The wool situation

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Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00053

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text




U;:ITMD STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Washington


WOOL-12 December 10, 1937


THE WOO L SITUATI ON

with

DOCMUNTSF WORLD PRODUCTION TABLES
- -=- -


U.S. DEPOSITORY Summary


Supplies of apparel wool in the United States at the beginning of

the new marketing season on April 1, 1938, are likely to be about average

instead of below average as indicated earlier, the Bureau of Agricultural

Economics reports. Supplies on November 1 were smaller than on that date in

any of the 5 years 1930 to 1934 but were larger than in 1935 and 1936.

Mill consumption figures for November and December when available are

expected to be below average. Consumption in the first quarter of 1938 is

likely to be somewhat smaller than in the corresponding quarter of 1936

and 1937.

At the beginning of November apparent supplies for disposal in the

five principal Southern Hemisphere exporting countries for the remainder of

the 1937-38 selling season were slightly larger than a year earlier but were

about equal to the average for that date in the 5 years, 1931-35. Production

in the five principal Southern Hemisphere countries in the 1937-38 season

is now estimated at 2,096 million pounds, an increase of 3 percent over that

of 1936. In 22 countries for which estimates are now available for 1937

the increase over 1936 was also 3 percent.








V'OOL-12


Mill consumption of arp-rel wool on a scoured basis in the United

States in October was 36 percent smaller than in October 1936 and was the

smallest monthly consumption since October 1934. Because of the large mill

consumption in the early months of 1937, consumption in the first 13 months

of this year was about the same as in corresponding months of 1936.

Wool prices continued to decline in November in both domestic and

foreign markets. Average quotations for combing territory wools at Boston

late in November were fully 30 percent below the high point of the first

quarter of this year and were about 25 percent lower than a year earlier.

Domestic wool prices in 1938 probably will average lower than in 1937, but

possible declines from present levels may be small.


DO!.LSTIC SITUATION

BACKGROUND Chiefly as a result of the weakness in
mill demand and generally unfavorable business
conditions, wool prices have declined in both domestic
and foreign markets since August. Domestic mill con-
sumption has declined sharply since May and consumption
has also declined in some foreign countries in recent
months. Stocks of raw: wool in the United States in the
current season have been larger than a year earlier but
have remained below the average of other recent years.



'Iool Sales and Prices

Trading in domestic wools on the Boston market continued very light
in November according to reports from the Boston Office of the Bureau.
Prices of shorn domestic wools showed a further sharp decline during the
month but quotations were largely nominal. Average quotations for combing
territory wools at Boston late in November were fully 30 percent below the
high point reached in the first quarter of the year and were about 25
percent lower than a year earlier.

Quotations on spot foreign wools in Boston have followed the downward
trend in foreign markets. Only a few small lots of foreign wool wore sold
in Boston in November and few orders were placed for domestic purchases in
foreign markets.


-2-








WOOL-12


The recent decline in domestic price quotations apparently was an
adjustment to the lower level of prices in foreign countries. Without such
an adjustment the relation of quoted domestic prices to foreign prices
would have been such as to encourage- imports of wool. Even at the lower
domestic price quotations, however, very little wool has been purchased by
mills in recent weeks. The fairly large stocks of raw wool held by
manufacturers and the large stocks of finished and semi-finished goods,
together with the decrease in mill activity, probably account for the lack
of trading in the domestic market. As stocks of finished and semi-finished
goods are reduced in the next few months, some increase in purchases of wool
probably will occur. This increase in purchases might occur at the present
level of prices, or some further decline in prices may be necessary.

In view of the present fairly large stocks of wool and finished goods
in this country and the recent sharp reduction in domestic mill consumption
along with the weakness in foreign markets, little or no recovery in wool
prices from present levels during the first quarter of 1938 appears probable.
With domestic price quotations now considerably lower than in the 1937
domestic selling season, and with little recovery in prospect during the
next few months, domestic wool prices in the 1938 marketing season, beginning
in April, probably will average lower than in 1937.


Wool Stocks

Total supplies of apparel wool in the United States on a grease basis,
including wool held in producing States, were estimated to be almost 25
percent larger on November 1 than a year earlier and also were larger than
2 years earlier, Supplies on November 1, however, were smaller than on
that date in any of the 5 years 1930 to 1934, but with consumption in
recent months much below average, stocks were rapidly approaching the average
level of the last 10 years.

