World wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
World wool situation
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some issues combined.
General Note:
Description based on: WOOL-16 (June 17, 1929)
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 631804619
lccn - 2010229455
ocn631804619
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .A19
System ID:
AA00011233:00003

Related Items

Succeeded by:
World wool prospects

Full Text



S.. U1JITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
E bureau u of Agricultural Economics
S... as. iiLgton

WOOL-13 AIu-t 22, 1929

Thi 1.QLrD OL SIT':ATITrj'


The icmestic wool market was more active during July and a large
'l01mne of wool was moved. Price changes were only moderate. Fine wools
andi los grade wools declined slightly before a level was reached at whicn
business couli De transacted readily. Medium grades increased slightly
in price. Foreign wools were in only moderate demand and prices decline
I slightly following the declines at the London Wool Sales.

The quantity of wool shorn in the United States during 1929 is -:-
timated to be 3C2 million pounds or about 1 per cent greater than last
year. Tne number of sheep shorn was 4 per cent greater than last year
but the average weight per fleece was less.

Imports of wool into the United States during the first six months
of 19S9 were 38 million pounds greater than last year. More than half of
this increase was in carpet wools and about 13 million pounds were combing
wools.

Receipts of domestic wools at Boston were light for the first seven
months of 1929 and, amounted to 128 million or about 18 per cent less than
les' year.

Wool machinery was much more active in June than last year and con-
s'ir.ption of wool was 3 million pounds greater according to the Census. The
quantity of wool consumed from January 1 to June 30 was 255 million pounds
compared with 226 millionn last year. Consumption of combing and clothing
wools increase nearly 16 million pounds and carpet wools nearly 13 million.

Exports of yarns and piece goods from the United Kinfgom increased
consiler-bly riuring July but the total exports of wool and wool manufac-
tures for the first seven months of 1929 were very much lower than for
last year. The Lraafori market reports seasonal dullness which is to be
expected until ti.e eni of AuIgust.

t Prices of wool iand tops continued to decline on the Continent.
Stocks of tops are accumulating and on August 1 were 4 million pounds
greater tnan on July 1, exclusive of stocks in Italy which have not been
reported. German spi'nners are well employed and yarn sales have increased.
France, Belgium, and Italy are mostly unchanged from last mongh except
for increase activity in the French tops market toward the end of July.








WOOL-18


Boston wrol market

A very large volume of wool was moved during July and all through
the month shipment of purchases to-the mills was begun a.lnst as soon as the
sales were closed., according to R. L. Burrus of the Boston wool office of the
Bureau of Airicultural Enomics. This leads observers to conclude that mills
had been running on a volume of stock not very much larEer than enough to
cover immediate re iirements. Most of the grease woul houses reported total
sales unusually large for the month of July. The effect of thz larger volume
of business has been to check the broad downward movement of prices that has
been going on for months.

Activity in the wool market increased soon after tho London opening.
A few days after the opening, London prices strengthened slightly. Manu-
facturers interpreted this to mead that the London decline at the o .ening
had previously been discounted and that values wore than fairly well estab-
lished. The spread of this feeling created confidence .nd as a result buying
increased at a considerably rate.

Price changes were only moderate. The finer _.ri.'.s eased slightly
before a level at which business could be transacted readily wes reached.
Slight gains were made in the prices of 56's and 48's, 50's grades.

Strictly combing 64's and finer Ohio and similar fleeces were steady
at 38-39 cents in the grease, with derr.nd only moderate during the first
half of the month. A week of quietness on these lines Lro-.-.ct a little
soft'ening in prices when a fair nqality was sold at the low side of the
grease price range, figuri:ix 91-93 cents on an estimated scoured basis.
Toward the close of the month a number of buyers came into the market and
took a considerable weigt, a number of the last sales being closed at 39
cents in the grease or 92-95 cents scoured basis,

Activity on strictly combing 56's, 60's fleeces steadily increased
over that of the previous -ornth and beforee the end of the month resulted
in some hardening of prices. This grade was quoted at 4'3-44 cents in the
grease until the last week of July when practically all offerings sold or
were held at the maximum figure of the ran.e. A fezw choice lots of light
condition wool moved at 45 cents in the grease, but the scoured basis prices
were in the previous range of 92-95 cents.

A strong undertone became evident in the market on 56's and 48's, 50's
fleeces esrly in July. Demand broadened and dealers held out for their
asking prices with the result th t s-iles b.egsi to be closed without rmking
concessions. Slight advances fo*..Lowud and we.:.e established before.the month
closed when 56's strictly combir }b-ighlt f.ls:ces trjL:;nt -45 cents in the
grease and 48's, 50's brought 4. i...S in th g&rof.se quite readily. The
clothing wools of these grades tended to stre?~o.hcn.

Activity on 64's end finer western :ro,'n '"o ls i-as confined during
the early part of the morth lar-r:ly to original L -e -.. 's wools which sold
in the range 92-95 centI, scouw cd b:is.i S c a$f r t..r Lodn opening,
this demand fell off and tlte nt ior w7a turuie to ,o.? jr:'.3 d lines and the
New Mexican wools. Soma irregularity was ncted in prices on early sales







i7C': L-18


:ut triri.n, finally settled down to 93-95 cents, scoured basis on strictly
combine: 64's and finer, and 91-93 cents, scoured basis, on cre ii h coamb'Ji..
wools of this grade. A large volume of strictly combing and French combing
wool together, from which onl, the clothi:. wool had been graded out, was
sold at 92-9.- cents, scoured basis. C:lot'.:.,,. wool aem~.-d was slow on account
of the weakness of woolen wools and ouotatjiols were slightly lower at b5-83
cents, scoured basis. The New Mexican wools met a re---./ demand. The better
class from around Roswell br.:.,:I-t 88-90 cents, scoured basis, in the original
bags. Top..p -rs bought quite heavily of the more unevenly grown lines of
New Mexican wools at around 8M cents, scoured basis.

Demand for strictly combinrj. 58's, 60's Territory wools has been fairly
strong throughout the month. The range of prices, however, remained steady
with some hardening of prices noted toward the close of the month. The
short combing 56ts, CO's eased slightly because of the price limit of top-
makers. Clothing wools of this grade also were slightly lower in price.

Territory 56's and 48's, 50's wools moved very readily and some rise
in prices was shown before the close of the month. A gain of 1-2 cents a
pound on an estimated scoured basis was realized on strictly combijn_ 56's
and a gain fully 2 cents was shown in 48's, 50's strictly combing. The
clothing class of these grades strn-,thened very materially and nearly wiped
out the spread in prices that usually exists between combing aid clothing
wools of the same grade.

