World wool situation

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Title:
World wool situation
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some issues combined.
General Note:
Description based on: WOOL-16 (June 17, 1929)
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)

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University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 631804619
lccn - 2010229455
ocn631804619
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .A19
System ID:
AA00011233:00004

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World wool prospects


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Full Text
UNiv OF FL 13
DOCUMENTS DEPT

,,, J UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agri.cultural Economics
LIU e oEPOSI-- C- Washington

WO L- 19

THE W:RLLD W^jCDL 31JTUAT II'
Septcmbtr 2::., 192'?


Domezt-.c w:.l prices were firm during August and early September,
although for the r,.o:t part the,,: remained within the ranges quoted at the
end of Jul.". Ti-i *'reste:t impr,'wement was in wools grading 48's, 50's,
and 56's, c.ue Isr_-ly tt a restricted supply of both domestic and foreign
wool of these grades. Following the opening of the London Sales, prices
I cf forejin wools in bond at BDost n declined. Australian wools feil 2 to
6 cents anad ew Zealand wools fell 1 to 3; pents per pound scoured basis.
The volumee of w..cl sales continued larre during the first half of Au.1 st
but was a little lower during the latter half of the month. The decline
was partly seasonal and partly due to the proximity of the Australian
and London wool sales.

The Lcndnn Wool Sales opened on September 17. Prices of almost
all types of coming and clothir.g w.:,ls graling 70's down to 465s are
from 12I to I. per cent below July, and prices for wools grading 44's
and under are .5 per cent below Jult, prices. Sellers are reported as
anxious to dispose :of their wool early, in the series.

Imports of wool into the United States have been greater than they
were last year, as would be anticip-ited from'r thn relatively lower foreign
prices. Despite a slih-t increase in the clip, receipts of domestic wool
at Poston have been smaller no far this year than last.

The domestic woolen industry continues active. Cons-umption of wool
is above last year's levels, and was greater in July than in June, although
machinery activity d-clined slightly.

In Great Pritarin, however, activity in the wool textile industry
appears to be below that of last year, and the improvement noted early
in September has not been maintained. Exports of all wool manufactures
in August were considerably' less than in August 1928. Compared with
July, exports of wool and tops increased, but exports of yarn and piece
Goods decreased.

Conditions in the Belgian and Italian wool textile industries
were very nuiet during August. France was well employed but new yarn
sales for export were small. The German wool industry reported satis-
factory activity in the worsted mills with sufficient new business to
keep that industry employed for the next few months. The German woolen
spinners, hnwerer, reported unsatisfactory activity and lack of new
orders.






S7 1'L-19


Reports from the Southern Eni here continue to point to another
large wool clip. Australian wool production may e csmewhat under last
year but increased production is expected in Scuth Africa, Zealane
and 'T-rizgri .

Br r.r -n ** 1 na:vmket

The volume of sales in the rcol market continued large during
the early part of aigust, according to R. L. Burru.s of the Boston wocl
office of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. The market was a little
slower, however, during the latter half of the month. Opening new lines
of goods contributed to the slckninu,: in trade as mills wanted tc
analyze the trend of the goods market before making commitmentE on raw
materials. Vacations in mills during Au-ast is another factor that us-
ually tends to retard wool consumption during the month ef 'Aug.t and
no doubt had some effect upon the wool market this year.

With the approach of the opening of the new season in Australia
and the cper.ln- of another series cf auctions at London, manufacturers
preceded cautiously in the purchase of raw materials because of the in-
fluence a further decline in prices abroad would have upon domestic
prices. The situation in domestic wools of 56's and grades below is
considered very strong by members of both the manufacturing and the wool
trades. The situation is fairly strong also on 58's, 6C's wools; but in
the case cf 64's and finer wools, the domestic situation is felt to be
auite susceptible tc a change of cc'.-ditions abroad. All factors inter-
ested in raw wool values are displaying a great deal of interest in the
S'ptembrer! or.enings in foreign markets.

Domestic wool prices have shown but a very slight change durir:-
August. The range of prices, however, does not fully reflect the situa-
tion. Asking prices have been much more easily obtained and the trend
all through the month has been for selling prices to gradually move to
the hi-her sides of the ranges quoted. This does not spply cuite as
strongLly to the 64's and finer wools as it does on the lower grades.

The feature of the market during the past month has teen the
streinthenie of the position cf 4o's, 50's and 56's wools. Both Fleece
and Territory wools of these grades have been selling ahead of gradiJr .
A number of houses have refused to sell any further quantities ahead of
grad.in. because they cannot estimate accurately how much of these grades
their present holdings will yield. Demand has continued fairly steady
but a sufficient volume has been offered to fill requirements without
stimulate i:,c materf'lly- hic.her prices. South Amcrican wools of equivalent
grades are also in restricted supply on this market. The limited supply
of both foreign and domestic wools of 43's, 50's and 56's grades has
aroused discussion of the possibility of heavy imports from South America
during the coming season. In view of this possibility, some users of the
domestic wools are refraining frcm attempts to contract ahead cn domestics
until some idea of the opening valued in South America can be obtained.


- 2 -









WOOL-19


Some holders of domestic 48's, 50's and 56's wools are asking prices
higher than current quotations, but they have been unable as yet to
establish their figures as market prices. Efforts by the selling end
of the market to raise the prices on medium grades of wool have met a
very stiff resistance from the buying end in spite of the alleged possi-
bility of a shortage in supply.

The market on domestic 58's, W0's wools has been steady and strong
at practically the same ranges of prices as prevailed at the close of
July. The factors of supply and demand have been fairly well balanced.
If there has been any advantage to either the selling or buying end of
the market, it has favored the seller as reflected in a decreasing resis-
tance and a broader demand at asking prices. Supplies of competing for-
eign wools of equivalent grade are negligible on this market.

Domestic wools of 64's and finer qualities have been sold in
large quantities covering auite a varied assortment. In the eastern
grown lines, the choice delaine, or strictly combing, wool of Ohio and
similar lines has been the favorite with the buyers. Demand has been
expanded by new users of these wools. Prices remained within the same
range quoted at the end of July but were a little firmer than during the
previous month. In western wools, average and short combing staple mostly
of originall bag lines received the best demand. While occasional lots of
graded strictly combing and French combing were sold, the total volume
was small in comparison with the volume of sales on original bag wools.
A fairly large volume of strictly and French combing wools from which
the clothing had been graded out, sold at about the same range of prices
as the best original bag lines which was about 92 to 93 cents scoured
basis, Average combing original bag wools sold at around 90 cents
scoured basis, while the very short combing wools comprising some of
the poorer New Mexican wools sold as low as 85 cents, scoured basis.
Prices tended somewhat firmer on the shorter wools because of the strong
demand from topmakers.

