The wool situation

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Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00058

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


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Full Text



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Washington


WOOL-20 August 9, 1938



THE WOOL SITUATION
DlNIV OF FL Lis..
Q C NT O-PT ..


Summary
U .) EPOSITORY

Recent developments in the domestic situation indicate that the

low in domestic wool prices for the year probably has been reached and

that some further advance in prices may occur before the end of 1938,the

Bureau of Agricultural Economics reports. Mill consumption in the second

half of 1938 is likely to be larger than in the first half of the year,

and it also may be larger than in the last 6 months of 1937. Stocks of

finished and semi-finished goods have been sharply reduced in recent

months, and mill sales and activity increased in June and July.

The preliminary estimate of the quantity of wool shorn or to be

shorn in the United States in 1938 is 369 million pounds which is an

increase of about 2 million pounds over 1937 and about the same increase

over the 5-year average. This estimate does not include wool pulled

from slaughtered sheep and lambs which averaged 65 million pounds annually

in the 5 years 1933-37.

Early est-imates for several important foreign wool producing

countries, including Australia, indicate that world production of wool in

1938 will be smaller than in 1937. The decline in production, however,

may be largely offset by the larger carry-over into the 1938-39 season,

and total supplies may be about the same as in 1937-38.








WOOL-20


Stocks of apparel wool held by and afloat to United States dealers

and manufacturers totaled 298 million pounds, grease basis, on June 25

compared with 207 million pounds a year earlier. Total supplies of raw wool

in the United Cta'es on July 1 probably w oro much larger than at the

corrospondinr tier in 1936 and 1937. Stocks of finished and semi-finished

wool goods, however, probably were much smaller on July 1 than a year

earl ior

United States imports of apparel wool f or consumption wore only 8.6

million pounds in the first half of 1938 compared with 120 million pounds

in those months last year and an average of about 23 million pounds for

the 5 years 1932-36.

The weekly rate of consumption of apparel wool by United States

mills in Juno was 50 percent greater than in April, but it was 23 percent

smaller than in June last year. Consumption in the first 6 months of 1938

was about half as large as in the same months last year and with the

exception of 1932 was the smallest for these months in the past 20 years.

Mill buying in the domestic wool market in July was relatively large

compared with recent months and prices advanced on all grades of wool.

Prices of representative grades of spot territory combing wool at Boston

at the end of July wore 6 to 12 percent above the 1938 low but theyvero

about 40 percent below the high point of 1937.


-2-


I ..






WOOL-20 -3-



RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN DOMESTIC SITUATION

BACKGROUND.- The donmstic wool situation in the first half
of 1938 was marked by small mill consumption and large
stocks of raw wool. Wool prices declined rapidly in the
latter part of 1937. By May of this year, domestic prices
were lower than at any time since 1933, except for the spring
of 1935. The unfavorable conditions in the domestic wool
nmrket early this year wore accompanied by declines in prices
and in mill activity in foreignn countries, and stocks of raw
wool accumulated in Southern Homisphore selling centers.
Since April, prices in foreign markets have boon quite firm.


Wool Sales and Prices

Mill buying in the domestic wool market in July was relatively largo
compared with sales of recent months, and prices of some wools advanced
rather sharply.

Quotations at Boston for country packed lots of 3/8 and 1/4 blood
bright fleece wools at the end of July were 31-32 cents a pound, in the
grease, delivered to eastern markets, 'compared with about 26 cents a month
earlier. Spot bright fleece wools of combing length wore quoted in
Boston at 29 to 31 cents a pound for fine and '32-33 cents for 3/8 blood
the last week of July, compared with 26-27 cents a pound for both grades in
the last week of Juno.

Trading in territory wools in July was chiefly on original bag lines
but there was some business in graded wools. The advance in prices of
territory wools was not so great as the advance in fleece wool prices.
Good French combing length fine territory wools in original bogs were
quoted in Boston at 65-66 cents a pound, scoured basis, the last week of
July, compared with 62-63 cents a mnnth earlier. Prices of graded
territory wools of combing length avoragod 71.5 cents a pound, scoured
basis, for fine and 60.5 cents for 3/8 blood the end of July, compared
with 65 cents and 54 cents respectively, a month earlier.

