World wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
World wool situation
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some issues combined.
General Note:
Description based on: WOOL-16 (June 17, 1929)
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 631804619
lccn - 2010229455
ocn631804619
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .A19
System ID:
AA00011233:00006

Related Items

Succeeded by:
World wool prospects

Full Text

- NIT F F. 6p


a,,, -" ^ WrIT'D STATES -.P .TI OF GErTC"'TTT'TE
Bf4X6 la e su o ,i'3 2 i .1..r; .l < --u .o.. ". ;,
U OEPOSITOR,' ia shiton

WOOL-21 November 30, 1929

THE WORLD WI~ .L SITUATION




PRICES C* ADEAD ,j1 C '3"' T :I.:T : :



D Lo.mestic wool prices a_ -i declined during October. In general

prices were more stable for the coarser grades of wool than for the

finer grades so that prices for domestic fine scoured wools are very

little hitih'er than for scoured medium wools, according to the Bureau

of agricultural Economics. Prices of Australian wools in bond at

Boston were unc-naged but prices of Buenos Aires wools declined from

1 to 2 cents a round and Montevideo wools 2 to 4 cents a pound diuri .-

October and the first half of l-..ember.

There has been a considerable strengtheni.n- of wool prices in

foreign markets following the 33-1/3 .r cent reduction of offerings at

the Austrslian sales. During the month sales were held at Geelong,

Brisbane, Perth, Adelaide and Sydney. Tr.cse sales were well attended

S and prices advanced generally from 5 to 10 per cent. Practically ail

tl.e wools cataloged were sold to Fr.vce, Geran..;., Japan, Russia and

ErEgland. American purchases were small. The London wool sales opened

November 19 with merinos and crossbreds ,erePrally 5 per cent higher than

the close of the October sales. T.-ese recent cl.snes narrow, to some

extent, the unusually wide margin between foreign and domestic wool

prices.









WOOL-21


There has been an increase in activity in European wool textile

industries generally since prices of raw wool have stabilized, but

Bradford tops dealers are reported to have been unable to pass the

higher prices on to spinners and weavers, The greatest increase in

activity apjFa.rs to have occurred in France, although the German industry

has also become more active.

fSc,.cstic consumption of wool was still high during October but

trade in raw wool on tne Boston market was rather quiet most of the

month.

Wool production in nine countries which usually produce ?7 per

cent of the world's wool clip, (exclusive of Russia and Ci.in) is now

estimated at 2,467 million pounds or approximately the same as the lsr.e

clip of last year. Stocks of wool on hand in the principal wool export-

ing countries of the Southern Hemisphere, except Urnu~yu-, amounted to

76 million pounds at the be inning of the 1929-30 season compared with

55 million last year. ?appjlies for this season therefore, including

production and carryover in the prier-y markets, are estimated at about

1.5 per cent above last season.


P i D,: rre t i.,


The decline in wool prices in Loion at the beginning of Octobar
c-used a falling off in demand for wool 6n the Poton market, cccrdinc
to R. L. Burrum of the Boston wool office of the Bureau :f LAricultural
E:r.-.-ics. not -tions ;t .c: .on diJ not react to the London decline,
however, untij toward the middle of October when dealers And mills arri'-.
at a U'-'el :bout 2-3 cents a pound, scoured basis, below prices that
prevailed before the last decline at London. The last week in Oct:lr
business aL.MIn beca,ne dull but au.ot tons on dor.estic wools :-eT.ciini
unci zged.


- 2 -











W-O L-21


The bulk of the business transacted in the Boston market during
October was-on 64s and finer domestic wools with prices showing a.
ste;d' decline. t rictly combing Territory fell to 88-S0 cents, scoured
basis, and FLrer.ch combing to 84-87 cents. Original bag Territories of
this grade, consist ni: of good French combjnr and average strictly
combing staple sold at 90-92 cents, scoured basis, early in the month
but later moved at 87-88 cents. Average staple, mostly French c-.-i::;,
moved at 85-87 cents, scoured basis, and the short combing original bag
lines moved at 80-85 cents. Defective .fine wools went below 80 cents,
scoured basis. T'o:lve months Texas wools moved at 85-88 cents, scoured
basis, for average to choice lines while shorter wools were lower.

Business cn .Lds, 60s domestic wools diminished steadily in
volume during October and prices declined sharply. In September when
64s and finer wools declined, the 58s, 60s held firm at the previous
level and continued to move in moderate volume. After the further
decline in fine wools in.October, 58s, 60s-droppel to about the new
low level of a.4- and finer wcol prices. The lower prices ae red
to have little effect in openinr:, new outlets and sales were made only
to piece out stocks on old orders. Territory strictly combing 58s,
'0s sold as low as 67-90 cents, scoured basis, as compared with 93-
96 cents during September. Bright Fleeces of similar quality declined
less than Territories.

Declines were slight in the quotations on 56s and lower grades
of wool. -.radinr on these qualities, however; was very dull and un-
certainty over prices developed toward the close of the .month. The
absence of an established market value on the.now clip in South America
was a factor of considerable importance in unsettling, values of the
medium and low grades of domestic wools.

Zpot offerings of foreign wools held in ti. Boston market, were
:ver', quiet. Qarotstjc.nz were nominally stf-aJd, oa Astralian lines and
were inclined to stiffen when the cables reported advances in the primary
markets. Quotations on South Ameridan offering'. declined as the buying
season for the new clip approached and offerings were made at lower
figures than had been asked on'the limited supplies of the old clip
available. During the latter part of the month some buying was done
for account of mills and dealers.

*3nusness was bery dull on all lines of wool sitsble for the
woolen manufacturers. Inquiries at times were more numerous, giving
the impression an increased demand was peidin:, but the movement in
each case proved short-lived and resulted in only a few sales mostly
of small quantities. Prices were irreo-ular on scoured domestic cloth-
ing wools. Pulled wools declined in price during the month.


- 3 -












.COL-. 4 -



The noil market was weak and prices were irregular with a ten-
dency to decline.

A rather drastic readjiztment was made in prices of 64s top,
Choice staple 64s that will spin 50s yarn sold at 41.15 with some
asking up to $1.17 in oil. Short staple dry combed 64s sold at $1.10-
$1.11, but later stiffened slightly to around $1.12 per p3und. Lonwer
staple dry combed tops moved at prices in the range .1.12-1.15 per
pound. Quotations were moderately lower on 60s and slightly easier on
the 56s and qualities below. New business was rather limited on all
grades. TD.e bulk of the new orders were for 64s. Deliveries on old
orders, however, continued in steady volume.


WOOL: Price per pound at Bo.-ton, ,:ove-mber 1928 and
September, October and tNove'm.ber 1929

: 1i28 : 1929
Grade
Nov 10 Feot 7 c ct 5 Mov 9

: Cents Cents : Cent ents
64s, 70s, 80s (fine)
Strictly cromblnt :
.:io ard simi lgr grease : 46 : 38-39 33 : 6-37
Fleece scoured ,......... 110-115 : 92-95 : r9-93 : ;'-90
Territory scoured ...... : 110-115 : 9o-9.3 : -3 : j37-9
`*s (3 1s/ #l...: .3
Strict ly ,- ,-,:.t. i.
Ohio and similar grease : 55- 56 : 45 : 4-4 : 44-45
Fleece scoured ....... : 100-105 : d-- 7 : b-:- : .-6S7
Territory scoured ...... 102-107 : -2 5-9a : 8.'-90
4-: (I.-.. 1/ bl'd :.
trict i:. c*.. in :
rfic, ~ si -. -i lr *resse : 4- 49 : 36-o9 : 38-69 38-39
;ieece scoured ......... : 2-- 87 : 3- : 6 .3-6.5 : 3-65
Territory scoured ...... : 7- 90 : 65-70 : -W-7 6--7?0
a a a a


Comrpiled from weakly Market Ni.-s '.e.orts of
the -ijreau of Arricultural Economics.


the lB Roteo Office of


le
-----














PRICE: Wool and yarn, per pound, and piece ;ccds,
October 1928 and January octcber 1929


Year
and
month





192P -

1929 -
Jan........
F b ........
Mar........
Apr........
Jnay.. .....
June.......
July.......
Aug........
Sept.......
Oct........
U/ BureLu C
!e/ Bur& 14 Q


S ool at

:64's,70's
Sand 90r's
S (fine,
:Territ.-'r-
:clothing
scoured
unls

101

S 102
1 00
98
97
94
92
S 87
S 87
: 8
82


Boston l/


:53's (3/S
blood)
:strictly
:combing
Fleece
grease


55

56
55
54
50
45
44
45
45
45
45


Worsted yarn 2_


: 2/4('s
:(half bi...:
: weaving


: dollarss

1.82

S 1.34
1.84
1.84
1.84
: 1.81
: 1.7P2
1.72
1.72
: 1.80
: 1.80


crssbred
crossbred


Tr 12. 4r

l.5i3


1.58
1. .. C
1.55
1.5[C
1.45
1.45
1.45
1.48
1.48


Suit'r.-, unfin-
ished worsted,
lo oz. at :ijlls
g;


Dollars

2.01


2.01
2.01
2.01
2.01
2.01
2.01

2.00
1.9k
1.E C
1.90


Agricultural Economics.
Labor Statistics.


