ..- 67 .: 6-". : ,-- *. -'
"iTurrit;:.' Scoured ... .. .. : "-.* : -70

"',- iioed fronn :i :l:;r lart t i:?':s :, -rts cf thli .-..t-:; ''/' ice r tho
i'.




WOOL-22


Prices: Foreign


New Zealand wool sales


Wool prices were about two cents a pound lower at the Wellington
wool sales on December 6 than at the Auckland sales on November 25 accord-
ing to a cable received from Consul Cochran at Wellington. The wools
offered were bright and clear but mostly tender, thin and wasty. About
23,000 bales of wool were cataloged and 75 per cent of this sold, chiefly
to Bradford. The Continent bought limited quantities and America took
small amounts of the best wools. Withdrawals were ouite heavy.

The London Colonial wool sales

The London wool sales opened on November 19 with 137,000 bales of
wool available, of which approximately 75,000 bales were Australian and
48,000 bales were from New Zealand. About 80 per cent of the wools cata-
loged were sold. The Continent was the principal purchaser and took
59,500 bales. The United Kingdom purchased 48,500 bales and the United
States took 1,000 bsiles c.f which 500 bales were New Zealand sliped r'ols.
The following table shows the quantity :f wool cataloged and sold by.
countries at tLre six auctions held in London during 1929.

LO';DOII CCLOljiAL WOOL SALES: 'i~untity cf wool catalceged rnd
sold at London in 1929

Country. : Wc 'o ] a action s clrig on
: Jan 30 : iar 21 : .a, 15 July 23: 'Oct 4 D:ec 4
S Bales : Pales : ;ales : =es : ales : Bales
Wool cataloed by :
Australia :
New South Wales : 27,257 : ,85 : 9,474 : 14,856 : 18,57. : 27, '0r
Victoria ....... : 12,700 : 11,:74 :12,04' : 12,918 : 20,22. : 15, 000
Queensland ..... : .5,824 : 1,603 : o,71 : 8,d93 : 16,920 : 15,=70
West Australia : 11,88 711 : 4 7,244:: o,7 32 4,2.50 : 10,60
South Australia 5,.16 : 3,084 : 3,561 :4,71 : 7, 2i0 : 5,600
Tasmania ....... : 92 : 1,019 : 1,621 : 85 : 461 :
Total ........ 73,77 : 36,199 : 7,6 : 45,055 : 67,627 : 74,870
ew Zealand ..... 23,829 3 9,140 : 44,810 : 2,904 : 46,579 : 47,. 50
Cape ............ : 3,527 : 2, l : 2 .5 6 : 1,727 : 3,100 : 4,05C'
South American ..: 1,03.99 : 1,716 : 27,55 : 20,528 : 24,754 : 4,"r. 0
All other ....... 1,3 6 : 1,059 : 1,431 : 932 1,21 : 6,30
Total ........ :102, 653 : 99,025 :113,957 :101.,146 1413, 3(3 :167,r,.
Wool sold to:
Continent ...... : 49,,",0 : 43,000 :52,000 : 43,500 :59,00 : 59,500
United Eingdom : ,0,0 :r, 36,500 : 39,500 : 31,000 : 45,0 0 : 46,5 s0
United States : 2,000 : 4, n : : : 5,00n :
Total ........ : 82,000 83,500 : 91,500 :74,500 :109, '"?0 :1CI9,0,'0








-'6-


W00L-22

The London wool salus closed on Ik cernb.r 4 with greasy morinos mostly
5 to 10 pur cent higher and fine crdssbrods 10 per cent higher than at the
close of tht. previous sales on October 4. Slipc( wiols, rn dium and low
gr asy crossbrods and all scour(id wools wire r nstly unchi .ii d, except ilow
Zealand scoured crossbreds which Jwre 5 to 7 1/2 per cent lower. Puntn
Arenas wools cwre 5 per cent higher but Cape wools vicro bar.-ly steady. The
following table shows the prices of wool by grades at the close of the
auctions in Doccnber cori .rcd with the close of the previous 5 sales this
yc-r and the Docoibcr sales in 19j .: .nd 1927.

LOI[DOIT VOOL SiL:S: Prices at closing of the wool auctions rcportr.d
on basis of the Official Standards of the United 3t:.tos for
gradsc of :wool (on scoured basis)
1927 1928 1929
United Status :
Unit Status : Dec 13: Dec 5 :J:,n J0: Lnr 21:May 15:July 23:0t 4 : Dec 4
grades
C(..nts Cnts 'Cnnts Cnt :Cnts Cnt : C ii : C(.nts

70s ..... 99.4 87.2 87.2 83.1 : 79.1 :71.0 : b8.8 : 59.8
64 ..... 89.2 : 83.1 80.1.: 77.0 : 73.0 64.9:: 537 : 56.8
60s ..... 8.1 80.1 75.0 :72,0 : 66.9 ; 6U.8 : 48.7 : 54.7
58s ..... 78.1 7J.0 69.9 : 64,9 60.8 56.8 : 46.6 : 50.7
56s ..... 7.0 69.9 66.9 : 60.8 56.8 :52.7 : 44.6 : 47.6
50s ..... 48.7 51.7 50.2 : 44.6 : 4.6 :40.6 : .6.5 : 38.0
48s ..... 4.6 47.6 46.6 42.6 40.6 : 38.5 : 35.5 : 36.5
46 ..... 2.6 45.6- 4.6 .6 6 : 39.5 : 37.5 : 34.5 : 35.5
44 .... 40.6 4'.6 :42.6 : 39.5 : 39.5 : 34.5 : 34.5 : 35.5
40s ..... 39.5 42.6 41.6 : 38.5 : 38.5 : ..5 -3.4 34.5
36s ..... : 8.5 : 42.6 : 40.6 : 37.5 : 27.5 : 37,5 t 33.4 : 34.5

T bul .ttd front report, of T'. ,. FolCy, Unitcd St:ttus ;Agriclultural Corinissionor
at London.

Trar.de .nc' C,. isurpt ion~: ron. ctic

,c: i %t.s rt IBozoton Lo:rLr

Tht quantity of d.onjctic :wool arriving :at Boston ;'uri"in ::o.b.. r w.as
ovcr 1 million pounr's 1(;s than l:st yc .r. The rece ipts of donr stic wool .'u-
rin c:o' .:nb.r :w7:rc 8,'dl,O0O pouni c ':;iri. .1ith 9,322,.'j p:Ln''s duri:tb
Tovenb 1:r 19.2- an9d 8,972,000 ]:1.'s s in N 'TIC-.l. r 19:".

