The wool situation

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Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00057

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



UI ITZD STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Washington

VIOOL-11 November 11, 1937


U.S. DEPOSITORY


THE WOOL SITUATI ON



Summary


Most factors in the wool situation now indicate that domestic wool

prices in 1938 Iray average lower than in 1937, according to t he Bureau of

Agricultural Economics. Wool prices are now rather high in relation to prices

of other textile materials.

World supplies of wool in 1938 probably will be slightly larger than in

the present year, the Bureau points out, although they will be below average.

Mill consumption of wool in this country and possibly in some foreign countries

in 1938 is expected to be smaller than in the present year.

The total supply of apparel wool in t he United States on October 1

was estimated to be about 15 percent larger than a year earlier, but it was

smaller than in a number of other recent years. Since stocks of such wool

held by dealers and manufacturers in late September were only about 5 percent

larger than a year earlier, the quantity of wool held in the producing

States on October 1 apparently was larger than on October 1 last year.

At the beginning of October apparent supplies of wool for the 1937-38

selling season in the five principal wool-producing countries of the

Southern Hemisphere were slightly larger than a year earlier, but they were

slightly smaller than the average for early October inthe five preceding

years. Although wool production in these five countries in 1937 was

tentatively estimated to be about 3 percent larger than that of last year,

the carry-over from the preceding year was somewhat smaller than a year later*







J7:.OL-11


Consumption of apparel wool on a scoured basis by United States mills

in the first 9 months of 1937 was about 5 percent larger than in the

corresponding period of 1936 and was only slightly s-aller than the very large

consumption in 1935. Since M'iarch, however, mill consumption has declined

somcv.hat and in September it was about 20 percent smaller than a year earlier.

It now appears probable that consmllrtion in the last quarter of this year

will be smaller than that of a year earlier,

In view of the large domestic mill consumption since early, 1935, it

seems probable that there has been a considerable accumulation of finished

and semi-finished manufactured wool goods in the several channels of trade.

In view of this accumulation and the present high prices for wool as

cmc.,-ir-ed with other textile raw materials, it is probable that mill con-

sumption in 1938 will be smaller than that of 1937.




DOMESTIC SITUATION

BACKGROUND : As a result of very large mill consumption
and below-average stocks in the United States and
foreign countries in the early months of this year the
1937 domestic wool marketing season opened in April with
prices at the highest levels since early 1929. Prices
declined in April and :.>ay as the now clip became a.va.ilable
in quantity and then rr.:-ind fairly steady until
Septt.o.br. Chiefly as a result of the weakness in mill
demand in this country and abroad, prices in both domestic
and foreign markets declined in September. Domestic
mill consumption declined gradually after the first
quarter of 1937. Stocks of raw wool in the United States
iniocent months have been larger than a year earlier
but have remained below the aver:;.- of other recent years.


-2-







WOOL-11


Wool Sales and Prices

The price situation in the Boston wool market was very irregular in
October and quotations were almost entirely nominal. On the basis of prices
asked for moderate offerings at the end of October, prices of graded territory
wools, scoured basis, were 5 to 8 cents a pound lower than at the end of
September. Prices of greasy Ohio and similar fleece wools were 3 to 5 cents
a pound lower than a month earlier. Prices of most wools at the end of
October had declined below prices reported at the end of October 1936.


Lower prices of wool in l9 18_than in 1937 probable

Numerous uncertainties in the world economic situation make an
appraisal of the probable trend of wool prices in both domestic and foreign
markets in 1938 more difficult than usual. At the present time most factors
in the wool situation indicate that wool prices in 1938 will average lower
than in 1937.

World supplies of wool in 1933 apparently will be slightly larger
than in the present year, although below average. Mill consumption of wool
has been above average in the United States and in moost foreign countries
in the past 2 or 3 years. in the United States, at least, there apparently
has boon soae accumulation of stocks of finished wool products in 1937,
and this along with the prospective weaknesss in consumer demand in 1938
may tend to curtail the domestic mill demand for wool. The present relation-
ship between prices of wool and prices of other t extiles also is such as
toreduce mill consumption of wool. In some foreign countries, however,
reo.rm:~mnt programs and military operations in 1938 may tend to offset the
weakness in mill demand for wool resulting from other factors.