Prices: Foreign


Australl:il ';'1 S'les


A k coJ selection of hiverina mnrinos and fine crossbreds were offered at
the :c-lb.y:rne tool sales and about 90 per cunt of the wools catal-cg,.u v;:wre sold,
ace(cr.iin; to a cable received October 29. Competition was keen and prices
adv-.n2r.od to 7 1/2 per cent compared with the close of the previous sales.
Japan. Russia, Yorkshire and the Continunt wcro ectivt purchasers.

Aboujt 1;,000 bales of ,'ool were cattilogcd .t the Gqolong sralus hold
durin,- thl..e -t funding November 1. Com)ptition 'as good r.'d practically all of
the ;ai l;,'v s- old at prices !]i,'.'y- 1 to 7 1/2 pjr cunt Mbih.r, mostly 5 per cent
higher, thLn : t the sales on October 16.

A v'i.:r ood selection of wools "was offered :,t the Brisbane sales which
opened jn 1Ilv.:rnber b5 with 'a 1-rge attend-nce --f buyers. Competition wi.s very
anili-.tcl with Jap;.n, Russia nd Gcrmnny the principal purchasers, although


Wool 21


per y ,rd,







i': 21


France and Bradford eoro operating frocly. Practically nll of thu 40,000
bales offered were sold at prices generally 5 to 10 pur cent above thu close
of the previous sales on Suptumber 23.

About 19,200 bales of wool were cat-.lctud at thu third wool sale
hold at Perth, W.st Austr:ilia, on November 5 and about 19,000 bales rore
cold. Competition bct een British, French, German and ,Iuszian buyers was
very keen and a fe':; sales wore made to American buyers. Prices were un,h-.ng.d
to 5 pvr cnnt h..ih.-r than at the last sales and wzere the highest of this
season.

The third series of the S-dn ,.;-wool sales opened on Nov.mber 11, with
prizes firm and about b per cent higher than at thu close of the last series
in October. France, G-:r.mn, J;ap n and FLsIia were active purchasers accord-
ing to a cable received from Consul tMconr.ugih at Sydney.

The fourth ,d:la-.ld wool sale .7as held on Novenmber 8 with cff-:rings of
26,000 bales. A g-od selection of vools was offered and competition was
animated rand general. Approximate.ly 25,00C b.als .:ore sold. The Continent
=was the principal purchaser but Yorkshire buyers wuro active. Prices of
good merino wools ;:eru from 10 to 12 1/2 per cent rhi-hrr than at the previous
sale on October 4. Inferior and faulty merino wocls solar from 5 to 10 r.-r
cent above the previous sale.

N.. .- 1: nd '.:ol S:.1 :s

The New "eal:,nd wuol sale onenod at ./lli rinton on !'c.: nrL'.r 14 with
8,OUO bales offered and about 7,500 b..1es sold, accord 'ri to a cable from
Consul Cochrrn. There :.w.s a full branch of buyers and bidding ;a-s animr.t- d
altbh:' oh Bradfora w.as not active.

Only 9,900 bales of .iool 'o:re, offered .t thu .:uol sralos hold in U:-.'
Zoral.nd from July 1 to October 1, 1929 compared ..'ith 13, i1, bales Ouri!n the
same period last year. About 8,500 b..los of .iool n ro sold this 'c .r, .:-Irc-
as last your nearly 11,000 balocs .-ure sold. T.-:;rts rf w:ool from iT .. Z*ala.nd
durir ', the three months ended October 1, amounted to 40,l:K- bales as :.-t.inst
38,184 bales during. the correspondir.'y lrioi last yot'r, cmn- r'lin. to Ch:arles
F. I;unkel Assistant Trn.d. Commissioner .t ~-:e. i.tcn. The follow:n t A.L
shows the quantity of wool eat: lrf:id and sold during the quarter und,-d
October 1, 1928 .nd 1929.










Wool 21 -

Quantity of wool catalog d and sold in ITJ, -;ul:.lrd from Jlv 1 to
October 1, li12 and


._ u.ntitv of .71ol
:.. .r:lt : C t. l,. c S ld!


192P 1929 19'2 1q29


Du(ndir : 2,301 1,914 2,436 : 1, 91
*.;.. l in ton 2,533 2,138 2,099 : -1, 86
Christchurch : 2,494 1,906 : 2,123 : 1,7 21
WInc 'nui 2,059 1,594 : 1,653 1,419
'TFpi.:r 1,301 1,047 1,.21 : 672
Auckl:irnd 971 1,09 : 971 : 1,039
Limaru 701 169 .'7 132
Gisborne 218 :14 21 14
Blonhtim :73 30 45 :17

T:. : 12,951 9,911 10,933 8,421


T:abula.ted from report of Ch~r.r:(s
at Ull '. t in, Nj'.ir Zu..;.nd.


F. Kunkcl, ,sssist:.nt Tr:'d(; Com0issioner


7:nst .nti ..i ,. ":. r,-.,.t

Ovur thruQ-fourths of thi tot-.l 1929 'Lur.:1sh .;o.l clip h..s b,. n t..kcn
for lec:.l consumption or exported according to Jul-:nr Gillcspio, Co'.:mrcir.l
Attrcho :.t Cunst .ntinoplo. The United St..tcs h:.s b~cn r'. principal foreign
purchsorr. During; Septunbor 25ppr0xinm.t:ly 2,300 b'lis (f ,';ool arrivled :t
Const:tntinoplo from An:.to'li;. and Thr-.c, -.mnc ovor l,i'0 b:.;ls ;-rc shiipc- to
foruitn ports. Stocks of -r: l on Octobor 15 ..mount;1. to :.round 6,000 b:.los.
Prices hiveo bLo(n u.ll m.-intu inod -.nd the m rrk<.t clied firm.

Lnndr!:- '., ol 3 lo-

Prices :Lt tho L.ndon ;w, l s:l.: .:erc; firm .t hiihor luveIls. Th.' five
per cent incro~.so notcd :.t thue puning f thu sn:os n 7: v-. mbcr 19 *::s mntin-
t:ained accord' in tu -. c:,blegr,:r: ruceivud !iT vjnbur 22 from F. A. Flvuy,
Amuric:n Ak;ricultur:l Connissi nor :t LondrZn. Top a~- ir{ st7ros -:'ore- goncrally
5 .r c' i t ,ihr L.ut sj zin:. rs .7 ols f 48s qu:.lity :.nd bcttur .uro' fully 10
po-;r c.r.t hirh'-r t'n n th -'1 suo :f the pjrcvious scri~s t Oct
.i, t... U.si:., f ft. ffici-.l st.-ndc.rds If th,' U'itot' St-tos ir.r grados
.f rn, inc. se- c i', ,,rc. ac ru .s ioll ,17s: u. uls gr..inf 33s t. 48s ::.re
.n,-: c .ut ..un. ni~';h.-r, 5 ; t-r'. t;) cvnts r. pound higher, 50s :icro three
c: .ts, Ic -u.i 7C3 ur c .its, 64s five counts, an: 60s .:rre six cents higher
'h n th. c.l sc *f th, prrvi us sale.