The average farm price of wool nr July 15 was 18.7 cents a pound,
compared with 17.7 cents on June 15 and 31.3 cents on July 15, 1937.
While prices of representative grades of territory combing wool at Boston
at the end of July were 6 to 12 percent above the 1938 low, they were
about 40 percent below the high point of 1937.

Federal government wool loan

In connection with ie loan program of the Federal Government for
domestic wools the Commodity Credit Corporation has announced recently that
through July 30, a total of 69,R million pounds of wool (grease basis) had
been appraised for loans aggreg-.ting about 12.1 million dollars. Of this
amount, loans of 5 million dollars have boon completed on 28 million pounds
of wool, the remainder being in process. The loans average about 17.5
cents per grease pound.








WOOL-20


-4-


Wool Stocks and Imports


Stocks of apparel wool held by, and afloat to, United States dealers
and manufacturers totaled 298 million pounds, grease basis, on June 25,
compared with 287 million pounds a year earlier and 295 million pounds
on June 27, 1936, according to reports of the Bureau of the Census. These
figures include wool afloat and in bonded warehouses but they do not include
wool held on farms and ranches and in local warehouses in producing States.
Because most of the new clip has been shorn by the end of June and is
largely in the hands of producers, stocks held by dealers and manufacturers
do not include nearly all of the total supply of wool in the country at
the end of Junoe The stocks reported by dealers and manufacturers on
June 26 this year with comparisons, are shown on a scoured equivalent basis
in the accompanying table.

Although stocks hold by dealers and manufacturers at the end of
Juno on a grc.:.-o basis wcro slightly larger than a year earlier, they wore
smaller than a year earlier when converted to a scoured basis. This
difference is duo partly to the fact that the stocks at the end of June last
year included a larger proportion of light shrinking foreign wools than did
the stocks at the end of Juno this year. Stocks of medium and low grade
wools wore smaller at the end of June than a year earlier but stocks of
fine wools were considerably larger than a year earlier.

Total supplies of raw wool in the United States at the present time
probably are much larger than at the corresponding time in 1936 and 1937
and are large in relation to current mill consumption requircments. Because
of the small imports so far this year, however, supplies are not so
burdensome as might be expected from recent mill consumption levels.

United States imports of apparel wool for consumption wore only
8.6 million pounds from January to June, compared with about 120 million
pounds in those months last year and an avorago of about 23 million pounds
for the 5 years 1932-36. The January June imports were the smallest
for these months in any recent ycar except 1933.








WOOL-20


Stocks of raw wool top and noil held by dealers, topmakers
and manufacturers in the United States, scoured basis,
June 25, 1938 with comparisons


: 1937 : 1938
Itm : June 26, : r Mar. 26, :
Item : 1/ : / : June 25,

: 1,000 1,000 1,000
: pounds pounds _pounds

Apparel wool, total ........: 142,554 109,487 139,423

Dealers ...................... 68,119, 63,574 81,239
Domestic ...............: 57,794 55,092 73,455
Foreign on hand ........: 9,855 8,303 7,631
Foreign afloat ........: 470 179 153

Manufacturers and topmakers...: 74,435 45,913 58,184
Domestic ..............: 40,662 30,556 43,900
Foreign on hand ........: 31,430 13,804 13,603
Foreign afloat .........: 2,343 1,553 681

Carpet wool, total ..........: 35,649 34,300 32,025

Dealers ............... ....: 2,873 3,643 4,064

Manufacturers ................: 32,776 30,657 27,961

Tops ......................... : 25,576 25,948 22,192

Noils ........................: 12,218 7,608 7,858



Compiled from Bureau of the Census Quarterly Wool Stock Report,
June 25, 1938. Those figures are believed to include more than
95 percent of the total stocks held by,and afloat to,all dealers (in-
cluding Commissionhouses, pullers and cooperatives), topmakers, and
manufacturers in the U .ited States on the dates specified.