It now seems likely that total supplies of wool in this country at
the beginning of the new marketing season April 1, 1938, will be about
average instead of below average as was indicated in earlier issues of this
report.


Wool Imports

Imports into the United States of apparel wool for consumption in
October, totaling about 4.5 million pounds,were 12 percent smaller than in
September and 30 percent smaller than in October 1936. Imports in October
of this year were smaller than in any month since September 1935. Because
of the large imports in the early months of the year imports of apparel
wool in the first 10 months of 1937, amounting to 144 million pounds, were
the largest for those months since 1926. Since supplies of apparel wool in
this country are now much larger than a year ago and with prospects for
a smaller mill consumption in the early months of 1938 than a year earlier,
imports of apparel wool in the first half of 1938 are likely to be consider-
ably smaller than in the first half of 1937.




WOOL-12


Mill Consumption

Activity in the domestic wool textile industry was again sharply
curtailed in October, and practically all sections of the industry operated
during October at the lowest levels since October 1934. The weekly average
consumption of apparel wool on a scoured basis in the 5 weeks ended
October 30 was 3,319,000 pounds, which was 23 percent smaller than in
September and 36 percent smaller than in October 1936. Consumption on a
scoured basis in the first 10 months of this year was about the same as in
those months of 1936 because of the large consumption in the early months
of the year.

Since consunmtion figures for November and Decerrbr, w.'hen available,
undoubtedly will be considerably smaller than the large consumption in
the same months of last year, total consumption for 193a7 will be somewhat
smaller than in 1936.

Consumption from January through October 1937 was equivalent to
385 million pounds of shorn wool, greasy shorn basis, and 62 million
pounds of pulled wool, greasy pulled basis. Mill consumption on a grease
basis in the first 10 months of 1936 was equivalent to 402 million pounds
of shorn wool and 65 million pounds of pulled wool.


Unfilled Orders for Woven Cloths

Unfilled orders held for men's wear cloths by 138 re-orting mills were
sharply reduced during the third quarter of this year as very little new
business was booked, according to a recent report by the national Association
of Wool Manufacturers. Unfilled orders for women's wear on September 25 also
were smaller than at the end of June but were slightly larger than a year
earlier. Lines of men's wear cloths for spring 1936 were not opened until
the last week of September. This was about a month later than the openings
last year, when substantial orders were booked in September. Unfilled orders
for woven cloths containing by weight over 25 percent of yarns spun on the
woolen and worsted systems, were reported as follows:


Unfilled orders for woven cloths, reports by 138 mills, 1/
October 3, 1936, June 26 and September 25, 1937


Date Mon's Women's Auto Total
wear wear .cloths 2'

: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
:linear ,is. linear yds. lin yds. linear yss.
1936 -
Oct. 3 24,568 6,500 2,682 33,750
1937 -
June 26 : 33,167 12,173 1,912 47,252
Sept. 25 15,221 7,541 3,773 26,535

Compiled from Monthly Statistics of Wool Manufacture published by the
National Association of Wool IManufacturers. Cloth less than 50 inches
reported in equivalent 54-inch yardage. 1/These mills equipped with
30.000 looms. 2/ Exoludos cloth with pile or jacquard design.


-4-








WOOL-12


FOREIGN SITUATION

Wool Sales and Prices

London auctions


Wool prices in foreign markets in November continued the decline which
began in September. Prices at the final series of 1937 London wool sales
which opened on November 16 were mostly 20 to 25 percent lower than at the
close of the previous series at that market on September 24. The decline in
prices at London was in line with changes in Southern Hemisphere markets since
the September series.

Largely because of the lower prices and weakness in demand conditions,
the London sales were shortened by 3 days from the original program and
closed on November 26. About 57,000 bales were sold at the series, of which
29,500 bales were taken by English buyers and 27,500-bales by continental
European countries. Price declines at the close of the series compared with
closing prices on September 24 were reported as follows: greasy and scoured
Merino wools 20 percent; greasy fine crossbreds and low crossbreds 25 percent;
greasy medium crossbreds 30 percent; scoured fine crossbreds 15 percent;
scoured medium crossbreds 20 to 25 percent; scoured low crossbreds 20 percent
and slipes of all descriptions 25 to 30 percent. The first series of the
London sales in 1938 will open January 18.


