World wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
World wool situation
Physical Description:
Serial
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Ceased with: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)
Numbering Peculiarities:
Some issues combined.
General Note:
Description based on: WOOL-16 (June 17, 1929)
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: WOOL-26 (May 27, 1930)

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 631804619
lccn - 2010229455
ocn631804619
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .A19
System ID:
AA00011233:00001

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Succeeded by:
World wool prospects


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Full Text
NBV F FL i


..... UNITEDD STI'LES D -:.:TU.ET OF AGR'CULIURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
US DrEPOSrrOP "a r ingr-ton

7;0L- 16

TH'E "';.RL **7 L ;.TT' I 'I"
June 17, 1929


Frices of most grades of domestic wool in the Boston market de-

clined during M.-ay but, except for the coarser classes of Eastern wools,

their -a a noticeable steadying of the market in the latter half of the

month and dealers have been more active than in previous months. Ohio

64's ani finer rere the most steady of the active lines, alth .i.,'1 demand

has been good for new Texas wools. The most severe declines were on 56's

k/.- blc.,i'. Combing of all grades fell more than clothing. The domestic

top market ',':. fairly active in May. Activity in the manufacturing indus-

try ir. April, tr.e latest month for which figures are available, was rather

hi h. Both spinning and weaving machinery were more active than in the

previous: month and in April last year. Consumption of wool has been lil-.-r

than for ChE same month in recent years. Imports in April continued low,.

c.il markets in Europe have been ; --,nerally weak. The declining .

tenridnc: at tlhe London sales has not stimulated demand, but has resulted

rather in le. confidence in wool values and avoidance of speculative

buying. T-.pz prices at Bradford at the end of M-y were somewhat below

those a month previous. Stocks of tops at Continental commission combinr--

?cta.blishmentt at the beginning of June were generallyy above those a

month ago. Latest official returns from Russia show a general expansion

in the product '-n of wool goods.







WOOL-16


Boston market

F1stern wool dealers have been more active in the domestic primary
markets during the past month. In Texas, particularly, competition has
been reported rather keen, according to Mr. R. L. Burrus of the Boston
wool office of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. A large volume of
the new Texas wools has reached the Boston market. Some Territory clips
have also arrived on this market during the paAt month. Small Quantities
of the Middle West fleece wools of the new clip came into the market early
in the month. A moderate demand has been received on almost all lines of
the new wools that have arrived. In the case of Texas wools, a fairly
large volume of the new clip has been turned over to mills. Price trends
have been slightly downward on most grades of domestic wools.

Ohio 64's and finer strictly combing wools were the steadiest of
any of the active lines. While sales were scattered and the volume of all
tran sections wag light to moderate, quotations continued throughout the
month at 40-41 cents in the grease. LTe bulk.of the sales vwas closed at
about $1.00 on an estimate scoured basis.

Chio 58's, 60's strictly combing wools were fairly active, but
prices declined slightly. Sales of moderate quantity were closed at 45-
46 cents in the grease during the early part of the month. This was
followed by a period of weakness in which some sales were closed as low
as 43 cents, but the bulk sold at 44-45 cents with the moderate increase
in demand that developed toward the close of the month.

Fleeces of 56's and 48's, 50's grades strictly combine_ wools de-
clined two cents a p.-.und in the grease during the month of May. Demand
was very slow and prices were irregular, with each newly established level
slightly lower. Th.En the month opened 56's Ohio wool sold at 46-47 cents
in the grease while 48's, 50's was moving at 45-46 cents with rumors
circulating through the market that lower prices had been accepted. As
prices reached new low levels, buying increased moderately in proportion
to supplies available until during the -last week of the month quotations
were fairly steady with 56's somewhat firmer than 48's, 50's. Closing
prices were 44-45 cents on Ohio 56's, strictly combing and 43-44 cents on
48's, 501s Quality of a similar description. Good bright strictly combing
fleeces from Michigan and Missouri sold on about the same scoured basis
as the Ohi> wools which sold at 83-.Pi cents for 56's and 75-78 cents for
4t3's, 50's. Few offerings of the low grades were available.