1/ Revised.


-5-







WOOL-20


Mill Consumption


Consumption of wool by domestic mills in Juno continued the increase
which began in May. The weekly average consumption of 3,867,000 pounds,
scoured basis, was 50 percent above the low in April but was 23 percent
lower than in Juno last year, aid about 10 percent below the June average
for the 5 years 1932-36.

Consumption in the first 6 months of 1938 was equivalent to 131
million pounds of shorn wool, grease basis, and 28 million pounds of
pulled wool. Consumption during the period was little more than half as
large as in the same months last year.

Mill consumption of apparel wdol on a 'scoured basis, in t he year
ended June 1938 was smaller than in any similar period in the past 20
years of record. The consumption of 171 million pounds, scoured basis,
was 43 percent smaller than in 1936-37 and about "25 percent below the
average for the 5 years 1931-32 to 1935-36. In the calendar year 1934,
however, mill consumption was only 18 'million pounds.



OUTLOOK FOR DOMESTIC PRICES.


Recent developments in the domestic wool situation indicate that the
low point in wool prices for 1938 has been reached and that some further
advance in prices may occur before the end of the year.

The advance in domestic prices in July while foreign prices remained
about at previous levels, has widened the spread between domestic and
foreign wool prices. In recent months, however, this spread has been some-
what less than the tariff and if foreign prices remain fairly stable, as
now seems likely, a further moderate advance in wool prices in the United
States could occur without causing much increase in imports.

Mill consumption in the last half of 1938 is likely to be larger
than in the first half of the year and also may be larger than in the
last half of 1937. Since sales of wool goods to c6nsurcrs did not drop
so much as mill consumption, stocks of finished and semi-finished goods
wore sharply reduced in the first half of 1938. Mill sales of wocl oiece
goods increased in June and July, according to reports of the Hoe York
Wool Top Exchange Service.

No change has occurred in the raw wool supply situation in the past
month. As stated in the July issue of the Wool Situation, stocks of
wool in the United States are larger than at the same tine in 1936 and
1937. But if imports remain snall and mill con-sum:;ption is increased,
as now appears likely, stocks of raw wool in this country on January
1, 1939, may be smnllor than at the beginning of the current year; but
stocks probably will remain.relatively largo.


-6-





WOOL-20


-7-


WOOL PRODUCTION IN 1938

The preliminary estimate _of the quantity of wool shorn or to be shorn
in the United States in 1938 is 368,528,000 pounds which is an increase of
about 2 million pounds over 1937 and about the same increase over the 5-year
average, according to the release of August 3 issued by this Bureau.

The estimated number of sheep shorn or to be shorn in 1938 is 46,632,000
head, which is 600,000 head or about 1.3 percent more than the number shorn in
1937. The average weight per fleece this year is .estimated at 7.90 pounds
compared with 7.97 last year.

Early estimates for 10 foreign countries including Australia, the Union
of South Africa, the United Kingdom, France, Italy, GermLan-y ad af ow others
indicate a reduction in world wool production in 1938 from that of 1937.
World production in 1937, exclusive of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
and China is now estimated at 3,487,000,000 pounds, an increase of about
1 percent above 1936 and the largest production in recent years.


Wool: World production, 1921-37

:Production excluding: Union of : :Production including
:Union of Soviet : Soviet : China :Union of Soviet
Year :Socialist Republics :Socialist : 2/ 3/ :Socialist Republics
: and China :Republics : : and China
: Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil,lb. Mil, b.