The receipts of wool a.t boston I'r" *Tnurry 1 to ::."c. -b. r 30, were
slii/htly less than for th first 11 months : 1.'. an .-n *. tr.t .' to 197 million
pounds as ."-.i:;st 2::3 million l ml 's in 1. .n 0 rlilion: p,'-u's in 192."
The followm-n! table shows the rtcoi .t 'Ustic wool :.t Bo bton b"r 'rt-thr
from l'12'. to .'.te.







'.1jOL-22 7

D",'L~, r'cL ETC" Receipts at Boston, by months, January
1927 November 1929

.onth 1927 1928 :1929 1/
1.000 pounds : 1000 pounds : 1.0 ?0 rnduns
:an 6,081 0 ,044 4,532
Feb 6,577 6,399 1,836
[:ar : 8,600 : 6,497 : 5,738
Apr : 9,522 8,138 : 6,442
tLa:r 17.,9J8 : 25,843 : 16,108
June : 46,106 : 50,083 40,C94
July 55,877 51,346 56,870
u : 29',891 : 25,802 32,377
Sept 11,799 7,156 16,233
3Dt : 9',033 4,598 9,171
;ov 8,972 9,322 8,202
Dec 8,794 : 7,. : 8,22
Compiled fro-m .''eVekly reports of the Boston '7ool Office of the Bureau of Agri-
cultural L:conicnics.
1 Prclirini ary '
:achi n-r. ct ivit,'y ,yr-ater
The Ceoisus Bureau report of.the activity of wool machinery during
October 19:9 chc.'ed considerable increases over September both in the actual
number of hours that machines were in operation and in the per cent of the
maximum sinlric shift capacity, except for combs which were loss active on a
percEnta~.; baLsis than last month. The greatest increase in activity was in
r.rpA t a..nd ruc loons which wore 5 per cent more active than last month,
ba.scd on p,.r c.etit of maximum single shift ca'.rcity. Th. table on the follow-
ing pr:-. cor.rl.s the activity of wool machinery during September and October
1929 -.nd Octobr 1928.

Imports Cr,:-.t.r th'.n l:LSt 7,, *ir

InIorts of wool into the United Status from J::nuary 1 to October 31,
wort cInsL'. comnp.rcd .rith 205 million pounds during the first ten months of 1928. Carpet
vwool i-iports showed the greatest incr,:ease( and weurc 22 million pounds greater
than last ..ear. Imports of colbin-; wools wern about 11 million pounds
gre'ate-r than l-t year but clothing wool imports -.oer.! practically the same as
; a ,,'ar .igo.
Imports of combing; and clothing wools during October wcro 1 million
pounds gre-ter than in October 1928, mountingg to 5,640,000 pounds this year
as -ga:inst ,',_12,000 pounds last year. Carpet wuol imports wore much loss
than in Octobur last year, amounting to 13,615,000 pounds compared with
16,017,000 p..unls in 1928.

The table on the following page shows imports of combing, clothing and
carpet wools into the United Lt:.t.s during October 1928 and 1..?. and for the
first ten months of 1928 and 1929,









WOOL-22


Wool machinery activity in r7 Unitod StLats during
October 1928, -ni Septombor and October 1929


To; 1 number of hours
machines were active


machinery


Oct

1928 : 1929


: Sept
1929


:1,000 : 1,000 9 1,000
:hours : h.' s :i ho..rs

Cards......: 1,457: 1,304: 1,156:
Combs......: 496: 543: 494:
Spindles:::::
Woolen....:455,219:405,662 :%3,0 ,:
..rsted... :387,032:411,289:351,875:
Looms:
Wide 1/...: 8,558: 8,147: 7,189:
Narro 2 : 2,103: 1,90.: 1,688:
Carpet
and rug..: 1,487: 1,579: 1,321:


Percentage of total:
Machinery active
:at some time 1arini :
: month
* *


1928 1929


Per
cent

V0.0 :
70.7 :

78.0 :
66.2

59.9 :
66.0


Per :
cent :

73.9
71.3

69.2 :
67.4

56.6
62.8 :


66.5 : 68.8 :


je .-,
1929


Per
cent

72.1
72.6 :

-9.8 :
66.7

55.8 :
61.4


Percent 3t-e of
maximum
s! r -le-shift
cal. ac ity


: Oct :


1928 ?' i29

Per : Per
S- nt : c-nt

92.6 : 84.6
82.1 : 91.0

88.1 78.0
.68.2 : 71.8

67.3 : 65.0
65.6 : 66.0


S1929

:Per
: cent

: 82.8
S94.3

:76.7
: ;9.5

: 64.3
63.0


65.9 : 67.0 : 70.6 : 65.7


Cc-i! IJ i from the Reports of Active and Idle :l;cl Machinery, issued monthly
by the --ei-artment of Conmmnerce.
j/ 'ider than 50-inch reed space. 2/'50-inch reed space or less.

Imports of .vool into the United States during October 19.. and 1929
and total imports from January 1 to October 31, I1JLC and 1929

Oct Jan 1 Oct 31
1ool --92-
1928 1929 198 1929
_______________________________________.____________


: 1,000 :


Cbi: ........ .: .
Cloth'n. .,.... :.
Total .
Carpet .. : I6,017
..tal .. : 20,.t


[; I: I.


3,792]
1,848
5,646
13,615
19 3..


1,00'
!,eo0





I_7,416
204,7 7t


1,,CO
rToun is

76,2C4
14,Z"1
*2 r,. r
145,144:
$37,645


Corr~~-i :r-i official records 0o' the 3d.!',- o; Fore.,-n and Domestic Commerce.


A !rliminary r',- rt ;'r, '1o *' ';ton .ool 1ffie .' the .;r- a.; of
Agricultural -'ononics states that the imports of :'0ol i'r' ,Tn' ..!ar:. 1 to
'.-,I-,-r 7 into the i.rts .: 3 .ton, :'? Yo'r- ani: rhl:n1-elhia ,vre as follows:
*- : vool 7', 6 ,, *,8j4 I. i-ls; clot. : .iool 1~",' .. ,'"l i ;n1r,; and carpet
v: 1 1.' 0I8,4.' [,ur is. i *.1rts dur '-.- t' sam-e -';: o4d in 1 .F w: ere ;i,9.9,f41
I .r..]S of comb' r. >7ool, 12,.,"^ ,: 7 i n.rl.; 'f clot'n .i ;, l nr. 1D 6,190,,'38
T .n-r.lr of earl 7-t J:ool.