The topmakers have had a position of growing importance in the
market during the recent months. The narrow msrin between the prices
of tops and the prices of raw wool stimulated some worsted manufacturers
to the use of tops rather than raw wool. This factor was partly res-
ponsible for the unusually large volume of orders on tops placed a few
weeks ago. In covering the large volume of contracts on tops, the in-
fluence of the topmakers as a factor in determining raw wool prices has
been greater than usual. The increased demand from topmakers partly
accou.its for the relatively large volume of sales of fine wools of
avers-e to short c'.mbin' staple in the original bags, although the
demand from worsted mills has run quite strongly to wool of a similar
character. Mills, however, more frequently prefer graded wools.


- 3 -






WrinL-19 4 -


Woolen wools remained very slow. Trly in the month signs of im-
prominent were in evidence but no sustained movement in this direction
materialized. Sooured wool prices showed further declines. Pulled wool
quotations were about steady. Lema-n i was chiefly on the lamb's wool.

Noils recovered somewhat from the low point as a result of a spec-
ulative buying by dealers and some purcl.--.ii by mills. remand from
either source, however, was not sustained.

New business en tops was comparatively light when the heavy con-
tracts placed in July are considered. The rod~erate volume of new business
placed was on 64's and 60's counts and prices were firm within ranr._s
quoted at the close of July. The feature of importance in the top market
hars been the large volume of deliveries which has at times taxed the
capacity of available active combs. The switch of worsted mills from
the use of raw wool to tops has placed a g$od many combs in the idle
list and thrown a heavier burden upon the combs of commission combers.


WOOL: Price per pound at Boston, September 192E, and
July, August and September 1929

: 1927 : 1929
Grade :
a Sept 1 July 1 Aug 1 .ept 2

Cent s Cents Cents Cents

64's, 70's, 80's (fine)
t rictly combing
Ohio and similar grease: 48 49 38 39 38 3? : 3; 39
Fleece scoured 115 117 : 94 96 : 92 95 : 92 95
Territory scoured : 110 116 : 94 96 : 93 95 : 93 95

St r if t il,, c < mr, bin:
Ciii.- and similar grease: 54 55 44 45 : 45 : 45
Fleece scoured : 100 1C2 : 83 95 83 87 83 87
Territory scoured : 100 15 : 86 90 88 91 86 92
46's low 14 blood)
St rict l y. n.-_;b jn:
'hiio arnd sirrilar grease: 48 49 41 42 : 38 39 36 39
Fleece scoured : 82 87 : 68 72 : 63 66 : 6 66
Territory scoured : 87 90 :70 73 : 65 70 : .5 7

Corrpilei from i Arket News Reports of the Poston Office of the Bureau
of Agricultural Economics.




































Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2012 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from LYRASIS and [he Sloan Foundallon


http://www.archive.org/details/worldwl92925uniI







,'VCC'L 19


-5 -


PRICE: Wool and ,ri, per pound, and piece goods, per yard,
August 1928 and January August 1929


Wool at Boston I/ Worsted yarn 2/
: '' iC' : '- ',. : : : Suiting, unfin-
Year and O's blood) :ished worsted,
and : (fine) strictly 2/40's 2/32's :13 oz. ot mills
month Territory combing :(half blood): crossbred : 2/
: lothi.'n fleece : weaving
:scoured grease
S Cents 'Cents Dollars Dollars: Dollars
1928 -
A : 104 : 55 1.91 : 1. : 2.01
1929 -
Jan 102 56 1.84 1.58 : 2.01
Feb 100 55 : 184 1.58 2.01
Mar 98 54 1 84 1 .58 2.01
Apr : 97 : 50 1.84 1.55 : 2.01
May : 94 45 1.81 1.50 2.01
June : 92 44 1.72 1.45 2.01
July : 87 45 1.72 1.45 : 2.00
Aug : 87 : __ : 1.72 : 1.4 : 1.90
1/ Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
2/ ? re-. of Labor Statistics.

Imnorts increased

Imports of wool into the United States from January 1 to July 31
were considerably greater than last year and amounte-i to 183 million pounds
compared with 15 million pounds during the first seven months of 1928.
Carpet wool imports were 17 million pounds greater than last year, Cu,;.bir.g
wools were over 10 million pounds greater and imports of clothing wools
were a little less tiian last I.-e.r.

Imports of combing and clothing wools during July were less than
last year and amounted to 3,425,i' .0 pounds compared with 4,270,000 pounds
last year. Carpet wool imports were greater than in July of last ,': .',
amounting to 14,r'.,,' pounds compared with 15,189,r''> pounds in July 1928.

The 'c** :r.:,oAying table shows imports of combing, clothing and
c-.rrct :oOis int, t r.. ;rn-ted States during T.ly 1928 and 1929, and for
the fi':t *.1.'.-n :I,otrt 3 of 1';28 and 1929.






,1,c'L-19


Imports of wool into the United States duri "- July 192. and 1929
and total imports from January 1 to July 31, 1-20 and 1929


7ui : July :January 1 to July 31


. 1928 : 1929 19 28 : 929
: 1 00 Pounds :.OO1 000 -cuns:1,O pouns : 1.030 punas


Combing ...........: 2, : 2,505 7: 57,9 : 7,74I
Clothing ..........: I 0~~ __ I L12j 1, 4
Total......... : ,
Carpet ............: 1___ 1 _, __.
---- -
-----i-lll----__-li- -i___-" --i ^__:_:rlil--2I-l-rl-
Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign anl Doiestic
Commerce.

Receipts at Boston 7re low

Receipts of domestic wool at Boston from ..i : .' 1 to August l5
were much less than for the first e'l:.t months of last .ear ana amounted
to only 14 million pounds as co', re, with 182 million pounds last year,
or a decrease of about 18 million pounds. Receipts of wool from January
1 to August 31 1927 amounted to 192 million pounds. The quantities of
wool arriving in Boston during the past two months has been larger than
for the same months of last year. T..- receipts during Pugust were $2
million pounds compared with 2r, million for I. .-t 1928 and 30 :million
in 1927. The acs'oipanying table shows tie receipts of domestic wool at
Boston by months from 1J27 to date.

,COL, X0 JTIC: Receipts at Boston, by months, January 1927 August 1929


Month


Jan................
Feb................:
Mar................:
Apr................
May ................:
June.............. :
July ...............
Aug ................:
Sept...............
Oct............... :
1. ......... .. .. ...... .
Dec ................
Co:ipil' from weekly
1/ Preliminary.


1927


I ''

A,08!
6,f77
8,Kc,
9,1-
17, ,".
4h, 10
55,877
29,8(91
11,799
9,033
8,972
H '


8,044
: 6,- 99
: 6/497
: 8,1^
S 25,84

S 50 -r
: 25,b02
: 7,156

: 9,722
7,29


: 192'9 1/



S 4,32
: 1,0 -

6,442
e16, c18
40,094
: i6,870
: 2,77


reports of the Boston '...:i Office.