1921.........: 2,661 298 89 3,048
1922..........: 2,699 244 89 3,032
1923.........*: 2,647 256 89 2,992
1924..........: 2,818 294 89 3,201
1925..........: 2,952 315 89 3,356
1926..........: 3,135 351 78 3.564
1927.........: 3,159 371 78 3,608
1928..........: 3,275 392 78 3,745
1929 ..........: 3,284 394 78- 3,756
1930..........: 3,299 306 78 3,683
1931..........: 3.393 2/ 212 78 3,683
1932..........: 3,458 li/ 142 78 3,678
1933..........: 3,392 141 78 3,611
1934.........: 3,317 135 78 3,530
1935..........: 3,352 / 158 78 3,588
1936..........: 3,442 / 202 78 3,722
1937 3/.....: 3,487 / 259 78 3,824

1/ Revisions of estimates published in the Wool Situation, December 1937-
/ Unofficial estimates based on official estimates of sheep numbers in 1920
and 1934 and 1935,
3/ Exports are not a reliable index of production during this period owing to
the unsettled conditions in China,
4/ Estimates based on sheep numbers and average yield as derived from
official estimates.
/ Preliminary.
/ Wool production and Trade 1936-37, Imperial Economic Committee (September
1937) quoting "Sherstyanoo Dyclo".






WOOL-20


FOREIGN SITUATION

Wool Sales and Prices

London auctions There was little change in prices of merino wools at
the July series of London auctions compared with prices of the
previous series which closed on May 20. Prices of most
crossbred wools, however, were slightly lower than in May when
the series closed on July 22. Sliped wool prices at the close
of the July series were fully equal to closing quotations in May.

The next series of sales at London will open on
September 20,

Southern Hemisphere sales The wool markets in South America continued
quiet during most of Juno, but some improvement in sals and
prices was reported late in the month* Sales wore chiefly to
German and French buyers.

The 1937-38 selling season is closed in most ot-her
Southern Hemisphere selling centers. Sales of the new season
will open in Australia.and South Africa in September, and the
Now Zealand sales in November.



Wool Supplies in Southern Hemisphere, July l'

1/
Apparent supplies- of wool in the five important wool producing
countries of the Southern Hemisphere on June 30 are estimated to be about
170 million pounds larger than a year earlier and 130 million pounds
larger than the avorago for June 30 in the 5 years, 1932-36. June 30 is
the end of the official export season in Australia, Now Zealand and the
Union of South Africa. In Argentina and Uruguay the season ends on
September 30,

Although the carry-over of wool in the Southern Hemisphere at the
end of the 1937-38 season is relatively largo, this may be offset to a largo
extent by a decrease in production in 1938-39.

Wool exports from Australia, Now Zealand, and the Union of South
Africa in the season ended June 30, 1938 are estimated at about 1,270 million
pounds. The 1937-38 exports woro 7 percent smaller than in 1936-37 end
8 percent smaller than the average exports of the 5 preceding seasons.

Exports from Argentina and Uruguay to Juno 30, which includes the
first 9 months of the 1937-38 season, wore about 292 million pounds.
This is a decline of 23 percent compared with 1936-37 and a decline of 18
percent conparod with the average exports for the 5 preceding seasons.


_/ Production plus carry-over fror procoding season minus exports to end of
June.


-8-





V0OOL-20


The decline in exports from: the Southern Honmiphore in the 1937-38 season
is accounted for by the smaller exports to the United States, Japan and Bolgiure
Exports to most other countries wore equal to those of t he preceding season with
exports to Gormany and France showing a considerable increase.

Supplies in Importing Countries

Front available information it appears that supplies of raw wool in
European countries are not largo but are adequate for current manufacturing
requircnonts which have boon reduced. Stocks of wool in Japaneso warehouses
remain well below the level of recent years. Raw wool supplies in most importing
countries have increased seasonally during the past few months.