__ __


__ ______


-------


-- ---


- 8 -


:*





WCOOL-22


Wool con surmpt r'In much higher

T:he consumption 69 wool in the United States by mills rep:,rting
to the Bureau of the Census, increased nearly 20 per' cent during October
and amounted to 59,351,974 pounds.(grease equivalent ) compared with
51,477,103 pounds last year and 49,754,780 pounds in.September 1929.
This is the'highest consumption reported for any month this year. About
58 per cent of the total wool consumption reported in October was domes-
tic combing and clothing wool, 12 per cent was foreign combing and cloth-
ing w..ol, and 30 per cent was carpet wool. The quantity of combing and
cicthing wool consumed during October was the highest reported for any
month since May 1923 and amounted to 42,534,000 pounds (grease equivalent)
compared vith 35,461,000 pounds last month and a five year average for
October 1924-1928 of 36,279,000 pounds. The following table shows the
cc-nsumption of wool by grades daring September and October and the total
for January to October 1928 and 1929


WOOL: Consumption. in the United States, by grades,
for specified months, 1928 and 1929 1/

Ofricjal] standards of the Oct Sept : Jan 1 to Oct 31
United States for grades
of wool : 1928 : .1929 : 1929 : 1928 1929
: 1,000: 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000
: pounds: -ounds: pounds: pounds : pounds

Corumbing and clothing wool- :
64., 70s and 80s .........: 10,703: 15,379: 12849: 94,271: 121,729
50-s nnd 60s ............: 6,767: '6,237: 5,619: 51,383: 54,575
56s ............. ......... : 6,519: 6,56o: 5,669: 51,490: 56,855
43s and 50s ............ : 5,733: 5,710: 4,794: 52,062: 49,344
36s, 40s, 44s and 46s ....: 2,282: 2,923: 2,796: 20,648: 25,289
Total combing and'cloth-:
ing wools .............: 32,004: 36,815: 31,727: 269,854: 307,792

Carpet wo:.ls ...............: 12,680: 16,045: 12,712: 110,611: 133,464

Total all wools ........: 44,684: 52,860: 44,439: 380,465: 441,256

Compiled from data.in the "Wool Consumption Reports" issued by the
Bureau oC the Census.
1/ These are totals of grease, scoured and pulled wools, as
published by the Bureau of the Census, and have not been
reduced to a grease basis.


- 9 -










WOOL-22


The foregoing table shows that the consumption of combine: and
clothing wools increased 38 million pounds for the first 10 months of-
1929 compared with the co:responding period in 1928. Of this increase,
28 million pounds were domestic 64s wools, 5 million pounds were foreign
5.:-63 wools, 6 million pounds were foreign 56s wools, 4 million pounds
were foreign 48-50s wools and 5 million pounds were in wools ar;ning
46s and lower. The greatest decline was in the consumption of domestic
48s-50s wools which was 7 million pounds less than last year.


WOOL: Consuription in the United States, by classes,
January October 1929 1/


I.nth : Tott. :Combing : Clothing :Carpet : Domestic : Foreign

: 1,000 1,000 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,r' : 1,000
:pcunds : cunds : p-,:unris : pounds: o-unds : pounds

Jan ....... : 47,789 : 26,649 : 7,005 : 14,135 : 26,640 :21,149
Feb ....... : 41,373 : 21,318 : 6,716 : 13,339 : 21,2?7 : 20,100
Mar ....... : 41,584 :22,416 : 6,680 : 12,48 : 21,367 : 20,217
Apr ........ : 42,776 23,188 : 6,705 : 12,883 : 22,659 : 20,117
May ....... : 42,764 :21,962 : 6,568 : 14,234 : 21,482 :21,252
June ...... : 38,539 : 20,954 : 5,985 : 11,600 :20,638 : 17,301
July ...... : 42,148 : 23,990 : 5,632 : 12,526 : 24,122 : 18,026
Aug ....... : 46,983 : .27,292 : 6,190 : 13,501: 27,C-3 : .19,9CO
fept ...... 44,439 : 25,662 : 6,065 : 12,712 : 26,3.13 : 16,226
Oct ....... : 52,860 : 29,365 : 7,450 : 16,045 : 30,569 :22,291


Compiled from monthly reports of the Bureau of the Census.
1/ These are totals of grease, scoured and pulled wools, as published
by the Bureau of the census, and have not been reduced to a
grease basis.

Trade and C,.. mption: Foreign

I r- -df ri m market continues cuiet

The Bradford wool market is not very active and the de:r.Pnd for
.to: and .yIarr.s continues quiet according to a cable received by the
F':orti.Ln Serv.ice of the Department of A~riculture on recer~ber 6 from
Consul '-.ms.:n, at 3rdf[ord. The mi.iority of manufacturers are refrain-
in;- frr'cr heavy purcl,:es of trps and yarns until after C1.ri.stran but, in
n.ite of competition for the lir..ted business, quotations for tjps and
yarns are generally unch-.%neid.


- 10 -








WOOL-22


The output of fine worsted piece goods is being maintained but
activity in the woolen industry is decreasing and there is much unemploy-
ment in the heavy woolen manufacturing, districts.

The total weight of wool and tops passing through the Bradford
Conditioning House during IIovember was considerably smaller than for the
past two months of this year. The quantity of wool tops conditioned
was about 575,000 pounds less than last month and amounted to 3,7',000
pounds compared with 4,337,000 pounds in October and 4,120,000 pounds
in September. The quantity of wool conditioned amounted to 553,000
pounds or 325,000 pounds less than during October. However, the quantity
of worsted yarn weighed amounted to 274,000 pounds which is the highest
reported for any month this year. The table on 'page 17. shows the
quantity of wool, tops and yarns passing through the conditioning houses
of Bradford, Roubaix, Tourcoing and Verviers for the past six months.


WOOL TOPS AND YAMR: Price per pound at Bradford on specified
dates, November 1928 1929

64s I/ :50s 1/
Date Sco : Worsted: Scured: Worsted
Date Scoured Scoured' '
: ed Tops : yarn w: Tops : yarn
l: : : 2/48s : : : 2/32s
: Cents : Cents : Cents : Cents : Cents : Cents


1928- : :: :
tTov 24 : 89.2 99.4 131.8 : 52.7 :58.8 83.1
Dec 24 : 89.2 97.3 :127.7 : 52.7 :57.8 :82.1
1929- :
Jan 26 : 87.2 : 97.3 :129.7 : 51.7 :59.8 :83.1
Feb 23 : 81.1 : 91.2 125.7 : 48.7 :56.8 :80.1
Mar 23 : 79.1 : 90.2 : 125.7 : 46.6 : 56.8 : 78.1
Apr 23 : 78.0 89.2 :125.7 : 48.7 : 56.8 : 78.0
MI:ay 25 : 75.0 : 85.2 : 119.6 : 45.6 :54.7 : 77.0
June 25 : 74.0 :83,1 117,6 : 44.6 :53.7 :77.0
July 25 : 68.9 : 79.1 : 115.6 : 42,6 :50.7 :75.0
Aug 25 : 66.9 :77.0 : 113.6 : 40.6 49.7 73.0
Sept 25 : 56.8 : 68.9 103.4 : 39.5 : 46.6 68.9
Oct 25 : 62.9 ; 73.0 103.4 : 39.5 : 46.6 67.9
Iov 2 : 62.9 :71.0 : 103.4 : 39.5 :47.6 67.9


of the United States for wool and wool


I/ Ct'ficial star.dards


tops.