Wool Stocks

Stocks of apparel wool held by United States dealers and manufacturers
reporting to the Bureau of the Census on September 25, 1937, totaled about
135 million pounds scoured basis, co:.p- red with 143 million pounds on June 26
and 127 million pounds on September 26 last year, Stocks of domestic wool,
on a scoured basis on September 25 were about the sane as a year earlier while
stocks of foreign wool were about 8 million pounds larger.

Dealers stocks of apparel wool on Septomber 25 were 7 million pounds
larger than in September 1936 while manufacturers' stocks were about 2 million
pounds larger than a year earlier. The stocks reported on September 25 were
equivalent to 234 million pounds of shorn wool, greasy shorn basis and 42
million pounds of pulled wool, greasy pulled basis. Stocks in late September
1936 on a grease basis were about 224 million pounds of shorn wool and 38
million pounds of pulled wool.


~i~






WOOL-11 -4-


In addition to the above stocks of raw wool, dealers a..d rIanufacturers
held 32 million pounds of wool tops (app.reol class) on -ptrncr 25
compared with 26 million at the end of September 1936. The stocks of tcps
were larger than at the end of any quarter since June 30, 1934. The l1rge
increase in stocks of -tops during the third quarter of this year indicates
that -art of the mill consumption in that period was due to activity in
co. bing which was not accompanied by a similar rate of activity ir. other
sections of the industry.

Total supplies of apparel wool in the United States on a grease basis,
including wool held in producing States, were estimated to be about 15
percent larger on October 1 than a year earlier. This would indicate that
the quantity of wool stocks not held by dealers and manufacturers on
October 1 was considerably larger than on that date in 1936.


Stocks of raw wool, top and noil held by dealers, topmakers and
manufacturers in the United States, scoured basis,
September 25, 1937 with comparisons


1936 1" 37
Item : Sept. 26 : June 26 : Sept. 25


: 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.

Apparel wool, total .....: 126,846 142,554 135,259
Dealers ........... .....: 66,629 68,119 73,600
Domestic ...........: 57,220 57,794 62,700
Foreign on hand ....: 8,573 9,855 10,645
Foreign afloat .....: 831 470 255
Manufacturers and top.L-i:ers 60,217 74,435 61,659
Don:estic ...........: 43,291 40,662 38,757
Foreign on hand ....; 15,657 31,430 21', 76
Foreign afloat 1..... 1,269 2,343 1,0

Carpet wool, total ....... 33,116 35,649 42,269
Dealers .................. 3,218 2,873 2,802
Tiiu.facturers ............: 29,698 32,776 39,467

Tops ............... .. 26,702 25,576 32,372
Noils ............ ......... 10,795 12,218 12,122


Compiled from Bureau of the Census quarterly Wool Stock Report for
Septe:iber 25, 1937. The stocks are believed to include more than
96 percent of the total stocks held by and afloat to all dealers
(including commission houses, pullers and cooperatives), topmakers
and manufacturers in the United States on the dates specified.


I/ Revised.







Wool-11 --
--3.


Wo o1 Imworts

United States imports of apparel wool for cons .tion in
September, totaling about 5 million pounds, were 37 sorcont smaller
than in August and. 22 percent smaller than September 195 ports
of such wool in the first 9 months of 1937, amounting to 13' million
pounds, were the largest lor those months since 1926. Although mill
consume tic:- in the final quarter of 193"7 ad early months of 1933
probably will be considerably smaller than a year earlier, imports of
apparel wool in the first half of next yuar arc expect-ed to be fairly
large because of the smaller-than-average stocks of %wool on hand
in the United States.


Mill Con s ux',icn


.ill activity declined sharply in all sections of the United
States wool manufacturing industry in Scptiimber following a brief
upturn in August. The weekly average: consu. tion of apparel wool
on a scoured basis in September was 4,326,000 pounds compared with
5,369,000 pounds in September 1936. Thu Septe::Lber consum-ption w :.s
20 percent lower than a year earlier, but consumption in the first
9 r.onths of the :Ly:%r was 5 percent larger than in the same months of
1936 and was only 4 percent s.-llr than the unusually high
consumption in those months of 1935.


Consumption from January through Septiti'er 1937 '.as equivalent
to 359 million pounds of shorn wool, greasy shorn basis, jand 57
million pounds of pulled wocl, greasy pulled basis. i-ill consumption
on a grease basis in the first 9 months of 1936 was equivalent to
356 million pounds of shorn wool and 57 million pounds of p.ulld wool.