7)IGL-21 8 -


LON1DJI .,OL SAL3S: Prica at opening of the wool naltinn rlpnrted an basis
of the Official Standar4rd, of the United States for grades of wool
(on scoured basis)
: 1927 : 192R 1929
United States -- ..-.
Gr-les .Nov 23 :Nov 23 .Ian 18 Mar 8 :May 3 :July 9 :Sept 20 :Nov 19
: centss :sents : ents :Cents :Cents :Cents cents s :Cents

.70' ........: 1 3 : 89 : 7 l: : 71 : 64 6
64 .s .........: 91 : 7 : P : 79 : 75 : : 8 : 59
GC' .........: 3 : 1 : 77 : 75 : 71 : 61 5 : 55
58's .........: 7 :: 73 :69 : 61 : 57 : 1
56's .........: 7 :69 :71 : 65 9 : 5 : 49 : 47
5C's .........: 49 :51 : 52 :47 :45 :41 : 41 : 4
4 .', .........: 46 :49 : 48 :44 : 41 : 9 : ?7 : 7
40's .........: 43 :47 : 47 : 42 : 4n : ?7 :
44's .........: 41 : 46 : 45 : 41 : : 5 1: 5
4 's .........: 40 : 44 : 43 : 40 : 8 : 9 : 6 5
B6's ......... : : 4 43 : '? : 8 : : 5

Tabulatrd from reports of E. A. Foly, united d States Agricultural 'raimis.si.ner
at London.


TradG and roOunrtt r_: 7~m. tie


Receipts at Boston lar2er

The quantities of d&-mestic wool arrivir.- at !T'-stn duringt the past fnaur
months have been ronsiderally 1'.--: than for the .am period last year. T'r.
re.tierts of wool during Oatober were 9,171,000 pcui.' cr-,:-ar-'d with 4,595.r."
yroun'ds iu: i : Ortter 1983 and 9,073, ? pounds in '-t'' r 1927. This manin'-
nance of rccil.ts at a relatively .i.-'. level was to re e- r"-"t, sinSe dnrom:.t
clip was slightly t.i--"i? than last year, and re"ei;t- were low narly in tl:
season.

T'.I r-3ip:sts of dotmstiQ wool at 1 :--ton f'rm Janua-y 1 to Novemter w .'.
slightly loss than for the first lb months rr' 19;- and amounted to 1~9 mi1llijn
pounds [as :..'~'d with 194 million last year or a "-Reads of 5 million rcur.d.-.
.i-1,-, of wool fec, the first 10 months of 1927 iwrc about m1i miollirn TouL..J.
T! tatbe rn the following rI- .'hoews the receipts 'f diesItic wool at --:,to.
ty months from 1. to dat' ,







WOOL-21


hOOL, D]3STI: F.e--ipts at Boston, bl: months, January
1927 October 1929


" 1927

: Il1n pounds


6,081
6,577
8,600
9,522
17,938
46, 106
55,877
29,;91
11,799
9,1.- .-
8,$794.
8,794


Comrilkd from weekly reports of the
l_/ Preliminary.-


I '2.-.:


: Li "-- t


8,044

S 6,497
: 8,138
25,843
*: 50,08?
S 51,346
: 25,r '
: 7,156
4,598
: 9,.9 .
7,293

Boston ; c.-l Office.


: 4,-..
:1, 1~.
5,758
: 6,442
: 16,1 C8
S 4,C094
S 56,870
: 7",377
: 16,2?~
S 9,171


Weol inr-nrt_ _inrcO-.se'r

Imports of wool into the United States from January 1 to September
30 4ere considerably greater than last year and amounted to over 218 million
pounds compared with 184 million pounds during the first nine months of 1928.
Carpet wool imports were 24 million T7:,'i.1 greater than last :--'-r, comb-
thg wools were about 10 million pounds greater, but imports of clothing
wools were about 1/2 million poinl-'z less than in 19S.

Imports of c~'mring and clothing wools diuringD September were greater
than last year and amounted to 3,176,000 pounds nomra'-:- with 2,678,C0I0 pounds
in 1928. Carpet wool imports were much ,c-:.etr:r than in 7-' tFm~enr of last
year, emu.-intirn to 14,915,r '.' roundis compared ;:ith 11,428,000 pounds in 1398.

Th.- t:_i .:: .on th-: follr-.:- n,,L' '-.e shows imports of combing, clothing and
ror'.- t -;col.r into tli.e l7nit.-d :+tat-s duin;u r.t:it:hI r 1'9-, and 1929, and for
the first r.irne. iur.t.s of 19:.. and 1. .


rIonth


Jan
Feb

Apr


July
Aug
S pt
Oct
Ik v
Dec


- 9 -


?i~





- 10 -


Imports of o7ol into the nr.ited States during September 1928 and 1929
and total imports from January 1 to September 30, 19f: axd 1989

o: o: t rri ;r January 1 .e' tit~e .r
ool : .
: 1928 : 199 :: 19
... .... ..... .. .. t--J.1- ---- --T 'r-
: 1j'GD r.ou-.]: 1 000 ^rund~s : 1.9 l e o'ur :i 1 7.- .^ uns

woml ing .........: 2,21 : 1,97 : 62, 70 72,49:
Clo-i ir ... .... : ... 57 1 ,1 9 3 1.4 ,- 14..
Tot,) l ......... 5,176 76,95C 86 5
Carp ot ..........: ,48 :11, 14,915 c0? 3799 13 55
Total .........: 14 ,106 18,091 184,t3 : 218,390

Comipild from official records of tho 'Eur-jiu of Foreign and Domestic
Com:erQe.


A .prliminary report from the Boston wool office of th3 Bureau of
Annri'.ulturl. Econonmids states that the iiports of wool from January 1 to
"'-.' .! r into the ports of Bostcn, New York and Philla.iphia were as
follows: Combing 'jool 66,837,134 pounds; elot'-din wool 13,192,7.- p-"'nl;
and ar-oet wool 140,437,508 ...,-. Imports duri'Lg the same poi, J in 1j'"
wer3e S, ',480 Z'inr- of -ontring wool, 11,865,912 'an.-, of lo-'. .--" wool
and 11, -. ,4-2 pounds of ..- -t wool.

I. ahi n:ry a tivity *ir ; tr

The C rnsus report of the activity of wool machinery during September
19 .4 showed -onsiderable inc'easesover Soptmber 1928, both in th- actual
number of Lours that machines were in or rr-t ion and in the eor cent of t:--ei"
maxii.um si:.--..-shift ry p.-ity, ex'eopt for cards and 7?oolen s indl.-. wlii'r.
were both less active than last year. Activity durir. c-.t. t :,-;r 1929 was
hi ghur than during August for all tpes of machinery oexopt woolen s-ir.iles,
uased on per "cnt of nnximum single shift capacity. The table on foll-.-. 1
i' ronmparod the activity of wool machinery d'lrii Au'ust and Reptember
1C'3 and Suptomber 19:- .







11. -
'700L- 2
i':.l1 nacin'.i r.' activ:.t:. in th,- r;Un teI J tesr Jur r. i September



: 'orc.'e-n e i'tiL: Percenta.l of
: T'.al !nu.l, f r.-o rs : ...acl.' ." a- i" : maximum
: rd 7iro3 ..r' *e : t s f.' '. i* rir.: single-shift
0 : r :',trn : capacity
m h : e g-rer AA. st: 't- .r E.;est: September :August
: 1928 i.2" 1929 : 1928 1929 1929 1928 1929 1929

: 1,00 : 1,C0 :. 1,000 : Per : rer Per :Per : Per Per
.: hrj : horS : hours : :-=nr : cent : cent : cent : cent : cent

Cards ......: 1,216: 1, 16: 1,221: 76.3 : 72.1 71.2 : 5.3 : 82.8 : 80.2
.o. ..... 396: tJ4: 549: 67.5 7272.6: '.6 73.6 9.3 92.8
Spindles: .
oul'en ..:. :37,585 355,,r6:393,431: 77.-2 : 68.8 .. 8. 80.3 :76.7 : 77.2
Worsted ...:306,103: 51,875: 384,62: 6C.6 : 66.7 6. 6.,, 61.5 .: 69.5 :68.9
L s:c .
Wide 1/..: 6,Pr: : 7,1 9:. 7,480: 5.4 : 55.8 51.1 59.1 64.3 : 59.8
Narrorf 2/.: 1,609: 1 ,68: 1,855: 57.0 : 61.1 61.0 53.3 : 63.0 : 61.5
Carpet :: .
and rug : 1,202: 1,321: 1,.35: 63.3 : 65.9 : 6.7 : 61.9 : 65.7 : 65.6
Cc ,.i".. Ifr.'. t r -r.orts rf n ', an i I 1 .,'-,c. 'I:'i r;", is Iu i nr.h r, ly
by the I:u.-rtmrnnt of Co-4'erce.
1/ Widur than 50-inch reed space. 2/ 50-inch reed space or less.