The low grade domestic wools, including 46's low L blood and 36's
40's, 44's, common and braid, sold fairly well in the small quantities that
were available. Price ranges were slightly lower at the close than at the
opening of the month before a selling basis had been definitely established.

The market on foreign wools has been very dray,_, and quotations eased
in s,mprthiy with the decline at London. A very moderate demand was scattered
over the various grades of Australian Merinos and the croasbred wools from
New Zealand and South America.

'Wo.:len wools were very slow during the --r.ater part of the month. A
slight improvement in demand was noted toward the close of July. Quotations
declined some on scoured clothing wools. Pulled wool notationss were steady.
Waols of this season's slaughtered lambs sold iuite rer.dily. Lambs wool of
B grade brought about 83-84 cents for good white staple while stained B
lambs wool sold at 81-83 cents, scoured.

The noil market was very irregular. Qaite a sharp decline in prices
took place, especially on 69's and finer grades. An increased activity of
topmakers accompanied by a dull demand from woolen mills was responsible for
much of the weakness in the market for noils.

The aggregate volume of business transacted on tops during July was
very large. Readjustments in prices were made on several grades. Oil combed
64's were fairly steady at $1.21-$1.23 for the bulk. Dry combed 64's short
staple tops declined to around $1.17-$1.18 per pound. Oil combed 60's eased
slightly to $1.16-$1.20 per pound. A i.urther drop was noted in prices 6f
5.'s, 56's and 50's early in the month, but later quotations were marked up


- 3 -










WOOL 18


as a result of stiffening prices for the corrcs c'ding grades of wool. The
bulk of the business on 58's war: closed at .,1.10-41.12, on 56's at 41.05-
.41.07 and on 50's at 97-98 cents. Cc stations at the end of the month were
slightly above those ranges but the quantity of business closed on this
basis was small. Topmakers have booked orders ahofad for several weeks to
about the capacity of combs and are accepting further business on some grades
only at a premium. This advance in asking prices has been followed by a
slower demand. Tops of 48's and lower grades have been very dull.


WCOL: Price per pound at Boston, August 1928,
and August 1929


and June, July


: 1928 :1929
Grade : :
Aug 4 June 1 July 1 Aug 3

Cents : Cents : Cents : Cents
64's, 70's, 80's (fin)
Strictly combing
Ohio and similar grease: 48 49 : 40 41 : 3 39 : 36 39
Fleece scoured :116 120: 97 100: 94 96: 92 95
Territory scoured : 115 118 : 98 100 :94 96 :93 95
-56's (3/8 blood) :
Strictly combing
Ohio and similar grease: 55 :44 45 : 44 45 : 45
Fleece scour(-l : 100 102 : 83 85 : 83 85 83 87
Territory scoured : 103 105 : 87 91 : 86 90 : 88 91
46's (low 1/4 blood) :
Strictly combing
Ohio and similar grease: 48 49 : 41 42 41 42 : 38 39
Fleece scoured : 82 87 : 68 72 : 68 72 : 63 66
Territory scoured : 87 89: 72 77: 70 73: 65- 70

Compiled from Market News Reports of the Boston Office of the Bureau
of Agricultural Economics.


- 4 -









"00L 18


PRICE: Wool and yarn, per
July 1926 and


pound, and piece goods, per yard,
J -a: .:; July 1929


Vo'jl :at Boston i/


Worsted yarn 2


64's, C70's :
1:,J ('- :
([fin i :
Territory :
c !,thing :
C '..ircdi :
Cents

1(7


10C :
lCt

'.P
97
94
92
87


5


S6's (3/8
blood)
strictly
combing
fleece


Ce


lnts

56

56
55
54
50
45
44
45


S2/40*s
(half blood):
weaving
* :


DC


)llars

1.94

1.84
1.E4
1. 84
1.84
1.81
1.72
1.72


4.ure-,i of gri cultural Zc,:nomics.
bureau cf Labxr Statistics.


','ol product i'-n in theL Unit'-d SL't-ts


2/32,s
cressbred


:Suiting,
:finished
:sted, 13
:at mills


un-
wor-
Oz.
2,/


ic'llar- Dollars

1.60 2.01

1.58 : 2.01
1.58 : 2.01
1.58 : 2.01
1.55 : 2.01
1.50 : 2.01
1.45 : 2.01
1.45 : 2.01


The quantity of wool shorn in the United St:tes during 1929 is es-
timrat-d to eto 5'" million pounds or 3 million pounds greatertthan the amount
ish)-cn in 1l'C mnd 2O million pounds greater than the 1927 clip. This es -
timite does n'-t include the production of pulled wool which a..ucupted to 5C
million pounds in 1927 and 52 million pounds in 1928.

The incresce of less than 1 per cent in the production of shorn wool
as cc'mp-rcd with 1928 was due to the decrease in the average weight per
floecc, cseccially in the Western States, which largely offset the increase
of 4 p..r cent in thi number of sheep shorn. The following table shows the
production of woo,l and weight per fleece in the United States by -:c graphic
divis'jns and for aill States which produced more than 5 million pounds of
wov.l in 1j28..


Y,.- -" r
andt
month


132& -
July
1929 -
J-.n
F, b
.'ar
Alpr

Juno
July
..T[rio
JUlyl


- ----~ ------------


----;-




































Digitized by the Internet Archive
in 2012 with funding from
University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from LYRASIS and the Sloan Foundation


http://www.archive.org/details/worldwoo8192922unit










WOO T. 1 b -


fOjr,L: Production and v:lght per flcoce shorn in the United States,
and in States producing over 5 million pounds in 1928 and 1929


Division and State


V ght of wool shorn Average weight per
: 6i;:ht of w l fleece IO /

1928 1929/ : 1928 1929 2

:1,000 pounds:1,000 pounds: pounds : ouds


United States ......

North Atlantic ...
North Central ....
South Atlantic ...
South Contral ....
Western ..........

Texas ............
Lontana ..........
California .......
Wyoming ..........
Utah .............
Oregon ...........
Idaho ............
Ohia .............
New Mexico .......
Colorado .........
icvad-. ...........
Michigan .........
Ilissouri .........
Iowa .............
Arizona ..........
South Dakota .....


In States where sheep


299,113 : 301,866: 7.8 : 7.6

S 7,002 : 6,868 7.2 7.2
66,208 : 67,3- : 7.y : 7."
: 5,797 : 6,280 5.1 5.1
: 42,332 : 46,988 : 7.4 7..
S 177,774: 174,346 8.0 : 7.6


35,591
26,626
23,800
26,486
22,072
20,332
17,885
15,826
12,400
8,831
8,580
8,520
5,962
5,960
5,760
5,644

are shown


39,882
29,077
25,192
24,200
19,764
18,849
17,829
15,512
12,882
8,655
7,560
8,58C
6,0CC
6,202
5,784
5,636


twice a year, thi


8.4
8.6
6.8
8.8
8.9
9.2
9.2
8.2
5.8
7.6
7.5
8.0
7.2
8.Q
6.0
8.3


per head of sheep shorn and not vwight per fleece.
2/ Preliminary.