Southern Hemisphere sales

The average price of 70s warp wool at the Sydney auctions in October
was about 63 cents a pound delivered Bradford, compared with 60 cents in
October 1936, Prices declined during October 1937 and on November 10 dropped
to 58 cents a pound compared with 65 cents a year earlier. England and
France were the chief buyers at Australian sales in October and early November.
Japanese purchases in Australia thus far this season have been small.

Price changes in the South African markets were similar to those in
Australia.

The New Zealand wool auctions for 1937-33 opened at Auckland on
November 23, Prices for crossbred wools showed a decline of 25 to 40
percent compared -with March closing prices. France vas the only important
purchaser. About 75 percent of the offerings were withdrawn by sellers because
of the low prices offered but reports .indicate that 'much of the wool withdrawn
was sold later at private sales with little if any advance in prices.






',OOL-12


Apparent Suppjies in the Southcrn Hrmisphere, Iovember 1


On November 1 apparent supplies -for disposal in the five principal
Southern Hemisphere exporting countries during the remainder of the 1937-38
selling season are estimated to be 3 percent larger than at the same date of
1936, but approximately the same as the average for the 5 years 1931-35.
Supplies are, however, about 6 percent smaller than on November 1, 1932, when
they were the largest for the 10 years 1927 to 1936,

Production in the five most important countries of the Southern
Hemisphere in the 1937-38 season is now estimated at 2,096 million pounds,
an increase of 3 percent above 1936. Preliminary estimates show small
increases over the preceding season in practically all of the countries.
In 22 countries for which estimates are now available for 1937, production
was 2,811 million pounds, an increase of 3 percent above 1936. These 22
countries produced 80 percent of the world total, exclusive of Russia and
China, in 1936. (See tables at end of report)



l/ Carry-over from preceding season plus estimated production minus exports
from beginning of season to end of October. Jo account taken of
relatively small quantity sold but not exported and that used for
domestic consumption.






Apparent supplies of wool remaining for disposal in five principal
Southern Hemisphere countries as of November 1,
1931-37 .....
: : : Union :
Period :Australia : H :of South,:Argentina :Uruguay : Total
Zealand
: : : Africa : : :
SMillion Million Million Lillion Million Million
: pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds

1931............: 815.2 344.6 303.4 343.6 106.1 1,913.9
1932............ 865.7 362.4 283.8 384.7 112.3 2,028.9
1933............: 757.8 336.6 238.2 356.9 108.8 1,798.3
1934............: 913.5 296.4 218.0 379.1 123.1 1,930.1
1935............: 803.0 359.1 215.3 369.0 119.1 1,365.5
5-year average, :
1931-35 ........: 635.0 339,8 251.7 366.7 113.9 1,907.1

1936............: 787.8 317.5 233.5 386.6 124.7 1,850.1
1937............: 823.4 316.3 251.9 392.1 118.6 1,902.3


-6-





WVOOL-12


-7-


Reported Stocks on Hand at Selling Centers of Southern Hemisphere


The slight increase in Southern Hemisphere supplies for the season
accompanied by the slackened demand for wool in the early part of the new
selling season has resulted in larger stocks on hand at selling centers on
October 31 this year than a year ago. Receipts of new clip wool at
selling centers showed a tendency to decline somewhat in October after
running a little larger last season through the month of September. The
quantity received in four countries excluding lew; Zealand for the 4 months,
July 1 to October 31, was approximately the sarie as a year earlier.

Stocks of old and new clip wool on October 31, 1937, at selling
centers of the three countries reporting stocks, i.e., Australia, Union of
South Africa, and Argentina, amounted to 392 million pounds, an increase of
10 percent above the same date of 1936 and 4 percent above the 5-year average,
1931-35. Including estimates 2/ for New Zealand and Uruguay, however,
the total quantity on hand at selling centers on October 31 in the five
principal Southern Hemisphere countries is estimated at 407 million pounds,
an increase of 3 percent above the s--.r.o date of 1936 but 11 percent below
the average on that date of the 5 years, 1931-35. The reduction col:ipared
with the 5-year average is due to the fact that old wool stocks were
unusually large in New Zealand in the 5-year period 1931-35, but were small
in the 1936-37 season.