'.7ol^1 -'nsrmt .ion r ir.in im: r h'r(b

The consumption of wool in the Unitel States by mills reportir t3
the Bureau of the Census during September amnrunt.: to 49,754,780 pounds
(groase equivalent) ,omp-ared with 13,192,494 last year and 5L,6-,4,162 pounds
in August 1929, This is tho highest consumption roportod for ;ny month this
year except January with 54,030,933 pounds and Aa. i.st :.ith 52,644,162 pounds.
C'v:-r 59 par cent of the total wool consumption re.portud in Septomber ,as
domestic ardbing and clothing .'ool, 12 p:r count ,v7s foraeit c.ombiin and cloth-
ing wool and 29 per cent was carpet Noool. The yuantity of combing and cloth-
ing wool consumed d-url:n J ivptoember amounted to 38,. jl,000 pounds (gre se
equivalnt) compared .?'th the five year :rveraga fQr -.-ptomber 1924-1928 of
34,783,000 pr..nds. The follow*in;,- trblo shors th. .-ensumption of wool by
.rad'-i.s during August and September and the total frr Janiuary to S:pt nmber
1928 and 1929.











- 12 -


'700L: Consumption in the United States, by grader,
for snpcified months, 1928 and 1929 1/

Official standards of the September Aut January 1 to
United tats for -:;r-s : Spt mber 30
United States for :ru] s
of vool
o ool 1928 1929 1929 1928 1929

1,000 1,000 1," 1,000 1,.;'C

] T S
: o :11-A s PC- .1 r.- F -I n: I. I T, oar.) s
i* .
Combing and clothnc; ovool- :
64s, 7Cs and 80s ........,: 9,203 12,849 : 14,2,'00 83, 68 : 106,351
58s and 60s .............,: 5,074 : 5,619 : 5,581 j 4,616 ; 48,3J7
56s .........5,658 5,669 : 6,145 i -4,971 : ,289
48s and 50s .............: 5,177 : 4,79 s: 4,857 i 6,330 ; ,3,634
?6s, 40s, 44s and 46s ..... l, 2 :2.76 2 .693 1.365 : .,o'
Total combing and cloth-
i:a.; wools ............: 26,.i : 31.,727 : 32,182 j23,8.1 : 27",977
Carpe3t .wools ...............: 10, ., 12,712 : 13,501 : 97, 72 : 117,A18

Total all wools..,.........,: 37,.P83 : ,439 : c6,7.69 1335,75P 7.f,395
------------__ -L_____; .. ___ L ___L.J_.......S.. "_...._


Compiled from data in the "..-ol Cons.i"S'r ion R
of tho Censas.


.ports" issued by :h-: 3ar -.a


i/ These are totals of rre:ise~ scoured And pulled woola, as pablishi- by
the Bareo.u of the Census, and havy not been reduced to a I-reiso basis.


Th, fcr;r-oing table sho-vs that th! consumption of combing and cloth-
ing wools incroasse over 7Z million pounds for th- first 9 months if 19~3
compared with toe corrcspon1:' period of 1928, Of this ircrasnrs, 2'
million 1.'umi3 w;re fin. "'ols, million ]par.is .oro 1/2 blood wools, 5
million pounds .:jr3 3/8 bl&od -ools a:nd 4 million r-undi .'are in wools
gr-i:rjr *-6s and low.-r. The gr ::t:st incro.:ses ireo in tha co.nsu-"tion .f
domestic fine c-0b0.i: "ools Nhich aas over 24 million ,-j.ds tr3)tor than
last year, -md in for~-in 5bs %nd F -~-60s ;:ools which h incr-'.i:d 5 million
pounds onch. 2' gr.%;it t 4cclino 'as in the :or: -. tion D.i' iin.:stic *Ss-
50s wools v;hich i.as 7 million pounds tia than list .'ar.















'700L: Consuamition in th3 United States,
January :-.1.,tmnber 1929 1/


by classes


Month : Total: Combing : Clothing : Carpct : Domejtic : Foroign


S1,000 1,000 1,000 : 1,000 1,000 1,000
: .-,.In1 1- ro.-l1s poirndi s i : pound s pounds

Jan 17,789 : 26,649 : 7,005 2 14,135 : 26,640 21,149
Feb : 41,77.57 21,318 : 6,716 i 13,339 : 21,27" : 20,100
Mar : 1,584 : 22,416 : 6,680 : 12, '88 21,367 :20,217
Apr ... : 42,776 : 23,188 : 6,705 s 12,883 : 22,659 20,117
2.y 42,76 : ..4i962 : 6,568 : 11,231 21,482 21,282
June .. .. : 38,539 20,954 : 5,385 t 11,600 t 20,638 : I.,T?'-
July .. : 42,118 23,990 t 5,632 12,526 : 24,12 : 18,026
Aug : 46,9. : 27,2- : 6,190 : 13,501 i 27,08o : 19,:-0
Sept : 44,433 : 25,662 : 6,065 : 12,712 26,313 : 18,226

Compiled from monthly reports of th, B.ireau of the C*nsus.
I/ Th3se- ar3 totals of grease, scoured and pulled :-ools, as published by
the Bareau of the Census, and have not beon reduced to a grease basis.





StocOs of ",o'l ir,2r'e-qd


The stocks of '.wool, tops and noils ir the United States or afloat
to the United States, held by dealers and manufacturers on October 1, were
21 million pounds greater than on July 1 and amournte to 370 million pounds,
grease equivalent, This increase in stocks is especially note.dorthy because
stocks of Jool have decir.3ed from July 1 to October 1 every year-since 1922
and the averrge decline for the five years 1924-1.-:5 .as 19 million pounds.
However, stocks of wool on July 1 were the lowest ever reported to the
Bureau for -Tulv and .'ere more than 4' million pounds belo7 the five year
average for July lJ.2-1928. Total stock this year are almost exactly the
saie as on Or.0Der 1, 1928. The follo-aing table sho.'s the hol-n-s of
combing, c clothing and carpet .;ools, and tcns- and noils, by quarters from
July 129e to October 1929.


'.'03L-21


_ ~~~~~~~~ ~~~_~~~ ~_~ _I










-'.,-21 14 -

Stoccs of wool, tops and noils held by dealers and
manufacturers in the United States, first of each
quarter, July 1928 October 1929

W: t- .. ,.:2 of
,Vool
:: ool, tops
: ;r.l noils
Dte Grade no Tops aoils :
: Combing Clo'iir, Carpet :rae n .: oils r,-;
S: stated : :to r?.as-'
basis


Million millionn : Lilllio: million Million: million: :,llion
: rJnis : ponLds :a po: nds : cnds L2LL : i r'
1028 : :
july 1 : 171.0 62.8 49.5 3:0.5 14.3 7.4 385.4
Oct 1 : 163.4 67.8 :46.3 :230 : 14.6 7.1 : 369.8
1929 : : : : : : :
Jan 1 126.3 :53.3 44.8 15.2 :13.5 : 8.0 3r.6
Apr 1 : 108.7 42.6 :51.7 : .0 14.1 : 8.0 : 27..2
July 1 144.8 : 62.8 47.9 : 23.0 : 14.1 : 7.9 : 348.5
Oct 1 : 164.1 65.6 :53.6 :13.2 14.5 8.5 :369.6
Compiled fro:. ".7ool Stoc. RB3ports" iss.ied by the Breau of Agricultural
Economics and the Bureau of the Census.


Stocks of 64s, 70s and 80s vools declined nearly 5-1/2 million -l-'-ls
under last year. locvt o: this decline ias in stoc.cs of foroe-r cc-bi..f
:;ool. Of the tot:l .;ool stoc,:s reported, 69 per cent uore Jor."-stic combing
Lod cclth:r. :rvools, 13 Ipr cent ;er- forel -. combvi. -r clothing wools and
IS1 per cent :ero carpet vools. 2Th1- cc om'r:n: '- ta bl sho:ns the hollir;s
of :ool by ;r -,'s for October 1.1..9 and 1929. In usin h tnis taole it should -
bo noted that the item *.,r:.. not str.tod" ;a.no.nts to 4-1,'. .-'r cent of the
total hol r ,.r


SOL: Stocks held in Un 'L. St.teS, by i;r.ds,
October 1, I:' :', .d i.- .