WOOL-19 7 -


I-acriin.ry activity Efr-ater than last year

The Census rLport of the activity of wool machinery during July 1929
showed considerable increases over Juiy 1928 both in the actual number of
hours that the machines were in operation and in per cent of their maximum
single-shift capacity. Activity during July 1929 wa-; somewhat lower than dur-
in June for all types of machinery except combs, which werf mere active. The
folloviLg table compares the activity of wool machinery during June and July
1929 and July 1928.

Wool machinery activity in the United States
during June and July 1929 and July .928
: Per cent of total :Per cent of maximum
Total number of hours : machinery active inle-shift
Wool machines were active :at some time during : capacity
machinery : : month :c
__ July : June : July : June : July :June
S1928 : 1929 : 193 : 1928: 1929 :1929 : 1928 : e192 192J
1 000 : 0n00 1 i nnn Per. Pr : Per : Per : PFr : c-,


Cards ......: 1,132
Combs ......: 319
Spindles:
voo l,r] ..,:361,322
,'rsted ..:258,354
Looms:
Wide l ..: 6,302
Narrow 2 : 1,525
Carpet and:
rug .....: 1,135


:37
:31
3]


hcur : hours

1,174 :1,209
476 423

'8,478 :381,401
18,451 :,;5,796

7,172 : 7,390
1,773 : 1,699

1,307 1,429


cent

73.4
61.5

71.0
52.7

51.3
60.5

64.4


cent

72.1
682 :

69,9 :
62.5 :

55.5 :
61.0

63.2


cent :; ,"r'

75.6 : 77.6
65.9 : 58.5

73.0 74.9
65.9 : 50.1

58.8 : 53.3
60.5 : 48.6

67.7 : 54.8


Compiled from the Report of Active and Idle Wool Machinery, issue
the Pepartment of Commerce,
1/ Wider than 50-inch reed space. 2/ 50-inch reed space or less.


d monthly by


Wool consumption continues high

The consumption of wool in the United States by mills reporting to the
Pura:, f th. Census during July amounted to 47,295,901 pounds (grease equiv-
alent) compared with 38,099,091 pound. last year and 44,066,079 pounds in June
1'29. The quantity of combing and clothing wool consumed during. July 1919 was
1.7 million pounds above the 5-year average for July 1924-1928- Over 59 per
cent of the total wool consumption reported in July was domestic combing and
clothing wool, about 14 per cent was foreign combing and clothing wool, and
over :'. per cent was foreign carpet wool. The following table shows the con-
'.rrtion of wool by grades during June and July and also the total for January
to July lT2h and 1929.


80.1:
85.7

77.6
61.7

61.5 :
60.3

60.7


c~nt

85.0
78.0

82.0
64.5

64.8
60.9

69.2


--


--


S .,r r


----







- 8 -


WOO,,: Consumption in the United States, by grades, for specified months,
1928 and 1929 1/

S: January:1 to
Official standards of the :Jly June July. 1.
United States for -'-."- :
of wool 1928 129 1929 1928 1929


Combing and clothing wool -
's, 70's and 80's .
58's, and b0's. .
S's . .
48's and 50's .
36's, 40's, 44's and 46'1
Total co"bltr.I g and cloth-
ing wools .


: ,0 .. : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000
: pounds : pds : u2nds : pounds : pounds

: 8,107 : 12,a32 : l,428 : 65,875 : 79,302
S4,709 : 5,19 : 5,(. : 34,321 : 37,1
4,391 : 4,980 : 4,897 : 33,716 :38,47
S5,096 :4, 4,48 454 : 35,503 : 33,93
1,551 : 2,033 : 2,074 : 14,956 : 16,871

: 25,854 : 29, : 26,939 :184,371 :205,768


Carpet wools ... : 8,943 : 12,52 : 11,600 : 74,844 : 91,205
Total all wools ... : 32,797 : 42,148 : 38,539 :259,215 :296,973
Compiled from data in the "Wool Consumnption Report for July 1929" issued
by the Bureau of the Census,

i/ These are totals of grease, scoured and pulled wools, as published by
the Bureau of the Census, and hawv not been reduced to a grease basis.


The above table shows that the consumption of combing and clothing
wools increased nearly 22 million pounds during the first sev n months of
1929 compared with 1928. Of this increase 13 million pounds were fine wools,
3 million pounds were -- blood wools and 5 million pounds were 3/8 blood
wools. Tr.e great-st increases weru in the consumption of domestic 64's -
80's combing wools which was 14 million pounds greater than last year and
in foreign 48's 5('s, 56's, and 58's eO's wools which increased about
4 million pounds each. The greatest decline was in the cLrins.,'-ption of
domestic 48's 50's wools which was 4 million pounds less than last year,


';OOL-19






WjOL-19


WOOL: Consumption in the United States, by classes
January July 1929 1/

Month Total .'t.in 'Cloti' n:- Carpel .Domestic Foreign


: 1,000 :: 1,C0'" : 1,000
:pouunds: pounds: pounds

Jan .......... ..... :47,789:: 26,649: 7,005
Feb ................ :41,373:: 21,618: 6,716
Mar ................ : 41,584:: 22,416: 6,680
Apr ................ :42,776:: 23,188: 6,705
S................ : 42,764:: 21,962: 6,568
June ............... : 38,539:: 20,954: 5,%5.3
July ............... : 42,148:: 23,990: 5,632


:1,000:: 1,C' : 1,000
:3 unl :I: pounds : pounds

:14,135:: 26,640 : 21,149
:13,339:: 21,273 : 20,100
:12,488:: 21,367 : 20,217
:12,883:: 22,659 : 20,117
:14,234:: 21,-46 : 21,282
:11,600:: 20,638 : 17,901
:12,.'6:: 24,122 : 18,026


Total Jan-July 1929:296,973::160,477: 45,291 :91,205::158,180 :138,793
1928:259,215::138,..5;: 45,835 :74,844::150,459 :108,756
Compiled from monthly reports of the -'ure-Lu of the Census.
1/ These are totals of grease, scoured and pulled wools, as published
by the Bureau of the Census, and have not been reduced to a grease
basis.

The consumption of carpet wool during July amounted to 12,526,008
pounds, which is about 3.6 million pounds greater than in July C123. The
total consumption of carpet wool from January 1 to July 31 was 91,205,456
pounds as compared with 74,844,447 pounds during the same period last year.
Practically all of this increase was in filling wools, the consumption
of which was over 15 million pounds greater than last year.


Un ited Kin-,d rn

Exports and imports of wool manufactures

The export of wool and tops from Great Britain increased consider-
ably during August but were less than lIst year according to a cab)elrr-n
received September 13 from Agricultural Commissioner Foley at London.
Yarn exports were slightly less than in July and about the same as during
August 1928. The export of woolen and worsted piece goods during August
amounted to 17,084,000 square yards as compared with 17,542,000 square
yards in July, 10,211,000 square yards in June I'' and 19,395,,CC square
./aris in August 1928. Exports of noils, wastes and woolen rags were all
less-than last month and considerably less than last year.

