World wool situation

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Title:
World wool situation
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some issues combined.
General Note:
Description based on: WOOL-16 (June 17, 1929)
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 631804619
lccn - 2010229455
ocn631804619
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .A19
System ID:
AA00011233:00005

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World wool prospects


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Full Text





***** ."'" UITITED STATES AUP,Pifr.'T C" A.FiCJLUJRE
Bureau of Agricaltural Economics
U.S. DEPOSITOR'r j.asl n:.t on

WOOL-20 October 23, 1929

THE WORLD WOOL SITUATION



FR iC' S TRA:E71 A" COT'SUV5PI, I S'JPPL'


Small s-prliess helme i.: pt..?-o lr I ri es f r t !, r :

.r'ades firm to sli'.tl;-: hii-her at 3cston, accor.Ldir -, to tr,e tr .i- .i'

dgri ltural o ics. Price fr fire ..':ools declined 2 to cent.,

iostri,' 'ollo.ving the f; rther Jeclines ao,': '. Prices oif i'fore-i : iool?

in bonrd alco declined and trade iin the 3:st., '-1 -:et *.'as a .'ersei;,' oi'eOte

by the foreign price trends. Tops rices it th,; E ir-'r ean mar rets .I.-- lied

in Sirt-,:mber. as did r .'o l ,.rice-: : t woo! sale.- in .,,Ztra i1' ani

Lon.oon. The Lonion 'V ol Sales cl o. Pc -: '.' r 4 "'itn I -ic:-. 1 to L-1 rer

cenlt belo'- those on July; 27. at the l-se -,f the ; rev sa.s. T-his has

resulted in an aunwslJ ally, .vide mar-gi; oe. 't wen i torn i L .: i:' i.-es.

Accompan;.'irng charts sho. the tran is ,f act..al rpri'c s i Lo '-i- ai.d do t:irn

and the trends in tre marina Det.veen ths se r'ic'.s. ".cqaue :f d 'frenc?

in .:ools it sho.ild not be asEs.jn- that thece .ar i-I r n sho.v:o the if:.i' '-. ces

I,, in prices vhich could be secured for e,.actl:, si iilrr lots of -j')ol in Ie

t to mr, arcets.

The slightl;., lar-er domestic '-;0 1 cli i of this '-e r vas --!r, in

coamirn to market ani receipts so far this 'e:ar i ave totaled less than f.or

the same period last year, altho gh tr.ey have bo..;n relativ.l:,' large fr

the past few month.s. ILTports have )een larg -r ti.a tha 3 ;' ..-re a a'ur

ago, in response to the higher mar.-in oet.jeen dJn-estic and foreign I:rices,

and active wool textile conrditions i" -t:e United states. DJoestic 'raol









:.VC'jL-20


cor-i s-ition continues at a high rate. '7ith prices of fine .ools not

nuch if any higher than medium wools, scoured basis, the consumption of

fine vaools has been incr.asel.

The British wool textile industry is still quiet and exports of

wool mana'factires ;'ere lower in September, apri.ar 'tly having been ad-

ver.sely affected by monetary conditions. The labor difficulties have

not yet been settled. The delgian and Italian wool textile industries

were also quiet in September, but the French industry was well dCCccpi9el

and sales, especially of yarns for export, increased. In the 3er'in

industry the worsted and cnittiri- sectors are -.ell employed and there

has been a satisfactory volume of ne.v business but :..e ;oolen spinners

reported unsatisfactory activity _nd a small volume of new orders.

Production of aJool in 8 courtrics ;jnich have about seven-tenths

of the world clip outside of Russia %nd China is now estimated at

2,317,000,C, pounds for the 1929-30 season compared with there record

clip of 2,726,000,000 pounds last season and 2,`-' ,0 C,000 pounds the

season before last. Docr3as> s have Do n r-i"or-:-- for Australia, A.:-rtina,

th! United l"In 'om, France and Germany, and increases for :- i Zoaanid, the

Union of South Africa, *nd t-h Unitoe States. Stocks of .:ool :t pri- -r

markets at the b;,:in;iln.- of the season are not significant in co-'-ari-son

v:ith proj action, out they appear to havy bar sli. htly i-ar.-r this ::ar

than last. Production and stocks in pri -.ry .- markets 4.''-).r tLe'reore to

give about the sane s.11 ply situation for co-.ib i: :nd clothing ~ools as

existed last year.


- 2 -







W1COL.-20


Prices, Domc:stic

Demand for all grades of wool was fairly active at Boston, and
inquiries indicated a good volume of business pending at the opening Lf
September, according to R. L, BrLrrus of the Boston 0ool Office of the
Bureau of Agricultural Ecorcmirs. With the declines in prices at the
foreign markets there was some hesitation in placing large orders, but
no readjustment was made in prices-until after the downward trend from
the opening of the London Sales became apparent.

The domestic wools effected by the weaker world rmnari. ts, as reflec-.
ted at London and in Australia, were the 64's and finer grades. Short
corbing wools of the original bag lines wore the first to feel the weakness.
Topmaker's support in the market for these wools had to a great extent
been withdrawn. Moderate quantities of the !ew .-x ican wools of the
short combing class that had been s.-Uiing at 85 cents, scoured,basis,
and which, before the London opening, wore being held at-85 to 87 cents,
sold at 80 cents, scoured basis... Average: length staple New LMt'-ica) wools
moved at 83 to 85 cents and the better staple sold for 85 to 87 cents,
scoured basis. Texas twelve-months wools moved at around 86 cents, scoured
basis, for the choice offerings, Doerand was indifferent even on the choice
original bng Montana wools consisting of bulk 64's good French combing and
average strictly combin; staple at quotations in the r;.rigu 88 to 9u conts,
scou:'cd ba'is.

Quotations on graded offerings of 64's, 70's, 80's, Territory wools
were subjected to a like Jo,..a nvrd revision. Strictly combing was quoted
at 88 to 93 cents, French combing at 85 to 88 cents, and Clothing .t -10
to 85 cents, scoured basis, without stimulating .any demand over the buying
necessary for piecing out stocks to.cover orders that topmakers and mills
had on the books.

Ohio and similar strictly combing wools of 64'ls and higher grades
suffered rather loss than any other of the domestic -fine wools. Sales were
closed at 38 cents in the grease, or at an estimated scoured basis range
of 9C to 95 cents right rp to the close of the month.

Fleece and Territory wools of 58's, 60's rade remained firm in
prices throughout September. Sales were fairly steady though moderate in
volume. Prices hold up by virtue of the supply bing more restricted than
in the case of fine wools.