: 3to--s held '. t 1


);" total Oct 1


1: .


r c- -.


64 6Cs ......:
S- 60s .

46 i s ...... :

36 .14s ......:
rr t .. ...... .
. 1 tLd from ", d
r.t;led frora '


.4

'32. 1,
:J.1


F. 3
2:.3*0
*-1 .j1Oe':F


"'- .7
36.9
"1.5
10.8
8.6
53.6
i L(id


:.-onoImcs nnd the .Vr:..i 'i thj Censis.


1O.2





i ".6

10.3
3.3 C
3.0

7.6


j:" t*h, .,, '. of ari .'* 1 .i ral


"'1, 7
3,.7
13.1

10.6
..6

18.1


I


. > "At '. .I i p


""U'


, lrc : nrt .


.I '.PfY"'









WOOCL-21


- 15 -


Tr n -ni nzicur, ti- n F- r.. .-r

G.re,"t :zr i in

Th7n. :p-rt's of wiool and .iccl manufrcturus from Gre'.t Britain increased
during "' .t1.. r, excout ;auolcn pitco gE:c.ds which h .-uro 300, .; square :.r;s loss
th~-i 1 .st *ir.th., according to c. c( tl .rl received from Agricultur.al C-.m:issi nor
SI;..- ;'n. r .p:rt of y:.rns tamutnted to ovr 4,50L,';f pounds c mpared
ith ," 'l' 1 u '.s in S.pt.-ri't! r; the u::p.rts of t.rrstd piecc o.is a untc d
tc 12 .. c uaru y.rds ramro th.n in Septombor; anc: the o::rprrts .f t~s v:er
1,2C00, '." j,. ids greater thin lIst month. Thjro v'ins a declinee lf ov(r 1 millir.n
n..unds in th h u:pcrrts of :cllon rags.

I'ru, rts of 'iool an! no.ol manufactures into Greo.t Britain iuri'.,. October
.'cru z;"-.:.ih"t greater th.n in S.:pt cmbr rn wore Curnerarlly grc:.t r tn:hn in
rct ..' r 1"2r. 'The fll(Avinng tablo sho.vs the o::p'.rts :nd j-.-,rts :f :. ul and
:.7- ol r.:iufrc.uros for Cctobcr 1926-1929 :.nd for S.pttumber 1929.

'i7'_D I:ITEO.!s: Trade in wool :rnd :~.ol nrnufacturus, Octobter
1926-1929 r.nd Sept,.mb.jr 1929

E:q:-rt .n. reports : Unit : October :Sept.
:. 19267 1927 :: 19 92 29 :1929
: :Thuusands :Th, uhsannls: h-us'incs :Th,,us'in'.ls:' us .ns
E:-.p' rt t
.Li... ........ :p und : 7,50 : 7,100 : 4,:.C : 5,70 : 5,4C0
T ................ : ,bO0 4,000 : 2,500 3,00 2,100
Y:.rn-, .' *vio ..... : 4 2 : 70 : 71 737 :. J8
Y.-.r, sted.... : 3,413 4,b75 : 3,808 3,810 : 3,0u0
Tlssu..3, olewn... :sq yd P ,823 : 10,:( 9,050 : 7,:'5 : ,275
Tissues, .:ors'... : 2,83 9 2,781 : 5,s2 : 3,19 : 3,010
Fl..nn>.l: *.id. : : .
.elaines ", 5O0 : 775 : 464 : 20
Cirpi.ts :.ij r.ugs.. : 586 : .26 : 424 : 27
'I ilu............. pound 2,000 : 1,400 : 1,900 : 1,100 : 0
,'t~L ............. ,500 1,400 : 1,500 1,000 : 900
,.,i-nr, r ; ........ *: 3,342 : 3,372 : 3,815 3,13 4,144

Imp>rtz -
:,,'.i ............. d J .. : 33,400 : 20,7- 22,000 : i ,100
T'.r.s. ............. : ( 400 : 300 200 : 200
.:.'.stu In. "1 ils.. : 450 500 : 200 : 2 -
Y'.rns ............. 1,20 : 1,493 1,4:5 1,725
T Su'-, .'ol... sq .*; : 2, "52 3,781: 3, 34 : 3,225 : 2,351
L : 1 451 243
Tis ;s,-.- .;,,r"t- '.. : : j : : 41 : 48J : 451 243
'",rpyrt ..n.' rus'L. : '" : 682 : : : 1
,ollujn r:.r. ..... :: : ., 7 4,319 : 4,137 : 5,1: :' 3,808

Ci'Tpilu:( fr Y Tr.i '.-., ''.v i ti. f the United :I-n ; c.ndl cabled
ruper's fr',, Arcrictlturl Cmis-ti nor b I... :.t London.


T-----;ic~ -rr- -rr~ ---











10OL-21 -16-

Bradford

The 3BrLi'ord ,ool mar.ot is not very active according to a cable
received :jv'-nb ;r 22 from Consul Thomson. Users have generally covered re-
quireimnts to the end of this year and are uncertain about next year's needs.
i.-; Brdford spinners have not been able to pass on the recent adva:ce in
the price of tnps and new7 business in yarns has decreased. Cloth m~arufacturers
report 75 tc 8C per cent machinery activity and an improvement in mrdiur
cloths and 1 r-r-t tWoeds. The carpet industry is very active.


WOOL TOPS3 ID YARI: Price par pound at -rd.]ford on specified dates,
October 1'.2' 1929


64's 1/

Tops

Cont :

97.3
99.4
97.3

97.3-
91.2
.9.0.2. :
89.2
F'L..2
83.1 :
79.1
77.0 .
F ,P.9


: 50 s 1/


Worsted : Scoured
,yarn : TIc ;
,2/4~'s_ : wool ,
Conts : ~rt s :C nr s

127,7 :48.7 : 55E7
131. : 52.7 :: 58`8
127.7 : 52.7 : 57;8

.129.7 : 51.7 : 59.8
15.7 : 48.7 : 56.8
.125.7 : 46.6 : 56.8-.
125.7 :48.7 :" 56.P.
119.6 : 45.6 : 54;7
117.6 : 44.6 :: 53.7
115.6 : 42.6 50.7
117. : 40.6: 49.7.
103.4 : 39.5 46.6


1/ Official stand-,rds of the Unitod ', .~s'for :nol -.nd :4 )61 t- s.


-r. total .7.'-:ht of .'0oo, tops and yarns passing t*hruujh the Brad-
frd C ,nd'tioning House dur'.:.; nctober wvas cons' irabl:.' larer'nthr for
the p.st four n~nths of this y~a-r. 2'.- qa.tity'- ool tops condi tioed
dur't'- the or.th'.as ore t;h'n 00, 'i pounds greater tha~ in !-3tember
ar1d mruntad to I,327,,000 pounds c-, -:r. .ith 4,:.', in 3 -ebor mni
3,617,1o0 in *., -,t.



0C ni.: ns in tha ir',:~n r.-l inlurt;ry *ri d :inA business is increas-
"- -?tth st- :- 'th.nin{: prices c.c 'ri': to a cabloer:. rociv 1 fr') agricul-
tural ;soijrjr Sd..ur at .i.rlln. 2ho Bro .an i;arcat for .'nol 1.nd t-l .= i-.rr.vd


Scoured :


1:l
Cc
No
D3
i.--:
Ja
Fo






Si

Cn


Cents

87.2
89.2
99.2
89. 2
r7.2

79.]
79.0
75.
74.0
68,9
66.9
56.8


t 25
v '.-,
c 24

n 26
b 23
,r 23 :
*r 23 :
ly :.
.ne 25
ly 25
. 25
rt 25 :


t PF


: Worstod


yarn
2/32's
C *lts

79.1
7911

82.1


37.1

78.1
78 .
77,0

75.0

66.9


_ _:- _395 46.6 .a 67.9.


r


,


.