- 11 -


t


O
m


0
g


4
@


~_









- 12 -


The exports of wool manufactures from Great Britain decreased
dur rji- November except for worsted piece :,ooDls which were slightly high-
er than last month but over 1 million pounds less than last year, accord-
ing to a cablegram received from Agricultural Commissioner Foley at London.
The exports of woolen and worsted yarns amounted to 4,122,000 pounds com-
pared with 4,547,000 pounds in October and 4,074,000 pounds during Novem-
ber 1928. Exports of woolen and worsted piece goods were considerably
lower during November amounting to 10,814,000 square yards compared with
11,104,000 square yards in October and 12,492,000 square yards in November
1928.

Imports of wool into Great Britain during November amounted to
nearly 49 million pounds compared with 22 million pounds last month and
34 million pounds last year. The following table compares the exports
and imports of wool and wool manufactures for November 1'26-1929 and
October 1929.

UNITED :niC-3DCOI: Trade in wool and wool manufactures, Pc.'-ember
1926-1929 and October 1929

Exop.-rts and imports* Unit Nov : Oct
: 1926 : 1927 : 1928 : 1929 : 1929
: Thou- : Thou- : Thou-.: Thou- :Thou-
: sands : sands : srnds : sands : sands
Exports -
Wool............ : pound: 8,300: 7,700: 6,100: 5,9.30 5,7,0
Tops ............ : : 3,000: 3,4Q0: 2,800: 2,907: 3,300
Yarns, woolen .. : : 6, 716: 687: 671: 737
Yarns, worsted.. : : 3,515: 4,436: 3,337: 3,451: 3,810
Tissues, woolen : sq yd : 9,789: 12,-87: 8,251: 7,:9: 7,97.
Tissues, worsted : : 3,507: 3,765: 4,241: 3,219: 3,129
Flannels and : : : : :
delaines: : 518: -20: 316: 443: 464
Carpets and rugs : : 606: -: 4.0: 593 63:
Noils ........... : pound : 1,6,r: 1,.',.: 1,700: 1,500: 1,100
.. te .. ........ : : 1,4, 2,0 : 1,700: 1,200: 1,?'001
Woolen rags ..... : 3,452: 3,j64: 2,.2: 2,128.; 3,136
I .c.rts :
1 ............ : pound : 54,3?: 46, 10: 34,500: 48,700: 22,0.0'
Tops ............ : : 10: 230: 160: 100: 200
T--te and noils : 200: 400: :,00: 3.0: 2,1
Yarns ........... : : 1,644: 1,469: 1,676: 1,67: 1, 34-
Tissues, woolen i sq vd : 2,0i9: 2,.39q: l,9c2: 2,167: 3,22..
Tissues, worsted : : ..7': 5i.: 477: 360: 4.-i
Carpets -nd ru : : 438: 735: 617: 69: 7Tc
'..:len r,:us ..... : pound : 5,420: 4,20:: 3,-50: 4,032: 6,160

1:r- : ijti Ir'ri Trad-i :ad ; : .'i-jti*.:. f t::.- United Kin.-.dc. and called
reports from ~gri jltur-l Commissioner 7.le.' at London.


"* -," L-22






- 13 -


Uncnplc:.ynenit ::ij;htl.r increased

Unornploynent ir, r-:. slightly in the British wool textile industry
during October as in, icatco. tby.the numnbr of unemployed persons registcrc
at the enploynont exchanges of Bradford, Huddersfield, Halifax, Dc sbury,
Batluy Lnd ":orloy. However, the sorting, combing and carding sections of the
industry showed a slight improvement over last nonth and the vorstcd weaving
industry showed considerable improvcnr nt over Septe'iber according t6 data
published by the Leeds Office of the ministryy of Labour. All. branches of the
wool teotile industry wore better niploayed than during Octobe.r 1928 except
w.orsted spinners. The accompanying table shows the number of unemplo-. .1
tu::tilo workers rugistured in the ~Wst Eii'ii ; employRent ..xch'.ni-s from July
to iOctober 1929 and October 192..

ITunmbr of persons unemployed in the British wool textile
industry, rc:isztLrud in the West Riding enploynent -exchanges 1/

iMa.nufacturing 1928 1929
processes Oct : July Aug : Sept : et


Sorting ........... 829 675 664 718 692
Sand prpring 1,5 957 1,026 1,099 1,269
Cor.bing .. ........... 2,382 1,805 1,602 1,809 1,760
C:.rding .............. 1,403 914 1,035 1,150 1,119
Spinning, woolon ..... .805 518 .~'" 510 613
Spinning, worsted .... 3,191 ,214 3,686 -,948 3,290
\.Lu ving, woolen ...... 2,538 1,280 1,243 1,8.34 2,035
;*.... :,ig, worsted ..... 2,031 : 5,394 3,10 2,190 1,581

Co-piled froa d-at:. published by the Leeds Office of thu U!inistry of Labour
I/ Including Bradford, Huddcersficld, H::lifar:, ic..'sbur:-, Batlcy and l:orley.



The Gornan narkut was good during ITov nbr, according to Agricultural
Coaiissioner Stoore at Berlin. The r:arkot for tops an( noils -was v~ry active
at Bronmn the first half of ITov-nibor but soriuvhat quieter during the s< cCnii.
h.lf 3f the nonth. The inprovvcu.nt in industrial activity reported last
nonth has boon rmaintainod especially in the wo;rstod section of the trade.
The activity of worsted spinning was rportod as 73 per cent in L;ay, 83 per
r -ent in Junue and 93 per cent a:t the enl of October. The per cent of union
workers in the wool in.lustry fully unployoe! luring August was 74 per cent,
S',pt.-nbor 71 and Octobcr 69.

Stocks of -tops in th., co:'ission cou.bing est:.blishnl-nts of Ger':'.ny
on Dcunebur 1 were about 2,400,000 pounds less than on 1,overiber 1, 1929, and
about 90u,0OJO p'un..s less than on Deceorbur 1, 1928. Stocks of rierino tops
on D-.cerbur 1, 1929 amounted to 4,7-7,000 pounds and crossbrol tops to
9, ,69,080 pounds.