8.5
8.6
6.7
8.C
6.1
8.5
8.8
8.1
6.C
7.1
7.C
7.8
7.1
7.9
6.7
".7


Imports increased

Imports of wool into the United States from January 1 to June 30 were
considerably greater than last year and amounted to 165 million pounds com-
plard with 139 million pounds during the first six months of 1928. Carpet
wool imports were 15 million pounds greater than last year, combing wools
were 13 million pounds greater and imports of clothing wools were the same
as last year.


s figure covers wool










WOOL 18


Imports of ccmbirgi. and clothing wools during June were less thin last
year anid :-aountcd to 5,116,(..' pounds coMpared with 5,560,000 pounds last
year. Carpet wool imports :uro much less t ian in Juno of l:rt yoar, amlount-
ing to 10,968,3 compared with 13,470,000 pouncis in Juno 1920.

ThuJ accomprAn.ing table shows imports of combing, clothi:.. and'? ,:it
wools into the United tattes durir.:; June 1926 and 1i2.1, -.nd for the first
six months of 1928 and 1929.


Imports of wool into the United States during June 1928 and 1929 and
total imports from Janu iry 1 to Juno 30, 1926 and 1929

June January 1 to June 30
Wool
1928 1929 1928 1'92

:1,0 O pounds:1,000 nounds:1,uO0 cr.LEra : 1,000 pounds

Combing ............ : 3,555 3,834 : 54,393 65,244
Clothing ........... : 2,005 : 1,282 : 11,595 : 11,594
Tot Al ......... : 560 : 5,116 : 65,988 : 76,838

Carpet ........... : 13,470 : 10,968 73,020 88,406

Total all wool. : 19,030 : 16,084 : 139,008 : 165,244

Compiled from reports of the Burl-u of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.


Receipts at Boston are low

Receipts of domestic vool it Boston from January 1 to July 31 are
much less than for the first seven months of last ,.'*r and anounted to only
128 million pounds as compared with 156 million pounds last year, or a de-
crease of about 18 )or cent. Receipts for Januiary July 1927 amounted to
151 million pounds. Recently the quantity of wvool arriving, at Boston has
boon increasing. The receipts during July were 54 million pounds compared
with 51 million pounds in July 1928, and the receipts for the week zeding
August 3, 1929 were 17 million pounds as compa-red with 10 million poundZ
for the previous 'eek. The accompanying tablo shows the receipts of
domestic wool at Boston by months 1927 to date.


- 7 -









\IL 18 -8-


WOOL, IC:.1E51C: Receipts at Boston, by months, January 1927 July 1929


;.:nr h 1-2 7 1 1919 1_/

: 1,000 pounds : 1,000 pounds 1,000 pounds

Jan ............ : 6,081 8,044 4,532
Feb ............ : 6,577 6,399 1,836
Mar ............. 8,600 : 6,497 : 5,738
Apr ............. 9,522 8,138 6,442
: y.i ........... : 17,938 25,843 16,108
June ........... 46,106 : 50,083 40,094
July ............ 55,877 51,346 53,652
Aug ............. 29,891 25,802
Sept ........... 11,799 7,156
Oct ............. 9,033 4,598
I13 .............. 8,972 : 9,322
Dec ............. 8,794- 7,2-3

Compiled from weekly reports of the Boston Wool Office.
L/ Preliminary.

The Census report of the activity cf wool machinery during June 1929
showed considerable increases over June 1328 based on the actual number of
hours that the machines were in operation compared with their maximum single-
shift capacity. These increases varied from 3 per cent for narrow looms to
15 per cent for combing machinery. Activity during June 1929 was somewhat
lower than during M1ay for all types of machinery except woolen spindles which
were slightly more active. The following table compares the activity of wool
machinery during Llay and June 1929 and Junoe 1. .


WOOL 'lACrii:LJ'Y:
1.29, and Juno


Number of hours active in the United States, L~ay and June
1928, expressed as percentage of maximum single shift
Scarab it v


: Juneo
ool macinry 1928 1929 May 1929

: Per cont : Per cent Per cent

Cards ........... : 80.5 85.0 86.1
Com.bc ........... : 62.9 : 78.0 : 83.5
W!ojlen spindls : 78.1 82.0 81.6
.torsted spinil, s. 49.1 64.5 66.3
Looms -
IcLrro'w ........ 57.9 :60. : 61.0
Vido .......... : 58.6 64.8 67.3
Carfwt and rug 62.4 69.2 71.9

From Departmcnt of Commerce fcrortr on "Activity of Machinery in Wool
Manufactures during the month of June 1929".









'JOOL 18 9 -


Wool consumption continues high

The consumption of wool in the United Statos by mills reporting to the
i Brqia of the Census during June amounted to 44,066,079 pounds (grease equiva-
lent) compared with 41,282,089 pounds last year and 48,764,676 pounds in IMay
1929. The quantity of combing and clothing wool consumed during? June 1929
was 3 million pounds above the 5-year average for June 1924-1965. Over 56 per
cent of the total wool consumption in June was domestic combing and clothing
wool, 16 per cent was foreign combing and clothing wool, and over 27 per cent
was foreign carpet wool. The following table shows the consumption of wool
by grades during May and Juno and also the total for January to June 1928 and
1929.

'.VOOL: Consumption in the United States, by grades, for specified months,
1928 and 1929

QOficial stpadards of the June ay Janury 1 to
United States for grades June 30
of wool 1928 1929 1929 1928 1929

: 1,0O : 1,000 : lCC' l,(' 1,000
:pounds :pounds : p.un-' : pounds pounds
Combing and clothing wool -
64's, 70's and 80's ...... : 8,371 : 10,428 : 10,717 : 57,768 : 66,670
58's, and 60's ........... : 4,830 : 5,086 : 5,252 : 29,612 :31,917
56's .................... 4, : 4674: 4,897 : 5,373 : 29,325 33,496
48's and 50's ............. : 4,969 : 4,454 : 4,857 : 30,407 :29,225
36's, 40's, 44's and 46's : 1,479 : 2,074 : 2,331 : 13,405 :14,838
Tot.l combing and clothing: :
wools ............... : 24,323 : 26,939 : 28,530 :160,517 :176,146
Carpet wools ................ 10,633 : 11,600 : 14,234 : 65,901 : 78,679
Total all wools ......... : 34,956 : 38,539 : 4L,764 :226,418:.254,825
Compiled from data in the "Wool Consumption Report for June 1929" issued
by the Bureau of the Census.