Imports of wool and wool manufactures into Great Britain during
August were less than during July except woolen and worsted piece goods
which amounted to 2,605,000 square yrds compared with 2,292,000 square
yards in July. The table on the following page shows the exports and
imports of wool and wool manufactures during August 1926-1929 and July 1929.


----


-~----


- 9 -








WOO L-19


UI ITED KINGDOM:


- 10 -


Trade in wool and wool manufactures, August
1926-29 and July 1929


SAu 'st : July
Exports and i mp:.rts Unit 1 J 1929Au
1926 1927: lj3 : 1929 1929
: Thou- : Thou- :Thou- :Thou- :Thou-
: saini : sands : sands : sands :sands

Exports :
Wool ...............:pound: 3,500: 4,700: 3,600: 3,300 : 2,300
Tops ................ ": 2,700: 3,800: 2,800: 2,700 : 2,200
Yarns, woolen .......: ": 422: 501: 801: 924 : 949
Yarns, worsted ......: 2,994 4,684: 4,094: 4,012 :4,134
Tissues, woolen .....:sq yd: 12,409: 13,719: 13,989: 12,054 : 12,065
Tissues, worsted ....: ": 4,112: 3,741: 5,406: 5,030 : 5,477
Flannels and delaines: ": 450: 432: 466: 366 : 275
Carpets and rugs ....: ": 54 : 478: 552: 569 : 547
Noils ............... :pound: 900: 2,400: 1,500: 1,100 : 1,200
WIste .....,.........: : 1,100: 1,500: 1,700: 1,000 : 1,100
Woolen rags .........: : 1,957: 3,102: 2,699: 1,680 : 2,912


Imports : :
WVo..l ............... :pound: 35,000: 25,000: 27,000: 32,700 : 39,000
ToF s ................ : 100: 100: 300: 75 : 100
Waste and noils ....: : 400: 400: 300: 400 : 400
Yarns ............... : 1,153: 1,409: 1,337: 1,567 : 1,807
"..'Tissues, :wtolen .....:so yd: 3,142: 2,503: 3,597: 2,425 : .2,153
Tissues, worsted ....: ": 469: 405: 437: 180 : 139
Carpets and rugs ....: ": 338: 462: 521: 627 : 660
Woolen rags .........:pounds 4,608: 3,301: 3,566: 4,704 : 5,040

Compiled from Trade and Navigation of the United Kingdom and cabled
reports from Agricultural Commissioner Foley at London.


Unemployment in the Wool Textile Industry

Unemployment in Great Britain increased during July in all branches
of the wool textile industry except wool sorting and woolen weaving, with
2,105 more persons unemployed at the end of July than at the end of June,
according to data published in the Textile Argus for August 28, 1929.
The greatest increase in unemployment was in the worsted weaving section
which reported 4,536 unemployed in July compared with 3,404 in June and
6,510 in July 1921. The following table shows unemployment data for the
first seven months of 1929 and for July 1927 and 1928.









- 11 -


Number of persons unemplo?-i in the wool textile industry in Great
Britain end of month, July 1927 and 1928, and January-July 1929 1/

Year : n: : : -r.ig : e n : Total 27
and :Sorting:Carding: C.rtir- g: d.'sted: Woolen:Worsted: '.: i- .:Unemoloyed
month : : :


Numb r:

761
7"1 :

2,56 :

1,957
1,644 :
1,303 :
,34C :
1,424 :
1, 74
2,131 :


Lumber:

2,388

5,077

5,135
4,35 :

3, 7-
3,841
5,4(,4
6, l =l


Number:



957

1,6; :
1,062 :
880 :
720

731
743


h umber: i.i., ..; ;r:


3,436 :1,737

,510 :2,899

1,667 :3,76C
1,749 :3, o8
1,4.9 :2,521
1,44 :2,263
2,195 :1,94
-,404 :2,370
4,556 :1,94e


13, c3


1 ,26
: 19,1':

14,670
S1 ,511
: 19,660
: 21,765


Fro',: the Textile Ar: .., August 28, 1929.
1/ These figures cover about 2/3 of the industry.
2/ Includes other departments and not specified.

London

The fifth series of the 1929 London Wool Sales opened September 17
with low greasy crossbreds selling at par but with all other worls below
the close of the last sales on July 23 as follows:


Merino, greasy
scoured
Crossbreds greasy, fine
medium
low
scoured (all grades)
Capes, greasy
scoured
Punta Arenas


1C per

" 2
5 "


cent

ft
I,
"


Unchanged
1C-15 per
5-10 f"


lower
to
ft
"


cent lower
ti I


10 "
,-7 n


There have been considerable withdrawals of merino wools from the
according to a cabl-gr.,j received from Agricultural Commissioner
at London.


W'-rL-19


. n.j. r r



467

: 35
573
3:95
541
S 37 :
835
791)


1927 -
July
192 -
July
1929 -
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
".ay
June
July


: ., .xr.-er:

830

:1,337

:1,602
:1, : :
:1,020
:1,060 :
:1,10 :
:1,170


sale,
Foley


--- I -- -~--~11-~-1-


--~--'-----'- -'-- --I--~--


-----~-----






.VJC jL-19


LONDON i00L SALES: Prices at opening and closing of the wool auctions
reported on basis of the Official Standards of the United States
for grades of wool.j ay, July and September, 1929
Official United Opening Closing Opening Closing Opening
States wool grades May 3 May 15 July 9 July 23 Sept 1
------_--.----^^----------------- .^ -
SCents Cents Cents Cents : Cents

701s ..............: 81.1 79.1 71.0 71.0 : 63.9
64's ..... ....... 75.0 : 73,0 6 4.9 64.9 57.8
601s .............: 71.0 66.9 60.8 60.8 : 54.7
58's .............: 60.8 1 60.8 56.8 56.8 51.7
56's ............: 58.8 : 56.8 52.7 52.7 48.7
501s .............: 44.6 43.6 40.6 40.6 : 40.6
48's .............: 40.6 40.6 38.5 38.5 37.0
46's .............: 39.5 : 39.5 37.5 : 375 36.5
44's ............: 38.5 : 39.5 34.5 : 34.5 36.0
40's .............: 37.5 : 38.5 38.5 38.5 : 35,5
36's .............: 36.5 37.5 37.5 : 37.5 35.5

Tabulated from reports of E. A. Foley, United States Agricultural Commissioner
at London.


Eradford

The decline in prices of wool, tops and yarns in Bradford continued
through August, according to a cablegram received August 26, from E. A.
Foley, American Agricultural Commissioner at London. The price of 64's
warp wool, scoured basis, at Bradford was 2 cents under last month and
28 cents below the price of August 25, 1928; 64's tops were 2 cents below
last month and 30 cents below last year; and 2/48's worsted yarn was 2
cents under July and 24 cents lower than August 1928. Scoured wool of 50's
quality sold 2 cents under last month and 16 cents under August 1928; 50's
tops were 1 cent below July and 12 cents below last year; and 2/32's
worsted yarn declined 2 cents from July and was 10 cents below August 1928.