The market on 56's and 48's, 50's domestic wools remained strong.
The quantity sold,' however, was only moderate, but -the restricted offerings
largely accounted for that. Up to the close of September the prices of
domestic wools of those grades had shown no effect from the decline at
London. Members of the wool trade had as yet felt little concern over the
prices of these grades since the opening of the season in South American
markets was several weeks away and largce quantities of the new clip from
there are usually not available before the end of the year,


- 3 .







WOOL-20


Activity in foreign spot wools was quite limited. A few scattered
lots were moved during the month, most of the sales being on crossbred
wnrols. Australian merinos were very dull. Prices wore about steady until
the fLondon opening after which quotations were lower in sympathy with the
trend abroad.

The market on woolen wools has boon depressed. Lowered quotations
seemed to offer no attraction to mills that usually consume scoured wools.
Pulled wool prices on all grades declined several cents a pound with
demand very light,

Noil prices again declined front a lack of support from either mills
or dealers.

New business in the top market tapered off to almost nothing at
the close of September. Occasional o-dors.were received on 64's tons in
oil at $1.2G-1.22 and on 64's dry combed at l1.18-1.20, mostly for piecing
out old contracts. Cil combed 60.s moved in small quantities at 1.2)-1.22
per pound. Other counts were quiet. The last half of the month was very
slow on all grades and quotations remained nominally unchanged. Deliveries
on contracts held up fairly well on all grades. Topm'.ckrs had, at the close
of the month, a good volume of orders yet to be delivered.

'."L: Price per pound at Boston, October 1928, and Auus'st,
September and October 1929

S 1928 : 1929
Grade : October 6: August 3 : September 7 : October 5
Cents Cents C-ets Ce nts
64's, 70's, 80's (fine)
Strictly combing
Lhic and similar grease: 46-47 33-89 : j-J9 38
Fleece scoured ......... 112-115 92-95 92-95 : 0-73
Territory scoured ..... 110-115 93-95 9.-95 -9
56', (3 4,l4,4d)

Ohio and similar grease. 55 45 45 45-46
Fleece scoured ........ 100-103 63-97 83-87 S--
Territory scoured ..... 102-106 ~0-91 8-92
46's (107 1/4 blood)
3St ri ct! .... *m i11m n::
Ohio and similar grease 48-49 38-39 J3-39 ?-
Fleece scoured ....... : 12-P *33-66 : 63-66 : 6-.-r
T-rritory scoured .... 87-90 65-70 65-70 : -"2

Con'il-i from Market News Reports of the Boston Office of thL ri.reu cf
Ar'ricultural Economics.


- 4- -4









WOOL-20


PRICE: Wool and yarn, per pound, and piece goods, per yard,
September 1928 and January September 1929


: Wool at Boston 1/: Worsted yarn 2/

r:r :64's,70's:56's(3/8 : Suiting, unfin-
and and 80's: blood) 2/40's /s 2 's ished worsted,
month (fine) : strictly (half blood): crossbred 13 oz. at mills
.Territory: combing weaving :
Clothing: fluece
Scoured : grease
Cents : Cents Dollars : Dollars Dollars
1928 :
Sept .. : 101 : 55 : 1.82 1.58 2.01
1929 -
Jan .... : 102 56 1.4 : 1.58 2.01
Fob ..., : 100 55 1,84 1.58 2.01
ar .... : 98 : 54 1.84 : 1.58 2.01
Apr .... : 97 : 50 : 1.84 : 1.b5 : 2.01
iiay .... : 94 : 45 : 1.81 1.50 : 2.01
.Tune ... : 92 : 44 1.72 : 1.45 :2.01
July ... : 87 45 1.72 : 1.45 : 200
Aug .... : 87 : 45 1.72 : 145 : 1.90
Sept ... : 86 : 45 : 10 : 1.48 : 1.90

l/ Bureau of AriLulturnl Economics.
/ Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Pricc s- Fc rei.E n
Austral ian 7ool S-ls

The wool sales at Perth opened on September 17 with a record number
of buyers in attendance. The crat -.~Icue included over 22,C00 bales of
wool, mostly of Continental t:,pr.s. .Values were generally 25 to 30 per
cent below the op!cr.inri, last year. Competitioaa was very good and about
75 per cent of the wools catalogued wore sold. Friuce and Italy secured
the bulk of the offerings. Bradford buyers were also active but German
buyers wore not operating freely.

The second series of sales at A~:clide opened September 30, with
offerings of about 26,000 bales. Th..: selections wore not as good as at
the opening sale on September 6. Orders w-era restricted ard withdrVawals
were fairly heavy. About 70 per cent of the offerings were sold, mostly
to the Continent. B5st morinos were from 2-1/2 to 5 per cent below the
prices on September 6 and medium wools were from 5 to 7-1/2 per cent lower.

An average selection of wools was offered at the Brisbate wool
sales on Sptemb.r 23. There was a large attnJdance of buyers and


- 5 -








'i:,',L,-2C 6 -



.'r; et.tion was keen. The Japanese wijre the principal purchasers and the
German buyers also supJp-t-: the market well. Bradford a.nd France wore
not particularly active. Prices Wore from 10 to 15 percent below the
close of the last sale on June 27, but were practically the same as those
ruling at '0i,.-y on S. rt.mbr r 19.

A poor selection of wools was offered at I..l'c,1rne on S--pter.ber 23.
Prices were .0 to 33 per cent below the opening last year. Japanese buyers
and local mills competed for the better classes of v-ols available. Faulty
wools were difficult to sell and withdrawals were heavy,

The second series of wool sales at qS'Jdnri opened on September 30
with good wools selling slightly below the close of the previous sales,
according to a cable received from Consul MuacDonald at zydnmy on October
3. Crmp.p tuition was fairly good. Japan and France rere the principal
purchasers.

Lor ,j '. Wool -.1.,s

?-nr London Wool Sales closed October 4 with all prices below the
close of the previous series on July 23, according to a cable from k:ri-
cultural Coimissioner Foley at London. The declines were as follows:
: '*. *ner'ius 15 per cent; scoured merinos 20 to 25 per cent; fine
greazs crossbreds 7- to 15 per cent; superior scoured crossbreds 1C to
15 per count; ordinary scoured crossbrods 15 to 17- per cent; slipped wools
1l per cent; cape wools 15 to 20 per cent; and Punta Arenas wool 15 .-r
uont below the close of pr.-vious sales. There was no c-ni'idence expressed
by British or Continental buy- rs that the bottom of the decline had been
reached. America b. u.jht only about 5,'(N0 bales chiefly sliprd Now Zealand
lamb's wool of 50's and 56's grade and superior greasy merino wools.
Great Britain liur?}ho..+d 45,000 bales and the Continent took+.594i0 bales
a:.i about 34,0 1i. bales remained unsold.