The above table shows that the consumption of combing and clothing wools
increased nearly 16 million pounds during the first six months of 192", compared
with 1926. Of this increase 9 million pounds was fine wool, 2 million pounds
was 1/2 blood and 4 million pounds was 3/8 blood. The greatest increases were
in the consumption of domestic 64's, 70's and 80's combing wools :-hi'h was 10
million pounds greater than last year, in foreign 48's, 50's and 56's wools
which increased 4 million pounds each, and in the consumption of foreign 58's
and 60's wools which was 3 million pounds pr'tcr than last year. The greatest
decline was in domestic 48's and FO's wools, the consumption of which was 5
million pounds less than in 1928.









';; OL 18


WOOL: Consumption in the United States, by classes
January June 1929


Month : Total :: Combing:Clothing: Carpet ::Domostic:Foreign

: 1,000 :: 1,000 : 1,000 : i,O :: 1,000 : 1,c '
p: pounds .:: oudz: pounds : onds :: pounds : pounds

Jar .............. : 47,789:: 26,649: 7,u05: 14,135:: 26,640: 21,149
Feb ............. : 41,373:: 21,318: 6,716: 13,339:: 21,273: 20,100
Iar .............. : 41,584:: 22,416: 6,680: 12,488:: 21,367: 20,217
Apr ............. : 42,776:: 23,188: 6,705: 12,-53:: 22,659: 20,117
My ............. : 42,764:: 21,962: 6,568: 14,234:: 21,482: 21,282
June ............. : 38,539:: 20,954: 5,985: 11,600:: 20,638: 17,931
Tot:1 Jan-June 1929: 2.,825:: 136,487' 39,659: 78,679: .134,059 120,766

"1928: 26,418: 120,1':4 40,313: 65,901: 130,141: 96,277

Co-mlpild.d from monthly reports of the Bureau of the Ocnsus.


':he oi:,ur.pt ion of carpet wool during June amounted to 11,600,425
pounds. r:..ch is about 1 million pounds greater than in June 1928.. The
t-tal r' -?.~ tion of canrpt wool from January 1 to June 30, 1929 was
79,6' ,- prands as compared with 65,900,995 r:oui;s during the same period
last P'"-ctically all of this increase was in filling wools, the con-
sumption of which was over 12 million pounds greater than last year.


Stoc'r .

The stocks of vocl, tops and noils in the United States or afloat
to th -.. te Stantcs. hbld by dealers and manufacturers on July 1, 1929,
amo':..el to 21-7? million "* :.. i, grease equivalent, as compared with 385
milliJn i.,-s on July 1, 1928. Stocks held by dealers were 21 million
p'u:in- 1.:s than July 1928 and manufacturers holdings were 17 million
p.- unloer last year. The f:ll,;:ing table shows the holdings of combing,
clot'n'r.g ana carpet wools, and tops rmd noils, by quarters, from July 1928
to J, ly 1:29.


- 10 -






WOOL- 18 l A


Stocks of wool, tops and noils held by dealers and mrrnufx'cturors in the
United States, first of each quarter, July 1W26 July 1929

Wool :Stocks of
:___ :wool, tops
**and noils
Date : Tops Noils nnils
Combing Clothing Carpet :Grdnot: reduced
: : stated : :to grease
:________,: : : basis
: Million : Million : Million : Million : millionn : Lillion : Million
: pounds : pounds :pounds :pounds : pounds : pounds : pounds
1928 : : : : : : :
July 1 : 171.0 62.8 49.5 30.5 14.3 7.4 :385.4
Oct .1: 163.4 : 67.8 : 46.3 : 23.0 14.6 : 7.1 369.8
1929 : : :
Jan 1 : 126.3 : 53.3 44.8 15.2 : 13.5 8.0 309.6
Apr 1 : 106,5 : 42.5 51.7 : 4.0 : 14.1 : .C 277.9
July 1 : 144.4 59.8 : 47.8 1/26.7 : 14.1 : 7.8 :1/347.4

Compiled from "Wool Stock Reports" issued by the Bureau of Agricultural
Economics and the Bureau of the Census.
1/ Including 3,617,jiC' pounds of w;ool, tops and noils reported after
closing of the tabulation.

Stocks of 64's, 70's and 80's wools showed the greatest declines and
were nearly 22 million pounds under last year. Stocks of 58's and 60's also
docelined and were about 8 million rounls below last year. Of tne total wool
stocks reported, 64.0 per cent were domestic conbinCr and clothing wools, 18.6
per cent were foreign combing and clothing: wools, and 17.4 per cent were
carpet wools. The accompanying table shows the holdings of ;ool by ades
for July 1928 and 1929. In -usin this table it should be noted that che item
".rTrdo not stated" amounts to nearly 10 per cent of the total holdings.

WOOL: Stocks held in United States, by grades, July 1, 1928 and 1929

: Stocks held July 1 :Percentage of total July 1
Grade 1928 1929 1928 1929


:Mill ion r'~~nis:rillio!. rounds:


Per cent


Per cent


64 80's .......
58 60's .......
56's ......... ..
48 50's .......
46's ............
36 44's .......
Carpet .......... :
Grade not stated.

Compiled from "Wool
Economics and the


106.8
40.9
32.6
32.6
11.4
9.7
49.5
30.4


85.2
33.0
32.6
29.9
11.7
;.1.8
47.8
26.7


34.0
13.0
10.4
10.4
3.6
3.1
15.8
9.7


30.6
11.8
11.7
10.7
4.2
4.2
17.2
9.6


Stock Reports" issued by the Bureau of Agricultural
Bureau of the Census.








WOOL-18


United Kingdom

Exports of wool manufactures

There was a considerable decrease in the British export trade in
wool manufactures during the first six months of 1929. Exports of tops
were 12 per cent under last year and amounted to 16,654,000 pounds com-
pared with 18,939,000 pounds for the first six months of 1928. Germany
took 1,656,000 pounds less than last year and 3,760,000 pounds less than
for the same period in 1913. Exports of woolen and worsted yarns de-
clined 18 per cent or nearly 4 million pounds under last year with Germany
taking 7,710,000 pounds compared with 11,097,000 pounds last year and
15,014,000 pounds for the first half of 1913.