Smaller domestic mill consum:ption n 1933 than in 1937 expct~od

The high rate of consumption in the past 2 years has resulted
from a building-un of inventories of manufactured and sce.:i-manufactured
products, largo Government orders for wool textiles, and rcpltnishaint
of consumer needs which had accumulated during the depression. The
automobile industry also has utilized increased quantities of wool
in the last 2 years. With stocks of manufactured and semi-manufactured
goods now accumulating and :ith prospects for a slight decrease in
consumer demand next year, mill consum :tion of wool in 19. : -robably
will be smaller than in 1937.








V0oo1-11


3FORE:G1 ,ITUATIC::


Wool Sales and Prices


Wo ol prices declined in Australia and the Union of South Africaf
in September and October, the first 2 months of the new marketing
season for Lierino wools. The price trend was in direct contrast to
that of a year earlier when prices advanced rapidly from Sert--.ber
through December.


The average price of 70s warp wool at the Sydn-ey sales in
Australia during September was about 6 cents a pound higher than in
September 1936 and prices in October remained slightly higher than
a year earlier. England and continental European countries were the
principal buyers in ;.ustralia, but Japan has been buyii':, since the
latter part of September and srnll sales to United St:.tes buyers
have been reported recently,


Prices in the South African wiool market in Soptcibc.r were only
slightly higher than a year earlier and prices in October were lower
than in October 1936. Because of th- ;-iigh prices paid by J:.-,anse
buyers in South Africa in the first half of the 1930-37 season,
prices at South African centers in the latter part of 1935 were
relatively high compared with prices in Australia. Japan has not
been an active buyer in the South Afrian market so far this season
and the price relationship between the markets is more nearly normal.


The new wool selling season in Argentina and Uruguay co ned
in October but little tratir.n is expected until November and December.
The New Zealand auctions will open at Auckland on Hoveomber 27.






WOOL-11i 7

Apparent Supplies in Southern Hemisphere on October 1

On October 1 apparent supplies 1/ of wool for the .1937-38 selling season
in the five principal wool-producing countries of the Southern Hemisphere may be
estimated at 2,012,000,000 pounds or about 1 percent more than on the same date
of 1936 but 1 percent less than the average for the 5 years 1931-32 to 1935-36.
Although production in these five countries exceeded that of last season slightly,
there v.as a reduction in carry-over so that supplies for the entire season were
only a little larger than in 1936-37. In the first 3 months of the new export 2/
season July 1 to September 30, exports from Australia, New Zealind and the Union
of South Africa amounted to 159 million pounds, exceeding those of a year earlier
by 13 percent.

Wool Production in Southern Hemisphere in 1937-38

Wool production in Argentina in 1937-38 is expected to reach 375 million
pounds according to a cable from Agricultural Attache P. 0. iT:'hs, containing
the estimate of the Buenos Aires branch of the First National Bank of Boston.
This compares with 37? million pounds in 1936-37 and 364 million pounds in 1935-31
according to revised estimates furnished by Mr. Nyhus, based on actual exports
converted to a grease equivalent, stocks and domestic consumption. The average
production in Argentina for the five seasons 1931-35 to 1935-36 based on the same
method of estimating was 353 million pounds.

The 1937-38 wool clip in Uruguay is :--ected to be larger in quantity and
better in quality than that of last season wh n production reached 116.* million
pounds according to the estimate of the Mercantile Exchange of Montevideo (Camara
Mercantil de Productos del Pais) based on returns for the season. Production in
Uruguay averaged liMmillion pounds for the five seasons 1931-32 to 1935-36.

The II:w Zealand Drpartment of Agriculture in collaboration with the
Imperial Economic Committee has recently revised their estimates of wool pro-
duction on the basis of a more exact conversion of scoured and pulled wool to
a grease equivalent. Thn ne- estimates are approximately 4 percent lower than
former estimates. iAnofficial estimate based on shedp numbers as of April 30,
the ave'ra-re percentage shorn and the average weight of fleece, places the new
clip at 314.2mil'icn pounds compared with nearly 300 million, the revised esti-
mate for last season and an average of 272 million pounds for the five seasons
1931-32 to 1935-36.

Supplies in Importing Countries

The quantity of imported wool retained in the United Kingdom in September
was about the same as in September 1936. The total retained in the first 9
months of this year, however, was 10 percent or 50 million pounds smaller than
in the same months of 1936. The smaller imports this year reflect the decline in
wool consumption in the United KIingdom from the high consumption of 1936.