Original bag lines constituted the bulk of the business of the
western grown lines. The Texas new wools particularly have moved in
fairly large quantities. Early in the month the 12 month wools br.'Lght
9e-$1.00 scoured basis, for the aver-,e staple, but the larg,.r sales
were closed at prices mostly in the range 95-98 cents. A few choice
lots realized about $1.00 during the last week of the month. The 8-10
months' wools brought almost as much as the 12 months. The bulk of these
shorter wools sold at around 95 cents, scoured basis, with choice lots
hr-:r,]ni up to 98 cents.


- 2 -








170' 'T1-16


Territory wools in the ori- inal b-,es including bulk French combing
64's and finer qualities declined from 97-$1.00 to P5-9S co ts, ro~:re]
basis. Fair quantities were sold. Some Uth original bags sold e-r:y
in the month at 98-$1.00, scoured basis. The best Arizona "ools brought
95-96 cents, scoured basis. i"' Mexican fine wools sold in the original
bgs at 90-92 cents, scoured basis. Northern California 64's and finer
wools moved at 91-93 cents, scoured basis.

Prices on most lines of graded Territory w',ools declined durir, the
month. The bulk of the business was on French Combing 64's and finer and
on 58's, 60's strictly combing. Thi, French Combing fine brought up to
$1.00 scoured basis early in the month but later sales were mostly in the
rage 94-97 cents scoured basis. Strictly combing 58's, 60's, 3as fairly
steady with a fair volume of business distributed thr: .:i.ut the month.
Only a small volume of business was done on 64's and finer strictly comb-
ing wool. Prices declined from $1.CO-$1.04, scoured basis to '-. 1.00.
Grades including 56's and below, were dull most of the month because of
the limited ,uanLtities available. Tu-iness was scattered and of such
limited volume that prices were difficult to ascertain. The limited
transactions reported were at .5lihtly lower prices than prevailed during
the previous month.

Business in woolen wools has been limited during May. Moderate
quantities of scoured clothing and pulled wools were moved from time to
time at declining prices. Toward the close of the month the volume of
business improved and prices steadied somewhat. Noils were slow and
prices declined, especially on the finer grades.

'.^.v has been a fairly active month in the top market. Deliveries
on old contracts were good and a considerable volume of new orders "'as
booked. Prices, however, have declined in spite of a broader demand and
a l1-r-er volume of business. Oil combed 64's of choice staple declined
from $1.29-$1.30 to P1.25-$1.26 per pound. Dry combed 64's of shorter
staple declined from $1.29-$1.30 to 1.23-l1.25 for the better class and
to 041. :0 for the very short staple top. Oil combed 60's moved down from
$1.27-$l1.28 to l1.2?-,41.26. These lines comC:rrised the bulk of the new
order altho a fair amount of business was done on 58's, 56's and 50's
for men's wear and knitting trades. A sharp decline took place on 58's
tops. A month ago this grade was quoted at $1.25, but during the last
week in T.9:, business was accepted at pl.17-l1.16 per pound. On 56's
also, the decline was considerable going from $1.17-$1.18 to $1.07-41.08.
Top of 50's quality declined, but not quite so drastically as in the case
of the two higher grades. At the beginning of .'a', 50's were quoted at
$1.07-$1.08 and toward the close fairly large orders were booked at 41.02-
$1.03. A fair volume of business was done on 48's at $1.00-4)1.02 and on 46's
at 98-4.00 per pound, the lower figure of the range bein.. the prevailing
rate as the month closes. Some business was done on 44's at 8,-88 cents.
Demand was slow on 40's and 36's with both these grades quoted at 82-83
cents per pound.


- 3 -



































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WOOL-16


PRICE; Wool ver cound at Boston y and June 1982


Grade


64's. 70's. 80ts (fine)
Strictly combine
Ohio and similar grease
Fleece scoured
Territory scoured
561s 3 8 blood
Strictly combing
Ohio and similar grease
Fleece scoured
Territory scoured
46ts (low 1/4 blood)
Strictly combing
Ohio and similar grease
Fleece scoured
Territory scoured
Compiled from Market News
Agricultural Economics.