- 14 -


TOPS: Stocks held by Continental commission combing establish-
ments, 19" and 1929


LocatiLou and
description
of vool


Belgium -
,erino .....
Cro~sbred ..
Total ....

Ge rnanr -
Lerino ...
Crossbred ...

Total ......

France -
Lierino ......
Crossbred ...

Total ......
Italy -
Merino ......
Crossbred ...


:192


:Tov 1

:1,000
r, : :p.lds S

:3,135
:2778 .


D

1
PI


)ec 1

,000 :
pounds

2,465
2.544 :


Oct 1

1,000
pounds

2,890
3.889


1929


Nov 1

1,000 :
ort,f n" s'


Dec 1

S1,000
pounds


2,573
4.178


1,914
3.966


5,913 5,009 6,779 6,751 5,8'


S9,7 6,409 : 9,087 : 6,377 4,747
:10.99 8,708 : 10,650 : 10429 : 9,469

18,726 15,117 19,737 16,606 14,216


:13,062 10,622 : 16,400 : 1j,483 12,348
:15.706 12,983 : 18,322 : 18,042 : 16.413

28,768 :3,605 34,722 31, f25 28,761


: SIJ 615 : 1,576 1,058 7:5
S1.936 1,501 3.7:. : ..623 : 2.249


2,116 :


4,3.jf


3,691


3,034


Compiled :i'i-r, cabled reports from Agricultural


Comnissioner Steere at Berlin.


3,l-I1.n


'The Belgium inarket was active during :november and the improvement
rcyported last nonth was maintained. 7hoe ,futures" market reporti) a turn-
over -fi 1,,b.,0D0 pounds in Ucov nbor conupared with 2,,rff,000 pounds in
October. The quantity of ;vool and yarn passing through the condit nintht :
house at Vcrvi. rs wa;s .l-ss than last rlonth but the quantity of tops increased.
Stocks of tr~ps held in commission contbi'n cstablisihmonts decline about 12
pur cent but :.ro still about -"0,000 pounds greater than last year.


--


---


"-~-"-~- ~----- ~-- ~--- '-- ~--


Cotal ..... 2,749







\'-)L-22


',L: Imports intec BSoliurn, Cchoslo'.nkla, France, GcrD n:.,, Italy,
Jap:in, Pol .nd, Unitcd KinEdcn ".nd United Stnt..:s for p:'c ci'fi,-d
[rcniths, 199


Country :ndm itcr. : Juinu


bol 1iui -
'.!ool, Lr asy .....
'. ol, secured ....
Tot .....


Dzcchcoslovai:iL'. -

Fra.nc', rro;'r :-.lie Cn
skins .,,.......

Gu rmn. ny -
.'col ri:rino, grv..-s
and v:ashed .....
.'0o 1, riurino,
scoured ........
l/W ol, cr- ssbr-.d,
rr.:'.uy nnd
Vw shcd .........
','cil, cr:''u;brVu ,
sc iIr 1 i.,. .
T? t. l ....

It :ly-
'./col, grc as:, ....
\,col, vwashid .....

Tot :r ....


J'.pran -

Pol..nd -

United Kingdon -

United bt .ts -


1,00[0


S ,506

* 22,16


July

1, 0'u
pounds 3




15,621


7
4
1


L,311


74 ,-.4




15,739

1,071


. i,

1.0357 :

1., C,2



10,264
1,298

11,56'


.11,153

: 3,24

: 70,297 :

: 1 ,094 :


5,291


49,149




16, 093

1,519


9,04o

1,u77 :
7,2



9'7

7? ,' Cl-
?,535 :

l? :



7,C'6S :

2 ':r : ^

39,009 :

1,021 :


August
Ali- S St

1,0,'


14 ,2(4
419
14,65 :


ll',.t


10. :66
246.
11,112


1,964 ,


30,766 : 26,602




11,7(6 6,153.

1,307 1, 0t :


*9,, 9 4 ,9.1





6 5 -E
6,255 1
7-9 : :

7,044 : 1
-


5,901 :

2,026 s




16,6531 :


19,125

19,091 :


S Ptn..r t b, t I)or
I


Sr ;Und'
,,: u nYd:


,049

",290


1i







4,700

1,209


S,025

1,215
1 _149


1/


L/

21,997

19,255


Coripild front ri-ports c'Lbll..'d by th. Atrieultur:.l Comirission irL : r .t
Berlin ..nd Lcndor r nd reports front the Intcrn-.:tional Institutc of Agriculture
at ~moo.
1 'lot reported.


---;------


--


--


- 1 r-







IOOL-22 16 -

France

The rnarket for tops ann1 noils -.as good curing the first of the. ~onth
but was rather quiet towards the end of Noveriber. Industrial activity was
good and important now orders were received front both the domestic an- the
export trade.

'Prices of crossbred 56s tops declined:3 cents rland rnerino 64s tops
declined 5 cents during the nonth.- Capl. noils .- Australian norino and
crossbred noils all declinedd 2 cents below the price on rNoverber 1. :. rino
and Cheviot.yarns, however, advanced 2 cents per pound during' the rionth
accr ".'n; to L1c;',1 V. Steere, American Agricultural Comr.issioner at Berlin.

UiOOL, TOPS ATD YlRIT: Price per pound in France, specified date,
1929

Item t June 1 :,uly 4 :Aug 29 :Oct 3 : 1ov 1 : Dec 5


Tops, Australian-
iierino 64s warp ......
Crossbred .56s ........
Tops, .r,-htiit no -
Crossbred 56s .......
!;oils-
Aiustrnlian merino ..
Australian crossbreo
Cape ...............
Yarn -
:oerino .........:...
Cr-'iot ............ :


Cents C, -*it Conts

97.3 93.3
87.3 79.1 74.0

81.1 75.0 70.0

92.4 81.7 -:0.9
75.5 63.1 57.8
S2.4 87.1 85.3

121.3 115.5 11i.0 .
69.7 88.0- .6. :


Cents Cents

89.2. 92.1
71.0.. 64.9

68.9 60.3

78.2 71.1
-58.6 49.8
S 76.4

103.1 104.4
d).9 : 80.9


Stocks of tops in commission combing establishments in France on
December 1 wiort nearly 3 million pounds lss than on ":ov'.-:b-r 1, 1929 but
were 5 million pounds frroator than on Dectmbur 1, 1925. Stocks of norino tops
wore 12,-:,000- pcun s .nml crossbred tops 16,413,:1C'.