The following table shows the price of wool by grnJcs at the close
of the London wool s: in ., 1p.t:ombnr 19A:/, (Peteor 192I and fr-om .Tnr.uary
Lo (Itonbr Jc99.


p I








I OOL-20


lI'.':JD'LU 1iOC'L SALIS: Price at closing of the wool auctions reported
on basis of the Official Standards of the U..ted States for grades
of wcol


United States


grades Sept 29 Oct

:Cents :Ce

70's ......... : 101.4 : 89
64's ......... : 89.2 : 82
60'd ......... : 80.1 78
5 's ......... : 73.0 : 73
56ts ......... : 70.0 : 68
O.ts ......... : 45.6 : 46
48's ......... : 42.1 44
46's ......... : 39.5 : 42
44 s ......... : 35.5 41
40's ......... : 35.5 : 4]
36's ......... : 35.5 : 41

Tabulated from reports of
Sornmissioner at London.


: 1i27 : 1928 : 1929


;4 'Jan 30

ts : Cents

.2 : 87 .
.1 : 0.1
.0 : 75.0
.0 : 69.9
.9 : 66.9
i.6 : 50.2
.6 : 46.6
.6 : 43.6
.6 :42.6
.6 :41.6
..6 : 40.6

E. A. Foley


I.ar 21May 15 July 23 Oct 4
Cents : eents : Cents : Cent;

83.1 79.1 71.0 : .8
: 77.0 : 73.0 : 64.9 : ; .7
: 72.0 : 6.9 : 60.8 : 4 .7
: 64.9 : 60.8 : 56.8 46.6
: 60.8 : 56.8 : 52.7 : 44.6
: 44.6 : 43.6 : 40.6 : 36.5
: 42.6 : 40.6 38.5 .: 3.5
41.6 39.5 : 37.5 : 34.5
: 39.5 : 39.5 : 34.5 : 34.5
38.5 : 38.5 : 38.5 : 33.4
37.5 37.5 : 37.5 :33.4

,United States Agricultural


Traie and Consun-.ion: Domest i

Recef- ts at Poston n :i,:er

The quantities of domestic wool arriving at Bos-on C&ring the
past three months has been considerably larger than f the s'me period
last year. The receipts during September were 1,,233, '0 pounds compared
with 7,156,000 pounds durir.g September 1928 and 11,799,000 pounds .n
September 1927.

The receipts of domestic wool at Boston from January 1 to September
28 were less than for the first nine months of 1928 and amounted to 180
million pounds as compared with 189 million pounds in 1928 or a decrease
of 9 million pounds. Receipts of wool for the first nine months of 1927
were about 204 million pounds. The accompanying table shows the receipts
of domestic wool at Boston by months from 1927 to date.


- 7 -








WOOL-20


WOOL, DO':.FSTIC:


Month


Receipts at Boston, by months, January
1927 September 1929


1927


1928


1i29 I/


J;
F<
M


Ji
Ji


0(
SE
Oc

De


eb .............. :
eb . .
ar ..............
pr .............. :
a. ..............
une .............
1ly ............. :
L'.' .............
ept ............. :
t .... ......... :
I .............. :
3C .............. :

Compiled from v.eskly
1/ Preliminary.


6,081
6,577
8,600
9,522
17,938
46,106
55,877
29,891
11,799
9,033
8,972
8,794


reports of


t


8,044
6,399
6,497
8,138
25,843
50,083
51,346
25,802
7,156
4,598
9,322
7.,296


:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

he


Boston i'..:l


0J


1.000 pounds

4,532
1,836
5,738
6,442
16.108
40,094
56,870
32,377
1b,233


I'ipjce


Wool imports increased

Imports of wool into the United States from January 1 to August
31 ':ere considerably greater than s't ye-r and amountAd to over 2 )
million pounds compared with 170 million pounds durin,- the first 8
months of 1928. Carpet wool imports were 21 million p .c- 'ds 'eater than
last year, combingwaools were about 11 million pounds *-ater bat imports
of clothing wools were over a million pounds less than last year.

Imports of combing and clothing wools durini- August were less
than last year and amounted to 3,425,000C pounds compared with 4,01> ,000
pounds in 192c. Carpet wool imports were much greater than in August
of last year, amounting to 13,206,000 pounds compared with 9,762,0'30
pounds in AiUust 1928.

The accompanyitu table shows i.ports of combing, clotlin nd
carpet wools into the United States during August 1928 and 1i29, ajd
for the first eight months of 1928 and 1929.


- 8 -


O









WOOL-20


Imports of wool into the United States durrin- August 1928 and 1929
and total imports from January 1 to August 31, 1928 and 1929


Wool A'..uzt January 1 A .nust 31
: 1928 : 1929 _:_ : 1929
*:l, CL ~ ,Cu idS: I .r' L: ii r-. 1 CC '. r'.r'!:l__o 1.000 pounds

Comting ........ 2,670 : 2,764 : 59,748 : 70,513
Clothir. ........ 1,344 661 : 14,523 : 13,177
Totl ........ : 4,014 : 3,425 : 74,272 : 83,690
Carpet ......... 9,762 : 13,206 : 95,971 116,609
Totl ........... 13,776 16631 : 170,243 : 200,299
Copiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic
"omr.erce.


A preliTiJnar.,y report from the Boston Wool Office of the .Breau
of Agricultural Economics states that the imports of wool from January
1 to September 28 into the ports of Boston, New York and Philadelphia
were as follows: Combing wool 63,263,010 pounds; clothing wool 12,044,419
pounds; and carpet wool 125,823,283 pounds. Imports during the same period
in 19-;3 were 60,653,380 pounds of combing wool, 11,137,850 pounds of cloth-
ing wool, and 105,853,527 pounds of carpet wool.

Machinery activity greater

The Census report of the activity of wool machinery during August
1929 showed considerable increases over August 1928 both in the actual
number of hours that machines were in operation and in the per cent of
their maximum single-shift capacity. Activity during August was hi'-er
than during July for all types of machinery except woolen spindles and
wide looms which were slightly less active. The table on the following
page compares the activity of wool machinery during July and August 1928
and July 1929.