Exports _from Southern Hemisphere Countries July 1 to October 31


Exports from the fivu principal wool-producing countries of the
Southern Hemisphere in October 1937 showed a reduction of 25 percent compared
with the same month of 1936. October exports, however, exceeded September
exports by 22 percent.

In the period July 1 to October 31, 1937 exports from these five
countries, amounting to 313 million pounds, wore 4 percent smaller than in
the same period the preceding year. The Union of South Africa showed the
greatest reduction during that period, whereas Argentina was the only
country showing an increase.














2/ Estimates based on a total of stocks reported at end of preceding
season and receipts for now season up to October 31 minus exports
to end of October.






VO.'0L-12


-8-


Trend of exports of wool from Southern Hemisphere countries during the
months July to October 1936 and 1937

Exports
: ustr : New : Union of : :
Australia
: / :Zealand : South : Argentina Uruguay Total
Period : 1/ : Africa /: / : 3/
:1936 :1937 :1936 :1937 :1936 :1937 :1936 :1937 :1936 :1937 :1936 :1937
Mil. M il. Mil. Mil. Mil. i. Mil. Mil. il. Mil. rMil.
:lb. lb. lb. lb. lb. lb. lb. lb. lb. lb. lb. _lb.

July .... 30 49 7 9 5 5 10o 16 4 5 56 84
Aug. ...: 12 4 8 9 2 3 11 13 3 2 36 31
Sept.....: 65 68 6 7 4 3 8 10 4 1 87 09
Oct. ....: 103 84 6 2 24 16 10 7 3 4/ 146 109
July to
Oct. ...: 210 205 27 27 35 27 39 46 14 8 325 313


1/ Estimates of Dalgety and Company.
2/ Official estimate supplied by United States Department of Agriculture, London
Office.
/ Reliable commercial estimates supplied by United States Department of
Agriculture, Buenos Aires Office.
/ Less than 500,000 pounds.





Somewhat Larger Stocks in Imperting Countries


Information on wool imports apd manufacturing activity through September
or October indicated that stocks of raw wool in most foreign importing countries
at the end of October probably were somewhat l-rger than a year earlier -hen
they were reported to be small. Wool from the new Southern Hemisphere clip
is now arriving in consuming centers and a seasonal increase in stocks in
importing countries is likely in the early months of 193,.

The quantity of imported wool retained in the United Kingdom from
January to October of this year was 9 percent smaller than in the same months
of 1936. From May through October, however, imports were larger than in the
corresponding months last year while corsu.:ption was smaller.








':,OL-12


-9-


Imports into continental European countries in recent months have been
larger than a year earlier. Shipments to France from Australia from July to
October of this year were about twice as large as in the same months of last
year, and shipments to Germany and Italy also showed an increase. Stocks of
wool tops held by commission combers in France, Belgium and Germany at the
end of October were slightly smaller than a ramnth earlier and wore smaller
than on that date of each of the 5 preceding years.

Wool stocks in reporting warehouses of Japan on September 1, the
latest date for which statistics are available, were larger than on
September 1 in any of the past 5 years. Japan purchases in Australia
so far in the current season however, have been greatly below average and it
is likely that stocks of raw wool have -declined since September 1.


Manufacturing Activity in Importing Countries

The general uncertainty in commodity markets and the.decline in wool
prices in recent months has been acco.-panied by a decline in activity .in
the wool textile industries of some foreign countries.

Consumption of imported wool in the wool textile industry of the
United Kingdom from January to October was estim:.ted to be about 9 percent
smaller than in the same months of last year. In September and October
consumption was much smaller than a year earlier. The British 1Linistry of
Labour reports that 11.3 percent of insured workers in the woolen and worsted
sections were registered as unemployed on October 18 compared with 9.8
percent a month earlier and 7.6 percent a year earlier.

