The wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00048

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text


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UNITED STo..TS DrF..hT::.'- OF AiGRICULTUR
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Washington


'00L-3 March 1), 1937


THE 0 0 L SITUATI 0 N
with -
Quarterly Statistical Supplement


Summary


Prices of wool in this country probably will be maintained near

present levels during the first 3 or 4 months t-f the new marketing season

which begins April 1, the Bureau of Agricultural Economics reports. Al-

though domestic and foreign prices for wool weakened slightly in the last

month, supplies of wool in the United States and abroad are relatively

small and demand conditions continue favorable.

Production of shorn wool in the United States in 1937 is not expected

to show much change from that of last year when 360,327,000 pounds were pro-

duced. An increase of 1 percent in the number of stock sheep and lambs on
range
hand as of January 1 probably will be offset by unfavorable/conditions in

the Western States, where approximately 70 percent of the shorn wool is pro-

duced. Domestic production of pulled wool in 1936 was estimated at 66,200,000

pounds.

Wool prices in the United States are now at a relatively high level

as compared with prices of oTher textile fibers. The high prices are a re-

sult of the exceptionally strong demand for wool in the past 2 years and the

reduction in world wool supplies. Although there is as yet no definite

indication of a reduction in mill consumption of wool for 1937, it is possible,

in view of the relatively high level of wool prices in relation to prices of
NIV. F L I
other textile materials, that consumption in the United St te t ay

not be as large as in 1936. *** "'

U.S. DEPOSITORY







.'00L-3 2-

Trading in domestic wcols on the Boston mr-rket ..:as vcry' light during

February. .Heavy arrivals of foreign wools modo it difficult tc obtain the

premium asked on the small remaining supplies of spot domestic :.ools at

Boston and lover quotations were reported on some grades. The declines

were not expected to affect farm prices of T aol materially. A considerable

amount of the 1937 clip cf territory Twool is already under contr-ct to

dealers and mills for delivery after shearing.

'''"ol prices in foreign markets were somewhat irregular icuring February

but prices at the opening of the London sales on I-arch 2 sho--:d little change

as conp-red with the closing prices on January 27. In view of the relatively

small supplies rema.i-iing for disposal in the Southern Hemisphers foreign wool

prices are likely to remain near prcent levels, at least unt:.l the new

Southern Hemisphere clip becomes available next fall.







Copies of "Agrici'ltural Statistics 1936"' Ava-ilo.le


A limited number of copies >f "Aricultuir-1 Statis-

tics, 1936" are still available. This 420-page printed

volume contains statistics which cover practically all of

the important farm products of the United States. The

statistics relate to acrercee, production, fari., price, farm

value, and foreign trade of the principal cc:.n-:.Lities.

Copies rrncy be obtained. from the Supcrinttendent of Dpccunents,

Government Printing Office, T. shingtrn, D. C., at C5 cents

each.







-3-


DCM-STIC SITUATION

B..ck.r.rund The sharp decline in wool prices from 1929 to
the summer of 1932 reflected the influence of the world wide
business depression and the unusually large world production of
wool. A marked rise in prices in 1933 resulting from increased
demand was followed by a decline in 1934. General improvement in
economic conditions and expanded rearmament programs in some for-
eign countries nave resulted in a strong world demand for wool
since the middle of 1935. World supplies have been reduced and
prices of most wools have advanced to the highest levels since
1929. The large consumption of wool by United States mills in 1935
and 1936 has greatly increased import requirements, and changes in
the foreign wool situation are of considerable importance in the
domestic outlook.


Tool Sales and Prices

Trading in domestic wvools on the Boston market was very light during
February. Heavy arrivals of foreign wools made it difficult to secure the
premium asked on the small remaining supplies of spot domestic -ools at
Boston and lower quotations -ere'reported on some grades. The declines rep-
resented an adjustment in price relationships rather than a weakening. of
the domestic price situation. The quantity of wool sold was too small to
serve as a test of market values.

Fine territory wools in original bags were available at Boston at
$1.08-$1.10 a pound, scoured basis, the latter part of February corpared"with
about $1.12 a pound at the-January peak. The- decline amounted to about 1-2
cents a pound grease basis. Ohio and similar fleece wools including combing
3/8 and 1/4 blood grades were offered at 49-50 cents at the end of February
crmtared with 52-54 cents in January. See table 1 for monthly average prices
of graded territory wools.

The chief interest in domestic wools has now shifted to the new clip.
Early shorn Arizona wools, grading average too good French combing, were re-
ported sold to mills in February at about $1.05-$1.07 a foundd scoured basis,
delivered to buyers in the East. The grease wool prices would be about 42-43
cents for lots shrinking 60 -ercent and about 35-36 cents for lots shrinking
66-67 percent. A considerable amount of the 1937 clip of territory wool is
already under contract to dealers and mills for delivery after shearing.


Domestic Production

Tool production in the United States in 1936 was 427,000,000 pounds
according to the revised estimate released by the Bureau of Agricultural
Economics on March 2, 1937, showing production of shorn and pulled wool com-
bined. There -as a decrease of about 1 percent compared with productidn'in
the 2 preceding years and a reduction of about the same percentage compared
with the average for the years 1930-34. As compared with the record pro-
duction of 1931, there --as a decrease of 4 percent.