73.0








W,, -


during the: latter lulf of October. iorsted spinners report further imiprcvc-
rmit in activity and awoolon spinners find conditions improving but not as
r.piil.: s isn the ,vorsted section.

Stckls of tops held in the commission combine; estr.blishr.ints of Guriany
.ecline;: ovoir 3 million pi uiniC during October. Stocks of crossbred tops on
Novn.mber 1 amounted to 10,229,000 pounds crnr:p.:rLk ,with 10,350,000 pounds on
Octc.bor 1. Stocks of merino tops declined considerably durite the nonth and
amcinntel to 6,337,000 pounds or 2,710,000 pounds loss than last month.

7/IOL: Iroi)rts into Bulgiuu, Czechoslovakia, Frtmnc, Gor-any, Italy,
Japan and Poland for specified months, 1929
n


Country and item


*--
*
*


Belgium -
Wool, [ro:.sy .......:
W'ol1, scoured......:
T*tal.......... :

CzbChusluvtk;:ia -

France, ra:. and on
skins

Gernaty -
iu;ol, r.erino,gruasy:
and waslied.......:
Wool,netrino,scoured:
;/oul,crossbred,
greasy and washed:
Wool,crossbred,
scoured..........:
Total..........

Italy -
Wool, greasy.......:
VWool, washed.......:
Total ..........:


Japan -

Poland -


1,000 :


21,293 :
267
21,660

.4,643 :


79,799



23,907
1,2163

16,735

1,425
43,283


14,408 :
972
15.38C0


: 13,134 :
: 3,5
: 3,591 :


June

1,000


21,357
504
22,161

5,311


74,294



15,739
1,071

17,135

1,087
35,032


10,2.4
1,298 :
11.532 :


11,113

J,234


July

1,000
pounds :

15,195
42
15,621

5,291 :


48,149



13,Z93 :
1,519 :

9,043 :

1,077
27,732


7,535
977
8.512 :


7,08 :

2,' 8 :


August

1,000
n uvnds

14,204
419
14,623

1,934 :


30,766



11,705
1,307

9,659

1,160
23,832


6,255 :
789
7.44 :


3,801

2,02


Compiled frori cabled repcrts from


the Agricultural Co-'nis:; ioner at Berlin and


l/ pilot reported.


September

1,000
pounds

10,.'
246
11,112


5,153
1,057

4,851

778
12.839


reports frrn the Inturn-ticnal Institutte -f ALriculture at Roie.


I


--


------


- 17 -








W.IL-21 18


Farace

The market for wool, tops and yarns in Tr-nnce was good during
the second half of October tc lor'n the recovery of raw wool prices.
Sales of tops increased greatly especially merino tops for both domestic
and export tr-de. Thw wool industry was well employed and yarn sales
increaeai. The marrket for noils, however, remained iuiet.

Prices of merino 64s tops declined 7 cents and crossbred 563 tops
declined 6 cents from October 3 to November 1. Australian merino noils
declined 7 cats and crossbred noils 9 cents a pound d.urinr. the same
period. Cheviot yarns were u;.cr.sna6d and merino yarns were 1 cent a
pound higher than on October 3, as shown oy the loll-ow nr table:


WOOL, T'.PS AND YARN: Price per p,.jnd in France, specified dates, 1929


item May 3 June 1 'July 4 Aug 29 : Oct 3 Nov 1
I c 3 N


: Cents :Cent :entnts : Cents : Cents : Cent
Tops, Australian :: : .
Merino 64s warp ..... : 107.5 : :97.3 : 93.3 : 89.2 : 82.1
Crossbred 58s ....... : 90.2 : 87.2 : 79.1 : 74.0 : 71.0 : .9
T.:.-. Argantine -
CroEsbred .Ecs ....... 82.1 : 81.1 : 75.0 : 70.0 : 5o.9 : _C.8
Noils : : : :
Australian merino ... 90.6 : 92.4 : 81.7 : 80.9 : 78.2 : 71.1
Australian crossbred 75.5 : 75.5 : 3.1 : 57.8 : ..6 : 4.8
Cape ................ 92.4 2.4 87.1 : 65.3 : : .4
Yarn : :
Merino .............. : 12Q.6 : 121.3 .: 115.5 : 112.0 : lC3.1 : 1:4.4
Cheviiot ............. : 91.5 : 89.7 .: 88.0 : 36.2 : 80.9 : 80.9



Increased activity in the tops market is also shown by the F'rett
increase in the ioantity of tc.ps passing through the conditioning houses
at .-..uoaix and TDurccing. During October 15,421,000 pounds !f tocps were
passed through these conditioning houses as comrn.rpd with 10,37?, 'C.00
po.14s .lurin:; Se.te:nber, or an increase of over 50 per cent. The quanti-
ty of yarn conditioned also incregcrd and was over 1 million .-oundr.s rest-
er than last month. The amount of wool, tops and yarn passi--- tiir.:'uih
the conditioning houses of Roubaix, Tourcoing, Brrdfc.rd and Vpr'.iers, is
shown in the table on the following; py e.








WOOL-21 19 -


"I 3L, TCFP A"D YAPN: Amount passing through condit~i-nin.- houses
at Bradford, Roubaix, Tourcoi'ng and Verviers, 1929

iat ion and :t Oct
clas MaTy July Aun Sept Oct
:1,000 : 1,000 1,000 : i, 1, 1,000
: pounds : ciunis : io.und -: ui; : un d r.d' .
Bradford :
W l ....... : 5 : '/76 : 585 : 44 : 771 878
Top ....... : 4,467 : 3 ,.b : 3,834' :3,617" :4,120 4,337
Yarn ....... : 184 : 199 : 195' : -118 165 : 180
RoubSiAx : : :
Wool. 214 ': 2.14 196: 214.: 245 : 234
Tops ....... :,898 : 4,317 : 4,740 : 5,044 4,506 :6,722
Yarn ....... : 1,305 : 1,448 : 1,290 : 1,299 : 1,C 7 :1,583
Tourcoing .
Wool ........ :2,266 : 2,564 : 2,416 :2,478 : 2,319 : 2,994
Tcs ........ : 6,574 : 7,174 : 6,779 : 7,831 : 5,873 : .8,699
Yarn ....... 2,158 : 2,244 : 2,138- : 2,277 : 1,976 : 2,438
Verviers :
Wool ....... : 2,934 : 2,687 : 2,846 : 2,C-.3 : 1,351 : 3,513
T.z ....... : 190 .: 227 : 220. .211 : 124 : 406
Yarn ....... : 756 .716 : .675: : ..747 296 .: 20

Complied from called reports from Agricultural Conmnissioner Steere at
Berlin and Consul Toms.on at Bradford.


Belgium ,nd Italy

Conditions in the Belgian and Italian wool industries were im-
proved during October. The tops market was more active especially for
merino and fine crossbred tops. The "futures" market in Belgium was
active. Italy reported improvement in sales of yarns and piece goods.

Stocks of tops in the Belgian commission combing establishments
decreased slightly during the month and amounted to 6,751,000 pounds
on Ilov.ember 1 compared with 6,779,000 pounds on October 1. The stocks
of merino tops amounted to 2,573,'C0 pounds or 317,000 pounds less than
last month, and crossbred tops amounted to 4,178,000 po-unds or 289,,C0
pounds more than last month. The following table shows the stocks of
tops held in the commission combing establishments of Belgium, Germany,
France and Italy.


* J









WOOL-21


rT'P3: Stocks held by Continental commission combing establish-
ments, 1928 and 1929

Location and 1928 1929
description
of wool Oct 1 N. No. 1 Sept 1 Oct 1 Nov 1
S1,000 1,000 : 1,00 : 1,000 : 1,000
: Pcur'1 : pounds : pounds : pounds :pounds
BcCium :
Merino ....... 3,873 : 3,135 : 2,848 : 2,-90 2,573
Crossbred ...... : 3,148 : .2,778 : 3,768 : 3,89 : 4,178
Total ....... : 7,021: .5,913 : 6,616 : 6,779 : 6,751
Germany -
Merino ........ : 9,045.: 8,327 : 9,713 : 9,087 : 6,377
Crossbred ...... : 10,836 : 10,399 : 10,675 : 10,650 : 10,229
Total ........: 19,881 :18,726 : 20,38 : 19,737 16,6C6
France : .
Merino .......... 15,132 : 13,062 : 16,402 :16,400 : -
Crossbred ...... ::17,813 : 15,706 : 16,936 : 18,322 : -

Total ........ :32,945 : 28,768 : 33,338 : 34,722
Italy -
Merino ....... : 924 : 813 :1,678 : 1,576 : 1,058
Crossbred ...... : 2,526 : 1,936 :2,93 : 2,729 :2,623
Total ........ : 3,450 : 2,749 : 4,661 :4,305 3,681
Compiled from cabled reports from Arricultural Commissioner Steere at
Berlin.