1/ Carry-over plus production minus exports to September 30.
2/ Export season begins July 1 in Australia, New Zealand and the Union of South
Africa, and October 1 in Argentina and Uruguay.




-


WOOL-11 -

Imports into continental European countries in recent months show an
increase over those of a year earlier, but the totals to date in 1937 for France
and Germany remain seller than in the same months of 1936. Stocks of wool tops
at commission combing establishments of France, Belgium and reir.an-: on October 1
were slightly larger than a month earlier but were smaller than t-he stocks on
that date in each of the 5 preceding years.

Stocks of wool in reporting warehouses of JaDan on September 1 were about
15 million pounds smaller than on August 1 but 18 million pounds larger than
on September 1, 1956. Stocks were larger than reported on Septembrr 1 in any of
the past 5 years, according'to statistics published in "Wool Intelligence Notes".
The above stocks figures do not include unreported stocks in the hands of manu-
facturers which are usually large. Imports into Japan in the first S months of
1937 were 242 million povmds compared with 188 million pounds imported in the
same months of 1936.

Manufacturing Activity in IT-porting Countries

Information available on wool manufacturing activity in foreign importing
countries indicates a continuation of the recent decline in activity in the
United Kingdom and Japan. Continental European countries reported ,good employ-
ment in most centers in September.

The British Ministry of Labour reports that 9.8 percent of insured work-
ers in the woolen and worsted s-ctions were registered as unemployed on September
13 compared with 9.1 percent in September 1'76. Consumption of i-.orted wool by
the wool textile industry of the United Kingdom in the first 9 months of 1937
was unofficially estimated to be about 8 percent smaller than in tne sane months
of 1936. The estimate for September showed a sharp decline compared uith
September 1936.

The decline in wool prices in September was accompanied by c slowing up
of new business in the Belgian wool textile industry, but activity in other
continental European countries did not show much a.. 3ane according to a report
from Agricultural Attache Steere at Berlin. The weakness in the exchange value
of the franc apparently has been accompanied by some- increase in activity in the
French industry in recent months. :ills were fairly active in Italy and Germany
in September and early October. The high rate of activity in Germany in the past
few years has been made possible by a considerable increase in the use of sub-
stitute fibers by the wool manufacturing indu-try.

Southern Hemisth re Wool E.xncrt;-

Exports of wool from the five most important -roducin- countries of the
Southern Hemisphere for the season just closed totaled 1,795,000,060 ocunds, an
increase of 3 percent above 1975-r6. Shipments to the United Statep from the
five countries for the season totaled 220 million pounds which was an increase
of 78 percent as iomnrared with the 1935-36 season. :ot":.thstandi,. the large
exports from South America to the United States which increa-`,c d '5 percent to
106 million pounds, exports from the British Empire countries of t:.- Southern
Ho--misphere (especially from Au-tralia) to the United States wore ev.n larger,
amounting to 114 million pounds, an increase of 153 percent above 1925-.6.








WOOL-11


-9-


Although exports to the United States were larger than usual they con-
stituted a relatively small portion of total shipments from these five countries.
The greater share, or 566 million pounds, went directly to the United Kingdom, a
decrease of 5 percent as compared with 1935-36. Exports to other important
countries were as follows; Japan, 261 million pounds or 5 percent less than a
year ago; Belgium, 202 million pounds, an increase of 14 percent above a year ago;
and France, 176 million pounds or 27 percent less than in 1935-36.

RECIFT TREID. IN .:IEP TNUTTf.L

Sheep numbers increased in most countries following the World ahr and
reached record levels in 1931 or 1932 in many of the important countries where
the production of fine wool predominates, namely the United States, Australia,
and the Union of South Africa. Numbers in the medium and coarse wool-producing
countries also increased during this period and reached record proportions in New
Zealand. The level reached in the South American countries, however, was con-
siderably below pre-war figures.

As a consequence of poor returns from sheep in the depression years 1929-33,
accompanied by severe drought conditions in the United States and some of the
important countries of the Southern Hemisphere, sheep nmfoers declined after 1932
for 2 or 3 years. The improved price for wool and lambs in the past 2 years, how-
ever, and more favorable weather conditions, have already tended to increase
numbers. Sheep numbers in the Union of South Africa have recovered to some ex-
tent from the disastrous drought of 1932-35. In Australia and the United States
numbers have fluctuated at a high level in the past 6 or 7 years.