-"oL-3


Judi-:ed by the- n=~mer of stcck sheep and( lamb orn hand rn January 1
1937, as ccmparc-d :rith a year aEg, and the -nndition of sheep in the western
range area 'during th- first E mcntn-, of t:ie. -u.rent -rrl gro-.iing season, the
snorn ,-rool clip in 1337 will liffer very little fr:om 'ne '1, 3271, r- pounds
produced in 1936. T*hst year 4L, fh3,0'1I sheep -'ere shcrn, -iT.h an average
-eight per fleece of 7.89 pounds. The 1 pcer-'-nt increase in the n.im'er of
stock sheep and lamis on har.i as of Janiary 1, 47,15r '.r, prjtally -ill be
offset to some extent cy th1e rn.rer sheep and ran-e conditions in the -estern
ranr-e area here approximately 714 percent of the shorn .wo'o -lip --as ,ro-
duced in 1936. Shee"' nnltr-t ions ir. the- -Est-ern ran.c rr.c fcr the 8-nonth
period en .ed Febr-'arv 1, 19)7, ere five points lo-er than in the same period
a year earlier and range ondi'tions tr-n points lo-.er, lut they -7cre similar
to conditions receding the 1'9` 4 :lip.


United States: ITuL'ber of sokF, sheep on hand Jenuanry 1, number shorn,
and -pcol production, 193 -37

S Sheeop and lamns : Wool
: -umber of : : :
A0e raTe total
:stock shen;: Avera : Shrrn : Pulled :
Year .-miuer -eight Trecut ion
and lambs : : : -:ool
orn ff :f
: cn hand : :1in :Crodu.ei:
fl:eece -: 1
: Jan. 1 : __ _:
: lilln ion 1. ilion Million .'lillicn Million
: head ed F ur.ds und__ pounds ouni s

1930 45.6 44., 7.:' 2.1 A Lh14.
1931 : 47.7 1.. 6.04 7 .4 ." 2.4
1932 : 7 7.7 3-1.r' t7.l 41s.1
1933 47.1 4' .., 7 4.: 4.7 .4
1934 : 48.5 .. 7 7.54 :7 6 ,
1935 : 46.6 42., 4. 7 ..' .7
1936 : 46.4 45.7 7.89 0.)5 '2 r) 5
1937 : 47.2




Mill 'r snnpticn

Consumption of a.ararl -o1l b .'.-.iteld 3'at-s rr.ills in January -as
belo- the unusually iin 1.--vl1 ra.--.:'. i~. L'--ber but the rate of .*-onstuap-
tion -as the hi2hi-s- repcrt.- f-r Janruary sin- 132'. Th. -eekly average
rc.nsumption of ar~p..arl -ccl .-as 5,7.; C *Y o-inis, secured Iasis, in January
compared -ith the revised estimarc rf '_,.2,0 '" roCLLnds for r'enemter and
5,645,tc$ pounds in Janruary y 193. Total .'r.rns;urpt iorn in the 5 -eeks endel
January 30 -7as 28,814,' rcc.unl, sourd basi, and was equivalent to
51,120,00(, pTounds oc snrirrn -:.'r.o, arcars.' chor.n asis, and. 7,95,C'ir pounds
of pulled wool, greaCv r1ll-d basis. i'-.ns'.ur. ion by grrades and origin for
1935 and 1536 is shoTr. in table 2 in t.h; Stattistial Supmlement. Machinery
activity figures for 19 ad anI. 193C. re ,.o-n in table 3.


- 4 -






WOOL -3


Unfilled Orders Held_ 1b Mills on January 2

The ii-itioni.l Association of 7ool .Manufacturers reports the following
statistics on unfilled orders held for certain woven cloths containing by
w:eight more than 25 percent of yarns spun on the woolen and worsted system by
firm.:s ih the United States equipped in January 1935 with 34,000 loons.



Date 1en' s Women' s Auto Total
S we-r : wear : cloths / :

:1,000 linear 1,020 linear 1,000 linear 1,000 linear
y yards arrds yards yards

Dec. 23, 1935: ,36,127 10,808 2 2
Oct. 3, 1936 : 24,83 '6,725 2,62 34,251
Jan. 2, 1937 : 39,293 15,078 3,726 58,100

Compiled from ".dnthly Statistics of 7ool l:anufacture", Janu.arj 1937
Cloth less than 50 inches wide re-orted in equivalent 54-inch yardage.

I/ :Ece-t those with pile or jacquard' design.
2~ No cc--marable figures collected.

At the average rate of production riaintainred by these m-ills in 1936,
the unfilled orders on Jonuary 2 represented about 13 weeks of activity.
:.Ien's vear fabrics were sold some'rhrat further ahead than women's vwenr and
mill production of s-rini -oods was expected to continue s~,e'"lot later than
usual this year. M1ill openings on fall lines are expected in :Iarch ond mill
consu-ption probably will be fairly well maintained durin- the first half of
the yeor.