SUPPLEIMETARY DATA
Table 1l- Prices of wool per pound in specified markets and prices oft oxtile
raw materials in the United States, selected periods, 1936-38


Market and description


:Avorago:A


: 1936 :


vcragc: July : 1938
1937 : 1937 : May : Juno : July


Boston:


: Cents


Territory combing scoured :
basis -
64s, 70s, 80s, (fine).......:
56s, (3/8 blood) ..........:
46s, (low 1/4 blood)........:
United States:
Farm price,l5th of month,
grease basis ................:
London: 1/ :
Average qualitycloan cost 2/ :
70s ........................:
56s ......** ... ..... .....:
46s ....... ....6 ..6..* ... ..:
Bradford: '/
Scoured basis -
64s warp ...................:
50s..... .... ............. ..:
SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE -
United St.ats: Textile fibers -
Wool,torritory fine staple J/ :
Cotton, 7/8 :.iiidling 5/........:
Silk, Japanese 13-15 6/.......:
Rayon yarn, 150 denier .........:


92.0
80.4
65.9


26.9


58.4
35.1
23.8


59.8
29.7


Cents Cents Cents


101.9
87.1
72.1


32.0


62.1
46.3
39.5


64.7
43.2


102.C
88.5
70.5


31.3


70.4
49.7
44.2


71.5
47.7


BETI'.EEI. SEASONS


92.0
11.9
176.6
58.6


101.,9
11.2
186,0
62.2


102.C
12.1
194.0
63.0c


68,0
55.8
51-. 0


18.7


44.5
31.6
26.9


46.4
28,9
PRICES NOT

68.0
8.
160.0
52.0


Cents Cents


65.0
54.0
49.0


68.6
58.2
51.8


17.7 18.7


44.9 42.6
31.5 30.8
26.3 25.2


43.4 45.1
26.9 27.7
REPRESENTATIVE

65.0 68.6
8.4 8.8
160.9 181.1
49.0 49.0


Foreign prices have boon converted at prevailing rates of exchange. Yearly averages
are averages of monthly prices except United States farm price which is weighted
average.
1/ Average of quotations for each series of London sales reported by the London
Office of the Bureau. For months when no sales wore held figures are
interpolated.
2/ Top and noil in oil.
3/ Quotations reported about the 25th of the month by the London Office of the
Bureau.
/ Secured basis, Boston market, /Avovrago at 10 markets.
6/ 78 percent white, at New York.


1~1~_


~_~_


-9-







WOOL-20


Table 2.-


United States: Wool imports, consumption n-d machinery
activity, specified periods, 1936-3'


:Jan. Dec. : Jan. Jun : :
It- Juno May June
S19360 1937 1937 1933 1937 1935 1938

: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: fundss pounds _pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds


Imports for consumption
actual weight: 1/
Apparel ............ :110,712
Finer than .40s ......: 84,759
Not finer than 40s ..: 25,953
Carpot,including
camels hair 13.......143,276

Consumption, scoured
.basis 2/ -
Weekly average -
Apparel ............. 5,351
Carpet ..............: 2,029
Aggregate -
Apparel ............. :278,258
Carpet ..............:105,504


150,160
126,601
23,559


120,574
103,296
17,278


172,091 115,035


4,772
2,023

248,121
105,197


5,894
2,725

153,242
70,853


8,572
5,768
2,804


9,479
7,851
1,628


16,256 18,713


2,932
833

76,245
21,660


5,020
2,378

20,080
9,512


1,169
664
505


2,043
1,182
861


2,784 3,609


3,236
759

12,944
3,036


3,867
838

15,467
3,313


Prcnt Pen rcent'Percent Percent Percent Porcent Percent


Machinery activity: 2/ :
(40-hour shift)
Worsted combs .......:
Worsted spindles ....a
Woolen spindles .....:
Looms, broad ........:
Looms, narrow .......
Carpet and rug .looms :


121.1
83.5
118.2
98.9
51.9 *
68.3 '


115.2
82.2
107.8
97.2
51.0
71.3


145.o
103.8
131.3
119.9
67.7
86.8


69.5
47.1
59.9
56.8
24.1
39.0


125,9
90.6
120.2
112.1
56.6
82.1


80.3
52.4

49.9
22.6
33.2


96.3
63.2
65.3
62.6
19.2
33.6


Import figures from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Dcmestic
Commerce. Consumption and mnchirnry activity figures from the Bureau of
the Census.
1/ Weight of greasy, scoured and skin wool added together.
/ Figures for May and Juno based on 4 weeks, January to June on 26 weeks.
No adjustment made for holidays.