I.ichinory activity in the wool industry of France remained mostly
unchanged in October according to a report from the Berlin Office of the
Bureau. 7While domestic sales have declined, export trade in noils, yarns,
and tissues has increased as a result of the decline in exchange value of the
franc. Export business in recent months has assumed a larger importance
in the industry than for a long time.

Activity in Beolgium continues irregular. The worsted yarn industry
remained well employed on old contracts in October, but new sales have declined,
In Belgium also, foreign buying appeors to have gained in importance compared
with domestic outlets.

Machinery activity in the Italian industry continues higher than in
1935 and 1936, due largely to the increase in export sales.





WOCL-12


Table 1.- Price of wool per pour in specified markets and prices of
textile raw materials in tho United States, selected periods,
1935-37


SAverago Average*
Market and description v 19r35 Av1936

SCents Cents
Boston:


Territory combing scoured basis-:
64s, 70s, 0Os, (fine) ......,,:
56s, (3/8 blood) .............
46s, (low 1/4 blood) .........:
United States: Farm price, 15th
of month, grease basis ..........:
London 1/ :
Average quality,clean cost 2/-
70s ......... ........ :
56s .. ....................... :
46s ...................... :
Bradford 3/
Scou.rJd basis
64s warp .................... :
50s ................. .... ....:
Australia:
Average price at all selling
centers, greasy wool I/ .....:
Sydney (Delivered Bradford) j/- :
70s warp, clean basis ........:
Union of South Africa:
Average export price, greasy wool
Price at selling centers 6 -
70s warp, clean cost ........:
United States:
Textile fibers -
Wool territory fine 7/.......
Cotton 7/3 Middlin .......
Silk Japanese 13-15 9/........
Rayon yarn 150 denier ......:


74.8
63,6
51.4

19.4


47.5
29.0
13.6


47.7
23.2


92.0
80.4
65.9

26.9


58.4
35.1
23.8


59,8
29.7


1936
Nov. sept. Oct. I:ov.


Cents Cents


99.0
87.9
71.9


98.5
85.1
70.9


27.2 30.8


64.7
41.8
34.1


65.3
34.7


59.8
47.5
41.3


61.8
44.3


27.2 23.8

65.2 67.1

23.7 23.5

66.0 60.8


74.0
11,8
163.3
57.3


92.0
11.9
176.6
58.6


99.0
12.1
193.5
60.0


98.5
8.7
185.1
63.0


Cents Cents


92.1 85.9
78.8 72.0
66.8 60.6

29.2 26,0


53.7
41.3
35.5


57.8
41.3


47.6
35.4
29.7


51.1
31.3


22.6

63.0 10/58.3

23.5

56.8 10/53.5


92.1
8.1
172.1
63.0


85.9
7.8


Foreign prices have bcn converted at prevailing rates of exchange.
1/ Average of quotations for each series of London sales reported by the London
Office of the Bureau. For months when no sales wore held figures are
interpolated.
2/ Top and noil in oil.
3/ Quotations reported about the 25th of the month by the London Office of the
Bureau.
4/ National Council of Wool Selling Brokers.
5/ 'ool Record and Textile; 7orld, Bradford.
6/ South Africa Ministry for Agriculture.
/ Scoured basis, Boston market.
8/ Average at 10 markets.
9/ 78 percent white, at Now York.
10/ Week ended November 13.


-10-







WOOL-12
-11-

Table 2.- United States: Wool imports, consumption and machinery
activity, specified periods, 1936 and 1937

: Jan.-Oct : :
Qct. Sept. Oct.


Item 1936 31937 1936 1937
: : *


1,000 1,000
poundss pounds


143,577
121,187
22,390


6,406
4,572
1,034


: 1,000.
: pounds
Imports for consumption, actual :
weight / -
Apparel .... ........ ....: 87,674
Finer than 40s ........: 66,995
Not finer than 0Os.....: 20,679


Carpet',including camels
hair ........... ........ :


112,471 .162,683 16,953


1,000
pounds


5,078
3,696
1,382


11,645


1937

1,000
pounds


4,461
3,496
965


9,513


Consumption, scoured -basis 2/ -
Weekly average -
Apparel ............ :
Carpet ............. :
Azgregate -
Apparel ...... .......:
Carpet ............... :