- 12 -







700 L -19


WOOL TOPS AidD YARh:


1 -


Price per pound at Bradford on specified dates,
Aug 19;8 Aug 1929


s-----7'----
Date : Scoured ; : .sted : Scoured :: Worsted
: wool Tops yarn wool Tops :yarn
: __2/48's : 2/32's
: Cents Conts Cnts Cents Cents Cents
1928 -
Aug 25.....: 95.3 107.5 : 137.9 56.8 6.8 : 83.1
Sept 25....: 87.2 99-4 133. 52.7 58.8 : 81.1
Oct 25.....: 87.2 97.3 12 48.7 557 79
Nov 24 .....: 89.2 99.4 : 131 52.7 58 83.1
Dec 24.....: 89.2 97.3 : 1277 52.7 57.8 : 82.1
1929 : : :
Jan 26 .....: 87.2 97-3 :129.7 517 59.8 8.1
Feb 23.....: 81.1 91.2 : 12.7 48.7 : 5.8 80.1
Mar 23.....: 79.1 90.2 : 125.7 46.6 5.8 78.1
Apr 23 ..... 78.0 89.2 : 125.7 48-7 5.8 78.0
May 25.....: 75.0 85.2 : 119. 45.6 54-7 : 77c.
June 25....: 74. 83.1 117. : 44-. 53.7 77.0
July 25....: .9 791 : 115. 42.6 5'0.7 75.0
Aug 25.....: e6.9 77.0 : 11.6: 40.6 49.7 73.0
-


I/ Official standards of the United States for


wool and wool tops.


Some iLprovemnmt was noteA in the Bradford market, although this
was not maintained, according to a cablegram received September 20 from
Consul Thomson at Bradford.






:'00L-19


The total weight of wool, tops and yarns passing through the Brad-
ford Conditioning House during August, was the smallest for any month
this year, although the quantity of raw wool increased slightly over
last month. The quantity of wool tops conditioned during the month
was more than 200,000 pounds less than in July and amounted to 3,617,000
pounds compared with 3,834,000 pounds in July,

Germany

Conditions in the German wool industry are generally good according
to a cablegram received from the Agricultural Commissioner at Berlin. The
Bremen market is fairly good for wool and tops and particularly good for
noils. The per cent of employed union workers in the wool industry during
July was 76 as compared with 77 in June and 70 in April and May. The worst-
ed spinners and weavers report satisfactory activity, and, although the
amount of new orders in hand is less than last year, it is sufficient to
keep the worsted industry busy for the next few months. The woolen spinners
report unsatisfactory activity and a lack of new business.

Stocks of crossbred tops continued to accumulate in the commission
combing establishments in Germany and amounted to 10,675,000 pounds on
September 1, compared with 10,318,000 pounds on August 1. Stocks of merino
tops, however, declined during the month and amounted to 9,713,000 pounds
or 613,000 pounds less than on August 1.

GERMANY: Imports and exports of wool and wool manufactures

Item : July : January 1 to July 31
: 1927 : 1928 1929 : 1927 : 1928 : 1929
: 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000
: pounds : pounds : pounds : pounds : pounds : pounds
Imports :
Wool, merino ....: 16,041 : 11,307 : 17,613 : 201,642: 182,827: 177,627
crossbred .: 20,357 : 7,218 : 10,114 :109,776: 106,634: 110,347
total .....: 36,398 : 18,525 : 27,727 311,418: 289,461: 287,974
Tops, merino ....: 1,351 : 688 : 1,239 : 9,764: 6,398: 7,037
crossbred .: 1.305 : 1.140 : 884 9.235: 8.261: 5,904
total .....: 2,656 : 1,828 :2,123 18,999: 14,659: 12,941
Yarns, luster ...: 2,033 : 1,534 :1,296 ; 11,512: 11,146: 8,060
other worsted: 4,167 : 1,836 : 1,986 : 26,784: 17,520: 11.431
total ......: 6,200 : 3,370 : 3,282 : 38,296: 28,666: 19,491.
Piece goods .....: 302 : 430 : 454 : 2,758: 4,345: 4,407
Exports :
Tops merino .....: 1,179 983 : 637 : 7,434: 8,146: 6,307
crossbred ..: 631 : 494 : 478 : 3.265: 4,949: 4.101
total ......; 1,810 : 1,477 : 1,115 : 10,699: 13,095: 10,408
Yarns ...........: 1,082 : 1,204 : 1,519 : 7,610: 8,805: 9,733
Piece goods .....: 3,585 : 3,889. : 3,406 : 18,300: 20,055: 19,332

Compiled from data in the Textile Argus, September 1929.


- 14 -







030OL-19


The market for wool and noils in France was good during Aiuuct
and tips were especially active but slackened somewhat towards the end
of the month. The wool industry was well employed but new yarn sales
were small, particularly yarns for export.

Prices of merino 64's tops declined 4 cents and crossbred 56's
tops declined 5 cents from July 4 to August 29. Australian merino noils
and Cape noils declined 2 cents and crossbred noils declined 5 cents dur-
ing the same period. Cheviot yarn was 2 cents lower and merino yarn 3.5
cents lower on August 29 than on July 4 as shown by the following table.


WOuL: Imports into Belgium, France, Germany and Italy, for


I O)1


Country


SApril

1,000
Sounds


Belgium-
Wool, greasy .................. 15,793
scoured ................ .: 495
iL l, total 1929 ............ 16,288
France-
Wool, raw and on skins, 1929..: 73.030
Germany-
'ic,c,, merino, greasy and
washed ..................... 32,834
4ool, merino, scoured ........: 1,450
';)ol, crossbred, greasy and
washed....... ..............: 17,936
Wool, crossbred, secured .....: 1,890

Wool, total 1929 ............: 54,110
Italy-
Wool, greasy ..................: 14,803
Wool, washed ......... ...... : 988

Wool, total 1929 ...........: 15,791


i'ay June

1,000 1
po n_ is pou nds

21,293 21,657
367 504
21.660 : 22.1I1


: 79,799 74,294 : 1/


:23,907 15,739 16,093
: 1,216 1,071 1,519

:16,735 17,135 : 9,043
: 1,45 1,087 : 1,077

: 43,283 35,032 :27,732

: 14,408 : / 1/
: 972 1/ 1/

:15,380 : / 1/


July

S1,000
pouf 2.


15,195
426
15.621


Compiled from cabled reports from the Agricultural Commissioner at Berlin.
!/ Not reported.