- 9 -









10 -


;..l1 machinery activity in the United States during
Ausast 1928, and July and August 1':'2


Wool
machinery


: Total number of hours
: machines were active
*


August : July
1928: 1929 : 1929
: 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,-:3 :
:hours : hours :hours :

Cards .... .1,221: 1,221: 1,174:
Combs ....: 9-2: .;.: 476:
Spindles: : :
Woolen... :388.297:393,431:378,478:
Worsted .:335,109:384,452:318,451:
Looms:
Wide 1/ .: 7,222: 7,480: 7,172:
Narrow 2/: 1,610: 1,855: 1,773:
Carpet
and rug : 1,402: 1,435: 1,307:


Percentage of total: Parcentage of
machinery active : maximum
at some time during single-shift
month : capacity
-i zt :Jul_ August July
1928 : 1929 : 929: 1928 : 1929 : 1929


Per :
cent

72.9
64.6

71.1
58.4

52.4
58.1

62.9.


Per
cent

71.2
72.6

68.6
66.4

54.1
61.0

64.7


Per : Per
cent: cent

72.1: 77.0
68.2: 65.4

69.9: 74.1
62.5: 58.1

55.5: 55.0
61.0: 48.3

63.2: 63.1


Per : Per
cent: cent

,C.2: 80.1
92.8: 35.7

77.2: 77.6
68.9: 61.7

59.8: 61.5
61.5: 60.3

65.6: 6017


Coni -i.ed from the,Report of Active
mo-.`nly by the Department of Comme
1/ fider than 50-inch reed space.
2/ 50-inch reed space or less.


and Idle Wool i:,ac.irner:,-, issued


Wool consumption continues. hih

The c-r:nsu.inption of wool in the United States by mills reporting
to the Eur.a u of the Census during August amounted to 52,644,162 pounds
(grease equivalent) ccnmp.red with 45,102,626 pounds last year ?ni
47, -'9 ,901 pounds in July 1929. This is the highest consumption reported
for :on month this .year except J-cru-.ry which amounted to 54,030,9.-' pounds.
Over r2 per cent of the total ',c.>l consumption reported in August was
domestic combing and clotl-in- wool, 19 per cent was foreign combing and
clothing vool, and 29 per cent was forei _r:n carpet wool. ':ie quantity of
combing and clothing wool consumed during August was nearly 6 million pounds
above the five-year avera e for August 1921-1926. The table on the follw-
irn. p' -e shows the consumption of wool by fr:dies during July snd August and
the total for January to A. ist '192. and 1929.


1'"1') L-20


--


:


..









:.IO L-20


- 11 -


WOOL: Consumption in the United States, by grade, for
1:L and 1929 l/


specified months,


Official standards of the:
U__rlted States for gr.-dLs:
of rool


Augzst


1928 '


: July


1929


1929
*


Jner 1 t


January 1 to
S..~;st 31

1928 : 1929


-:


Combing and clothing ,ool- :
64's, 70's and 80's .....:
-F's and 60's...........
56's ...................; :
48's and 50's ........... :
36's, 40's, 44's and 46's:
Tot :1 combing and cloth-:
ing wools ............:

Carp t vocIs ..............


Total all w:ools ............


1,000
pounds :S


8,490 :
5,221
5,596
5,650
1,528 :

26,485

12,592 :


39,077 :


1,000
-f niz :


14,200
5,581
6,145
4,857
2.699


1,00.
pounds


12,632
5,219
.4,980
4,758
2, C1 7


33,482 :29,622 :2
*


13,501 :


46,983


1,000. : (,-')
p, A :'] pounds


74,2'5 : 93,502
39,542 : 42,717
39,314 : 44,620
41,152 : 38,840
16,483 : 19,570

:10,856 :239,249


12,526 : 87,436 :104,707


42,148 :298,292


:343,956


Compiled from data in thb "WYool Consumption Report for July 1929" issued
by the B9.ir-:i of the Census.

1/ Th .se are totals of grease, scoured and pulled rools, as published
by the Bureau of the Census, ani have not baen reduced to a groasse
basis.

The above table sho.vs that the cor-sinption of combing and clothing
wools increased nearly 28 million rounds for the first 8 months of 1929
compared with the corre -:r.irin. period of 12R. Of this increase, 19
million pou-inrls ,ere fine vools, 3 million oun'.is ,eore 1/2 blood ./ools,
5 million pounds were 3/8 blood */ools and 3 million pounds- vwre in wools
grtaling 46's and lower. The greatest increases :;er3 in the consumption
of domestic fine combing .;ools which was over 20 million pounds greater
than last year, and in foreign 48's,-50's, 56's, and 58's-60's .ools
which increased from 4 to 5 million pounds each. The greatest decline
was in the consumption of domestic 48's-50's wools which nas 7 million
pounds less than last year.


_ ------------- __


I









WOOL-20


WOOL: Consumption in tho United States, by cla s.:s
January @ ..ily 1'.'9 IJ


Month Total Combing Clothing Carpet Domestic Foreign

1,000 1, 1,0000 1,'10 1,000 1,000
Iif,, :] : pounds r: 1 1',c rounir1s i: lirs pounds

Jan .......... 47,789 :26,649 7 ,005 14,135 26,640 21,149
Feb .......... 41,373 21,318 6,716 13, 21,273 20,100
Mar ..........: 41,584 : 22,416 : 6,680 12,4.8 : 21,367 20,217
Apr .........: 42,776 :23,188 : 6,705 12,5. : 22,659 :20,117
S..........: 42,764 : 21,962 : 6,568 14,24 21,482 21,282
June ........: 38,539 : 20,954 : 5,985 : 11,600 : 20,'78 17, 01
July ........,: 42,148 : 23,990 : 5,622 : 12,526 : 24,122 : 18,026
Aug .......... : z',983 : 27,292 : 6,190 13,501 24,540 : 22,443

Compiled fr':m monthly reports of the 3Breau of the Census.
J/ These are totals of grease, scoured and pulled wools, as published by
the Bureau of the Census, and have not been r',ice-- to a grease basis.

The consumption of carpet Nool darli, .A.gust amounted to 13,501,254
pourn' which is about 1 million pounds greater than in A-gust 1928. ih.?
total consumption of carpet wool from January 1 to August 31 was 104,7C(,710
.' as compared with 87,436,571 rourds during the'sane period last year.
Practically all of this increase .vas in filling wools, the consumption of
which was over 16 million pounds --r.:ater than last year.

Prarl ari co:..r.w ti:n: Farei-n
Gr'-a t t ..ri i ,

The exports of iool :manufact.:i-es from Great Britain declined con-
siderably during September according to a cable.-ram received from Agricul-
tural Commissioner Foley at London. The export of yarns amounted to
3,700,000 pounds c-:.-iared with 4,900,000 pounds in AXl.st and the export
of :.oolen and worsted tissues amounted to only 11,-28L,000 square yards
co--.: r. with 17,084,000 square yards s in A--iCst and 17,5;.2,r- s '.re :airdi
in July 1929. The exports of wool and vool rags, however, were much ~r~ater
than dur1.'-.: last month.