Index iTu.-iers of Toytile Prices

Index numbers of prices of vool, cotton, silk, and rayon Jarn in the
United States for the years 1929 to 1936 are shown in the accon ranyin5. table.
The decline in apprrel wool prices during the Repression years 'aCs not as
,rea.t as the decline in prices of cotton and silki and the recovery fron the
low has been vre.ter for wvool than for the other fibers. In Januar.y 1937 the
index number for fine wool was 116.2 (1979 = 1CO) compared with 70.5 for
ootton, 41.5 for silk and 48.2 for rnyon.

The high level of wool -rices ?as been the result of exceptionally
strong" demand and reduced world supplies. Connmu-'tion of aptparel wool by
United States mills in both 1935 and 1936 was greater th`an in any previous
year since 1923. Consumation of cotton did not regain the precdepression level
until 1936. Cotton consurvtion is related more directly to variations in
industrial activity than is wool consum-,tion, since a consioer-ble part of the
total consunntion of cotton is for industrial jser, while the principal use
of wool is in the clothing industry,


- 5 -






JtOOL-3


Although there are as yet no definite indications of a material decline
in nill consrur:ition of 70ool in 1937, it is possible in view of the continued
hih prices of wool in relation to n'rices of other textile materials, that
mill consuncntion in 1937 Jilll not be so lir-e as in 1936.

Index nr,!.'bers of -rices of wool, cotton, silk, ond r-.yon
;yPrn, United States, 1929-36

~~____~_______(1_:? = 100)(c

Yerr : ool : Cztton Silk : iyjon yarn


1929 : 00.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
1.20 : 77.7 6'.9 69.2 85.0
191 4. 43.4 48.7 60.8
1 2, : 7.9 .6 31.6 55.0
193 : 68. 45.9 22.7 48.9
1:34 : 32.2 36.9 26.3 47.1
195 : 76. 64.7 33.1 46.0
1'2 : 93.8 65.5 35. 47.0
1937
J.n. 11.2 70.5 41.6 48.2

Index nuim bers are based on yearly avera-"es of monthly prices per found .
Items as follows: Wool, strictly com:bin- fine stable territory, 3oston market;
Cotton, Middling 7/8 inch, rverfce at 10 markets; Silk, Japanese silk double-
extra 13-15; 78 percent white, at 1Tew York; Rayon yarn, domestic first quality
150A denier.

FOfEIGN SITUATION

Wool Sales and Prices

London auctions The second series of 1937 wool auctions at London
opened on ,March 2. Prices for merino wools at the opening of the series were
unchanged as compared with the closing prices of the previous series on
January 27, but prices of most greasy crossbred wools and sliced wools were
slightly lower than at the January close, according: to a report from
C. C. Taylor, ACiricultural Attache at London. Prices of Jevw Zealann scoured
crossbred wools were 5 percent higher than on January 27, and lanb s wool
crossbreds were unchanged. See table 1 of Statistical Sunplcr.ient for quotations
on s-ecified -randes.

En-land was the nrincipoal buyer at the opening of the series. A,.erican
buyers -were not o--eratin-, but some Dutch, Belgian, and French orders were
reported. Approximately 75,250 bales "c re available for this series, including
28,000 b los fr-. Australia an- Tasmania, 35,450 bales from New Zealand, .nd
11,000 balcs frcin South A.i rica.


- 6 -






TW00 L-3


Southern Hemisphere sales Wool prices at the Southern Hemisphere
sales in the latter part of January and in Februaryvere irregular and
slightly lower. The irregularity in prices in Australia and South Africa
apparently was due in part to the spasmodic purchasing by Japanese buyers
in those countries. Japanese imports from Australia have been placed on
a quota basis and are regulated by the Wool Import Control Association of
Japan. The current wool selling season is expected to close somewhat early
in most Southern Hemisphere countries. Most available wool has already been
disposed of in Argentina and Uruguay.

The average price of all greasy wool sold in Australian selling centers
in January was 31.6 cents a pound (current rate of exchange) compared with
28 cents in December and 25.2 cents in January 1936. For the third week in
February the average price of greasy wool at the Sydney sales was 29.6 cents
a pound.

Manufacturing Activity in Importing Countries

The monthly index of wool top production for the United Kingdom, France,
Belgium, Poland, and Hungary was 105 in December (1935 100) compared with
98 in November 1936 and December 1935 according to statistics published in
"Wool Intelligence Notes", England. The average monthly production in 1936
was slightly below that of 1935.

Wool manufacturing activity continued relatively satisfactory in most
countries during January.

Supplies of Wool in Importing Countries

Imports of wool into the principal importing countries increased
sharply in recent months as the Southern Hemisphere selling season advanced.
Wool stocks, however, are still relatively low in ..ost countries. See table 5

Apparent Supplies in Southern Hemisphere Countries,February 1,1937

As the 1936-37 wool selling season advances, it becomes apparent that
supplies in Southern Hemisphere countries still to come forward are materiallyl1
below a year ago. It is estimated that on February 1, 1937, apparent supplies
were about 9 percent smaller than on the same date of last year, and 10 percent
below the average for that date of the 5 years 1931-35. Whereas total supplies
available for disposal during the entire season in these countries are estimated
to be about 3 percent smaller than inihe preceding season principally because
of a smaller carry-over, exports so far this season have exceeded those of a
year ago by 6 percent.