--


- 15 -


specified months


1 9Qr




'.OL-319 1i -

WOOL, TOPS AND YARh: Price per pound in France, specified dates, 1929

Item :March 4 :April : hMay 3 :June l:July 4:Aug 29
: Cents C Cnts Cnts Cents Cents: Cents
Tops, Australian -
Merino (4's warp ....... 107.5 1C : 73 : 9-3
Crossbred 56's.........: 9'.2 91.2 : 9.2: 87.2: 79.1 : y4
Tops, Argentine -
Crossbreds 6's.........: 83.1 : 3.1 : 82.1 : 8 .1: 75. :
Noils -
Australian merino.......: .7 89.7 .6 : 2.4: 8.7 : c.
Australian crosstred....: 75. 74. 75.5 75.: 3.1 7 *
Cape.....................: 9.6 : 9 92.4 : 924: 87.1 : '
Yarn -
M~ rino..................: 133.3 1 : 1 : 126. : 121.:115. : 112.
Cheviot.................: .9 89.7 : 915 : .: 58. : *


The quantity of wool, tops and yarns passing through the conditioning
houses at Roubaix and Tour-cing during August increased considerably ccm-
pared with July. Thi greatest increase was in the quantity of tops, which
amounted to 12,87F5,000 no 3.d in August or 1,35,,000 pounds more than in
July. The ai'-.t of yarns conditioned during August was 148,CC0 pounds
greater than during July.

I.h stocks of tops held by commission combing establishments in France
on September 1 declined 512, i:..i. compared with !..,. -t 1. Most of this
decrease was in stocks of merino tops which amounted to 10,4C -:. c pocuncd on
Septe.b-r 1 and 16,839,00G pounds on A..i..t 1. The stocks of crcsscred tops
held on S,-'t inber 1 amounted to 16,93j,OOC pounds compared with 17,C11,CO C
pounds on August 1.

Peljim "_nd Itly

Conditions in the Belgian ani Italian wool industries were quiet dur-
ing August. Purchases of raw materials were mostly to meet im-nediate needs.
The noil market improved sli-l.tly in Italy as a result of increased orders
from the military department.

Stocks of crossbred tops continu-ed t accumulate in the Belgian com-
mission combing establishments and amounted to 3,768,000 pounds on September
1, compared with 3,525,( :0 pounds on : i.:t 1. The stocks of merino tops,
however, -Jeclined considerably and amounted to 2,848,00( pounds on September
1 compared with 3,294,000 on August 1. The following table howss the stocks
of tops helf in Belgium, Germany, Fr r.:- and Italy.






WOOL-19


TOPS: Stocks held by Continental commission combing establishments,
1928 rnd 1929
Location and: 2____.___ : ___
description: 1 Se 1 uly Sept 1
of wool Sept y Aug ept
:CLc:_ud:l 1000 pounds :l.C0 p.,uds:l,."^ : 1ur d: I,1- o.:unds
Be gium -
Merino ....: 3,644 3,869 2,769 3,294 : 2,848
Crossbred .: 2,612 3,042 : 3,049 : 3,525 3.768
Total ...: 6,256 5,911 : 5818 : 6,819 : 6,616
Germany -
Merino ....: 9,517 9,581 : 10,622 : 3.0,326 9,713
Crossbred .: 9,109 : 9,4:.6 : 8,.547 .0,318 10,675
Total ...: 18,626 : 19067 : 19,169 20,644 : 20,388
France -
Merino ....: 16,493 : 15,825 : 16,744 : 16,839 : 16,4C2
Crossbred .: 1.5,256 : 17,531 : 15,796 17,011 : 16,936
Total ...: 31,749 : 33,356 : 32,540 : 33,850 33,338
Italy -
Merino ....: 721 : 838 1 ,559 1/ : 1,678
Crossbred .: 2,778 2,562 2,r97 : / : 2,.:3
Total ...: 3,499 : 3,40C : 3,656 : / : 4,661
Compiled from cabled reports from Agricultural Commissioner at Berlin.
1/ Not reported.


11WOOL, TOPS AND YARN: Amount passing through conditioning houses
at Bradford, Roubaix, Tourconng and Verviers, 1929
Location
and class : Apr May June July Aug


Bradford -


Wool ......
Tcps ......:
Yarn ......:
Roubaix -
Wool ......
T-,p ...... :
Yarn ......:
Tourcoing -
Wool ......
'To, ......
Yarn ...... :
Verviers -
VWo l ......:
Tops ......
Yarn ......:


: 1000 pounds:1.000_ aunds: 1 pQounds:l1.,7,0 i :unl : .C1,0s: ) pounds


909
4,670
173

243
4,244
1,389

2,209
7,601
2,130

3,205
309
783


875
4,467
184

214
3,898
1,305

2,286
6,574
2,158

2,934
190
756


776
3, r38
199

214
4,317
1,448

2,564
7,174
2,244

2,687
227
716


585
3,834
195

196
4,740
1,290

2,416
6,779
2,138

2,478
62
262


644
3,617
118

214
5,044
1,299

2,478
: 7,831
2,277

: /
:1/
: 1/


Compiled from fabled reports


from Agricultural Commissioner at Berlin and


" Consul Thomson at Bradford.
j/ Not reported.


- 17 -







V/O.L-lic


Australia

The prices of wools at the o: -in of tee Australian auctions at
Adelaide on September 7 and Sydney September 10 were a little lower than at
the close of the lst series and about 30 to 35 per cent under the opening
prices last year. Competition at the sales was fairly good. Total offer-
ings consisted of 27,500 bales of which about 22,000 bales were sold. France,
Germany, Italy, Bel-iumr and Japan v:'er ti.e ?rinc pal purchasers according to
a cablegram received Sentenber 10 from Consul MacDonald at Sydney. The
second sales opened September 20 with 27,5.. bales cataloged.



The Constantinople wool market was more active during July and 3,772
bales of wool were sold compared with 73 bules in June and 1,277 bales in
May. This increase was due chiefly to lUr:; orders received from the United
States and to increase shipments to Greocm were the manufacture of Oriental
rlgs has been taken up on a large sc:le according to Raymond A. Hare, Vice
Consul at Constantinople. Stocks of wool on August 1 amounted to about 3,000
bales compared with 2,91.0 on July 1.

Ale r i

Considerable difficulty is being experienced in disposing of the
Algerian wool clip for 1929 and about 1, .0 tons remain to be sold, accora-
ing to Consul Oscar Heizer at Algiers. French buyers are not active and
prices realized at the last public slos wjre very low. A small quantity
of the best wool sold at slightly under 1 cents per pound. Another public
sale is scheduled for September 23.

Raw wool supply_situntion in pr imary markets

Present prumn,;cts are for nnothur ir.go wool clip in the Southern
Hemisphere. Although the Australian clio is estimated to be 5 per cent be-
low the record clip of 950,C. ,C'-'L' pounds lost :~-r, indications are for
increased clips in New Zealand, the Union of South Africa and Uruguay. As
yet no estimate is available for th. Ar,. itiie:. clip but dry conditions have
prevailed in parts of the province of Buenos Aires for some time.

In 8 1/ European countries reporting at the beginning of l~29 or
in the summer, sheep numbered 50,.40,000 in l129, an increase of 0.5 per
cent compared with 1928. These countries shear in the spring or early
summer so that practically all have finished shearing the 1929 clip.

The clip in the United States for 1 29 was 1 per cent above lq i
and it is prob-ble that the Canadian clip will also be larger than last
year.