_ 1928
SJune 2
Cent s

: 48-50
: 118-12Z
118-12Z


56
: 101-10E
105-11(


48-49
82-87
87-92
Reports of


:
:t
:
) :


the


April 1I
Cents

43-44
103-107
104-107


53-54
95-100
97-102


45-46
75-78
75-80


S May 4
: Cents


Boston Office


3
5



5
3


SJuniie A-
: Cents

40-41
: 97-100
98-100


44-45
83-85
: 87-91


41-42
: 68-72
: 72-77
Bureau of


Domestic consumption high

Domestic consumption of combing and clothing wool by reporting mills
in April was 35.7 million pounds (grease equivalent) as compared with 28.3
million pounds, for April 1928, and an average of 30.5 million for April,
1924-1928. No material change from last year took place in the distribu-
tion of consumption by grades. Carpet wool consumption in April totaled
12.9 million pounds against 9.5 million in April 1928.

WOOL: Consumption in the United States, by grades, April 1929,
,,c rrrd it-,fh ".rh l9 and April 1928
Official standpras of : oo co -,- ..... : _.. nr- J L, c. of total
the United States : March r: !rl : March : April
for grades of wool : 1929 : 1288 : 1~9 : 192J : 1928 : 1929
:Million millionn :iou, on : Per : Per Per
Combing and clothing :pounds : _cu'1- : poujs : cent : cent cent
wool :


64's, 70's and 80's .: 10.43 : 8.17 11.88 25.1 : 24.9 : 27.8
58's, and 60's ......: 5.02 4.25 5.90 12.1 13.0 13.8
56s ..................: 5.76 4.74 4.73 13.9 14.5 : 11.0
48's and 50's .......: 5.34 : 4.03 4.87 : 12.8 : 12.3 :11.4
36's, 40ts, 44Ts and : :
4 t .......... .....: 2.55 2.04 : 2.52 : 6.1 6.2 5.9
Carpet wools ..........: 12.49: 9.52 : 2.8 : 30.0 : 29.1 : 30.1
Compiled from data in the "Wool Consumption Report for April 1929", issued
by the Bureau of the Census.
a/ These are totals of grease, scoured and pulled wool, as published by the
Bureau of the Census; the scoured and pulled wools have not been reduced to
a grease basis.


PRC:Wo e a


1929


40-41
97-102
100-104


46-47
86-90
88-93


42-43
70-75
72-77
e of the


- 4-


I"_- --






,00L-16


WOOL C01OSUI.MPTION: quantity of wool entering into manufacture in mills
in the United States, April 19239
Class of wool d: eight a/ : P rcent..e
:Domestic:Foreign : Total :Domestic:Foreign : Total
1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 : Per : Per Per
pounds : pounds : pounds : cent : cent cent

Combing and clothing 27,356 : 8,376 : 35,732 : 55.60 : 17.02 72.62
Carpet ................ : 13,473 : 13,473 : : 27.38 27.38
Total .............: 27,356 : 21,849 : 49,205 55.60 : 44.40 100.00
Computed from data in the "Wool Consumption Report for April, 1929," issues


by the Bureau of the Census.
a/ Includes scoured and pulled wools reduced to grease basis by assuming
that one pound of scoured wool is equivalent to 2 pounds of grease wool and
one pound of pulled wool to 1-1/3 pounds of grease wool.


Wool machinery more active


The Census report on the activity -of wool machinery during April
shows very large increases over last year on all types of wool machinery ex-
cept carpet and rug looms which were slightly less active based on the
actual number of hours that the machines were in operation as compared with
their maximum single shift capacity. Activity during April 1929 was also
greater than during March except for combing machinery which was about 1
per cent less active this month. The following table compares the activity
of wool machinery during March and April 1929 and April 1928.

WOOL :,ACHINERY: Number of hours active in the United States,
March and April 1929, and April 1928, expressed as
---percentage of maximum single shift capacity
Wool machinery : April : March 1929
1928 : 1929
Per cent : Per cent : Per cent
Cards .................... 77.8 87.3 86.0
Combs ..................: 63.7 81.0 81.9
Woolen spindles ........: 75.3 84.4 82.7
Worsted spindles .......: 55.7 : 69.7 67.7
Looms- :
Harrow ............ ..... 51.1 : 63.5 : 59.6
Wide ........*........: 57.9 70.3 66.6
Carpet and rug .......: 71.1 : 69.6 : 68.7
From Department of Commerce Report on "Activity of Machinery in ,Tool
Manufactures during the month of April 1929."


- 5 -





W~OOL- 16 6 -

'io 5l ITri ts r lat ]vly 1o0

Imports of c:.r.Li.i. and clothing '-ools into the United it:-.tss durir.
April were relatively low, amounting to 11,884,G"? pounds as compared with
14,421,000 pounds in March 19"?, and a five-year average for April 1924-
of 16,578,C.r.0 pounds. Imports '"ere the lowest for any April sinc4 1913
with the exception of April 1924 which amounted to only S,543,000 pounds.