There now appears to be a tendency to increase numbers in the countries
where medium and coarse wools predominate. T:,rre has been a recent revival in
demand for these sorts which has caused almost a complete disappearance of the
stocks which accumulated in the depression years. Reports of a tendency to in-
crease sheep have been received from Argentina and New Zealand, especially.
Sheep numbers in 'T : Zealand have increased over 3 million head since 1C33 to
reach the all-time record of 31,306,000 in April 1937.

In Europe the general tendency to increase numbers was noted in the
United Kingdom from 1920 to 1932 and since that time numbers have fluctuated
at a sc..me'ihat lower level. Numbers are relatively small in France and Grermany
and are now below early post-war levels. In Germany, however, there has been
an increase since 1935. 1~u',bhrs in these three countries are still below
pre-war levels. In contrast to other countries there has been an upward trend
in shtne numbers in most of the coarse wool-producing countries of southeastern
Eurcpe since 1929 or 1930.

In Russia, Turkey, northern Africa and the Near East where the bulk of
the wool is of the coarse carpet or mattress type, sheep numbers have been in-
crt~sing since 1933 or 1934.






-10 -


Table 1.- Sheep: Numbers in important -wool exporting and importing
countries, pre-war avero.a, and annual 1914 to date

: Exo rtin countries : I__ mo or tinn co triess
Fine wool : Medium and coarse .Fine ard medium wool
: princi'nll; : wol kredrominate s : r r-edm i nat e s
Date :Aus- : Union : :.er Aren- : :United :United :
:tralia : of So. :Zealand: tina :-ru :States :Kingdom:.Fran:c : Ger-
SDec. :Africa :Apr. : July : :Jan. 1 : June :Dec. 31: many
S3: 0_______A. I 0 : : 2/ 1 : :^ec. 1
::ii1 ion Million Million Million Million Million Million Miln ion Million
: head head h -ai head hea head he ad hea head


Pre--ar
average 3/:

1914 :
1915 ..... :
1916 :
1917 :
1917 .....:
1919 .......:


1921 .....:
1922 .....:


1925)
1925)
1926 .....:
1922 .....:
1923 ..... :



1929 ..... :
192 :5)



1925)
193) :
1931 ..... :
1922 ..... :
193329 ..... :

1935)
1930) :






1931 .....:
1937 :
1937 .. .. :


90.7

82.5
73.1
80. 6

91.9
79.5

81. S
86.1
82.7
84.0
93.2

103.b
1o. 6
104.3
100. ,
103.4
104.6

110.6
110.6
112.9
109.9
113.0

io0.6
112. 2


30.7


31.4
32.0

29.9
31.7

29.5
31.7
31.7
31.4
32.2

35.8
39.0
40.3
42.7
45.2

48.5
10i/51.2
10/50. 6
10/47.3
35.2

36.0
1l/41.4


24.0 /55.3 5/26.3


24.8
24.9
24.
25.3
26.5
25.8

23.9
23.3
22.2
23.1
23.8

24.5
24.9
25.6
27.1
29.1

30. s
29.S
28.7
27.
28. 6

29.1
30.1
31.3


r/36.2













7/39.3
s.o
3. 3


43.2


37.8
36.3
11.5 36.5
36.7
39.0
41.0
1/35.0)
-- 0.7)
39.5
36.9
36.8
37.1
1735.6)
14.4 38.5)
40.4
42.4
45.3
48.4
1757.0)
20.6 51.6)
53.2
15.4 54.o0
53.1
--- 53.7
--- 1/4s.4)
--- 52.2)
52.0
52.6


29.2 16.2


28.0
28. 3
28.8
27.9
27.1
25.1

23.4
24.3
23.8
24.2
25.0

26.5
27.7
28.4
28.0
27.8

28.3
30.0
30.8
30.2
28.0

28.2
28.2
28.6


S14. o
12.3
10. 8
9.9
6! 9.1
9.0

--
1 '. 4


10. 2



if. 7
1C,. 8


10.5

10.2
L.4

'--


.8.


Compiled from off


icial sources unless otherwise stated.


i_ Agriultural Census. 2/ Years 1910-19 tentatively revised figures.
3_/ Average 5 years immediately preceding Wer if available. In Europea-n -ountries
with ch'..f-ed boundaries estimates for 1 year only. 4/ Average of censuses 1909
and 1914. 5] Census 1908. 6_ Alsace Lorraine included with France for this
and subsequent years. 7j Census. ,j Census Ja.r.ur-y 1, 1922. 9J/ October.
10/ Unofficial estimates as of August 31, adjusted from June 30 estimr.tes.
1_/ W0ool Intelligence Notes.