1/ Etgiini ad Jales, Scotland, I4orthorn Ireland, Irish Free State, France,
Germany, Hungary tijL. Gr..c:.







;6O0L-19


Australia

Jool production in Australia for 1929 is estimated at 954,000,C"-
pounds, according to thu Pastoral Review of July 16. This is a decrease
of approximately 5 per cent compared with the record clip of 950,000,000
pounds for 1928 as officially estimated. Wool production in Australia for
the four v,'.-'s including 1929 has reached or exceeded 900,000,C-O0 pounds,
while the average for the pre-war years 1909-13 was only about 730,' ), "
pounds.

Western Australia appears to be the only state in which conditions
are satisfactory at present and that whole state is in excellent condition.
Rainfall has been less than normal for some time past over much of the
pastoral country of Australia and wide areas inland r sported a bad winter
(June-July-Aug) according to the National Bank of Australasia, Ltd.

As stated in previous reports, the National Council of .a~lj Selling
Brokers in conference with the Australian ..ol Growers Council in June
estimated the amount to be received in store for the 1929-35 season at
2,585, -'0D bales with an additional 258,000 not handled by brokers, making
2,843,000 in all. Total roc-ipts into store for last season were 2,090,
000 bales.

Sheep numbers in Australia at the beginning of 1929 were officially
estimated at 10,i115,000 against 100,Cl0, O. at the beginning of 1928, an
increase of 5 per cent, states Consul General Arthur Garrels, Melbourne.
This is the highest number recorded since 1891 when the figures were 100,
421,000. After that numbers gradually declined through drought and other
causes until in 1902 the fig, 'i-, totaled only 535,75,000 or just about half
the number 11 years before.

Following a succession of good seasons, the losses were quickly re-
gained and during the 20 years, 1905 to 1924, the numbers fluctuated around
80 to 90 million, states the Australian Commonweplth Statistician. Stim-
ulated by remunerative wool prices the numbers iQcreased by 10 million in
1925 and despite very severe droughts in the interior of the Continent, more
than 100 million sheep have been recorded during:each of the last five years,
culminating in the very high figure already noted for 1928.

In New South V'-1s3 despite the dry weather reported during the latter
oart of 1928, sheep numbers in December here estimated at 52,7 "0,000 against
only 50,510,000 in June, according to official figures. Although dry weather
has been experienced this year there have been no reports of very serious
losses of stock up to the present. On the other hand, however, it has been
stated that the fleece weights are lighter than last year when the average
weight was estimated at 8.8 pounds an, inst 7.5 in 1927 and 8.3 for the 5 yearn,
1924-2-.

According to a trade report of Winchcombe, Carson, Ltd., in the Country
Life and Stock arid Station Journal, August 2, 1929, wool brokers of Australia
state that an erroneous impression appears to be held abroad that Australis
is about to shear another record clip of merino wool and states that this is
incorrect. Australia pastures 10i,000,000 sheep but half the number are


- 19 -






./OOL-19


situated in liew South 'Inles, which state produces considerably more than 50
per cent of merino wool grown in the Commonwealth. Over the greater part of
the 12 months, states this Company, the State has suffered a very dry season,
and today the Great Western plain areas are in the grip of a severe drought.
jlhen the estimate of the new season's clip was made at the Melbourne con-
ference in June a decrease of 5 per cent was anticipated in Mew South Wales
production for the ensuing year. Since that time pastoral conditions have
become worse and sheep losses have been experienced in western districts.
The decrease estimated, therefore, is likely to be exceeded states these
brokers. Shearing has started in the wust and the sheap are cutting unusually
light fleeces. That fact zi',bined with stock losses will cause a larger
shrinkage in the clip than was originElly estimated. On the great western
areas of the state with shearing in progress, even if rain comes it is too
late to have any appreciable effect on the quantity of wool the sheep will
cut.

Wool production in Queensland for 1;29 has beon estimated by the
National Council of .dooi Selling Brokors at 4o0, -O bales, an increase of
30,000 over 1928, according to the Cueenslander for August 1. Of the 429,
000 bales produce. in 1928, 37T,217 bales were sold on the Brisbane market.
In the previous year 374,000 bales were produced so that there was an im-
provement of 45,000 bales in 1928 over 1927. This shows the gradual recovery
from the effects of the drought. The west has recovered to a large extent
while the whole of the Peak Downs district has been uniformly o ;1, so that
there has been an excellent opportunity to build up the flocks which were
depleted in the central district during tih drought *,.rs.

New Zealand

'ool production in ~ew Zealand in 1928 reachei- 24,,000,000 pounds
against 229,000,(0 in 1928, an increase of 7 oer cent, according to the
estimate of Dalgoty and Coitany. Shoep numbers in April 1929 reached 29,011,
000, an increase of 7 per cent over 1.28, pointing to another large wool
clip this year as the weather so far has been oeni.irally favorable.

Union of South Africa

Conditions in the Union of South Africa are favorable to a further
increase in the wool clip this r, r. During the last half of July, excellent
rains fell, not only in the usual winter rainfall area but throughout the
gre-ter part of Cape Province and in some districts of the Western To !s-..al
and IUtl. For the first time in ye.rs it is stated that no part of the
Union is suffering from droAht. The total quantity of wool available for
export from the Union for the year ending June 30 1920, is estimated at 302
million pounds according to a cable received September 20 from the Inter-
national Institute of Agriculture at Rome. The estimate for last season
was 285 million pounds.


- 20 -







.VOOL-19


Sheep numbers in A.'ijust 1?L:, exclusive of numbers in towns,
reached 42,500,000 an increase of 6 per cent over 1927. Of the above
number, 38,242,000 were wooled sheep against 36,006,&C-,). in 1927. The
last lambing season beginning in April 1929 has every indication of hav-
ing been as good, if not better, than it's predecessor, so that with the
abundant rains it is quite possible that next census returns may show
over 43 million wooled sheep in the Union, states the Consul. The local
trade does not seem to think this total indicates an overstocked condition,
considering the new areas recently taken up in the Prieska and other
districts of the northwest cape and the reasonable prospects that the
unprecedented drou:iht conditions Are ameliorated.

South Aierica

No reliable estimates are as yet available for the South American
clip and conditions do not appear to have changed materially since our
last report. A reliable estimate of the Argentine clip usually becomes
available in October.

Sheep slaughter in freezing companies for first 6 months of year
amounted to 2,979,000 or 21 per cent above 1928.

In Uruguay the winter season is reported to have been generally
dry and cold without violent hurricanes or heavy rains so that the new
clip should be in good condition. Wool production for 1928 estimated
at 139,000,000 pounds was a record clip and conditions appear favorable
for an increase this year unless the high price of meat compared with
wool causes more sheep to be sent to freezing establishments.

The increased slaughter of sheep in freezing establishments for
the first 6 months of this year was 376,000 above the same period last
year when killings were unusually low.