I-.! rts of wool manufactures into 3r.-nt 3ritain jiri :r Set---:.be?r
were somewhat greater than in A.gu:t but were .:er.rally less than durir::
.-r:.ember 1928. Imports of wool, tvool ra'.s, waste and noils, however, were
considerably less than in AU.-:t.


- 12 -










- -13 -


;'' )IL-26


UITrIED KINGLOM: Trade in wool and vvool manufactures, September
192e-192lj9 and August 1929-


SSeptember : August
Exports and imports : Unit :
; 1926 : 1927 i 1923 1 1929 1929


Exports -
Wool ****......****.......
Tops ................
Yarns, woolen .....
Yarns, worsted ....
Tissues, woolen ... :
Tissues, worsted :
Flannels and
delaines .:
Carpets and rugs ..
Noils ..............
Waste ..........
Woolen rags .......


Imports -
Wools ....:.........
Tops ...............
Waste and noils ..
Yarns *....... .. ....
Tissues, Wvoolen ...
Tissues, Worsted ..
Carpets ard rugs ..
woolen rags .....


pound
'
t,


?t It

1t t#
to to
,pound

'I


:pound
It
*


sq yc
: t! I'
- t


: pound


: Thou-
- sands

: 5,300
: 2,800
S 462
S2,654
9,438
S2,377

S 359
S 589
: 900
: 1 .nnq
:2,365




* "00
S1,207
S3,679
S 665
S 363
: 4,708


Thou
s nds :

4,800
3,100 :
572
3,845 :
11,474 :
2,922

:796
.616
2,300 :
1,400
3 ,.059


27,400
195
600' :
1,326" :
2,788 :
539 :
3566
3,668 :


T.rs : -


3,20 :
2,300
678
2,634
9,459
3.,314

S314
535

800

2,160'



18463:
4 U
1,146
3.4'76 :
: 349:
508 ,:
3,437 :


Thcu-
sanO E

5,400
2,lf0
688
3 00-1
8,275
3:,010

260
:527
:900
: 900
4,144


18,100
200
200
1,725
2,651
243
715
3,808


Thou-
sands

3,300
2,70r
924
4,012
12,054
5,030

366
E69
1,100
1,000
1,680


32,700
75
400
1,567
2,425
180
627
4,704


d Kingdom and cabled


Compiled from Trade and navigation of the Unite
reports from Agricultural Commissioner Foley at L-indon.


--------------








VWOCL-20


- 14 -


Bradford tops and yarns market slow, prices decline.

The decline in prices of wool, tops and yarns in 3radford continued
throu!:.' September, according to a cQblegram received Septembcr 25, from
E. A. Foley, American Agricultural Ccmmissioner at London. The price of 64's
warp wool, scoured basis, at Bradford was 10 cents under last month and
30 cents below the price on September 25, 1928; 64's tops were 8 cents below
last month and 30 cents below last year; and 2/48's worsted yarn was 10
cents under August and 30 cents lower than S3:ptinmbcr1923. Scoured wool of
50's quality sold 1 cent under last -inth and 13 counts under September 1928;
50's tops v:efe 3 cents under last month and 12 cents below last yeor; and
2/32's worsted yarn declined 4 cents from August and virs 12 cents bciow
September 1928.

WOOL TOPS AND YARN: Price per pound at. Er:.dford on specified dates,
September 1928 September 1929'

S64's 1/ 50's 1/
: Scoured : orsted : Scoured : : "orsted
Date ool : Tops yarn : wool Tops yarn
.: 2/48's : 2732's
Cnts ent Cents s:Cts Cents Cents : Cnts
1928 : : :
Sept.25. 87.2 99.4" 1 .9 b2.7 t:'.8 81.1
Oct 2.. 87.2 97.3 : 1247 48.7 55.7 79.1
Nov 24.. 89.2 99.4 13j.3 52.7 58.8 83.1
Dec 24..: 89.2 .97.3 12'.7 52.7 : 57.8 82.1
1923 -
Jan 26 87.2 97.3 1239.7 51.7 59.6 5.l
Feb 23... 81.1 91.2 125.7 48.7 53.8 80.1
Mar 23.. 79.1 90.2 125.7 46.6 56.8 78.1
Apr 23.. 78.0 89.2 125.7 48.7 56.8 78.0
Kay 25..: 75.0 : 85.2 119.6 45.6 54.7 77.0
June 25.: 74.0 83.1 117.6 44.6 : 53.7 77.0
July 25. 68.9 79.1 115.6 42.6 : 50.7 75.0
Aug 25..: 66.9 77.0 113.6 40.6 49.7 73.0
Sept 25., 56.8 68.9 103.4 : 39.5 :: 46.6 68,9

1/ officiall standards of the United States for wool and wool tops.

Unsettled prices in the world wool markets caused further w. r.kning
in values at Bradford and buyers generally hold back orders in the hope of
entering the market at the lowest point, according to a cable received
October 4 from Consul Thomson at Bradford. The prices of Enflish wools
eased slight'.. during the ;eek. Spinn,:rs rre finding it difficult to ob-
tain remunerative prices for yarns. Th. wages dispute ia still unsettled.








WOOL-20


The total weight of wool, tops and yarns passing through the Bradford
Conditioning House during September was lar-_er than for the past three months
of this year. The quantity of wool.tops conditioned during the month was
more than 500,0C'"0 pounds larger than in August rind amounted to 4,120,000
pounds compared with 3,617,000 pounds in August and 3,834,000 in July.

Germany

Conditions in the German wool industry are good according to a
cablegram received from the Agricultural Commissioner at Berlin. The
Bremen market for wool and tops is good. Worsted spinners report furhter
improvement in activity and the knitting yarn spinners report that activity
is high. Woolen spinners however, find conditions unsatisfactory, with
new business scarce. The position of the weavers improved somewhat during
the month but they still complain that the prolonged summer-like weather
is delaying new business.

Stocks of crossbred tops in the commission combing establishments of
Germany remained about the same as last month, amounting to 10,650,000
pounds compared with 10,675,000 pcJun.ls on September 1. Stocks of merino
tops, however, declined during the month and amounted to 9,087,000 pounds
or 626,000 pounds less than last month.