5.0


5.5
5.1
5.0
5.0
6/5.3
5.3

6.2
5.9
5.6
9/6.1
5.7

4.8
4.1
3.8
3.6
3.5

3.5
3.5
3.4
3.4
3.5

3.9
4.3


~I~







WOL-11


Table 2.- Price of wool per pound in specified markets and prices
of textile raw materials in the United States, selected
periods, 1935-37


Market and description


:Average Average 193 : 1937
1935 1936 Oct. Aug. Sept. Oct.
: Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


Boston:
Territory combing scoured basis-:
64s, 70s, 80s, (fine).......:
56s, (3/8 blood) ........... :
46s, (low 1/4 blood) .......:
United States: Farm price,
15th of month,grease basis ......:
London L/:
Average quality, clean cost 2- :
70 s.........................
56s .........................
46s ........................
Bradford 3/:
Scoured basis -
64s warp ...................
50s ........................
Australia:
Average price at all selling
centers, greasy wool 4/ ......
Sydney (Delivered Bradford) 5/ -:
Clean basis. 70s warp ......
Union of South Africa:
Average export price,greasy wool:
Price at selling centers 6/ ....:
70s warp, clean cost ......:
United States:
Textile fibers -
Wool territory fine 1/....:
Cotton 7/8 Middling S/....
Silk Japanese 13-15 ] ....:
Rayon yarn 150 denier ...:


74.8
63.6
51.4

19.4


47.5
29.0
18.6


47.7
23.2


92.0
80.4
63.9

26.9


58.4
35.1
23.8


59.8
29.7


90.0
79.8
64.5


102.0
88.5
73.5


98.5
85.1
70.9


92.1
78.8
66.8


31.4 30.8 29.2


59.2
36.7
29.6


59.1
28.5


64.4
47.7
42.8


71.7
47.8


59.8
47.5
41.3


61.8
44.3


57.8
41.3


22.9 25.2 23.8


60.1


67.11-/62.0


22.7 25.7 23.5


74.8
11.8
163.3
57.3


92.0
11.9
176.6
58.6


62.2


90.0
12.1
175.6
6o.o


60o. 56.3


102.0
10.2
187.3
63.0


98.5
8.7
185.1
63.0


92.1
8.1


Foreign prices have been converted at prevailing rates of


exchange.


I! Average of quotations for each series of London sales reported by the London
Office of the Bureau. For months when no sales were held figures are
interpolated.
2/ Top and noil in oil.
3/ Quotations reported about the 25th of the month by the London Office of the
.Bureau.
4/ National Council of Wool Selling Brokers.
5/ Wool Record and Textile World, Bradford.
/ South Africa Ministry for Agriculture.
7J Scoured basis, Boston market.
8/ Average at 1D markets.
9/ 78 percent white, at New York.
10/ Week ended October 16.


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WOOL-11 -12-


Table 3.- United States: Wool imports, consumption and L.r.c hi'.cry
activity, specified periods, 1936 and 1937


: Jan. Sept. :
-Sept. AuC. Sent.
Item : 1936 1937 : 1937
: 196 : 1937

: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: pounds -pounds pounds pounl s pounds

Imports for consumption, actual
weight 1/ -
Apparel .............: 81,268 139,116 6,523 8,016 5,078
Finer than 40s ......: 62,423 117,691 4,706 6,173 3,696
Not finer than O4s ..: 18,045 21,425 1,817 1,`3I 1,332

Carpet,incl.camels hair : 95,518 153,170 12,926 12,921 11,645

Consumption, scoured basis 2/ :
Weekly average -
Apparel .......... : 5,144 5,413 5,369 5,011 4,326
Carpet ..............: 1,855 2,428 2,302 2,167 1,315
Aggrehate -
Apparel .............: 200,617 211,099 21,476 20,044 17,304
Carpet ..............: 72,334 94,684 9,208 8,665 7,259