-10-





WOOL-20


Table 3.- Exports of wool (grease, scoured and washed combined) from
Australia and the Union of South Africa first 11 months of
season, July 1 to May 31, 1936-37 and 1937-38

: Australia : Union of
Country of :/ :South Africa 2/ : Total
destination T:1933-T- : 1937-38: 1936-37: 1937-38: 1936-37 ,1937--38--
Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb.

United Kingdom .........: 301.8 310.6 34.4 38.3 336.2 348.9
Germany ................: 42.6 50.9 44.7 78.9 87.3 129.8
France ................: 79.8 121.1 32.2 39.4 112.0 160.5
Italy ..............: 36.2 29.2 10.8 16.5 47.0 45.7
Belgium ..............: 131.9 88.5 21.1 18.2 153.0 106.7
Netherlands ............: 9.9 8.0 3/ 3/ 9.9 8.0
Japan ................: 82.4 64.3 87.8 5.2 170.2 69.5
United States ..........: 74.5 4.7 5.2 0.4 79.7 5.1
Canada ..........3.... : 3.8 3.3 / 3.8 3.3
Total...,,....... : 762.9 680.6 236.2 196.9 999.1 877.5
Other countries ........: _0.2 ._ 8 8..5 11.0 ..0_ 9.7 59.5
Grand total.......: 803.1 729.1 245.7 207.9 1,048.8 937.0

Wool Intelligence Notes.
l/ Statistics of the Commonwealth of Australia Bureau of Census and
Statistics. 2/ Report of the South African Trade Commissioner in London.
3/ If any, included with another countries,".




Table 4.- Exports of wool (grease, scoured and washed combined) from
Argentina and Uruguay to principal consuming countries, first
9 months of season, October 1 to June 30, 1936-37 and 1937-38

: Argentina _: Uruguay :_ Total
Country of destination i Tota
:1936-37 : 1937-38: 1936-37: 1937-38 : 1936-37: 1937-38
: Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.1b. Mil.lb. Mil.lb.

United Kingdom ........: 66.3 58.1 19.2 18.1 85.5 76.2
Germany .............: 14.8 65.6 16.3 26.0 31.1 92.4
France ...............: 32.0 39.3 5.0 3.7 37.0 43.0
Italy ..................: 24.2 7.9 8.5 5.7 32.7 13.6
Belgium ................: 23.0 16.7 8.1 4.8 31.1 21.5
Netherlands ...........: 0.8 1.6 1.7 2.2 2.5 3.8
Japan .................. 20.8 6.6 26.4 2.7 47.2 9.3
United States ...........: 72. 10.1 26.6 0.6 99.1 10.7
Total............:_ 254~4 205.9 111.8 64-6 366.2 270.5
Other countrics........: 11.9 l5.8 1._ 6.2 13.8 22.0
Grand total...... 266.3 221.7 113.7 70.8 380.0 292.5

Trado reports supplied by Buenos Aires Office ?f the Bureau of Agricultural
EconomIcs


-11-





700L-20


Table 5.- Wocl: Estimated production in specified countries,1933-38


Country :1933 : 1934 : 1935 : 1936 : 1937 : 1938
---------- : --: :-- :
: Ml.lb. Mil.l b. Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb. il.lb.
SOUTHERN HELIS3PHETE :
Australia ..............: 995.9 1,015.4 971.1 989.1 2/1,020.0 3/960.0
New Zealand .............8 289.6 265.0 304.3 302.9 ~/ 314.0
British South Africa ...., 275.2 210.0 237.8 264.0 5/ 233.0 /245,0
Argentina................:6/ 364.0 6/348.0 7/364.0 7/373.0 7/ 375.0
Uruguay .. ..............: 104.7 119.0 113.0 116.2 / 128.0
Chile .......,.........: 25.7 28.7 25.4 9/ 28.4 30.6
Peru 10/ ...........: 11.3 11.2 10.1 12.3 13.9 13.9
Total above countries.. 2,066.4 1997.3 2,025.7 2,085.9 2,114.5
Other Southern Hemisphere:
countries .............: 43<3__ 4.A -. 7 45.5 45.5
Total Southern Hemis. : 2,109.7 2,041.7 2,071.4 2,131.4- 2,160.0