The total imports of combing and clothing v-ool entered through the
United States Customs at the ports of Boston, New York and Philadelphia
durir,_ the period January 1 to June 1, 1929 was somewhat greater than last
year and amounted to 63.4 million pounds as compared with 57.1 million
duri,,- the same period last year.

Imports of carpet wools continue relatively high, amounti-" to 16
million pounds in April as compared '* th 8 million pounds last ,E r, and .
five-year average for April 1924-1928 of 11 million pounds. Most of these
carpet wools are imported from China, Argentina and the United Kingdom. Im-
ports of carpet wools into the customs districts of Boston, '' York and
P.h ladelphia from January 1 to June 1, 1929 were very much greater than
last year and amounted to 78.7 million :.courLs as c.':,rei -ijth 59.5 million
for the same period last year.

Situation of th "-,701 industries in ,.r ,p e
United K:inydom

Imports of woolen cloth into the United Kingdom for April increased
considerably over last year, amounting to 4,170,000 square yards, as
compared rith 2,488,000 a year ago. Much of this increase came from 3er-
many. Exports of wool manufactures, on the other hand, were considerably
less than during March 1929 or April 1928. The weih-.ted index of volume
exports for April was 66.3 compared with 82.4 for .:-,rch 1929 and 73.6
for April 1928. Ex:.orts of woolen and worsted fabrics amounted to
9,513,roo square yards in April 1929, 12,061,07 in March 1929 and
9,970,000 in April 1928. There were 2,355,000 pounds of tops and 2,999,000
p o-unr.s of woolen and worsted yarns exported in April compared with
3,169,000 pounds of tops and 3,285,000 pounds of yarns in iarch 19'-.

UNITED :I::.15.:: p.*ports of rool and wool m-nnuvfutures, April, 1 -1'-:?
____ ___and March 1929
Unt Aril : March
Item Unit 1927 : 12 129 : 1929
u c7, .: c =_ u z .:T f-s nJ_ s 7' ..u -13 T h .:-u nd S
,7ol ................: pound 4,618 : 3,213 : 3,804 4, &?
To s ............... : 03 2, 1 : 2,355 : 3,169
Yarns, woolen .......: : 451 417 525 : 577
Yarns, worsted ......: 3,311 3,311 : 2,474 2,70
Tissues, woolen .....: sq. yd. : 6,860 7,990 : 6,647 8,49S
TIszlses, worsted ....: "' : 2,619 1,980 : 2,866 3,562
Fl],nn is and delaine~: 272 2: 5 : 2 : 5.
Capet.s and ri s .....: : 62 : 500 4 :: 4
' oi l- ............... : pound 1: ,28 : 1,612 1,70 1,
a st ............... : 1,761 1,451 : 1, 79 1,48
oolefn rags .. ...... :_ 2.451 : 2_392__ 3 ,703 __,
CGomiled from Trade and Navigation of the United Kingdrrm.






WOOL-16


The May series of the London Wool Sales closed on May 15 v'ith sales
of about 65,000 bales of Colonial and 26,500 bales of South American wools.
American purchases were negligible, according to cablegrams received by the
Foreign Service of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics, from E. A. Foley
Agricultural Commissioner at London. The Continent purchased 31,000 bales
of Colonial and 21,000 bales of South American wool and the United Kingdom
took about 34,000 bales of Colonial and 5,500 bales of Punta Arenas, Falk-
land Islands and sundries. Approximately 42,C'0- bales of Colonial vools
were held over for the next series of sales on July 9.

Bradford m r]-:'et ;k

Business has been very ouiet in the Bradford tops and yarn market,
according to Consul Thompson. The decline in wool prices at London has
not stimulated demand, but has rather caused a lack of confidence and a
general avoidance of speculative forward buying. Some improvement has
occurred in'the piece goods market. The percentage of insured r'orkers em-
ployed in the wool textile industry on April 22 vas 10.5 compared -'ith 11.2
on March 25 and 7.1 on April 23 last year.