VW.'CL: Imports into Belfjum, France, Germany and Italy, for
specified months, 1929


Country and item


Be i im -
Wool, greasy ................
Wool, scoured ..............
Wool, total 1929 ...........
France -
-Wool, raw and on skins, 1929
Germany -
Wool, merino, greasy and
washed ....................
W7rsl, merino, scoured .......
Wool, crossbred, greasy and
washed ...................
Tool, crossbred, scoured ....
Wool, total 1929 ............
Italy -
Wool, greasy ................
Wool, washed ................
Wool, total 1929 ............


May June July : August
: 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000
: p :'1s : pounds : pounds : pouns

: 21,293 : 21,657 : 15,195 : 14,204
: 267 : 504 : 426 : 419
:21,660 : 22,161 : 15,621 : 14,623


:79,799 : 74,294 : 48,149 : 1/


: 23,907 : 15,739 : 16,093 :11,706
1,216 : 1,071 : 1,519 : 1,307

:16,735 : 17,135 : 9,043 : 9,659
1,425 : 1,087 : 1,077 : 1,160
:43,283 :35,032 : 27,732 : 23,832

14,408 : 10,264 : : 1/
972 : 1,298 : : /
: 15,30 : 11,562 : / l/


Compiled from cabled reports from the Agricultural Commissioner at Berlin.
1/ Not reported.


- 15 -








WOOL-20


France

The market for wool, tops and noils in France was quiet during
September but a normal volume of business was transacted according to
Assistant Agricultural Commissioner Dawson at Berlin. The wool industry
was well employed and new yarn sales improved, particularly yarns for
export.

Prices of merino 64's tops declined 4 cents and crossbred 56's tops
declined 3 cents from A,.uzt 29 to October 3. kistralian merino noils
declined 3 cents but crossbred noils advanced 1 cent a pound during the
same period. Cheviot yarns were 5 cents lower and merino yarns 9 cents
lower on October 3, than on August 29 as sLown by the following table.


WOOL, TOPS AND YARN: Price per


pound in France, specified dates, 1929


Item


Tops, Australian -
Merino 64's warp ....
Crossbred 56ts ......
Tops, Ar_ eitine -
Crossbre" 56's ......
i]cil -
Ait :ralian merino ...
Australian crossbred
Cape ................
Yarn -
Merino ..............
Cheviot .............


,Apr. 3 : My 3
Cents : Cents

:107.5 : 107.5
: 91.2 : .90.2

: 3.1: 82.1

: 89.7 : 90.6
S74.6 : 75.5
: 90.6 : 92.4

:129.7 : 126.6
S89.7 : 91.5


June 1 ;July 4 jAug. 29' Oct. 3


Cents :


87.2

81.1

92.4
75.5 :
92.4

121.3
89.7


Cents :

97.3
79.1

75.0

81.7
63.1
87.1

115.5
88.0


Cents : Cents

93.3 89.2
74.0 : 71.0

70.0 : 66.9

80.9 ; 78.2
57.8 : 58.6
85.3

112.0 : 103.1
86.2 : 80.9


The quantity of wool, tops and yarns passing through the c.n:idition-
ing houses of Roubaix and Tourcoing during September declined considerably
compared with Aug-.uit. The 're.test decline was in the quantity of tops,
which.amounted to 10,379,000 pounds in September or 2,496,000 pounds less
than in August. The weight of yarns conditioned during September also
declined and was 593,C"'0 pounds less than last month.

The stocks of tops held by commission combing establishments in
France on October 1, increased 1,314,000 pounds compared with September
1. All of this increase was in stocks of.merino tops which amounted to
18,322,0'".0 pounds on Octob6r I and 16,936,00C, pounds on September 1. The
stocks .of crossbred tops held on October I amounted to 16,400,0''0 pounds
compared with 16,402,000 pounds on September 1.


_


- 16 -










WOOL-20


e'31 1L m ind Italy

.Conditions in the Belgian and Italian wool industries ware quiet
during September. .The tops market improved slightly in Italy but con-
ditions in .3ner.:il' vere unichani:''3.

Stocks of tops continued to accumulate in the Belgian commission
combing establishments and amounted to 6,779,000 pounds on Octob'r 1,
compared with 6,616,000 pounds on Sel-tember 1. The stocks of meriro tops
amounted to 2,890,000 pounds br 42,000 pounds greater than last moith,
and crossbred tops amounted to 3,889,000 pomi]s or 121,000 pounds more
than on september 1. The following table shows the scoc :s of. tops held
in Belgium,. Germany,. France and Italy.

TOPS: Stoci;s held b~y Coirit oriental commission combing establishments,
S1928 and 1.'.'


Location 1 8
and


1929


description: S pt.,-.b:r 1 October 1 AuPgust 1 : eptenber 1 : Oct
of vool
1,000 : 1,030 : 1,000 : 1,000 1,
S: pounds pounds : poo


ober 1

000
unds


Mer
Cro


- .1.I a
fino....: 3,869
,ssbred.: 3,042
Total..: 6,911


C '-rmvny :
Merino....:
Crossbred.:
Total..:

France -
Merino....
Crossbred.:


'9,581
9,486
19,067


15, L5
17,531


: 3,873 3,294 : 2
S3,148 3,525 : 3
7,021 : 6,19 : 6


9,045
109, 6
19,861


15,132
17,813


9,7'.
10,678
20, 38


10,326
10,318
20,644


16,839 :
17,011 :


Total..: 33,356 : 32,945 : 33,850 :


3 2,890
8 3J&9
I 6,779


3 9,087
5 : 10650
8 : 19.737


16,402 : 16,400
16,936 : 18,322
33,338 : 34,722


Italy -
Merino....:
Crossbred.:
Total..:


Compiled from cajoled reports from Agricultural Commissioner at Berlin.


838 :
2,562
3,400 :
I


924
2,526
3,450


1,653
2,807
4,460


1,678
2,983
4,661


1,576
2,729
4,305


-------~~'~T~------"~--


~- --


-----


---`-


- I


- 17 -


i


4l







WOOL-20


- 18 -


WOOL, TOPS AND YARN: Amountpas i ng through conditioning houses
at Bradford, Rouoaix, Tourcoing and Verviers, 1929


Location and class


Bardford -
.t .
S-ps .