The decline in the export of woolen piece goods was 21 per cent or
13,677,000 square yards. The greatest declines in exports were as follows:
China 3.1 million square yards, Japan 2.7 million, Canada 2.4 million,
Australia 1.6 million and India 1.2 million square yards. Exports of
worsted tissues increased 7 million square yards or about 41 per cent with
Canada taking 1.8 million, China 1.1 million and the United States 1 million
square yards more than last year. However, there has been a change in the
system of reporting exports of woolen and worsted piece goods and part of
this apparent increase in export of worsted tissues is due to this change.
The total exports of woolen and worsted tissues to June 30, 1929 was
76,222,000 square yards, which is 6,713,000 square yards or 8 per cent
under last year.

The exports of wool manufactures from the United Kingdom during
June were much less than during May and, with the exception of worsted
piece goods and wool waste, were considerably lower than in June 1928.
Exports of woolen and worsted yarns amounted to 3,352,000 pounds in June
compared with 4,710,000 pounds in May and 4,466,000 pounds in June 1928.
Exports of woolen and worsted piece goods were 1 million square yards
less than last month and nearly 46 million square yards less than June
of last year. The greatest declftes were noted in the exports of piece
goods to China and Japan with each of these countries taking 1.5 million
square yards less than in June 1928.

During July, the exports of wool, tops, noils, waste and rags were
all less than in June, according to a cablegram received August 13 from
Agricultural Commissioner Foley at London. Exports of yarns were very
much greater in July and amounted to 5,083,000 pounds which is 1,725,000
pounds greater than June and 920,000 pounds greater than July 1928. There
was a big increase in the exports of woolen and worsted piece goods and
17,542,000 square yards were exported in July, compared with 10,211,000
square yards the previous month and 17,954,000 eouare yards during July
1923. The following table compares the exports and imports of wool and
wool manufactures during July 1926-29 and June 1929.


- 12 -











UIETED KINGDOM: Trade in wool and wool manufactores, July 1926-29 and
Tine 1929

: Ju ly :
SJuJune
Exports and :ji,,,orts Unit 199
S) 1927: 1 2 1929 .
: Thou- : Thou- : Thou- :Thou- : Thou-
S: -. z : sands : sands : :i sands
Exports -
Wool ................. : pound : 3,600 : 3,300 : 2,200 : 2,:'' : 3,100
Tops ................. : 2,70 : 3,100 : 2,600 : 2,2 0 : 2,100
Yarns, woolen ........ : 4 505 609 : 949 563
Yarns, worsted ........ 2,907 : 3,871 3,554 :4,134 :2,789
issues, woolen ....... sq yd :13,354 : 12,276 :13,380 : 12,065 7,168
Tissues, worsted ..... : : 4,644 : 3,701 :4,574 : 5,477 : 3,043
Flannels and delines.. : : 39 : 41 : 353 : 275 : 187
Carpets and rugs ..... : 586 : 512 : 50 : 547 : 350
Noils ................ : pound : 1,300 : 1,500 : 1,.0 : 1,2" : 1,400
Waste ................ : 1,200 : 1,3 1,400 : 1,100 : 1,300
Wo:len rass .......... : 2,79 : 2,9..2 : 3,230 : 2,913 : 2,919

Imports : :
Wool ................. pound : 52,000 : 44,0,0 : 28,000 : 39,000 : 70,000
Tops ................. 100 : 200 : 100 : 200
Waste and noils ...... : 300 : 400 : 2 : 400 : 300
Yarns ................ : 999 : 1,422 1, 6 : 1,807 : 1,703
Tissues, woolen. ..... sq ; : 2,836 : 2,216 3,316 : 2,153 1,776
Tissues, worsted ...... : 557 : 447 : 398 : 139 : 143
Carpets and rugs ...... : 315 : 485 : 535 : 660 : 658
Woolen rags .......... : pound : 5,361 3,942 : 3,777 : 5,040 : 4,307

Compiled from Trade and .r-.j.-at ion of thd United Kingdom and cabled reports
from Agricultural Cornmissioner Foley at London.


The Ministry of Labour Gazette reports that employment in the wool
industry during June continued depressed and showed a further reduction in
both the worsted and woolen sections of the industry. The per cent of in-
sured work people unemployed or temporarily unemployed, was 13.9 on June
24 compared with 11.5 on :"sa 27 and 12.0 on June 25, 1928.

Price of z r it, ? .- "ol.s ower

Acrordinz to Albert Halstead, Consul General at London, sales of
home-girc-': ::c:.lc, Crt local fairs in Great Britain, have been made at prices
frorrm to 1.7 cents below those realized last year. This decline in price
amounts to over 12 million dollars for the estimated production of 31 mil-
lion ,pounds of skin wools and 88 million cournia of shorn wools, according
to the Lcndon H1ornijng Post. Th~ce estimates are based on the semi-official
returns discl.:sed b.; the Census which reported 12.3 million sheep sla-ih-
tered ana 16.0 million sthee shorn.during the year 1928-29.


- .16 -








i.nd'-n w.ool -]es

At the fourth series of Colniajl wool sales which h were held in
London from July 9 to 23, &.,p .- ...tel-j cO,,.:. bales of Col.cial wool and
21,0,1,A bales of South iAaerican wools were cataloged and about 75,C,'&, balds
were sold, of which 28,000 bales of Colonifl and. 3,o00 bales of South Amer-
ican wools were taken by Great Britain and 28,500 bales Colonial and 15,0:1'
bales of c.itzi Amkerican ools were taken by the Continent. Ger mny was the
principal "'.:~i-oer of fine w)ols. Amuerican b- urs were not tdtive at
these sales.

At the opening of the sales all prices were lower but very irregular
due to the poor selections offered. There was a good attendance of buyers
but c:.-'Ietition was weaker than at the Msy series. Duririn. the latter part
of the sales, however, c.-r_..tition became more general and there was a
good demand for wools at the lower price level. This increased demand brought
about a slight recovery in prices of wools of good quality, especially
grease wools. Many wool holders, however, decided not to sell at the prevail-
i3n price levels and are carry"! ; their wools forward to the next series of
sales. It is estimated that about 58,000 bal4s of wool are being held over
for the London auctions on September 17.

The following table shows the prices of wool by grades at the close
of the London wool sales in July 1927 and 1928 and from January to July I:??.