NORTHLRIJ TIT;.EISPHERE
United States:
Shorn .......,,.......: 374.2 370.3 364.7
Pulled ...............: 60.5 66.0
Total.............: .. 438.4 430.8 430.7
Canada ...........,.-...: 19.3 19.5 19.4
Mexico ..................: 9.6 / 10.3 (10.3)
Total...............:_ 67.3 460.6 460o __
Other ... .... ..........: 0.4 0.4 04
Total North America : 467.7 A61.0 460.8


360.3 366.8 368.5
66.2 66.2
426.5 433.0
19.2 1970
(10.3) (10.3)
456.0 462.3 .
_04 0.4
456.4 462.7


South America (Northern) :

Europo:
United Xingdo(Eng land
and Wales,Scotland &
Northern Ireland) ....;
Ireland (Free State)...;
Ior.;..-y ................: .
France 11/ ..........
Spain / ..........
Italy ............... .
Germany 4/..........
Austria ........... :
Czecioslovakia 11/....
Hun .ry .......... ..... :
Yugc : via / ..*.....:
Gre c, I1 / ..... .. :
Bul- .cia *....... ...:
Rumcjnia / .......
Estonia ..............
Latvia .....*.........:


(12.0) (12.0) (12.0) (12.0) (12.0) (12.0)


119.9


19.6
5.8
37.0
67.6
39.0
30.0
(1.2)
2.0
9.3
30.8
16.0
21.9
61.5
2.2
4.1


112.3
17.0
6.0
36.4
(63.0)
38..1
29.8
V/ 1.2
2.1
11.0
31.1
16.7
23.2
68.0
2.1
4.6


1Q8.6
16.5
5.7
36.8
71.0
37.5
30.7
IL 1.1
2.2
13.0
32.1
17.3
23.8
60.1
2.0
5.2


107.7 105.7 4/108.9


17.6
5.9.
36.6
(71..0)
36.3
34.5
(1.1)
3.0
14.6
33.3
18.3

(60.1)
2.3
5.3


16.4
4/ 5.9
j/ 37.5 k' 38.3
(71.0)
4/ 37.4 A/ 41.5
38.1 41.2
(1.1)
3.1 4,/ 3.3
15.0 17.6
34.6 35.8
4/ 18.6
(24.6)
(60.1)
2.5
5.2
Continued -


__~_ ___ _~_______1_1_~__1___ 1_


-12-





WOOL-20


Table 5.- Wool: Estimated production in specified countries, 1933-38 Cont'd.