1/ Carry-over plus estimated production minus exports from beginning of season
to January 31. No deduction made for relatively small quantities consumed
locally nor for wool sold but not yet exported.


-7-






.LuOL-3


EARTY FRODU;TIOMC 2;C3?:CTS FOR 1937

Northern Hemisphere.- Interest is now centering in the 1937 spring wool
clip in the Northern Hemisphere. Such information as is available at present
on sheep numbers and condition indicate not much change in the 1937 shorn wool
clip in the United States, with probably some increase in production in
England and 'iales and in Germany.

Increases of 2 percent and 10 percent, respectively, in end-of-year
sheep numbers in England and "'ales .and in Germany indicate some increase in
wool production in ti.ese countries in 1937. Wool production in Digland and
.-.ales declined from 90,000,000 pounds in 1933 to only 78,000,000 pounds in 1936
following a corresponding decrease in sheep numbers. In Germany, on the
contrary, indications are that wool production will continue the increase begun
in 1935. In that country it increased from approximately 30,000,000 pounds
in 1934 to 34,500,000 in 1936.

Southern Hemisphre.- Seasonal prospects are now shaping up well in the
important wool producing countries of the Southern Hemisphere. Late summer
(December January) rains in most of the inmortant wool producing countries
of the Southern Hlrkiisphere has benefited pastures and ensured a fairly good
growth of ,rass for the late fall and early winter months (March-June), even
in those parts which suffered most severely from the summer drought. Green
feed in most instances is already available. There have been no reJorts of
prolonged drought in any country.

Conditions in mid-January were report d as good over the major
portion of Australia. The summer had been rather dry, in partsof lueensland
and New South '..ales, November being an unusually dry month. In December and
January, however, rains benefited pastures materially and prospects are now
good for fall and winter -eed. In New Zealand an abundance of feed is reported
from almost all districts. In the Union of South Ifrica rainfall has been
fairly general and pastures have benefited accordingly. The condition of
sheep is reported as satisfactory.

World Production in 193.6

It is now estimated that world production in 1936, exclusive of Russia
and China, was 3,412,000,000 pounds, an increase of 1 percent as cor.ipired with
1935. This estimate is based on statistics for 30 countries which produced
over four-fifths of the world production in 1935.

Production in six Southern Hemisphere countries amounted to
2,046,O 0,000 pounds and was approximately the same as in 1935 but larger than
in 1934. In 2, Northern Hemisphere countries production is estimated at
932,000,000 pounds, an increase of 2 percent above 1935. The increase in
Northern Hemisphere countries were principally in the countries of Central and
Southeastern Europe and in the coarse wool producing countries of the Hear East


-8-








WOOL-3


World production of wool, excluding and including Russia and
China, 1930-36 1/


: Total : : China__: Total
:excluding : : Estimated : : including
Year :Russia and: Russia :production : Exports : Russia and
:China 2/ : : 3/ : 4/ : China 2/
million Million Million Million Million
: pc fundss pounds pound s rund s pounds

1930.....: 3,318 306 78 26 3,702
1931 .....: 3,413 5/ 212 78 32 3,703
1932.....: 3,474 5/ 142 78 5 3,694
1933.-...- 3,401 141 78 30 3,620
1934.....: 3,347 135 78 32 3,560
1935.....: 3,387 5/ 167 78 44 3,632
1936.....:6/ 3,412 5/ 200 78 3,690



1/ Revision of estimates published in World "7ool Prospects,
November 1936, p. 21.
2/ Subject to revision at any time that a revised or better series
becomes available for any country. Includes revised estimates
for Argentina and Turkey.
3/ Unofficial estimate of production based on sheep numbers in 1933.
l/ Exports are not a reliable index of production owing to the
unsettled condition in China.
5/ Estimates based on sheep numbers and average yield as derived from
official estimates.
6/ Estimate based on production in 90 countries supplying more than
four-fifths of the world production, exclusive of Russia and
China.


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OOL-3


STATI STICAL SUPPLErMEIT

Table l.-4ool prices per poun-d in specified markets, selected periods


Market and


:Ave


rage:


description : 1235 :
: : ts
Boston:
Terr. combing scoured basis :
64s, 70s, C's (fine) ....... : 74.3
56s, ( ,/8 -lo.d) ........... : 63.6
46, (.c 1' bl ood) ....... : 51.-=
Farm -orict (1,.th of month) :
-r,-Je. b-.sis ...............: 19.4
London: I/
Av. quality clean cost / :
70s .........................: 47.5
56s ........................ : 29.-
46s ................. 18.6
Bradfo r _.:/ :
Scour i. b:.;j.s-
64s n: o ...................: 47.7
5Y 's '.-"p .. .................: 23.2
Aus t rli--.: :
Aver-A -,- rice: ,.t all selling :
centers, 4r/e:Tsv ....:
Syine'(DcI 'i '-re- Br ri, ior ,)-, / :
Clera r or. si 7:s *;'"'p ...... :
Union of Sc':' Afrir-: :
Avrr:,e :-port p ric ,rrv ca :
wo l ........... ........ :
Price -.. lirg cri:'t rs C :

s r ................. ........ .:
Argent i n: :
Buenos Aires rmarket-
Buenos Aires, South and
Southeast, greas:,' coarse
cro:sored 7/ ...............
UTruguay:7 :
Montevi.e i m :.rket-
Fine crossbr:d, grcasy,'
50s.-5.s to :Os / ... ......