The quantities of ;;ool, tops and. yarn pL:sing through tho co-nditirnir
houses at j.'-I:x an. Toiirrr.i during november were somewhat loss than
last month. The quantity of tops was over 1 million pounds less than in
October and! the quantity of yarn weighLhd was nearly 600,C(,0 pr-.n 'c less than
last month.


(( nTS

77.0
61.8

57.8

69.3
48.0
74.6

1C6.2
82.6


----






WOO L-22


.100L, 'COPS ATD YARIT: Amount passing through conditioning houses
at Bradford,RToubaix,Tourcoing and Vorviors, 1929

Location and :
cass June July Aug Sept Oct yHov
1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,0: 0
pounds n ds :ouiis pounds pounds : roii:rlls
Bradford -
V7ool ......, 776 585 644 771: 878 : 553
Tos ....... 3,638 3, 4 3,617 4,120 : 4,337 : 3,763
Yan ....... : 199 195 118 165: 180 274
Roubaix- :
Wool ....... 214 196 214 245 : 234 2 76
Tops ..... 4,317 4,740 5,044 4,L03 6;722 : 5,765
Yarn ....... 1,448 1,290 1,299 1,007 :1,583 : 1,453
Tourcoing -
1ool ....... 2,564 2,416 2,478 2,319 2,994 : 2,700
Tops ....... 7,174 6,779 7,831 5,873 : 8,699 :8,571
Yarn ....... 2,244 2,138 2,277 1,976 : 2,438 : 2,015
Verviors -
/ool ....... 2,687 2,846 2,083 1,351 : 3,513 2,886
Tops ...... 227 : 220 : 211 : 124 : 406 : 522
Yarn ....... : 716 a 675 747 : 296 820 : 769
Compiled front cabled reports from Agricnltur.al COmmissioner Steere
at Berlin and Consul Tho'ison at Bradfnrd.

Unrld ,'col Suijlyv Sitirticn

There h:.s boun no irmport.nt c.h: nii in tho world wool supply situation
since our Iist report. Production estirr.tus for 10 1/ countries which supply
a little over 3/4 of the world's clip exclusive of Russia and China, now point
to a clip in the neighborhood of 2,488 million pounds or :about the sane as
last year. IncludinC the carryover from the 1928-29 season supplies ::t the
beginr.int. of the current season were estim rtod at about i1 per cent above the
procF-ding season.

Ca.vlda

It is no'v possible to n.ake an apprcxirirte estimate of the 1929 Canadian
wool clip lhdu to the roctnt receipt of official shop returns for this year.
Wool p1raettion is now estinatoe at r.p roxiri:.tely 23,3', -,000 I cld an increase
of abou '? rpr cont above. the largo clip of 1928. Prolihinary rhotp returns
shi:- that i.n ,mne, 1? 2 throw wore 3,":!;,000 shc(p -:.d lhubs in Canada con-
p i "'th oni 31,,8l000 in ~.1' an incr,-as, of 9 per ctnt. Of this number
"2.,.- O w ru n'.-d as adult shop against 1,910,000 a y,-ar a.o, and
1. ..0 h--. .ainst 1,B5U. o1 S1t Afst riyr.

j Ji S: .m..i;;, ':-:t~: i.. don, Fr nec, Gormany, Lrgentina, Uruguay,
Australia, Falrnu, Inion of South Africa.


- 17 -









Australia

Reports.state thr,t toward the .idC lu-of ..:ovib.?r seasonal prospects in
Australia had improved :n ,rally. n/hile thore have boun unofficial reports
to the effect tvat the cstinrat of the Australian clip rany be revised do'.:n-
ward no official cofirriation of this has boon reccivcd and.the latest
estimate still stands at 925,000,000 pounds colrir.d with 9'O0,000,).' in 192;,

In Soilth Australia, 'where the droi;ht Ias.s thc worst in the history of
the st-tto shop numbers on June 30,19: iv; ru tstinatcd at approxinrtoly
7,q000000 inoludIir :v:intcr laribs compared :-ith 7,900,000 on.Juno 30,1l 2-,
according to Consul Tho.ir, C. Uasson. :Th, .flocks have b(:,tn.h.-.ily dcpletod
by riortality due to the d'o ci ht, states the Consul, losses beinC estinated at
over 500,000. This state, hoaevor, su!icrts only about 1/14 of the number
of shoup in Australian

Ar' lntfinl

Thi' n, r clip has boun slo:v in arriving; on the n:rkrt t i'Argentina and
the supply of super-co,:rsu crossbrjds is scarce. In Patagonia, hrn.'rc the
fin crossbred p'rdoninnt's, shnarlri: *as satisfactory And th 'oo1dl'is of
much finer quality than t lht of last season. Tioreovw r the: break in the
staple so.noticeable last season is net in evidence this season.

ITro. i .'

rhe -wol clip *s previously reported is ,sti'nated to be about 8 pcr
cent abovn th-at of last y.ear. 0.:ing to the dry winter th( v;ool is rolati-'ly
freeoo :i defects, th- quality in g en:nr'l is sun.rior to that of the last
clip a.:i the length of tht sta:pl is considered up to st;tnd:rd, states the
Anglo-9South An rcricanr B':n, Ltd. in its vwo(kly report.

Union of South Africa

The quality of this st ason's .-ool in the Union is report d.as sound,
dense a:nd full of life and luster according to L:r, .t. P. Hann.:, President of
tho Port Eliz:.beth :ro.';,ce Association st::t .s Assist nt Tr.iL Connissioncr
:"d' r.1 B. Larson. The wool is brijhtr, rore showiy, loss >.iust:. and possibly
sl'.htly nor, I r..' than last year's. The Dcpartncnt of A riculture hYs
(iv. i notice th-t thi. ;o-a rnr nt intends to take, the necessary steps to in-
p.js. a total 1( .-' of .:. c nts on :ach bal, of nool exported from the :'i. )n
b :inninin January 1, 1930. An insispe tion fi-o of 1 cfnt per r.o0ind "n".. a sp' ci .1
foe of :2." cents r pound .-ill br l(- i, 1 on each bale accorc(.'-. ti a Router
cabl; to th: Yorkshire Ob.erver. Tr.ni f( e :as prrc.ozLed t a c. -.f.r re. of
1- r'' ; ,ool f:arners, representaLtiv of agricultural ::~ wool or,'':'z .tion,
Cov.arnrnent officials and It':b,:rs of the wool trndo, starts Assistlt "r ,'
Con'ission, r It.;so fi, for the !'.r!. of h:.v'-ir. n fi,n1d v:.il:.bl for r'~s arc
work, rr .!:'..n :'70ol far rse a,.nd ,',.:r-ict in a vi :nrc'us publicity inr n in
in South Africa and ovt rseas to ncr"i, i, the usC of Voolen natcrinls.



p--L *-L- nW1
A -1.7 per c (nt .-inter (Aprl--'i1.1;.) l -1..rn- in Solu h Australia in
1.'.>) was the lo:;cst since 1.'15 which ;o:s only 44.,r. ..:.t ;,. anr thte *. rcint.,;;


,'00L-22


- 16 -







19 .
w OOL-22

1was 53. It is estinatcd that 2,807,'000 ovos viere nated 'and 1,170,755 lambs
narked states the Pastoral Rcvi'w. South Australia carries about 7 per cent
of the sheep in Australia.