LONDOJ WOOL .L.-S: ': Prices at closing of the wool auctions reported on
basis of the Officia. Standards of the United States for grades of wool

: 1927 : 1928 19239
United Stateos -
grades July 21 July 0S Jan 30 Mar 21 May 15 July 23
Cants :Cents : Ccnts : Cents :Cents : Ce .t s

70 s ....... 96.3 : 97 : 87.2 83.1 79.1 : 71.0
64's ....... 86.2 93.3 80.1 '77.0 : 73.0 : 64.9
601s ....... 78.1 7.2 : 75.0 72.0 : 66.9 60.8
:'r, ...... : 71.0 77.0 : 69.9 : .9 960.8 56.8
'6'.- ....... 6 55.9 74.0 66. 60.6 : ..8 : 52.2
S0'. ....... 44.6 : 55,7 50.2 : 44.6 : 43.6 : 40.6
48's ........ 40.5 : 51.7 46.6 : 42.6 : 40.6 38.5
463' ....... 38.5 : 49.7 43.6 : 41.6 : 39,5 : 37.5
44' ....... 35.5 47.6 2.6 39.5 : 39.5 34.5
4:'..s ..... .. 33.5 : 46.5 : 41.6 : 33.5 : 38.5 : 38.5
6's ....... 36.5 : 6.6 : 40.6 : 7.5 : 37.5 : 37.5

Tr'..ul. td fro:a reports of E. A. Foley, United States Agricultural
C.:iOz:isicour at London.

B radfDrd

.sUJSEss was quiet.io Bradford during the first part of July with
lessened 'iill activity and lower output of yarns, owing to lack of new order
.ccurd-jin to c-.bles received from Consul Thomson at Bradford. Toward the end


- 14 -


WOOL-18








W >,,L- 18


- 15 -


of the month, the market had a slightly improved tone resulting from the
ap aren't stabilization of raw wool values on a lower level at the London
wool sales. A slight reduction in yarn prices resulted in increased busi-
ness and greater interest on the part of buyers. The output of yarns in-
creased but this improvement has not been maintained in August except for
hosiery yarns.

The market during Au.gst has been auiet due to the closing of many
mills for the summer holidays according to a cablegram received from Agri-
cultural Commissioner Fcley cn August 9. The piece goods trade has been
experiencing its usual seasonal dullness and is expected to remain ouiet
until the end of August. Manufacturers of piece goods are not well employed
and cloth buyers are demanding concessions which are difficult to grant.

The total wei4ht of goods p %s~ : through the T.raiford Conditioning
House during July was the smallest for any month this year. The quantity
of tops however, increased nearly 200,000 pounds and amounted to 3,8,4,000
pounds as compared with 3,638,000 pounds in June.

Ge rnany

Prices of wool and tops continued to decline at Bremen with German
A/AA and medium Cape wools selling on August 1 at 2 cents a pound under
July 4. Fine tops of Australian wools declined 6 cents per pound and
medium tops of Buenos Aires wools declined 3 cents during July. The
market for noils was fairly gro-d. The tops market is expected to show
some improvement in view of the increasing activity of the worsted spinners.

WOOL TOPS: Price per pound in Germany, specified dates, 1929

Grade Apr 3 May 3 June 1 July 4 Aug 1

: Cents :Cents : Cents :Cents :Cents

German wool A/AA ......... .. 97.2 94.0 :92.1
Cape wool, medium Quality washed :
6-8 months very fine ......... 88.1 79.1 :77.1
T.ps, Australian A/AA .......... : 103.4 101.4 : 95. : 93.3 87.2
Tops, Buenos Aires, medium .... : 63.9 : 63.9 :62.9 : 60.1 : 56.8
Compiled from reports received from 0. L. Dawson, Acting Agricultural
Commissioner at Berlin.

Stocks of tops are accumulating especially crossbred tops, stocks
ro which increased 1.8 million pounds during July. This increase was partly
compensated by a decline of about 300,000 pounds in stocks of merino tops,
according to the Acting Agricultural Commissioner at Berlin. Stocks of
merino and crossbredtops on August 1 amounted to 20,644,000 pounds as com-
pared with 19,169,000 pounds last month.

Woolen spinners are well employed in Germany and worsted spinners are
increasin; their activity. Sales of worsted yarns have increased and knit-
ting yarns continue in good demand. The improvement reported by the weavers








- 16 -


S ]i.t rmni-nth hert continued and t;ci for iyn dcrrlnd for f'Lbrics is declared to


Francec

The market for wool and noils in July %was loss active than in June.
but sales of tops increased especially tovrLrd the end of July. Otherwise
conditions are goner'jlly u.. .:.: '4 from last month. Stocks of tops con-
tinue to increo.so arnd on August 1 amrounted to 33,i'.,.. pounds s compared
with 32,540,000 pounds on July 1, 1Ij'. Lost of this increazc w;s in cross-
bred tops.

Belgium and Italy

The markc-t for wool, tops and noils was quit with transactions small.
However, the Antwerp futures market for tops which reopened July 1, rororts
active business. The Italian nr.rket is exarioncii:" a period of quiet un-
usual at this season with the wool industry gcnorally unchliL.J from last
month but with thu export business slightly improved.

Stocks of tops-continue to accumulate in commission c,:m.lr.g establish-
monts on the Continent and havo reached a nwv h:;l] point for the y:..r nas is
saown in the following table.

TOPS: Stocks hold by Continental commission combing ostablishmcnts, 1929

Location and ,
ction oand I;May 1 June 1 July 1 Aug 1
description of wool :
:1,? r:u::1:j' -:_1,' .'.i :.l :.1,00C pounds:1,000 pounds
Blcgium -
Merino ............. 2,8 : 2,610 2,769 : 3,294
Crossbred .......... : 2,379 : 2,714 : ,049 3,525
Total ........... 4,657 : 5,24 : 5,818 : 6,619
Germany -
Morino ............ : 10,148 10,710 10,622 10,326
C:rossbrud .......... 6, 41 : 7,590 : 8,547 : 10,318
.;t.l ........... : Ib,?. 1 5,3CC : 19,169 : 20,4-
Franco -
Merino ............. : 15,792 : 16,449 : 16,744 : 16, 3
Crosebred .......... : 12,990 : 14,094 : 15,796 : 17,011
'ot .i ............ : 28,762 : 30,54z : 32,540 33,850
Italy -
Merino ............. : 1,528 1,515 1,559 :
Crossbred ........ : 1,515 : 1,806 2,097 : 1/
Total ........... 3,043 : 3,321 3,656 -
Coipill.l from oabled reports from AkgriL-clturl Cornrissioner at Berlin.
1/ Ljt reported.


170,L 18







*:"0CL 18


WOOL, TOPS AND YART: Amount passing through conditioning houses at
Bradford, Roubaix, Tourcoing and Vorviors, 1929

Location :
and class Apr unc
:1,000 pounds: 1,000 pounds :1,l .J pounds :i u0 pounds
Bradford -
Wool ............... 909 : 75 : 776 : 585
Tp ............... : 4,670 : 4,67 : 3 3,834
Yirn .............. : 173 : 14 199 195
Roubaix -
Vool ............... : 21.3 2: 14 214 196
Tops ............... : 4,24 : 3,898 : 4,317 : 4,740
Y'Lrn ............... : 1,389 l,0ob : 1,448 1,290
Tourcoing -
Jool ............... : 2,209 2,26 : 2,564 2,416
Tops ............. : 7,601 : 6,574 : 7,174 : 6,779
Yarn ............... ,130 : 2,158 2,244 : 2,138
Verviers -
WI'ool ............... : 3,205 2,934 2,687 1/
Tops ................ 309 : 190 227 : /
Yarn ............... 783 : 756 : 716 : 1

Compiled from c abled reports from. Agricultural Cor.missioner at Berlin and
Consul Thomson at Bradford.
IL/ Not re-orted.