There were few sales of wool tops at Bradford the first week in June
and spinners complained of little business, particularly for the export trade,
according to a cablegram received by the Foreign Service of the Bureau of
Agricultural Economics from Consul Thomson. E.:.rts from cloth making
centers indicate moderate activity in worsteds and woolens but orders have
been few. Conditioning house returns for :-,'; indicate a decrease in activ-
ity as compared with April last and May a year ago. The movement to reduce
wages in the wool manufacturing industry has been checked and the majority
of strikers have returned to work at unchanged wages.


OOL, TOPS AND YARN: Price per pound at Bradford on specified dates,
July 1928 May 1929


Date Scoured
wool

Cents : C
1928
July 27 97.3 :
Aug 25 95.3 ]
Sept 25 87.2
Oct 25 : 87.2
:iov 24 : 89.2
Dec 24 : 89.2
1929
Jan 26 87.2
Feb 23 81.1
Mar 23 79.1
Apr 23 : 78.0
y_ f 25... ._75.0
a/ Official Standards of


64's a/


Tops

'ents

L09.5
107.5
99.4
97.3
99.4
97.3

97.3
91.2
90.2
89.2
85.2' :


: _____ 50' sa/+
_A. -,3 "'rr11 y .".I Qr]


yarn :
2/48's :
Cents :


139.9
137.9
133.8
127.7
lo1.8
127.7

129.7
125.7
125.7
125.7
119.6


Scoured
wool

Cent s

57.8
56.8
52.7
48.7
52.7
52.7

51.7
48.7
46.6
48.7
45.6 .


the United States for "o.-.l


* r J w ,.


Tops yarn
______ / 1522's
Ce.'it : Ce'it T

63.9 : 85.2
61.8 83.1
58.8 81.1
55.7 79.1
58.8 : 3.1
57.8 : 83.1

59.8 83.1
56.8 80.1
56.8 : 78.1
56.8 : 78.0
:54.7 : 77.0
and "'ool tccs.


--~-


--


-7 -


ste : H


---


.. -r


:






- 8 -


Ei r:. !y-v. h ni r d I. Nr o,'r-1 n,'l t,:,1 r i .i t,
noils active

The market for noils at Bremen was active during b.:, but tops
and wool were quiet, according to a cablegram from Acting Agricultural
Commissioner Dawson, at Berlin. The activity of worsted spinners in Ger-
many was below last year but it continues good with woolen spinners. "eav-
ing activity has been only fair. New sales of wiorsted yarn are difficult
but the demand for knitting yarn is good. c.-.len goods prices are generally
unsatisfactory and orders on hand are below last year, but demand is fair.

In France the domestic demand for tops and wool is ouiet and con-
fined to current needs but export demand is good. T,.e noil market is
active. Activity in the wool manufacturing industry is good, but new sales
of yarn were slow the latter half of >t..:.

The demand for tops and wool at Antrerp continues very slow but
noils are somewhat more active. The same situation exists in Italy- Activ-
ity in the Italian manufacturing industry has declined slightly.


WOOL, TOPS AND YARN: Price per pound in France and Germany
specified dates, 1929
: arch 4 : April 3 : May 3 June
____ Location and grade 1929 : 1929 1929 : -.l___
Cents Cents Cent s Cents

Tops, Australian -:
Merino 64's warp ........ : 107.5 107.5 107.5 : -
Crossbred 56's .......... : 91.2 91.2 90.2 87.2
Tops, Ar.-entine -
Crossbred 56's .......... 83.1 8 .1 : 82.1 : 1.1
Noils -
Australian merino ....... 89.7 89.7 90.6 92.4
Australian crossbred .... : 73.5 74.6 : 75.5 : 75.5
Cape .................... : 90.6 90.6 92.4 : 92.4
Yarn -
Merino .................. : 133.3 129.7 126.6 : 121,3
Cheviot ................ : 88.9 89.7 : 91.5 : 89.7
Germany_
German rool A/AA ....... : : 97.2 : -
Cape wool, medium oual-
ity washed 6-8 mos. very :
fine ................... : 82.1 : 82.1 -
.ops, Australian A/AA ... 103.4 103.4 101.4 95.3
T:'ps, Buenos Aires,
medium ................. : 63.9 63.9 : 63.9 : 62.9

Compiled from reports received from 0. L. Dawson, Acting Agricultural
Commissioner at Berlin.