"'r0L S'PTFLY S3:rUATI?:

Producti--on

Wool production in 9 a/ countries which usually produce about
three-fourths of the worldIs clip, exclusive of Russia and :hina, is
now estimated at 2,467 million pounds or approximately the same as the
large clip of i92b. These countries produce the bulk of the world's
combing and clot. in- wool. -.i4lies for this season, therefore includ-
j:.i production and the carryover in primary markets is estimated at about
1.5 per cent above ti.e rrecedir. season.

Since our October rc-:.rt an estimate has become vwalable ror
pr-,_Lticn in ir- Cua1 sLow::,' an & per cent increase over ]ast .t',r
ri'.. this year's clip amount to I..,'. ',000 o-.ur.. Te combir.ei
cl., of the two principal South American wool-growi ni countries is thus


a/ Vr.i' c, i ..., "rit.] ?i:: i., nrnc r.rPr.-.;, Ar.Pnt ins VTri ua.-',
Australia, Naw Zalani, l'nion c f South AI'ri.


- 2G -








less than 1 per cent below last yd8ir, as the increase in Uruguay prac-
tically balances the decrease in Argentina. Of the 9 countries mentioned,
decreases are reported in Australia, Argentina, the United K~iri:-., Trance
and Germany and increases in the United States, Ur u1. .', New Zealand and
the Union of South Africa. Although no estimate is as yet available for
Canada which prc.duced about 20,000,000 pounds in 1'92,-, sheep returns for
1.92 in two of the most important provinces indicate an increase.
Uruguay
The clip for Uruiuay, estimated at 150,000,"'r'" pounds a'ccordin:; to
a cable from the International Institute of A:riculture, is approximately
8 per cent above last year's clip. This estimate refers to the clip shorn
during the last few months of the current year for export during the season
October 1, 1929 to Septemter 30, 1930. earningg is reported as having been
delayed somewhat owing to rain.

Arent ina
Approximately 30 per cent of the current Argentine clip of 330,000,000
pounds is estimated to be coarse crossbred, 26 per cent medium crossbred,
30 per cent fine crossbred and 14 per cent merino, according to a trade
estimate furnished by the Buenos Aires Branch of a Boston Bank, state's
the World Wool Pigest for November 4, 1929. The percentages last season
were 31 per cent, 25 per cent, 29 per cent and 15 per cent:respectively
and in 1924-25 they were 44 per cent, 19 per cent, 22 per cent and 15 per
cent. The quality and condition of wool in the Concordia district looks
g-d.i but Provincia and Pampa wools, on account of the long drought during
most of the growing season, are expected to have a high content of seed,
burrs and dirt and will be poorly developed in many districts. Rains in
the past month were too late to-clean fleeces. Prospects for southern
territory wools so far are favorable.
Australia
Offerings in all Australian centers are being reduced by about 33
per cent, according to a cable from Melbourne c nfirming the decision made
on October 9. Offerings of the balance'of the clip after ?tri.tmr s are
to be spread evenly as far as possible until June 30.
Unicn of South Afriza
The current clip of wool in the Union of 5-South Africa estimated to
be larger than that of the preceding season, as reported in the October
release, is also expected to be of a generally higher quality. In the west-
ern districts of Cape Province the wool has a more well-grown, healthy and
even appearance than during the previous two or three years. In the Karroo
and eastern districts of the same province the wool will be slightly strng-
er and the length and soundrie-'s will be better and the wool cleaner than
last season. It will have less dust but more yolk. Wool from the Natal is
of gccd growth ali should yield fairly well and in general is considered of
64a to 70s quality. In the 'range Free State the conditions of the wool
srh.ould show an improvement over previous years in both growth and quality.
Wocl in the Transvaal is expected to be considerably superior to that of
last year as regards both quality and quantity,


WOOL-21


- 21 -





- 22 -


W0OOL: Estimated Fprod,3ction in the grease, average 190--
1913, annual 1925-1929


: average : : : 1929
Country :1909-1913: 1925 1926r 1927 : 1926 : prelim-
: I/ : : inary


United States
Fleceo .........:
Pulled .......:
Total ...... :
Canada ..........:
United i;(n rO--,i .-i d:
Irish Free State:
France ........:
Ge many .........:
argentina.... ....:
Uruguay .........:
Australia .......:
New land .....
Union of S.Africa:
Total countries
reporting all :


1,000

272,248:
.41,.400:
313,648:
13,188:

136,021:
81,600:
43,893:
332,.21:
133,101:
727,709:
179,942:
157,690:


1,0CO
pounrls
245 ,562:
46,800:
292, 7',2:
15,553:

109, &.7:
44,974:
50,160:
319,':: 0:
116, r':
833,739:
200, 'L :
235,081:


1,000 1,000 1 O ,00 1,C.C0
0 ,.0n13 L.OU2k1_ 's -unis oun s
260,976: 281,914: 299,113: 301,866
49,600: 50,100: 51,900:
310,576: '.2,014: 351,013:
17,960: 18,673: 19,611:

114,567:. 118,537: 119,69k0:2/117,700
46,517:3/ 50,:610: / 49,840:C / 40,580
41,830: 35,900:3_/ 33,600:@3 1,900
63,,,Cr : 331,000: 343,0;C:4/'333, 30
129,000: '1C,0C0: 139,000:4/150,0C:
924,411: 888,130: 9[C,,o000 :4j 92F, .y('
202,7.6: 2.8,96n0:/245,696: 3/260,000
249,159: 273,r : 283,000:4/302, )C3


periods ....... :2,064,525:2,154,574:2, 1,846:2, eP,621:2,462,9.39 2,467, 46
Estimated -orld :
production,excl: :
of Russia ,nd :
China 6/......:2,774,000:2,903,000:3,"' 6,000:3,087,000:3,215,000:
Russia .......... :/330,311: 261,:CO: 3O01,0: 3:J-,E6Cr: 3-0,250:
China, exports...: 37,318: 56,817: 27,791: 48,037: 64.,84E:
Includes .Jool shorn in the r,-,rli.. in the IUorthorn Hemisphere and that shorn
in the last fe monthss of the s;ae calendar year in the o u.thern Hemisphere.
For complete r- 'erence to soaur eo, unless given beloba, see For-eign Crops and
Llarkots, February 11, 192,..
1/ average for years 1909-1913 whenever 'iviilable, o-hr'.Ti se for ::~n." Lr or
years ;-ithin or near this period for which h estimates are av-lil1bl-.
2/ Based on method of estimating used by the Yorkshire Ob-rarver.
/ Bcsed on pfficirl estimate ,-f sheep nuamb-rs at 'ite nearest shearing tine.
& Estimate furnished by International Institute of A-riculturo.
&/ D:il. ty & Co.'s estimate in b.iles multiplied by average :rei 'ht for season
furnished b-: Consul G naral Lo:.ri, ';3111 r.on, J1uly 29, 19Z9.
ST'.-is sublact to revision. Feo countries publish official -wrool proiuc-
tion f:-ur..c. In the absence of official figures for most countries various
estimates have boen .1~;-. .i':,. have oden s a lie' by 'ov irn *-nt r'yrrsenta-
tives abroad; others Oy Iultiplyi'l official sheep nuxmbars by n av :r'.1 o -t ircht
per fl eco. For so0e principle exportir; countries exports alone, or .:p::orts,
stocKs nul I .tic consumption have oeen '-i.d as rrrrs .n'in- irrole.ion. In
the'case of some Asiatic countries rc..,:h commercial estimates have been is.d
.Jhile the figures of the United b' .tes Dpart ;nt of iCo'e,-rce or th 1:1atil.'al
Association -f Jool :.:,1 '.cturors have b:un us:d for sone othar coLunri.Fs.
1/ Year D1-16.