: Percent Percent Percent


Percent Percent


Machinery activity 2/ :
S(40-hour shift)
Worsted co-mbs .........:
Worsted spindles ......
'oolen spindles........:
Looms, broad ..........:
Looms, narrow ........,:
Carpet and rug looms...:


117..0
. 78.8
.115.6
96.7
.50.6
65.9


124.7
87.9
.116.9
.103.9
55.5
77.6


119.7
92.6
115.2
91.3
57.4
83.7


94.1
57.9
92.9
72.7
34-1
70.4


74.6
57.6
80.6
68.6
34.8
52.5


Import figures from-official records of tho Bureau of Foreign and Domestic
Commerce. Consumption and machinery activity figures from the Bureau of the
Census.
l/ Weight of greasy scoured and skin wool. added together.
2/ Figures for September based on 4 weeks, October on 5 weeks, January to
October on 44 weeks. No adjustment n:,do for holidays.


. 5,147
S1,9,14

226,477
S84,214


.. 175
. .2,264

227,692
99,610


5,172
2,376

25,860
11,880


4,326
1,815

17,304
7,259


3,319
985

16,593
4,926






WOOL-12


Table 3.- W.ool: Estimated world wool production, 1932-37


Continents ad countries 1932 : 1933 : 1934 : 1935 : 1936
Continents and countries Prel.

NORTH AND CEiTRAL AIMERICA millionio n Million il n Million Millionion Million
AND WEST I;DIES: :pound s pnds pounds pounds ounds d pounds
United States -
Shorn ....................: 351.0 .374.2 370.3 364.7 360.3 367.4
Pulled I1/................: 67.......- 6 .2 60.5 66.0 66.2
Total ............. 4.: 18.1 38.4 4308 ..1 ..... 426.5
Canada ..................... 20.5 19.3 19.5 19.4 19.2
Ilcwfoundland ........... :2/ 0.1 ./ .1. (0.1) 0.1 0.1
Mexico .....................: (9.0) (9.,6)> /10.3 (10.3) (10.3)
Hawaii .......... .... ..... : (0.2) (0:.2.)-. (0.2) (0.2) (0.2)
Central America & W. Indies : 0.1 (0.1) (0.1) (0.1) (0.1)


Total N. & C.America:
& West Indies ....: i48,0* 467.7* L461.,0 460.8 456.4
SOUTH AI:PRIC: :
Peru / ....................: 10.0 11.3 11.2 10.1 12.3
Bolivia 2/.................: (3.9) (3.9) (3.9) (3.9) (3.9)
Chile ......................:2/ 25.9 /25.7 4/23.7 /25.4 22.8
Brazil 3/.......... ........: 33.7 35.3 -36.4 37-5 37.5
Uruguay /..................: 110.2 104.7 119.0 113.0 116.2 (
Argentina .............. .....:/364.0 5/364.0.6/348.0 6/364.0 6/373.0 6/
Falkland Islands ... .......: 3.9 4.0 4.0. 4.2 4.0
Other South America ........: (12.) (12.0) (12.0) (12.0) (12.0)
Total South America..: _563.6 560.9 563.2 _570.1 581.7


116.2)
375.0


EURO E: :
Iceland ........... .......... 2.0
England and .7ales ..........: 9.0
Scotland ...................: 27.0
Northern Ireland ..........: 2.5
Total United Kingdom..: 118,
Irish Free State ......... : 19.6
Norway .................... : 5.7
Sweden ..................... 1,8
Dcnmark .......... ...........: (0.9)
Netherlands .............. ....: (2.0)
Belgium ..... .... ..... ... 0.
France 3/ .................: 37.0
Spain 3/ ................:2/ 70.0
Portugal .................. : 5.4
Italy 3/ ............4......: 40.0
Switzerland ..............: (0.4)
Gcrrmany .................... : / 30.8
Austria ... ....... .. ... ..... (1.2)
Czechoslovakia 3/.........: 2.3
Hungary .. ........... ......: 10 0.
Yugoslavia 2/.............. 30.5
Greece / ............... 14.9