WOOL-16


- 9 -


During May a general increase in stocks of tops occurred on the
continent as indicated below:

T FS: Stocks held by Continental commission combing estabhishments,1929

Location Feoruary 1 March 1 April 1 "i-' 1 June 1
BelairdT : _.000 lbs: lC3 lbs: 1_00 lbs: 1_'0 : 1.000 lbs
Merino ....... 2,158 : 2,108 : 2,158 : 2,258 2,610
Croesbred .... :___2 ,260 : 2339___ : 2,229__ 2379 : 2714
Total ...... : 4418 : 4 47 :__ 487 __: 4__6 5324
ermany -
Merino .... ... .7,218 : 8,591 10,042 10,148 : 10,170
Crossbred .... 6,312 : 5,734 : 6,146 : 6841 7.590
Total ......: 13530 : 14,325 16188 16.989 17760
France -
:.Lrino .......: 12,189 13,514 14,484 :15,792 16,449
Crossbred .... __12.698 : 16,020 :12,886 :12990 14.094
Total ...... 24.887 26.534 : 27,370 : 28,782 : 30 543
Italy -
Merino ....... 769 866 1,060 1,528 ,515
Crossbred .... : 1393 1,424 : 1.349 : 1,515 :8___ 06
Total ...... : 162 : _2290 : 2,409 : 043 ___3-321
Compiled from cabled reports from Agricultural Commiszioner at Berlin.


In general the amount of wool, tops and yarn passing through con-
ditioning houses in France declined in May, as shown by the table belo"':


WOOL, TOPS AND YARN: Amount passing through conditioning houses at
Bradford, Roubaix, Tourcoing and Verviers, 1929


Locat i on


Bradford
Wool .........
Tops .........
Yarn .........
Roubai x
Wool .........
Top .........
Yarn .........
Tourcoing
Wo' l .........
Tops .........
Yarn .........
Verijers
WVo.:'l ...... ..
Tops .........
Yarn .........


February
: 1.000 -bs:

: 749 :
: 4,357 :
: 136 :

: 172 :
: 4,142 :
1,192 :

: 1,929 :
: 6,270 :
: 1,911 :

: 2.396 :
: 456
. 657 :


March April '-:


1 000 Ibs:

832 :
4,619 :
144 :

243 :
5,243 :
1,314

2,407
7,747
2,092

o,159 .


1."= lb-


909
4,670
173

24
4,244
1, 9 :

2.209
7,601 :
2,130 :

3, 20.5 :
309
78 :


875
4,467
184

214
3,898
1,305

2,286
6,574
2,158

2,934
190
756






.0JOL-16 10 -

The expansion in the Russian wool textile industry is shown by the
following figures on woolen goods products:

RUSSIA: Production by mills of wool goods, October-March, 1926-27 to 1928-29
Month : .1'?; 1927-1928 1928-19__
j .Q r -. .r rir I__'.' r r.'ds
Oct .................. : 7,106 : 8,699 : 10, -'
v...v ......... .... : 7,717 7,893 : 9,638
Dec .................. : 8,130 : 8,625 10,152
Jan .................. : 7,180 9,026 10,799
Feb .................. : 7,590 8,859 10,994
Mar .......... ........ : ?7.921 : 9,.555 : 11, 664
Total .............. : 45644 __ 52,657 : 6.,897
From Ec-:,ronmic Life, (Moscow) :I;;, 8, 1929.

Production conditions in foreign countries

Conditions may nol,, be stated as favorable for the coming clip in
Australia, New Zealand, the Union of South Africa, and Uruguay, although it
is still too early to give reliable estimates. There does not appear to
have been any great improvement in pastures in Argentina although conditions
.t the 'beginnin-, of M::y were reported as temporarily improved by recent rain,
occordin- to the "Review of the River Plate". There was still a g--ner'al
lack of rain in the interior of the province of Buenos Aires as lat. as
May 23, according to the Anglo South American Bank, ";',, 25.

Receipts, stocks and disposals of 1928-29 clip
(June 7, 1929)

"Tjile! there has been a considerable reduction in stocks in Australia
since our last report, that is, from 91,000,000 pounds on April 1 to
41,ro0,.'0, pounds on May 1, the quantity on h.-nd is still 33 per cent above
that of last year at the same time. Stocks in the Central Produce Market,
Buenos Aires, Argentina, on May 7, 1929 were approximately 10,908,000 pounds,
a slight reduction compared with the 11,056,000 pounds on hand March 26, but
about twice as large as the amount on hand on the corresponding date of 1928.
Stocks on hand in Uruguay on May 8 showed a reduction of over 30 per cent
compared with the 15,872,000 pounds reported for the preceding month. Tii"eZE
stocks, however, constitute only a small percentage of the total supply of
wool from these countries.