Yarn .
Roubaix -
.L 1) .
Tops .
Yarn .
Tourcoing -
,ool .
Tops .
Yarn .
Verviers -
Wool .
Tops .
Yarn .


i May

1,000
Sounds:

S 875
S 4,467
S 184

S: 214
S: 3,898
S: 1,305

S: 2,286 :
: 6,574
: 2,158

S: 2,934
S: 190
. : 756


June


" July August


1,CCO : 1,000 : 1,000
roalli_ : pounds : _ujn1s


776
5,638
199

214
4,317
1,448

2,564
7,174
2,244

2,687
227
716


r,
3,6.'K
195

196
4,740
1,290

2,416
6,779
2,138

2,646
220
675


644
3,617
118

214
5,044
1,299

2,478
7,831
2,277

2,083
211
747


September

1,C. 'D
,un Is

771
4,120
165

245
4,506
1,007

2,319
5,873
1,976




1)


Compiled from cabled reports '"rc:r 2.ricuatural


and Consul Thomson
I/ Not reported.


Commissioner at Berlin


at Bradford.


SUPPLY


Production

The outloolc for those countries of the Southern Hemisphere reported
as A i'fering from drought, i.e., Australia and Argentina, has improved
since our last report. Hoevover, the rain hi:ich' has recently fallen is pro-
bably too late to affect the 1929 clip to an;; :reat extent as wool is already
being sheared in the early sl-eirii. districts of Australia.

Estimates recently received :from three more of the most important
;vool producing countries: ma~es possible a preliminary estimate of produc-
tion in important countries.

Production in 8 _/ countries is provisionally es:iimated at
2,317,000,000 pou-nds compared with .2,326,0CO,f(.0 in l28, the rec-r.1
;e-r, ani 2,208,0'0,000 :in 1927. These 8 countries in, 128 roduced in
the neighborhood of 7-tenths of the world wool Iroduction, exclusive of
Russia and China.

Decreases are infiicated in A.Istr-lia, hAre-ltina, the Unitel Tingiom,
France and Ger-i:ry, with increases in the Unit.' States, New Zealand rind
the Union of Soith Africa.
1_/ U'rted States, United C!r.~Ior-, France, u rma~1, A.'-rnrli:i. Nex .ealand,
U:!.iu. of J:..ith A'rica and Arrcj--: ina.



r






r








WOOL-20


- 19 -


Conditions have been favorable for sheep grazing in Uruguay but
the number sln.;ht jred in packing plants this year for the first seven
months was 800,000 and is twice as large as the number Killed during the
sane period of 1928, when it Nas unusually low. Unfavorable wool prices
may be partly responsible for this increase in slaughter. A recent re-
port states that o'ving to the proximity of:the wool season, entries of
sheep are nov much r'liu':-:l.

AIjs t rr'il i

Te- 1.2j9 Iool clip in Australia is no7 estiaa-, i at 925,000,000
pounds, a decrease of 3 per cent compared with the r.ecrd clip for 1928,
according to a cable from the Interrational Instituts of Africulture at
Rome. The quality of the current clip sheared mostly durir,- the last
half of this year and exported during the season Jily 1, 1929 to June 30,
1930 is reported as slightly inferior to last year's clip. Production in
Australia for the last 4 years including 1929 has averaged 922,000,000
pounds .vhile the average for the 4 preceding years 1922-1925 reached only
750,000,000 pounds.

After full consideration of the wool position a loint conference
of representatives of the :'-tionrv Council of 7'ool Selling 3ro.Cers of
Australia and the Australian 'ool ,ro'.'er3 Council decided to curtail
offerir-'s at the Sydney, center to ,,?' ex:Ant of 25 Ter cent from October
9 to October 30, states a caule to the York'shire Observer of October 4.

Ar>-;'tipC

The Argentine clip also srhovs a decrease, according to a prelim-
inary estimate i, t received by caole from the Internatioral Institute
of Agriculture. The clip is estimated at 330,000,OCO pounds, a decrease
of 4 per cent compared with the estimated production for 1928. The
q.i-llity of the current clip sheared mostly .lrii the last part of the
year and exported d:ur;:n- the season October 1929 to Soptembor 1930 is
rIu:orted as p:)..d. v.:ra-.e production for the 5 years, 1924-19-" *.as
ap r.oxi,;atel; 374,000,000 pounds against a pre-war average for the years
1909-1913 of about 332,000,000 !.i ris.

Union cf: Sout-. 'r Af'r i

The South African clip for the 19-J-30 season, as represented by
probable exports is no: officially esti-mated at 302,000,000 pounds, an
increase of 6 per cent over the 285,017,",000 pounds, estimated for last
season. The clip is expected to show a generally improved quality, due
to the favorable season.









20 -

WOOL: Estimated production in the grease, 1927-1929


Country and item


1 '. '


1928


United States:
Fleece .
Pulled .


* .


Canada .
United :irg;i : and Iris
State I/ .
France /. .
Germany 3/ .
Argentina ..
Ur .-y .
Aastrlia .
New Zealand / ...
Union of South Africa .


1-
h


* .


Free:


. :
. :
. :
. :
. :
. :


S1.000 pounds : ^I"'^" -n, is : 1,C':i. pounds
* ~2~ *r __ _


281,914 299,113 3: ;1,866
50,100 : 51,900_
_ .,014 : 1,ni :
18,673 : 19,611

118,537 : 119,6-0 : 2 117,700
50,160 49,840 : 48,580
35,900 33,600 : 31.100
331,000 : 343,000 4/ .O0,000
131,000 : 139,1''0 :
868,130 : 950,000 4 925,000
'.,0 : 6/ 245,696 : ~ 260,000
273,000 285,000 : 4/ 02,C',0


Total 8 countries reported :
for 1929 .. : 2,( 7,621 2,325,:'? 2, 17,046


World total, excl. Russia
and China 7/. .

Russia . .
China, exports .. ...


: 3,07,000 : 3,215,000 :

3. ,80 : 350 0 :
: 46,0' 3


Includes vool shorn in the spring in the Uorther iHemi-r.iere and that
shorn mostly in the last few' months of the same calendar. year in the
Southern Hemisphere.

1/ Estimates of the Yorrshire Observer. These have been used inste-. of
the official figures as c: e-irable estimates are available for all
years up to 1928.
2/ -'-.;' on method of estimating used by the Yorkshire Observer.
3/ i on estimates of sheep numbers on hand at the date nearest sre-.ring
time.
/ Estimate furni1ioed by the Interrational Institute of Agriculture by,
c' ble.
5/ Estimates of Dal-st:." and Company. Official estimates of wool s. Tr: on
farms alone, not.includin{g :;ool obtained by fr,-e.it:g co~-~ anies from
sheep sl-i '.tred aas 194,687,f24 -oIr.1s in 1927.
6/ Dalet:-'s estim:.te in bales multiplied b;.' v.-rni weight for re ~.n, as
furnished oy Consul General Lowrie, VWellin -ton, J1;:. C2._, 1:,'.
/ .'r,tative revision of 1'..7 estimate -is publisEf- in i'orein Cropi :.n.i
Markets, 'obruary 11, l.'1. and prelis-.iu.ry estimate for 1Ji'.