Country :1933 : 1934 : 1935 : 1936 :1937 : 193

NORTHERJ HEMISPHERE Mil.Ib. Mil.lb. Mil.b. Milb. Mil.b. Mil.l Ib.
Europe: Cont' d:
Lithuania .............: 3.8 3.8 3.5. 3.7 3.7
Poland / ...........: 9.6 9.6 10.8 11.1 11.7
Total above countries: 481.3 81.0 j477,9 _A87.0 492.2
Other ...............: 23.3 23.6 24.4 26.5 2?.2
Total Europe, oxclud-:
ing Union of Soviet :
Socialist Republics : 504.6 504.6 '502.3 513.5 518.4
Africa:
Morocco ...............: 309 29.1 33.4 33.4 37.3
Algeria ..............: 39.3 4/ 41.2 4/ 43.6 A/ 47.9 4/ 48.5
Tunisia y/ ...........: 5.2 5.5 5.55 .2 5.8
Total above countries: 74 5.8 82.5 86.5 91.6
Other ......... ......: 12.0 12.1 11.9 12.2 12.2
Total Africa, exclud-:
ing British South
Africa .............. 87.4 87*9 94*4 98-7 103.8
Asia: 12/
Turkey ..............: 34.3 '30.9 35.3 48.9 '""54:2 --4 .
Iraq ............... 16.3 17.7 18.5 21.5 17.2
Iran (Persia) .........: 47.0 47.0 50.0 13/(50.0) 13(50.0)
Syria ................ 9.3 9.8 6.8 8.4 8.0
India ..............: 87.1 87.7_ 84.3 (84*3) (84.3)
Total above countries: 194.0 193.1 194.9. 213.1 213.7 .
Other ................. 17.0 16.7 16.7 16.7 16.8
Total Asia, excluding:
USSR and China ...: 211.0 209.8 211.6 229.8 230.5
Total Northern Homis.:
excluding USSR......: 1,282.7 1,275.3 1,281.1 1,310.2 1,327.4
World total, exclud- :
ing USSR, and China : 3,392.0 3_317.0 3,352.0 3,442.0 3,487.0 _
USSR ..............: 141.0 135.0 1j/158.0 14/202.0 1 /259.0
China 16/ .........: 78.0 78.0 78.0 78.0 78.0
World totalincluding:
USSR, and China ....: 3,611.0 3,530.0 3,588.0 3,722.0 3,824.0

This table includes wool shorn during the calendar year in the Northern
Hemisphere and that shorn during the season beginning July 1 or October 1 of
the given calendar year in the Southern Hemisphere. Pulled wool is included in
the total for many important countries at its grease equivalent. Figures in
parentheses interpolated or carried forward. For table showing all countries
see the Wool Situation dated December 10, 1937.


Continued -


-13-




I


WOOL-20 -14-


Table 5.- Wool: Estimated production in specified countries, 1933-38
Continued

NOTES

l/ Preliminary.
2/ Estimate based on increase in first hand receipts at selling centers
for the season as compared with those of last season.
j/ Pro-shoaring estimate of Australian wool selling brokers and wool
growers, converted to pounds grease equivalent.
4/ Estimate based on sheep numbers at date nearest shearing time and
other available information.
2/ Trade estimates. Receipts of new clip wool into store fbr season
1937-38, amounted to 231 million pounds.
6/ Estimates of the Argentino Ministry of Agriculture, subject to revision.
7/ Estimates furnished by Buenos Airos Office of the United States
Department of Agriculture.
8/ Estimate based on report from Vice Consul Adam Jr., of a 10 percent
increase above a year ago.
9/ Census.
10/ Estimates based on exports alone or exports, stocks, and domestic
consumption and any other available information.
11/ Revisions based on recent census figures of wool production or sheep
numb ers.
12/ Estimates for Asiatic countries rough approximations only.
13/ Estimated quantity for commercial purposes are as follows:
1936, 33 million pounds; 1937, 35 million pounds.
/ Wool production and Trade Imperial Economic Committeeo quoting
"Sherstyanoo Dyolo".
15/ Plan.
16/ Unofficial estimate based on sheep numbers. The Chinese Economic
Journal for Juno 1937, p. 658 gives an estimate of 70 million to
80 million pounds annually.










POUNDS
(MILLIONS)

350


WOOL, APPAREL CLASS, SCOURED BASIS: CONSUMPTION
BY MILLS, UNITED STATES, 1918-37


1918-19 '20-21


'22-23 '24-25 '26-27


'28-29 '30-31


'32-33 '34-35 '36-37


YEAR BEGINNING JULY


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 29402


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


FIGURE I


300


250


200


150


100


50


0


'38-39


=




,Im&- ,:


- -r
0-a
IL L


LU -
o
oo

_>m
Lu
cm


POUNDS
(MILLIONS)



3,600




3,400




3,200




3,000




2,800




2,600


1921


1923 1925 1927 1929 1931 1933 1935 1937


U. S. DEPARTMENT-OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 24690


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


FIGURE 2


WOOL: WORLD PRODUCTION, 1921 TO DATE




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