Average: Jan.
1936 : 133G :
en ts C et ts


92.0 8C.1
80.4 77.7
65.9 G0.6


Dec. : Jon. : Feb.


1926 :
Cents


106.8
94.7
79.2


1c37 :
Cents


114.0
98.8
82.1


9/23.9


58.4
35.1
25.8


59.3
29.7


55.6
33.5
21.7


61.3
q2.9
.3.7


.5.3 Ci7.5
27.1 40.9


64.4
49.5
39.3


69.5
44.9


1937
Cents


114.0
99.8
83.2

31.6


63.7
48.4
38.7


10/ 60.1
10/ 38.7


25.2 28.0 31.6

60.9 C7.4 73.9


21.3 24.8 23.3


57.6 69.4 69.7




12.9 20.9



28.3 38.8 40.8


Foreign prices have been converted at p:evailing rates of exch:.nce.
1/ Average of quotations for each series of London sales as reported by the
London office of the Buicr.u of Agricultural Ehc.norics. For months when no
sales were held, figures are interpolations of nearest actual prices.
2/ Top and noil in oil. 3/ Quotations reported about the 25th of the month
by the London office of the Bureau of Agriculturl Economics. 4/ National
Council of Wool Selling Brokers. 5/ 7ool Record and Textile World, Bradford.
6/ South African Ministry for Agriculture. 7/ Monthly average of weekly
range quoted in Revista Quincenr.l de Precios published by Salaberry, Bercetche
& Cia., B. A. 8/ Average of maximum and minimum prices for last of month.
Furnished by American Consul A. W. Ferrin. 9/ Preliminary. 10/ New series.


~ ~~ ~


- IC -


24.1 30.1 31.3





WVOOL-3


Table 2.-Mill consumption of -ool in the United States by 3,rade and
origin, scoured basis, 1935 and 1936


: 1935


Item : roes-: : :Percent: Doms-: : :Percent
i T l tic :Foreig: Total :domestic tic :Foreign: Total :domestic
:Million Million Million Miillion MIillion iiliion
:pounds pounds pounds Percent pounds pounds pounds Percent


Apparel class :
64s,70s,80s ...: 112.3
58s, 60s ......: 44.9
56s .......... : 66.5
48s, 50s ......: 46.2
46s ...........: 6.6
36s,40s,44s ...: 3.2
Total aroarel.: 279.7


Carpet class :
(all foreign) :


3.4
1.8
3.5
4.5
2.2
3.9
24.3


98.5


115.7
46.7
70.0
50.7
8.9
12.0
304.0


98.5


97.1 89.3
96.2 34.3
94.9 48.3
91.1 33.5
74.8 )
26.2 )
92.0 .212.8


12.8
5.2
11.2
11.0
25.4

65.6


102.1
39.4
59.6
44.5
32.8


278.4


87.5
86.9
81.1
75.2
22.5


76.4


--. 106.1 106.1


Compiled from Raw Wool Consumption Reports, Bureau of the Census.

Table 3.-jachin-ery activity in the woolen and worsted industry, United
States, October-December 1935 and 1936

S: Spindles Looms
Year and : Combs : : : Broad : Narrow :
month : : Woolen : W'orstd : / : 2/ Carpet
:1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1, 000
: hours hours hours hours hours hours

Weekly average machine and spindle hours reported
1935 3/
Oct. .....: 160 98,599 88,166 1,815 168 201
Nov. .....: 162 96,242 90,522 1,926 161 200
Dec. .....: 136 88,243 77,178 1,978 153 165
Year ...: 144 90,292 81,764 1,839 136 194
1936 3/
Oct. .....: 124 87,175 82,200 1,623 176 247
Nov. ....: 140 93,107 91,566 1,842 163 238
Dec. .....: 163 107,862 105,387 2,171 196 248
Year ....: 126 89,322 75,283 1,761 160 202

: Percenta:e of .rxinun single shift, new basis 4/
: Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent Percent

1935 5/ ....: 135.1 117.9 87.8 103.0 39.9 64.5
1936 5/ ...: 121.5 118.0 83.6 99.0 51.7 68.5

Compiled from Jool :.achin-ry Activity Reports issued by the Bureau of the Census.
1/ Woolenaad worsted loo:-.s wider than 50" reed space. 2/ ;Joolen amnd worsted
looms with 50" reel space or less. 3/ The first month in each quarter of 1936
is a 5-week period, and the 2 following months are 4-week periods. In 1935
the first 2 months of each quarter are 4-week periods and the final month is a
5-week period. 4/ Total machines times hours which they could have been operated
on a single shift of 40 hours per week. 5/ .7einhted average.