:his season's .a1,nbing in iHvw Soalt.nd is reported as very satisfactory.
As thero wa's a larger nuriber of breeding owes than during the preceding season
the ltanb drop will probably be i-.re.r than the large nuuber of 13,178,972
'reported for 192I although tho percentage of l:.rbs to !wes rated !ay be smaller.
.Argc :tI n"..

S In the authorn provinces of .rgentina which constitute Patagonia
winter l'.-'binj vias progressing satisfactorily although exact results are not
yet available.
Ro6oipts, (disposals and stocks in prinLry markets

'Season 1929-30
Wool supplies in the tvo Inrg;ust priinary 'iarkuts; justralia and Argentina
as inicatod by'receipts into store and stocks on hand wore smaller at the be-
ginninfL of HIovenbor than they were last year a.t the sa:,e tine. Smaller supplies
front these two countries are to be expected.for the sQusou 1929-30 due to re-
port: decreased clips as-a result of 'rc'n. ht. In addition offerings at all
Australian centers are being reduced 33 por cent up to Christrms while aft r
that date they are to be spread evenly .s far as possible up to June 30. Up to
Iove:ibor 1 receipts, into store in these tvo. countries wore about 6 per cent bo-
low the corresponding period of 1928. Shipments too, were 12 per cent below
a year age with stocks on hand about 2 per cent lower. Of the 5,217,000 pounds
of v ol0 shippec front lrgentina front October 1 to IToveiber 7, 1929, approximately
41 per cent cano to the United States and 26 per cent went to the United Kirng:onr

In Urug uny, whore an 8 per cent larger clip has boon reported for this
year, shipnunts for the first part of the new season frc r October 1 to Novemberr
7 have greatly exceeded those for the sane period of 1928 amounting to 879,C00
pounds against only 162,000 pounds last year according to the report in the
Review of the Rivor Plate. :ost of this large increase in shipments, however,
probably consisted of wool o; the preceding clip as a considerable quantity was
reported as carried over into the present season. The bulk of the wool went to
France and Italy. ITo wool up to that dcte had been reported as shipped. to the
United State s or to the United Kingdom. Owing to the reported 20 per cent fall
in prices at the o.arly Lin-lon salrs and reports of large stocks on hand in con-
suuing countries the Urum u:.y.'.n Government was taking un'er consideration the
lowering of exportt -'utiojs on wool according to a report front Consul General C.
Carri,:.n, Uontovidoo, dated Novcnber 1, 1929. It was proposed to lower the
customs valuation of raw wool, washed and seni washed Iwool fro- Q22.88 per
100 poun.'s to 18.48, the no value to go ito effect on IIovoeubr 1, 1929
andi to rc.min effective for three .,ciths, The're has boon no :::p'irt duty
on washed ol but t.1i. ravw and- seni w.shoed wools each paid 4 per cent on the
above valuation. The duties and other taxes on 100 pounm.s of raw or snei washed
wool ar.ountc, to Il.21 in each case.





" 20 -


.7C OL-22


Estimated production in the grease, average 1909-1913,
annual 1925-1929


: Average : : 1929
Country :1909-1913: 1925 1926 : 1927 : '1928 : Prelim-
1/ inary
I. : : : : : inary
: 1,000 1,0000 00 00 : 1,000 :1,000 : 1,000
United States: : pounds :pounds :pounds : pounds : pounds *: pounds
Fleece .........: 272,248: 245,562: 260,976: 281,914: 299,113: 301,866
Pulled .........: 41,400: 46,800: 49,600: 50,100: 51,900:
Total. .......: 313.,648: 292,362: 310,576: 332,014: 351,013:
Canada ...........: 13,188: 15,553: 17,960: 18,673: 19,611:2/ 21,000
United K rin.-d:.r- and:
Irish Free State :. 136,021: 109,853: 114,567: 118,537: 119, 90:3/117,700
France ...........: 81,600: 44,974: 46,517:2/ 50,180:2/ 49,'840:2/ 48,580
Germany .......... 43,893: 50,160: 41,830: 35,900:2/ 33,600:2/ 31,900
Argentina ........: 332,321: 319,000: 363,000: 331,000: 343,000:4/330, ',1
Uruguay ... ......: 133,101:' '116,000 129,000: .131,000: 139,n (0:4/150, I
Australia ........: 727,'W09: 833,739: 924,411: 888,130: 950,C)'0:4/925,000
New Zealand ......: 179,942: 200,205: 202,386: 228,960:5/245,696:2/260,' 3
Union of S. Africa: 157,690: 235,081: 249,159: 273,000: 2.,,000:4/302,r.,'i
Total 10 coun. .:
reporting all : :
periods ....... :2,077,713:2,170,127:2,349,806:2,357,294:2,482,550:2,488,046
'Estimated world :
product ion,excl:
of Russia 'and :
China 6/ .-...... :2,774 ,,C-n:2,903,000n3,089,000 :3,087, :3,213,000:
:,u F -. ........... :7/330,311: 261,000: 301,.--: 329,800: 350,250:
l.iia, exports ...: 37,318: 56,817: .27,791: 48,037:. 64,845:
Includes wool shorn in the spring in the Northern Hemisphere and that
shorn in the last few months of the same calendar year in the Southern '.cmis-
phere. For complete-reference to sources, unless given blow, see Foreign
Crops and Markets, February 11, 1929.
1/ Aver-se for years 19C0-1913 whenever available, otherwise for any year
or years within or near this period for which estimates are available.
2/ Based on official estimate of sheep numbeFs at date nearest shearingtime.
6/ Based on method of estimati 3 used by the Yorkshire Observer.
4/ Estimate furnished'by International Institute of Agriculture.
5/ :'.l.ety & Co.'s estimate in bales multiplied by average weihi:t for
season furnished by Consul General L6wrie, Wellington, July 2?, 1929.
6/ Totals subject to revision. Few countries publish official wool
production f:.res. In the absence of official figures for most countries
various estimates have been used. Some have been supplied by ;-_:ernment
representatives abroad; others by multiplyjin: official sheep numbers by an
aver: weight per fleece. For some principal exporting countries expo.crts
alone, or exports, stocks and domestic consumption have been used as represent-
ing production. In the case of some Asiatic countries r .il commerz=ia esti-
mates have been used while the figures of the United States department of
r- rce or the ::.tional Association of ':zT1 Manufacturers have been used for
some other countries.
7/ Year 19-.