";OOL-21







WOOL23


- 23 -


.'rj,:,o., j; c.. d-- ,' ,is _,,, 1 : 1,,' ;" : .7..? ,1 ; ... ",-' ,:. -".



Stocks of' woolI on band in the g/ principal expor' i
countries (:f the Southern Homisphore, except Urr-;..;, at the
bot;in:in.; of the 19:1-O0 season, are estimated at 73,000,000
pounds .. .li,;t 55,. J,000 at the '-, inning of last season, an
increase of abov-t '0, poer cent. Theso. stocks, hc-',ev,:r, constitute
a very shrill porcuntage if the total amount (f 1,0S million
puinds av\ilablo frcm thuj countries. Stocks of ,wool in Uruguay
at thu euld of August wore estimated at 8, C.2,:;c, p-,:!-s. i:o
estinzate is :.s yet available for the end of thu season, i. o.,
Soptouibur 30, nor is there cr _n ..rable one for last i:.'. r, although
stocks' ;oru rup,.rt 4 as o10: a yCar ago.


Rc-cipts of :ool into stcre in kustralia. fcr the first 3
months of the new season ar!. r-gated 287 million '.-'s, ar decrease
of 8 pr cent, c.rmiar,.d with last season. Disposals for the sa'nm
period were 13.per cent greater at 61 million pounds while stocks
on hand in October 1 were 12 por cent loss. It is too early in
1, season in Argentina to tell much about conditions as the
export season in that country b~' ins en OctobCr 1. rec ipts into
the Central Produce itarkot, Buenos Airos from July 1 to Octobor
3, wore 1,647,000 pounds, a decrease of 10 ,,.,r cent compared with
the sano period last *-our,




p/ Aust~-aia, AxtgenoiJtaiia. .Ai Zeai nu aand Uuion et' huth Africa.








..'tL: Receipts, disposals and stccKs 1929-30 and 192r-20 clips
vith comparisons


Country, item and period


Quantity


1929-30 clip
Australia: !/
Receipts: From July 1 to October 1, 1929 ........
S:ime i:rioj 1928 .....................
Disposals: r'rom July 1 to October 1, 19'1- .........
bame period 1926 .....................
Stocks on hand, September 1, 1929 ..................
Samj date, l':68 ....... ....... ..... ..
Argentina:
--.*ipts at Cmntral Produce :aarret-
Jul:' 1, 1J29 to October 2, 1929 .....,...........
aueo period, 1928 ..............................
Shipments Oct.l, 1329 to Oct. 3, 1929 ...........
Sanrm period, 1'J-.-2' ..........................
Stocks at Cmntril Produce Harket-
Cctober 2, 1929 ........................ ........ .
S de d:ate, 1926 .............. ..................
Uruguay:
Shipments: Octcb7r 1, 19.' to October 3, 1929 ....
Same daita, 1928 .. ....................


Australia: 1/
Receipts: From July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 ...
a pno period 1927-2.6 ....................
Disposals: Fror: July 1, 1928 to Junoe '.', 1929 ....
Same period 1927-26 ....................
Stocks on h-md June 3Q, 1 ......................
S~ ne dita, Ij'- ......................
.Ar it'n -:
RBeaC!pts at CantrLl Produce :.:-r*a t, duenos Airbs-..
Sison July 1, I,:.; to June 26, 1:.? ............
Sa.n, period 1 :."-20 ................... ..........
Shil. r-s: Cct'ob.jr 1, '3.2 to Setoi-br 30, 1929

.j'cc .s -'n r" n in
On 1 ..........................
S e d-;t, 19;. .. ...... .. ...................
Urj -.; ;:.:


.:











(/










!






:
:


1,

























LC
3



F








7'








P-
-T

7;


heC a its: 'r to February 4, 19289 ................ 1
SFebruary 6, I.:.J ................. ..... 1.

r . . V
S, s:s Octobr 1, I :.-I to i' .b r .7 1.C .. 1
SrnIe .riod 1.27-'.. .................... 1
!",^~:. r1i 1., 1926. 2'occs for :iTn.-ra, sia-ll.
fri l 11 1 ,'' : ..

8 .:..... .............
1. .. ....... .... .. .... ......... /

C ni Ied


,000 pr.un'is

',060
LI,746
;0,791
5,794
26,269
.0'C


1,647
1,536
1"
202

3,406
3,496

F7





34,051
7 3,81
2':,317
33,961
13,7-4
9 ,;-Q


:'9,646
91,9 '
17,156



l, 2.


19, '.

21, C7



71,468


10,91C
0 )2?


--


i700L-,.1


- 24 -











'ICOL: Receipts, disposals and stocks i929-a'.0 and 1928-29 clip.
with comparisons, Contd


Country, iter: Und period Quantity

:1 C j Ealnnas

Union of :.7..it. Africa:
E:.c rts: July 1, :3' to June 30, 1.-'' .......... .. ,C
Same period 1927- o0 .................... : 273,000
Stocks: of unsold wool
S" August 31, 1'-9 ......... :. / / O, 176
A ,uust 31, 1928 ......... :5/6/ 7,629
1]e' Zealand:
.n-ipnonts: Jul; I, 1928 June 30, 1929 ,........ : 244,110
Same 'riod 3' "'-28 .................. : 225,45.5
Stocks: June 30, 1?29 ........................ : 27,500
June 30, 3928 ........................ : ...18, :

A,'t r.li: Ej.:.irates of National C ":r. 1 general Arthur Garrels, Melbourne, July 10, 1.:' -. TWeight per bale
from Countr;- Life and rtock aid Station Journal, *Tuly 14, and Dalgety's
Annual Review, 1927-26, page 19. Season j]??C-.:, Country Life and Stock
and Station Journal, Agust 2, 1929, -Argnt~n;: Receipts, :1 -.'. :-,t
:.cl.:'w of River Plate. Stocks, Cable from Buenos Aires Branch f ir.i
Natij.nal Bank of J: -t.:. Uru.ur; Receipts, Monthly Review, March,
Lsnk of London and South America, Ltd., and Servicio Informatio. para el
Exterior, March and April 1; -. Stocks, April 11, 1929 and .. a.* 8, 1-':.
S-:]1 r.3crd and TreFtile World. April 11, 1Z2?, L.ay 9, 1929 and Octo er
'Re:I_:w, Bank of London and South America Ltd., .1 ipr.er-.s, Acting e0:,. er-
cial Attache Spencer B. Greene. UnTrin f .-utL A.ri.-; Stocks, iMnt'hly
Bulletin of Union Statistics. Lxports, Crops and Markets of Union of
South Africa, August 1929. Tcv e Tland: 1.27-26 and 192E-29 Consul
-erne:al W. LT. Lowrie, Wellington, July 29.

I/ Tr.-se figures concern only the clip of the season designated.
2/ Have used average weight of bale for June as estimated by the
i:tional council of Wool Celling Brokers. No later estimate available
as yet.
3_/ Converted to pounds by using estimate of average wei;.t per bale
or 310 pounds as furnished b. the National Council of Wool0 Selling
5r:.kers of Australia, July-June 1928-29, cc.n1pared with an aver'--e of o04
pF'-nds for period July 1 to June .:, 1927-28.
i/ I,'.correspeni-r estimates for preceding year Availab'le.
./ Scoured wool changed to grease on bases ef 60 per cent loss in
scouring.
./ P, .cticall:; all in eri-,r sorts.
--. l


-------------- 3--------------


___ ___ __


- 2.5 -












1
I












1
I










DOMESTIC WOOL PRICES, WORLD WOOL PRODUCTION
AND DOMESTIC BUSINESS CONDITIONS


1 I-
VARIATIONS FROM NORMAL


MANUFACTURING ACT

-- -____1____


IVITY
I


05 'I0 '15' '20
&O7E LO CC AND CONDITIONS COON CONDUCIVE TO LOW PRICES ARE SHADED
*r 1I ~T. MAT[E SLBED ON REPORTS FROM 9 COUNTRIES


CENTS
PER LB


60



50



40



30


2
INDEX
NUMBER


1900


uS DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMY


/I


ii


&t | ili Iq I
/^y^ w''


-.n


a




UI3!V1KE>[I T U8 r8LKIUA1
IIIIl IIIIIIIt II I 111
3 1262 08861 7518