WOOL-20


1929
: rrellminar"


___ __


total :








VIOOL-20


- 21 -


Receipts s ?t:'. cks ".T i dis,.o'l s 21n ur r" r r.- mTr.i:r -::t

Seas nn 19?-5u

The present season has started. out with probably sligh-tly heavier
stocks in primary markets than did the past season. The stocks on hand
at the beginning of the season probably amounted to around 80,000,000
pounds which is a -.r;. small porcontage of the total supply of !1r:x-i'ately
2,000,000,000 pounds available from these countries in 1928.

Receipts of Australian wool into store for the first two months of
the present season, July and Auius-t, are estimated at 110,000,000 pounds, a
decrease of 18 per cent compared with thu same p,.riod last season. Disposals
up to S!pt*.mTb .r 1 this year have been considerably loss than last, amounting
to only 2,000,000 pounds against 22,000,000 pounds for thu same two monAhs
of the past season. This important reduction is probably mostly due to the
fact that sales b. gan in --*t I;b. r- this year, whereas last ye;.r they '..2in
Au'.ist 20,

Stocks of the 1929-30 clip on hand on September 1, 1929 were
.pprcxiTmat.-y 108o000,0i'0 .,iou, against 112,000,000 pounds last year at
the same time, a decrease of 4 per cent.

In Ar, ntina, receipts a.t Central Produce -.r-kt-from July 1 to
September 4, 1929, are estimated at 1,2/"3,000 pounds or 9 per cent above
last seasonfor the same period.

Season 19i^ 9

Shipments from Argentina for the 1':'. -29 export season (Octoter 1
to September 53) now available up to 9' 'tr'ber 4, 1929, reached V31.,O0,'.''
pounds, an increase of 6 per cent ov'r the preceding season. Stoik's onl
September. 4 were estimated at 3,461, (j!f nii' were redn~cod' per cent below
the amount on hand the preceding serso..,






WOOL-20


- 22 -


WOOL: Receipts, disposals and stocks 1929-30 and 1923-29 clips
with comparisons


Country, item and period
1929-30 cliop
Australia: I/
Receipts: From July 1 to September 1, 1929 ..
Same period 1928 ..................
Disposals: From July 1 to September 1, 1929 ..
Same period 1928 ..................
Stocks on hand, September 1, 1929 ............
Same date 1928 ....................


Quantity
: l,Or, pound;


Argentina:
Receipts at Central Produce Market-
July 1, 1929 to September 4, 1929 .................:
Same period 1928 .................................. :
1928-29 clip
Australia: l/
Receipts: From July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 ....... :
Same period 1927-28 ...................... :
Disposals: From July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 .......:
Same period 1927-28 .......... ........... :
Stocks on hand June 30, 1929 ........................
Same date 1928 ...........................
Argentina:
Receipts =t Central Produce Market, Erienos Aires-
g son July 1, 1928 to June 26, 1929 ..............:
S3.:e period 1927-28 ............................... :
Shipments: October 1, 1928 to September 5, 1929 ....:
Same date 1927-28 .......................
Stocks at Central Produce Market-
On September 4, 1929 ..............................:
Same date 1928 ....................................
Uruguay:
Receipts: Up to February 4, 1928 ................:


February 6, 1929 .....................
March 1, 1929 .........................
April 1, 1929 .........................
2iiipints: October 1, 1928 to July 30, 1929 .....
Same period 1927-28 ...................
Stocks: April 16, 1928. Stocks for di sposal,
small,April 11, 1929 ..................
May 8, 1929 ...........................
July 30, 1929 .........................
Union of South Africa:
Exports: July 1 June 30, i923-29 ............
Same period 1927-28 .................
t -ck, : of unsold wool January 1, 192' '.......
June 30, 1929 ..........
i t June 30, 19.2 .........


:4/
... :4/




Q ":4/



... :/
...:6/


109.864
133,608
1,891
21,905
107,973
111,703


1,243
1,144


834,051
743,821
820,317
733,961
13,734
9,860


99,646
91,905
311,142
292,207

3,461
3,702

119,000
121,000
12c,841
12:.,275
125,0.6
129,343

15,6572
10,912
6,944

270,'::'0
261, 000
23,244
9,149
6,940


il'r Zealand:
Cri~",,!~nits: July 1, 1923 June 30, 1929 .............: 244,110
Same period 1927-25 ......................: 22 5,4.

Continued


4/
4/










23 -
VOOL.20

Australia: Estimates of NIatioial Council of Wool Selling Brokers,
Consul General Arthur Garrels, 7elbcurne, July 10, 1929. 7,- i, t per bale
from Country Life and Stock ai.d Station Journal, July 14, and. 'lot.::'s
Annual Review, 1927-28, p[v:e 19. Season 192;-30, Country Life and Stock
and Station Journal, August 3, 1929, Ar je:' i:L: Receipts, shipments, stocks,
Review of the River Plate. Tr;.a,: Sbilprni-ts, Consul Carrigan, ,iu:,st
13,1929, Receipts, Monthly Review, :March, Bank of London and South America,
Ltd., and Sorvicio Informatic para el Exterior, Mln'ch and Iay 1;.P-,onsul
CarriL LI, August 13, 19.... Stocks, ril 11 lC.-. and .y 8, I2.,. Wool
Record and Textile World, April 16, 1 2'3, May Review, .of Londcn and
South America, Ltd., July 30, 1929, Consul Carri, .i, A-l;ust 13, 1929. Union
tf South Africa: Stocks, Monthly Bulletin of Union Statistics. Experrts,
Consul, Port Elizabeth, July 23, 1929, ;:,. Zea :n': 1 2'--2:' and 19;2-.79
Consul General 7I. L. Lo':.rie, Welliji I on, ,uly 29.

1/ T'erse fi~ure- concern only the clip of the season desi n';:ted
SHave used average weight of bale for June as estimated by the P:tional
Council of ool Selling Brokers. No later estimatee available as yet.
3/ Converted to p-iunds by using estimate of .*.. i weight per bale or 310
pounds as furnished 1-:, thi ;Tational Council of Wool S'~l.ing Brokers
of Australia, J-ly-J ne l'-;-29, compared with nn average of 304
pounds for p..riod Ju-y 1 3 Jui^ 30, 1927-23~
/ 7o corresponding estimates for pi .cejrdng year available.
Scoured wool ca.:,nbkd to grease on basis of 60 per cjnt loss in scouring.
P/'.-:tically all inferior sorts,


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