2.1 2.0 1.9
90.0 85.0 79.0
27.5 24.8 27.0
2... ..... 2.5 2.6
119.9 112.3 10o.6
1.6 17.0o 16.5
/ 5.8 6.0 5.7
2/ 1.7.... 1.3 1.3
2/ 0.9. 0.9 0.9
(2.0) 2/ 3.1 2/ 3.3 2/
(.0.8) (0.8) (0.8)
37.0 36.4 36.3
67.6 ',68.0) 71.0
7.6 7.2 7.2
39.0 33.1 37.5 -
(0.4) (0.4) (0.4)
30.0 2/29.8 2/ 30.7 2/
(1.2) 2/ 1.2 1.1
2.0 2.1 2.2
9.3 11.0 13.0
30.8 31.1 32.1
16.0 16.7 17.3 2,


2.0
78.0 77.0
27.0 2/ 26.0
2.7 2/ 2.7
107.7 105.7
17.6 17.2
/ 5.9 2/' 5.9
1.3 ---
0.9 ---
/ 3.2 2/ 3.0
(0.8) (0.8)
3S.6 2/ 37.5
(71.0) ---
9.5 ---
/ 36.3
0.4 ---
./ .5 2/ 38.1
(1.1)
2.4 2.6
14.3 16.0
33.3 34.6
/ 18.0


Continued -


-12-






WOCL-12


Table 3.- Wool: Estimated world wool production, 1932-37


Cont d,


Continents and countries : 932 : 1933 : 1934 : 1935 : 1936 : 19
Prel.
:Million Million Million Million Million Million
:pounds_ pounds pounds pounds Pounds pounds
EUROPE Cont'd.


Albania .................... :2/ 4.1
Bulgaria ......... ..........: 20.0
Rumania 3/...............: 62.7
Lithuania ..................:2/ 3.8
Latvia ......... .......... : 3.6
Estonia ....................: 1.7
Poland _2/ .. .. ............: 9.5
Finland .................... :2/ 3.5
Russia,European & Asiatic ..:7/142.0
Total Europe excl. Russia : 503.5


4.2 4.3 4.5
21.9 23.2 23.8
61.5 68.0 60.1
3.8 3.8 3.3
4.1 4.6 5.3
2.2 2.1 2.0
9.6 9.6 10.8
3.6 3.6 3.7
141.0 135.0 7/167.0
504.6 504.6 502.3


(4.5)
24.6
(60.1)
3.9
5.3
2.3
11.1 11.7
(3.7)
7/200.0 8/259.0
512.3


AFRICA:
Morocco ....................:2/ 20.6 30.9
Algeria ...................: 39.3 2/ 393
Tunisia 2/ ................: 4.4 5.2
French West Africa and
French Sudan e/ .........: 2.5 2.6
Egypt ...........................:2/ 5.4 3/ 5-.4
British South Africa 9/....: 319,4 275.2
Others .................... (4.0) (4.0)
Total African countries...:_ 395.6 3626
ASIA 10/:
Turkey ............. .........: 24.7 34.3
Iraq ............ .......: 18.7 16.3
Palestine ..................:2/ 1.0 1.0
Iran (Persia) ...........: 49.0 47.
Syria ....................: 11.0 9.3
Afghanistan ................: (15.0) (15.0)
India ............ .......: 87.0 87.1
China 11/ ...............: 78.0 78.0
Others ........ ................(1.0) ( 0)
Total Asiatic countries


29.1
2/41.2 2/
5.5

2.5
5.6
210.0
(4.0)
297.9

30.9
17.7
(0.7)
47.0
9.8
(15.0)
87.7
78.0
(1.0)


33.4
S43.6 2/
5.5

2.2
5.7
237.6
(4.0)
332.22

35.3
18.5
(0.7)
50.0
6.8
(15.0)
84.3
78.0
(1.0)


33.4
47.9
5.5


(2.2)
6.0
264.0 277.0
(4.0)
363.0_

41.9 48.5
21.5 17.2
(0.7)
(50.0)
8.4 8.2
(15.0)
84.3
78.0
(1.0)


excl. Russia and China ..: 2074 .211.0 209.8 211.6 222.8
OCEANIA:
Australia ...................:1,.062.6 995.9 1,015.4 971.1 975.0 12/1,014.0
New Zealand 13/ ...........: 277.1 239.6 265.0 304.3 302.9 2/ 314.0
Other ........................: 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Total Oceania ............ :,339.8 1,235.6 1,20.,5 1.275.5 1,278.0
World total all countries
excl. Russia and China 14/3,457.9 3,392.4 3,317.0 3,352.5 3,414.2
World total incl. Russia
and China 1/............:3,677.9 3,611.4 3,530.0 3,597.5 3,692.2
9 -~ .,^ ^ .