- 11 -


: 1936


--


I-







JOOL-3


Table 4.- Wool irmorts into


countries, s-ecified periodss


Country and
item


1933


1?34


J5r.-2rc.
135 : 1936


: million n
: pounds


million n


United States
Imports I/
Appaerel wool ..:
Carpet wool ...:
United Kinrdorn
ImI orts .........:
itee-, 'orts ....... :
Imnort balance ..
G-e n .ar;-
Imports ......... :
:reexrorts .......:
Import ':"lance ..:
Janar.n
I:nports / .....:
Frn-ce :
Imnorts, shorn :
On skins (wvool :
equivalent) 3/:
E--,:rts ..........
I:.rort balance ,.:
3elium :
ITports ...... :
r-:.-" rts .........
Import balance ..:


35.6
115.4

952.0
360.1
591.9

347. 3
12.5
335.1

238.8

534.3

64.1
51.4
547.0

213.3
73.6
73.6


" 1.
39.I



26 ?
1i9.7


42. 0
1C.3.5
1:7..:. 5



.K),J 'I.


31.?.
9.,j ; 33
1.2


1-31.E





45.9
324.7

1 74. 6
99.6
65.0


42.0 110.7
158.5 143.3

9364.1 914.2
2c3.2 276.7
5-.. 637.5
J n. Io:v.
224.1 216.9
.0 0.7
261.1 216.2


211 .2


50. 5


47.2
i 3E. ,

117.6


45.9
41.4
359.7

214.6

1i'6.5


321.6

40.3
57.9
304.0

209. 5
91.5
113.0


Cor:-iled from official sources r-;r: fr:,; ":::1 I.-teili ence ITotes" -bJlished
by the Inmerial Econonic Co.--:ittee of t'-. Unitcl Kirn-c.o-.
j Imports for consi Onmtion. Anprrel ':"le ":nt finer t-.?n -*0s" rre inclu-ed
with alparel wool for all years. In- statistics -u'.blis'-.c~. L the De- rt-.ent
of Cor.-ierce front 1930 to 135, s.'ch .'ools :.ere inclu.de. :--it.h c-rIet. wools.

SEstinated -t 4/9 of wei-ht of v'ooled osir..


iii


M i1ii~n
TO.L


Million
-,3un.ds


~ ~ _~


_


- 12 -


l,'Zc
Lr U~






7COL-3 13 -



Table 5. Stocks of raw wool E.7i wool tops in specified foreign impcrtinf
countries at the end of each month, 1935 and 1936

Iten, ad :: : : : Jul
year :Jan :Fb. ; ar. :Apr. :May :Jurne:July:Aug. :S- pt.: r)ct. :Nov. :Dec.


(In


Ra- wool:
Japan 'hses. 1/
1935 ............. :
1936 ............ :
United Kingdom
Public -hses. at
chief norts
1935 .......... :
1936 ............ :
Yorkshire Depots 2/:
1935 ............
1936 ............:
Wool tops at cr.ting :
establishment / :
France
1935 ............:
1936 ............:
Germany
1935 ........ ....:
1936 ............:
Belgium
1935 ............:
1936 ............:


44 46
52 57



- 86
- 55

- 47
- 54



30 30
27 27


millions of pounds)


41 441 4go 50
71 82 84 86


- 76
63 80



28 29
28 28

13 12
4 4


- gn
60 68

- 92
92 89



28 30
29 27


55 56
76 62


41 31
50 38


- 75
83 74


37 44
30 24


- 43
49 47



25 26
17 17


32 33
28 27


12 11 11 11
4 4 4 14


10 8
4 3


- -


Compiled as follows Japan: "7ool Intelligence Notes", England, quoting reports
of the Tokyo Chamber of Commerce and Industry; United "in:lom: "Tool Intelligence
Notes"; France, German'. and Belgium: "Teekly 7ool Chart",Bradford.
1/ Manufacturers' sto oks are not included.
2/ Stocks at railway and canal depots in Yorkshire are believed to indicate
rcu,-ly the trend of stocks in the hands of manufacturers.
31 These statistics are for -commission combers only but are believed to be repre-
sentative of the mrn,-ment of total. tock. in ontries reported.







TOOL-3


Tn'le 6.- Estimated production of wool in specified countries, average
1926-30, nn'a- 11 72-36


:Averape:
: 1926- :
: 30 :


1932


millionn million
: -ounds nouns


1973 : 1934 : 1935 : 1936
: : : I/
millionn millionn millionn Is million
o'jnds rounds -Dounis pounds


Southern Hem:isnhere
Australia ... .................
Io- Zealand _/ 4/ ...........
Chile ........................ :
Brazil ....................... :
Argentina 6/ .... ........
Urug;uay / ...................
British South Africa 8/ ......
Total of 6 countries report-
in- to 1936 ....... ..... :1
o.rthicrn He-iis'here
'-Trti A.iericic :
United States 9/
Shorn......................
Pulled 10/ ... .......... .
Total .............
Canada ......................
Total 2 countries re-orting :
to 1936 .................. :
Mexico 11/ ............... :
Zurote:
United Kinrldomx (England and
Wales, Scotland, and North- :
ern Ireland)............... :
Irish Free State ........... :
T:,rvay .................. .
Fr-ince .....................
Spain 1 / ..................
Italy 12j ................
Germany ..................
Czechoslovakia I1 ....... :
Hun Eiry ................... :
Yu:oslavia / .........
Greece ..................... :
3ulcaria 5/ .............. :
Ruiania 11 ............. :
Island 5/ ................
Estonia ....................
Latvia .................. :
Lith Lar.!ia ................... :
Total 17 E'uro'pean countries:
re-ortin- to 1936 ........:


926.4

6.7
26.1
327. 1
140.1
294.1


1,062.6

5/ 25.9C
33.7
364. 0
7/ 110.2
31.. 4


995.9
300.5
3/ 25.7
35.3
364. 0
7/104. 7
275.2


1,.175.4
275. 9
/ 28.7
35.4
364.0
7119.0
210.0


991.7
316.5
25.4

359.0
113.0
227.8


2/983.0
295.0
3/ 22.8

7/373.0
-7/112.4
262.2


,930.7 2,170.5 2,066.0 2,013.0 2,C043.4 2,048.4



310.7 351. 0 374.2 370.3 364.7 360.3
53.6 67.1 64.2 60.5 66.0 66.2


364. ;
10 5"


383.8
6.3



112.4
18.0
5.6
46.5
73.7
53.3
34.8
3.7
12.2
28.3
14.0
22.7
66.9
9.5
1.8
3.5
3.8


370.1


41. .1


438.6
(9.0)



118.5
19.6
5.7
43.2
5/70.0
40.0
5/30.8
2.3
10.8
30.5
14.9
20.0
62.7
9.5
1.7
3.6
3.8


43 8.4
19.0


457.7
(9.6)



119.9
19.6
5 5.8
43.0
67.6
39.0
30.0
2.0
5/10.5
30.8
16.0
21.9
61.5
9.6
2.2
4.1
3.8


430.8
19.5


4510. 3
10. 3



112.3
17.0
6.0
42.3
(63.0)
38.1
5/29. 3
2. 1
5/10.8
31.1
16.7
g3.21
68.0
9.6
2.1
4. 6
3.8
-1
6~


430.7
12.4


450.1
(10.3)


426.5
5/ 19.3


445.8
-,


135.6 106.7
16.5 _/16.7
5.7 5/ 5.9
5/41.0 541.0
71.0
37.5 5/36.3
J:30.7 5/34.5
2.2 2.4
/12.2 5 /14.3
32.1 33.3
17.3 18.0
23. 3 24.6
59.1 --
10.4 11.2
2.0 5/ 2.0
5/ .9 4.9
3. 2.8


354.9 358.2 349.5 343.7 355.6
3 5 C'.2 '149. _


Continued -


Con.-ntry


............


-------


S .... .5


3.8


- -


370.1


- 14 -








15 -

Table 6.-Estimated production of wool in specified countries, average
1926-30, annual 1932-36 Cont'd


Country


:Average:
: 1926- : 1932
: 30


:Million
:pounds


Africa and Asia:
Morocco .....................: 22.2
Al eri ....... .............. : 41.9
Tunis .......................: 4.0
Turkey 13/ ..................: 31.3
Iraq 14 .................... 18.6
Syria 14/ ...................: 13.6
Total 5 countries of
Africa and Asia reporting :
to 1936 .. ......... ......: 109.4
Total 24 Northern Hemi-
.'i:re countries report- :
ing to 1936 .............. 863.3
Total 30 Northern and
Southern Hemisphere coun-
tries reporting to 1936 ..:2,844.0
Estimated world total,
excl.Russia and China 15/.:3,243.0
Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics ................: 363.0
China 18/ ....................: 78.0
Estimated total including' :
Russia and China 15/ ......:3,684.0


Million
rounds


5/

5/


19.6
39.3
4.4
24.7
18.7
10.0


: 1933
:*


1Million
pounds


22.3
39.3
5.2
34.3
16.3
8.5


: 1934 : 1935 : 1936
: : : I/


1/


Million
pounds


22.0
41.2
5.5
30.9
17.7
13.3


Million Million
pounds pounds


26.0
43.6
5.5
35.3
18.5
(13.3)


97.1 103.6 108.6 116.2 131.0


890.6 919.5 908.4 915.0 932.4


3,061.1 2,c85.5 2,921.4 2,958.4 2,980.8
16/
3,474.0 3,401.0 3,347.0 3,387.0 3,412.0
17/ 17 17/
142.0 141.0 135.0 167.0 200.0
78.0 78.0 78.0 78.0 78.0

3,694.0 3,620.0 3,560.0 3,632.0 3,690.0


47.9
5.5
42.0
21.5
14.1


This table includes wool shorn during the calendar year in the Northern
Hemisphere and that shorn during the season beginning July 1 or October 1 of the
given calendar year in the Southern Hemisphere, the bulk being shorn during the
last 6 months of the given calendar year. Pulled wool is included in the total
for most important countries at its Lgrease equivalent. Figures in parenthesis
are interpolated or carried forward. See World Wool Prospects, November 1936,
for table showing all countries, and current monthly issues of the Wool Situation
for latest estimates.
I/ Preliminary. Subject to revision.
2/ Preshearing estimate of Australian wool brokers and growers converted to
pounds, grease equivalent.
3/ Estimates based on exports alone, or exports, stocks, and domestic consumption
and any other available information.
4/ Years 1926 and 1936 supplied by the Imperial Economic Committee. Years 1927-
28 to 1935-36, Official Yearbook of New Zealand 1936 and Monthly Abstract
of New Zealand Statistics, August 1936.