: Percent Percent Percent Percent percent

.iiachinery activity 2/
(40-hour shift)
Worsted combs .......: 116.6 131.1 118.4 11'.4 94.1
'Jorsted spindles.....: 77.0 91.8 80.6 73.4 57.9
'.olen spindles......: 115.7 121.6 113.1 113.1 92.9
Looms, broad ........: 97.4 108.4 83.1 93.0 72.7
Looms, narrow ......: 49.3 58.2 50.9 42.3 34.1
Carpet and rug looms : 63.7 80.8 77.6 76.4 7C0.4


Import figures from official records of the Bureau of Foreign ar-i Domestic
Commerce. Consumption and m-achinerv activity figures from the Bureau of
the Census.

l/ Weight of greasy, scoured anx skin wool added together.
2/ Figures for August and September based on 4 weeks, January to September
on 39 weeks. No adjustment made for holidays.


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WOOL-11


Table 4.- Exports of wool (grease and scoured combined)from Argentina and
Uruguay to principal consuming countries, seasons 1935-36 and 1936-37

__ Oct. 1 Sept. 30
Country of
: Argentina U: __ ruguay : Total_
destination : 1935-36 : 1936-37 : 1935-36 : 1936-37 : 1935-36 : 1936-37

:.Mil. 1b 'i 1, ib. Mil.lb. Mi .b1. Mil.1b. Mi.lb.
United Kingdom ....: 75.9 75.4 25.8 20.9 101.7 96.3
Germany .......... 42.9 23.9 28.3 19.1 71.2 43.0
France ..........: 52.3 38.4 8.2 5.0 60.5 43.4
Italy .............: 11.4 27.3 9.4 10.3 20.8 37.6
Belgium ...........: 19.3 25.2 7.0 8.7 27.1 33.9
Netherlands .......: 2.6 0.8 2.4 1.9 5.0 2.7
Japan .............: 4.0 21.3 6.1 26.5 10.1 47.8
United States .....* 55.0 78.5 23.2 27.2 78.2 105.7
Total...........: 263. 290. 111.2 119.6 374.610
Other countries....: 1 :_l _9 13.9 2.38 2.1 17.7 16.0
Grand total ....: 273.3 304.7 114.0 121.7 392.3 426.4

Compiled from reports furnished by American Ajricultural Attache Paul O. Nyhus.


Table 5.- Exports of wool (grease and scoured combined) from Australia,
Union of South Africa, and New Zealand to principal consuming
countries, seasons 1935-36 and 1936-37

: .._July 1 June 30 .
: : Union of : New :Total
Country of Australia : South Africa : Zealand :
destination
:1935-36:1936-37:1935-36: 1936-37:135-36:1936-37:1935-36:1936-37
:Lil. b. Mil.b,. Mil.1b. J:il.lb. Mil.lb. 1.il.lb. Mil.lb. Mil1.b.
United Kingdom : 276.3 311.2 56.9 36.5 159.9 122.2 493.1 469.9
Option Continent: --- --- --- --- 25.8 32.6 2.8 32.6
Germany ........: 31.0 44.3 43.5 44.8 3.9 8.5 7-,4 97.6
France ..........: 75.5 83.6 66.6 35.2 39.9 14.1 182.0 132.9
Italy ...........: 4.7 36.5 3.0 11.5 / 1/ 7.7 48.0
Belgium .........: 113.2 136.4 22.7 22.5 14.1 9.0 150.0 2/167.9
Netherlands .....: 16.0 10.0 _/ 1/ 1/ 1/ 16.0 10.0
Japan ...........: 235.7 84.5 5.7 89.2 2/23.2 3/39.5. 264.6 213.2
United States ... 2 25.2 74.6 3.5 4.8 16.2 34.4 44.9 113.8
Canada ..........: 2.9 4.1 1/ / 134 13.6 16.3 17.7
Total.......: 780.5 735.__2 201.9 24'4.5 2 4 273.9 1,278.8 1,303.6
Other countries..:_ 39.2 !1._ 1.7 21.5 13.2 7_ .9 65.4
Grand total : 819.7 826.7 216.1 255.2 317.9 287.1 1,353.7 1,369.0

Compiled as follows: Union of South Africa, Agricultural Attache C. C. Taylor;
Australia and New Zealand, "n.ool Intelligence Notes".
j/ Not reported separately, if any, included with "other countries".
2/ Correction of figure in table 4, 'ool Situation September 9, 1937.
I/ In addition 10,500,000 pounds were shipped to Australia in this period of
1935-36 and 5,400,000 pounds in 1936-37 probably for transshipment to
Japan.


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