LC L-: ;-; 2
Receipts, disposals and stocks 1929-30 and 1928-29
clips with c. m.arisons

Country, itoe and p]. ri:d : Quantity
-- --------- I- I-----T- ~-- --------*


Australia: 1 /
Rosoipts: From
Sanc
Disposals: From
Same
Stocks on hand,
Same


July 1 to iovembor 1, 1929 ........ : /
period 192 ............ ......... .:
July .1 to, Uiov urir 1, 1929 ..........
porid, 1328 .. ... ..............
:lovumber 1, 1929 .....................
date,. 1928 ............. ...... :


Argentina:
Receipts at Central Produce Market-
July 1, 1929 to Nov.enber 6, 19q9 ...*............:
Sane period, 1938 ........................... ...........
Shilpints Octobor .1, 1929 to ;Tovo.bor 7, 1929 ......
Samn period, 1928.............. .......................
Stocks at Central Produce Market-
Tovomber 6, 1929 .... ................
Sane date, 19. .. ................... ...... ... ....
Uruguay:
Shiip~knill: October 1, 1929 to .ovunbor 7, 1929 ......
Same period, 1-29 .... ....................
Union of S:'uth Africa-
Shipments: July 1, 1929 to November 15, 1929 .......
Same period, 1928 .................... ......
1928-29 clip
Australia: 1/
Receipts: Fr.om July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 .... 3/
Sane period 1927-28 ...........
Disposals: Fron July 1, 1923 to June 30., 1929 ........:
Sane period 1927-28 .....................:
Stocks on hand June 30, 1929 .......................:
Same date, 1928 .......................


Argunt irnn:
Receipts at Contral Produce Market, i;.eno3 Aires-
Season July 1, 19~3 to June 26, 1929 ............:
Same period 1927-28 ...............................
Shipr.cnts: ctober 1, 1920 to Suptember 30, 1929 ...
Sane period, 1927-28 ...................
Stocks in Argentina
On SepteLrbuor 30, 19.:9 .......... ..... ........... :
S-.i-:! date, 1929 .................................

Receipts: Up. tn February 4, 1928 ................... :


Feburary 6, 1929 ... .............. .......
March 1, 1929 ............
April 1, 1 .............................
Shipnunts: October 1, 1925 to Spcturber L3L, 1929 ....
Sane period 19:-7-28 .. .... ... ...........
Stocks: April 16, 1928. Stocks for disposal,sunall
April 11, 1929 .................. ........
M iay 8, 1929 .......................... ,
Aujiust 31, 1929 ..........................


:i/
:4





.4/


Continued


496,549
520,902
151,209
169,640
345, -1O
351,262


6,625
13,863
5,217
7,530

4,905
7,053

S79
162

50,660
49,640



834,051
743,821
820,317
733,961
13,734
9,860


99,646
91,905
317,196
293,854

25,C102
18,520

119,000
121,00 C
126,841
12",275
127,559
131,468

15,872
10,912
8,928


!'ascJ~~~-!


l~.'A > I. '1A






WOOL-22 22 -

Receipts, disposals and stocks 1929-30 and 1928-29 clips
with comparisons,. Cont'd

.Country, item and period Quantity

: ,00C'OC pounds

Union of South Afric:a:. ....
Exports: July'l,'1l928 to Junr 30, 1929.......: 283,000
-Same 'period 1927-28 ............: 273,000
Stocks: of unsold' Nool
August 31, 1929......:5/6/ 10,176
August 31, 1928......:./ 7,629
New Zealand:
Shipments: July -1,* -1928 June 30, 1929 .......: 244,110
Same period 1927-28 .;.......*.*....: 226,455
Stocks: 'June -30, 19299 ...... ........ ......: 27,500
June 30, 1928 ;............. s..... 18,80:


Australia: -Season 1928-29 Estimates -of -National Council of Wool
Selling Brokers, Consul General Arthur Garrels, Melbourne, July 10, 1:929.
Weight per bale from Country Life and Stock and Station Journal, July 14,
and Dalgety's Annual 'Review, 1927-28, page 19..- -Season 1929-3C Mallett's
Weekly Wool Chart, io-j'.emer 21, 1929. Weight per bale, Country Life ar.1
Stock and Station Journal; October 18, 1929. Argertira: Receipts, shipments,
stocks at Central Produce 'Market, Review-of-River Plate. Total stocks in
Argentina, cable from 3.er.ros Aires Branch First National Bank of Boston.
Uruguay: Season 1928-29, receipts, M.! 1thly Review, March, Bank of London
and South America, Ltd., and Servicio Informativo para el Exterior, March
and April 1929. Stocks, April 11, 1929 and May 8 1929. Wool Record and
?Pxtile World, April 11, 1929, May 9, 1929 and October Review, Ban< Cf London
and South America, Ltd., shipments, Acting Commercial Attache Spencer B.
Greene. Season 1929-30 Shipments Review of the River Plate. Union of
S ah .AffK: Stocks, :.:n-thly Bulletin of Union Statistics. Exports, Crops
and Markets of Union of South Africa, A'uguist 1929. :.:ev, Zealand: Shipments -
1927-:". and 1? R-29 Consul General W. L. Lowrie, Wellington, July 29. Stocks,
Monthly Abstract of Statistics, August 26, 1929.

l/ T e-e figures concern only the lip of the season designated.
2 /Have used'average "eight of bale for July-September, 192? as
estimated by the nationall Council of ,'col Selling 3roKers. No later estimate
available as yet.
3/ Converted to pounds by"us:'ng eti.mate'of aveipa~e web-ht pyer bale or
310 pounds as furnished by the National Counci.l of WL-'2 Selling Br?,ers of
Australia, Jul.o-Jm!,. 1928-29, --ml..ared with an average of 3'4 rpanas for
perijl July 1 to .:une?30, 1927-:8.
4/ No c rr-.-? -:,iginirg estates for r;-'3ce,.in.', :-ear available.
5/ Scoured wool c'han ed t6 grea' 6ionbasis of 63 perr cent loss in
6/ Prarct-.al.: all inferior sorts..
QL/ Practya:i-a all inferior sorts.


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