Continued -


-13-







WOOL-12 -14-


Table 3,- Wool: Estimated world wool: production, 1932-37 Cont'd.


This table includes wool shorn during the. calendar year in the Iorthern
Hemisphere and that shorn luring the season beginning July 1 or October 1 of
the given calendar year in the Southern Hemisphere. Pulled wool is included
in the total for many important countries at its grease-equivalent.* Figures
in parentheses, interpolated or carried forward........

1/ Published as reported by wool.pulling establishments and is mostly washed.
2/ Estimates based on sheep numbers at date nearest, shearing-time and
other available information,. ......
3/ Revisions based on regent census figures of wool.production-or of sheep
numbers. ................
E/ Estimates based on exports alone or exports,, stocks, and domestic, con-
sumption and any other available information.
/ Estimates of the Argeitine Ministry of Agriculture; subject to revision.
6/ Estimates for these years as recommended by Agricultural Attache P. 0.
Nyhus, using estimates of stocks and domestic consumption of the Buenos
Aires Branch,.First National Bank, Boston,
7/ Estimate based on sheep numbers and average fleece weight as derived from
official estimates for seasons 1926-27 to 1931-32 as published in The
Livestock Industry in .the USSR and for years -1933 -and 1934 Plan # 2-3
1935,. P. 98 (.in Russian). .........
8 Plan -. Wool Production, and Trade 1936-37 Imperial Economic Committee.
9/ Estim:ates from official South African -Wool and -Mohair Bu-1-letin '1935 and
current estimates of t,he South African Department of Agriculture. In
addition, pulled wool was estimated as follows in millions of pounds-
1932, 24.5; 1.933, 21.8.
10/ Estimates for .Asiatic countries rough .approximations -only.
11/ Estimates based on sheep numbers in 1920 and in .1.933.. Owing -to unsettled
conditions in recent y.;ars, exports as. index .of pro.du.ct.ion- are unreliable,
12/ Preshearing estimate of Australian wool selling brokers and wool growers
converted to pounds, grease equivalent. ...
13/ Revisions based on more exact conversion of :pulled and. washed -wool to a
grease basis. ....... ..
l1/ Totals subject to revision. As few countries, publish .oif.icial wool
production figures, production for many countries has been estimated on
the basis of material available. In some cases reliable commercial
estimates have been used or estimates of the Imperial Economic Committee.
See footnotes for individual countries. .. .








WOOL-12


Table 4,- Wool: World production, 1921 to date l/


: Production :
excluding : Soviet
Year : Soviet Union : Union
: and China

Million Million
: pounds __pounds


: : Production
: China : including
: 2/ / : Soviet Union
: : and China


Million
pounds


Million
pounds


1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936


* *.... ... .:

* S :

. .. ..... : S
......... .:
........ ..: @
O..:o ee
e .. ....o
e eo 0 e o o o
o o o @ @@
00 me
e ee e I e
eeoo oee o o
/ oeo eeoc :


2,661
2,699
2,647
2,818
2,952
3,135
3,159
3,275
3,284
3,299
3,393
3,458
3,392
3,317
3,352
3,414,


298
244
256
294
315
351
371
392
394
306
4/ 212
y/ 142
141
135
A/ 167
A/ 200


3,048
3,032
2,992
3,201
3,356
3,564
3,60o
3,745
3,756
3,683
3.663
3,678
3,611
3,530
3,597
3,692


1/ Revisions of estimates published in the Wool Situation August 1937.
2/ Unofficial estimates based on official estimates of sheep numbers
in 1920 and 1933.
2/ Exports are not a reliable index of production during this period
owing to the unsettled condition in China.
l/ Estimates based on sheep numbers and average yield as derived
from official estimates.
5/ Subject to revision.


____ __I


-15-


T




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
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