The Constantinople wool rmrket was less active during June th'n in h!.ay
and only 739 bales of wool woro sold as compared with 1,277 bales in June and
2,222 bales in April. Foreign importers were not Lurchr:in g and wool prices
declined. However, this z.lckh'ninu tendency should be of short duration, be-
cause local textile factories are expected to be more active and to consume
larger quantities of wool as a result of the inicroasud duties on imported
textiles, adcord ing to Erwin P. Koolor, Assistant Courmercial Attache at
Constantinople.

The movement of the now clip to nmrkut continues on a ru-ul r scale and
all grades of wool are arriving at Constantinople. Receipts of wool during
June were much heavier and amounted to 3,830 balos as compared with 1,107 in
May. C.iprncrits during June were 1,320 bales or about 325 bales larger than
last month. Stocks are be-inr.ir. to .ccurmultte at Constnntinople and about
2,900 bales wero avail-blo around the first of July, according to Julian E.
Gillospie, Commercial Attache at Constantir.oi Ie.



Japanese purchases of Australian vwol have increased rapidly during the
past few years. This increase proved to be a source of strength to the Aus-
trallan wool markets and was especially important in view of the decline in
Ar.erican purchases. The accompanying table shows the purchases by Japan in
Australia, over a period of years and for the first ten months of the 1928-29
season,


- 17 -








W"JOL 18


JAPAN: Purchases of wool in Australia during fiscal years,
average 16&.-1908, 1909-1913, annual 1918-1928


Year purchased r : .l ur
b\irmi2 1Tuly 1: 1~ purchased ;!u01 rch t'ed
beginning July 1: __ beginningng July 1: ____
: lc :: : Bales
Ave rac ::
199-1908 ... : 7,158 :: 1923 ....... : T9, ,4
19C'-1913 ... : 22,080 :: 1924 ......... : 105,467
1918 ...... 12,451 :: l-5 ......... : 113,263
1919 ...... : 16,566 :: 1926 ......... : 166,344
1920 ...... : 24,372 :: 1927 ......... : 216,109
1921 ...... : 90,467 :: 1928 ......... : / 173,579
192 ...... 106,768 :

Textile Argus, July 1929.
i/ Ten months ending lay 24, 1929.

Australia

At the annual conference of the National Council of Wool Selling Brokers
of Australia and the Australian Woolgrowers' Council, held in iMelbourne, it
was estimated that 2,585,000 bales of wool would be available for sale during
the coming season. It was estimated that there would be an additional 258,7:'0A
bales, inclusive of skin wools, which would not pass through brokers stores,
according to Consul General Garrols, at llelbourne. The total production was
therefore estimated at 2,843,000 bales which represents a decrease of about
102,000 bales from the record clip of last season.

Last year these councils estimated the amount of wool to be offered at
auction for the season July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 at 2,462,000 bales. The
amount actually offered at auction for the season was 2,598,450 bales and the
total receipts for the season were 2,690,486.

.'t ".e : eClbourne co fLt':ce it ,:as further -;,roed that l,2;C,uOG bales
of v..:1 should be offered before Christmas, with 660,uLiC bales cat-alogkd in
t;ie northernn centers and 600,U00 bales in the Southern centers. Allocations
for sales before Christmas this year compare with actual offerings in the same
period last season as follows;


Center


1929-30


P 31cs


Sydney
Brisbane
Victoria
Adelaide
Pert h
Total


510,000
150,v.uu
3-10,000
160,u00

1,260,. .
1,260, '.<;0


1928-29

Bales

1532,22j'
141,958
346,031
119,952
84,360
1,224,f 30


- 18 -





WOOL 18


,'USTRALI-:. 7Wool sales at Sydney during 19v6-L) season with conp-risons

S:verage::
IArriv Total ot.l : price : :ALerage weight
: per : Per- of ble
als quan- Total value : per : Per- of ble
Season by rail tity sold of wool: bale :ceuteate:
and sea:offered sold :Greazy :erino
: and : :Greasy :Scoured
: : : :scoured:
:1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 :Dollars: Per :Pounds :Pounds
:bales : bales : bales :dollars: : cent

1919-20 .... : 694 : 739 : 739 : : 87.86 : 68.69 : 332 : 234
1920-21 ....: 568 : 313 : 309 : 20,849: 67.20 : 8J.06 : 340 : 227
1921-22 ....: 775 : 880 : 913 : 60,597: 68.02: 73.20 : 330 :240
1922-23 ....: 755 : 763 : 813 : 86,418:106.38 :78.99 : 31 :234
1923-24 ....: 675 : 665 : 685 : 94,430:137.99 : 83.90 : 318 : 228
1924-25 ....: 829 : 661 : 645 :105,509;163.59 : 85.89 :327 : 232
1925-26 ....: 924 : 1,049 :1,068 :115,458:107.32 : 86.60 : 315 : 227
1926-27 .... : 1,128 : 1,080 : 1,125 :128,364:112.81 : 87.93 : 322 : 208
1927-28 ....: 1,070 : 1,006 :1,052 ;130,838:122.76 : 90.32 : 306 : 226
1928-29 ....: 1,124 : 1,137 : 1,142 3122,213:106.27 : 88.62 : 313 : 236

Country Life and Stock and Station Journal, July 5, 129.

The opening sales of the new season will be held in Adelaide on Friday,
September 6, and on the following M'onday, Septenbor 9, Sydney will open the
Northern season, according to Doyle 1:cDCno'uLh, Consul at Sydney. Other sales
in Septenbcr will be as follows: Perth, Septouber 17; Adel:ide, September 20;
:1clbourno, Septenoer 23-25; Brisbane, September 24; Geelong, Soptombcr 26.

New Scaland

The 1929 wool clip in Io.: Zealand will in all probability show an in-
crease over 1928 as sheep numbers showed an increase of 7 pc-r cent to 29,011,000
in April 1929 according to the preliminary official figure reported by Assistmnt
Trade Commissioner Charles F. Kunkol, iVellington, under date of June 22. This
increase in sheep together with satisfactory seasonal conditions point to an
increase in the wool clip sheared during the last few months of this year.