Receipts into store this season have been larger than last in Aus-
tralia, Argentina and Uruguav according to available estimates.

Disposals up to the first part of May have been greater in Australia,
Ne... Zealand and Argentina. In the other countries disposals have been less,
according to the latest estimates available. From October 1, 1928 to !ay
9, 1929 shipments from Uruguay aggregated 91,763,000 pounds, a decrease of
20,836,000 pounds compared with the same period of the preceding season.
Shipments from the Union of South afri.ca for the first three months of the
present season, October, December 1928 aggregated apprc.xi-imat;ly 127,735, '0n7
pounds, grease basis, against 1.'1,G60,,c00 punda in 1927. Th,-ee figures are
taken from the official trade returns and scoured wool has been changed to
greq-.e on the basis of 60 per cent lost in 7cruring.







,;ODL- 16


WOOL: Recei.ts, disposals and stocks 1928-29 clip in
primary markets
Country and item and period : Quantity

Australia a/
Receipts: From July 1, 1928 to May 1, 1929 ........ : b/ 802,629
Same period 1927-28 ..................... : 715,904
Disposals:From July 1, 1928 to MW 1, 1929 ........ : 761,204
Same period 1927-28 ..................... : 684,871
Stocks on hand May 1, 1929 ..... ................. : 41,425
Same date 1928 .. ....... .......... 31,034
Argentina
Receipts at Central Producc Market, Buenos Aires -
July 1, 1928 to May 7, 1929 ........... 95,576
Same period 1927-28 .................... : 87,739
Shipments: October 1, 1928 to May 9, 192E- ......... : 246,607
Same date 1927-28 ...................... : 238,218
Stocks at Central Produce Market ce
On May 7, 1929 ......................... : 10,908
Same date 1928 ......................... : 5,728.
Urue-ua v
Receipts: February 6, 1929 ....................... : 121,000
February 4, 1928 ....................... : 119,000
Shipments: October 1, 1928 to May 9, 1929 ......... 91,763
Same period 1927-28 .................... : 112,599
Stocks; April 16, 1928: Stocks left for disposal,:
small ..................
April 11, 1929 ......................... : 15,872
May 8, 1929 ............................ : d/ 10,912
Union of South Africa
Stocks d/ of unsold wool on January 1, 1929 ....... : e/ 23,244
S t if February 1, 1929 .....: / 28,319
;.iLarch 1, 1929 ......... : -/ 22,010
New Zeal.nd Bales
Shipments July 1, 1928 to May 1, 1929 ............. : 640,000
Same period 1927-28 ..................... 621,000
Sources Australia: Estimates of N:tional Council of Wool Selling Brokers,
published in Weekly Wool Chart, C. F. Mallett, Bradford, England, May 16, 192c,
Weight per bale from Country Life and Stock and Station Journal, April 19, 1929
page 26 and Dalgety's Annual Revievw, 1927-28, pg4e 1'. Areentinm: Receipts,
shipments, stocks, Review of the River Plate. Urug.. s: Shipments, Review of the
River Plate. Receipts, Monthly Review, !.,arch, Bank of London and South Amer-
ica, Ltd. Stocks, ,T.1y 8, 1929 and April 11, 1929, Wool Record and Textile
'Torld, Aril 16, 1928-i..v Review, Bank of Lond TA and South America, LtV
of South Africa: Stocks, Monthly Bulletin of tliom Statistics, Jan'
miary,.~rch. ine-, Zealand: 1927-28 Exports, Monthly Abstract oF
1928-29 W.,ool Record ;nd Textile World 1.1-y 2^, 199. f/ Th
only the new clip, i.e., that of 1928-29. bf t wvrte
timate of average "ejeiht per bale or 311 pounds **
Council of 'Tool Selling Brokers of Austr-li.
data available, co.nmpred iti an average
April 30, 1927-2B. c./ Stocks of 192P
amount on May 7 m-y include some we
if any. d/ No corresponding stir
L3!g, chanEed to grpase c %- i


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