Continued -


WOCL-3


~-------~ "







WOOL-3


Table 6.-Estimated production of wool in specified countries, average
1926-30, annual 1932-36 Cont'd


NOTES, CO IT'D

5/ Estimates based on sheep numbers at date nearest searing and other avail-
able data.
6/ Estimates of Argentina Ministry of Agriculture. Subject to revision.
7/ Estimates supplies by U. S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Attache'
in Argentina.
8/ Revised estimates furnished by-Union of South Africa, division of Economics
and Markets. Includes production in Basutoland, Southern Rhodesia, and South-
west Africa.
9/ Revised estimates of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
10/ Published as reported by pulleries and is mostly washed.
11/ Revisions based on recent census figures of wool production or of sheep
numbers.
12/ Revised estimates based on estimates published in Prospettive Economiche
for 1930 and 1935. Intervening years based on information contained in same
source as to trend in sheep numbers in past 5 year-.
13/ Estimates recently published by the Banque Centrale de la Turquie. These
estimates supersede those published formerly which were based on exports.
14/ Unofficial estimates based on information furnisned by United States
Government representative.
15/ Totals subject to revision. Few countries publish official estimates of
wool production. In the absence of official figures for many countries,
various estiar.tes have been used. Some have been furnished by United States
Government representatives abroad and others have been based on reports of
sheep numbers, average fleece weights, and any- other available data. For
some principal exporting countries the figures are seasonal exports alone, or
estimai'es derived from exports, carry-over, and domestic consumption. In the
case of most Asiatic countries the figures are rough commercial estimates.
16/ Estinate based on production in 531 countries as compared with 1935.
17 -stimate based on sheep numbers and average yield as derived from official
estimates for recent years.
18/ Unofficial estimates based on sheep number- in 1933. Owing to unsettled
conditions in recent years exports of sheep's wool not reliable index of
production.


- 1t -







WOOL-3


Table 7.- Numbers of sheep in principal exporting and importing countries,
averages 1909-13, 1921-25, 1526-30, annual 1931-37

Exporting countries
stralia : :Union of South :Argen-
: Australia : New :Africa,AuA. 31 :tina
Period Zealand t i.n. a
erioTotal, New Zealand ; :total :Uruguay: Total
Jan. 1 :South : Apr. :Total :Wooled :June
1/ :Wales : 30 : nly :30,
millionss a millions MillionsMillionsMillions i llionsf.illieonsMillions
Averages,


1909-13
1921-25 .
1926-30"*':


1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936


. ... ... ..:
....... "e..:
,.
S .* *


90.7
85.6
103.3
ii0.6
110.6
112.9
109.9
113.0
112.5


3/47.1
3/44.3
3/51.7
6/53.0
6/53.7
6/52.1
6./53.3
56.0


24.0
23.4
27.5

29.8
28.7
27.8
28.6
29.0


30.7
32.6
43.3
7/51. o
7/50.6
7/47.3
35.2
36.0


25.8
27.8
38.9
7/46.5
7/45.4
7/42.6
7/30.4
30.3


2/43.2
i/36.2
1/44.4


26.3
14.4
5/20.6


214.9
177.8
239.1


15.4


39.3
38.0


--- 30.0


Importing countries
:United States : United
Jan. 1 .. Kingdom : France :Germany :
: : Stock and Irish :Jan. 1 :Jan. 1 :Canada : Total
:Total : sheep :Free State : :
: only : June : / : / :
:Millions Millions Millions Millions Millions Millions Millions


Averages,
1909-13....:
1921-25.... ;
1926-30....:
1931..........:
1932.......... :
1933 .......... :
1934.......... :
1935........ :
1936.......... :
1937.......... :


43.2
37.8
45.6
53.2
54.0
53.1
53.7
52.2
52.0
52.6


40.7
47.7
47.8
47.3
48.5
46.6
46.4
47.2


29.2
24.5
27.9
30.0
30.8
30.2
23.0
28.2
20.2
9/


16.2
9.6
10.6
10.2
9.6
9.0
9.7
9.6
9.6


5.0
5.9
4.0
3.5
3.5
3.4
3.4
3.5
/ 3.9
8/ 4.3


2.3
3.0
3.4
3.6
3.6
3.4
3.4
3.4
3.4


95.9
81.o
91.5
100.5
101.7
99.9
98.2
96.9
97,1


Compiled from official sources and the International Institute of Agriculture inldss
otherwise stated.
l/ Estimates as of December have been considered as of January 1 following year.
2/ Census June 1914. 3/ June 30 following. i/Census December 19:
5/ Census. 6/ March 31 year following.
7/ Estimr:Ates based on South African Department of Agriculture re' orts of changes
in sheep numbers in June adjusted to a census basis as of August.
8/ Includes the Saar where there were 5,154 sheep in 1936.
9/ :Ijur.ber in England and I."ales on December 1936 were estimated at 12,912,000
compared with 12,662,000 on the same date of 1935.


-17-




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
SIIIIIIIIIIIllIIIIIllll11 IIII l IIIIIIIIIIIIN
3 1262 08861 5421

































,1




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