TrLere is sufficient feed in the country to successfully winter (June,
July, August) all stock on hand and a good lr.bin-, can be looked for in the
spring (Octobor-November), states Meat and 7ool. The paper also states that a
peak load is now buing carried under favorable conditions but if the summer
(December, January, Fobru'r:.)! is very dry nuxt yea'r followed by a hard winter
and an extra large lambing, also an increase of cattle, both of which are al-
ready assured, there may be some difficulty in fccdinr: the stock in the spring
of 1930.

Union of South Africa

Livestock throughout the Union except in a few districts are generally in
good condition and prospects for the remainder of the winter (June, July, August)
are on the whole satisfactory according to the ;unic issue of Standard Bank of
South Africa, Ltd., issued July 15.


- 19 -








'3.DOL 18


Argentina and Uruguay

Conditions in Arpcn-tina and Uruguay have not changed materially since
our last report and some regions are still in need of rain. No reliable es-
timates for the 1929 wool clips for these countries are as yet available.

Frc nce

Accr:-rding to an article in "Le Bulletin des Halles et Iarches" for June
l, the ior::et for French wools has been very bad this year and producers have
found difficulty in marketing their clips in spite of lower prices. For sev-
eral :/,'ers the prices received by the French wool growers have been unsatis-
fact:.ry aon a larger number are considering turning from wool to meat pro-
duct iol.

Sheep numbers in the eight countries reported, numbers so far as at the
beginning cr in the sumrw;er of 1929 estimated at 188,000,000, an increase
of e peer .:,nt over 1927 and 14 per cent over the five year average 1921-1925.
These eight countries in 1921-12- 3s...'. r,,ed ap proximately a little over one-
folrth of tVe world's sheep numbers. Increases are shown in the United States,
I'e, Zeasland and two States in Australia which support about two-thirds of the
sh.ea' in trht country. Decreases are shown in England and Wales, France and
Gerrri ny.


'urF LD: Sheep in countries reporting at the beginning or in
summer of 1929


Average
Country 1921-
1_925
Thousan(

United Sttls ... 37,215
Ernrl-d d r '.i'l.! : 14,385
Irih Fr Stte. 2,804
Fr L : 9,777
Germany.. .5,889
Grceec.- .. : 6,965
I'ewj Ze9 1rnd. .... : 223,382
IJew Suuth ;,a.les. 47,245
Ouecnsland. .. : 18,190
Tota.. .. : 164,852


: 1920 : 1929

I : Thousand : Thousand


: 44,554 __ 47,171
S 16,390 : 16,103
: 3,264 3,491
: 10,9'3 : 10,415
3,819 3,630
: 6,442 1/ 7,275
: 27,134 29,011
: 48,920 52,700
: 16,642 : 18,077


: 177,R8 3


187,873


Est ir..altc.d world
total. :


618,100


Compiled f.r.: official soarccs unless otherwise stated.
1i Estimate furnished by Assistant Commercial Attacho at Athens, January 28,
S1.29.


----


- 20 -









WOOL 18


- 21 -


_.O/L. Receipts, disposals and stocks 192'-2d clip in primary trarkets
Country, item and period Quantity
1,00CC pouTnd
Australia L/
Receipts: From July 1, lz12 to June 30, 1929 ......... 2/ 834,051
Same period 1927-2 ........................ : 743,821
Disposals: From July 1, 1928 to June 30, 1929 ......... : 820,317
Same period 1927-28 ....................... : 733,961
Stocks on hand June 30, 1929 ......................... : 13,734
Same date 1928 ........................... : 9,860
Argentina
Receipts at Central Produce Uarket, Buenos Aires -
July 1, 1926 to June 20, l129 .............. : 99,503
Same period 1927-28 ................... .... : 91,639
Shipments: October 1, 1928 to July 4, 1929 .......... : 288,9C8
Same date 1927-28 ......................... 271,54C
Stocks at Central Produce market 3/
On June 20, 1929 .......................... : 7,164
Same date 1928 .......................... 4,311
Uruguay
Receipts: February 6, 1929 ........................ : 121,CCc
February 4, 1928 ....................... : 119,0C0
Shipments: October 1, 1928 to July 4, 1929 ........ : 10 ,303
Same period 1927-28 .......... .......... .. : 118,08
Stocks: April 16, 1928. Stocks left for disposal
small
April 11, 1929 ............. .............. : 15, 772
May 8, 1929 ........ ........... ........... :4/ 1 ,912
Union of South Af".
iLxxp-:rts: July 1-June 30, 1928-29 ................. : 2b0,CCo
Same period 1927-28 ...................... : 261,000
Stocks 4/ of unsold wool January 1, 1929 .............. :/ 23,244
une 30, 1929 ................ :6/ 10,9CC
Iew Zealand
Shipments: November 1, 1928 to May 31, 1929 ........... :7/ 61,699
Same period 1927-28 ....................... :7/ 647,407








,':OL 18


- 22 -


Sources Australia: Estimates of Iaztional Council of dool Selling Brokers,
Consul Gonerral Arthur Garrols, Itelbourno, July 10, 1929. Weight per bale
from Country Life and Stock and stationn Journal, June 14, and Dalgety's
Annual Review, 1927-28, p ge 19. aAr tir : occirts, shiprl:rits, stocks,
Review of the River Plate. ru_ ..: ,hipm.nnts, Irvicw of the Jivcr Plate.
Receipts, monthly Review, ".arch, Bank of London and Louth AmrericL., Ltd.
Stocks, ::r; 8, 1929 and April 11, 1929, Wool Record and Textile World, April
16, 1928, L'ay Review, Bank of London and South America, Ltd. Union of South
Africa: Stocks, TI'oithly Bulletin of Union Statistics, January, Fobruary,
!!'rch. I:zrorts, Consul C.E. aI.cy. i.,'l ician1i: 1927-&6 and 1928-29,
Assistant Trade Commissioner C.F. Kunkol.

1/ Thcse figures concern only the clip of the season designated.
SConverted to pounds by using cstim-te of rv.vri; weight per bale or
310 pounds as furnished by the National Council of Wool Selling
Brokers of Australia, July-IMay 1928-29, the latest data available,
compared with an c-.vLr-ig: of 304 pounds for period July 1 to June 30,
1927-28.
3/ Stocks of 1926-29 clip are not given separately and the amount oc
:2:a 28 may include some wool re.-:.-Minng from the 1927-28 clip, also,
if any.
4/ No corresponding estimates for preceding year available.
/ Scoured wool changed to grease On basis of 60 per cent lost in
scouring.
/ Practically all inferior sorts.
7/ Preliminary unofficial.


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