Receipts, stocks, shipments in primary markets

Season 1929-30

Receipts for the first month of the new season in both Australia
and Argentina show increases over last season.

Receipts of wool at Darling Harbor Terminus, Sydney, for the
beginning of the new wool season, July 1, 1929 to August 1, 1929, are
estimated at 12,023,000 pounds an increase of 39 per cent over the same
period of 1928. It is estimated that about 70 per cent of the wool which
arrives at Sydney does so during September, October and November. This
increase in receipts compared with last season can probably be ascribed
to the earlier shearing which is taking place in the northwestern portions
of the State, states the Country Life and Stock and Station Journal for
Aue-u~st 2, quoting some wool brokers. Operations in the western part of


- 21 -








WOOL-19


the State are being interferred witL. in conseourxjce of continued drA.ul.t
and shearing there will probably be later than usual.

Season 1928-29

Stocks in Australia at the end of the season, i.e., June 60 had
been reduced to 14,000,000 pounds, co.:ipered with 10,000,000 pounds at the
end of the preceding season. In Arcentina stocks of wool at Central
Produce Market, Buenos Aires, were reduced to about 3,600,0"1' pounds
by August 16, a decrease compared with the 4,054,000 pounds on hand
last year at the same time and about 1,500,000 pounds below the average
stocks on hand at the end of August for the 5 years, 1923-27.

Stocks in Uru-unuy and the Union of South Africa are fairly h:.';,
but have been reduced considerably recently. On July 30, 1929 stocks
in Urugusa amounted to about 7,000,000 pounds and in the Union of South
Africa on June 30, stocks were 9,000,CC,.

The stocks left on hand in these primary markets, however, con-
stitute a very small percentage of the total supply available from these
countries.


NEW SOUTH WALES: Number of sheep and wool production
o ___ ______


: Sheep__ : Sheep
Sshorn,
:: year
Year : June :Dec :ended
:30 : 31 : June 30
S : : follow-
: : ing I/
: ITumber: llun.br : Number


23 : 38,760: 2/ :38,371
44 : 41,440: 2/ : 1,320
25 : 7,100: 2/ 45,550
926 : 53,860: 54,630: 51,880
27 : 55,930: 48,920: 53,730
28 : 50,510:3/52,700:3/50,300


Average
weight
of wo
clip,
: greasy

: Fr ,ds


7.1
8.2
8.1

7.5
3/ 8.8


: Wool produced(year ended
:June 30 following) 1/
: Shorn,
.:crutched Derived
and from Total
: dead skins
dead

:1,000 : 1,000 : 1,'0
: pounds : ounds : oounds

:276,687 : 29,345 : 303,032
:341,711: 27,407 : 369,118
369,500: 32,990 : 402,0LO
:457,552: 41,770 : 499,322
406,080: 37,780 : 4-3,860
:3/42,1100: 2/ 2/


Compiled from Quarterly Statistical Bulletin, New South Wales, March 1929,
page 38.
/ Shearing mostly done in last few months of year listed.
SNot available.
3/ Preliminary.


e

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19
19
If
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VOOL-19 23 -


rC00L: Receipts, disposals and stocks, 1928-29 clip in primary markets

Country, item and period Quantity
Australia 17 : 1 000 oUn,-s
Receipts: From July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 ..........:2/ 834,051
Same period 1927-28 .........................: 743,821
Iisposals: From July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 ..........: 820,317
Same period 1927-28 ...........................: 733,961
Stocks 3n hand June 30, 1929 ........................... 13,734
Same date 1928 ..............................: 9,860
Argentina
IAccipts at Central Produce Market, Buenos Aires-
July 1, 1928 to June 26, 1929 ...............: 99,646
Same period 1927-28 .........................: 91,905
Shipments: October 1, 1928 to August 15, 1929 ...........: 305,681
Same date 1927-28 ..................... ....: 286,115
SStcks at Central Produce Market- 3/
On Au.ii st 13, 1929 ..........................: 3,554
Same date 1928 .............................. 4,054

Receipts: February 4, 1928 ...........................: 119,000
February 6, 1929 ............................: 121,000
March 1, 1929 ..............................:4/ 126,841
April 1, 1929 ...............................:4/ 128,275
Shipments: October 1, 1928 to July 30, 1929 ............: 125,086
Same period 1927-28 ................... .......: 129,345
Stocks: April 16, 1928. Stocks left for disposal,
small
April 11, 1929 ..................... ............: 15,872
May 8, 1929 .................................:4/ 10,912
July 30, 1929 ...............................:4/ 6,944
Union of South Africa
Exports: July 1-June 30, 1928-29 .....................: 270,0'
Same period 1927-28 ........................: 261,000
Stocks 4/ of unsold wool January 1, 1929 ..............:5/ 23,244
I" June 30, 1929 .............. .:6/ 9,149
New Zealand
Shipments: July 1, 1928-June 30, 1929 .................: 244,110
Same period 1927-28 ..........................: 226,455
1929-30 clip
Australia I/
Receipts at Darling Harbor terminus, Sydney-
July 1 to Aujust 1, 1929 .....................: 12,023
Same period 1928 ............................: 8,654
Argentina
Receipts at Central Produce i.arkLt-
July 1, 1929 to August 13, 1929 .............: 1,052
Same period 1928 ............................: 864
..,...,.....r~t f


__







WOOL-19


- 24 -


Sources- Australia: Estimates of National Council of Jool Selling Brokers,
Crnsul General Arthur Garrels, Melbourne, July 10, 1929. Weight per bale
from Country Life and Stock and Station Journal, July 14, and Dalgety's
Annual Review, 1927-28, page 19. Season 1929-30, Country Life and Stock and
Station Journal, August 2, 1929. Ar.entin3: Receipts, shipments, stocks,
Review of the River Plate. ruEu~g y: Shipments, Review of the River Plate.
Receipts, Monthly Review, March, Bank of London and South America, Ltd., and
Servicio Informatino para el Exterior, March and May 1929-Consul Carrigan,
August 13, 1929. Stocks, May 8, 1929 and April 11, 1929, wool Record and
Textile 'World, April 16, 1928, May Review, Bank of London and South America,
Ltd., Consul Carrigan, August 13, 1929. Union of South Africa: Stocks,
Monthly Bulletin of Union Statistics. Exports, Consul, Port Elizabeth, July
23, 1929. New Zealand: 1927-28 and 1928-29, Consul General W. L. Lowrie,
Wellington, July 29.

1/ These figures concern only the clip of the season designated.
/Converted to pounds by using estimate of average weight per bale or 310
pounds as furnished by the National Council of ..'ocl Selling Brokers of
Australia, July-June 1928-29, compared with an average of 304 pounds
for period July 1 to June 30, 1927-28.
SStocks of 1928-29 clip are not given separately and the amount on Aujst
13 may include some wool remaining from the 1927-28 clip, if any.
I o corresponding estimates for preceding year available.
Scoured wool changed to grease on basis of 60 per cent lost in scouring.
SPractically all inferior sorts.


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