The wool situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00045

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agriculthral Economics
Washington

WOOL-8 August 9, 1937



S DOCN JMTSEN PT THE WO L SITUATI N
with
-... .. WORLD PRODUCTION TABLES
--------------------------------


Summary


Wool prices in the domestic market probably will remain near present

levels for the next few months, the Bureau of Agricultural Economics reports.

While domestic mill consumption has declined from the high rate of the first

quarter of 1937, supplies in the United States are still below average and

demand continues relatively favorable.

Present prospects indicate that world wool production in 1937 will be

larger than in 1936. The increased production will be partly offset, however,

by the reduction in stocks in the Southern Hemisphere where the carry-over was

the lowest in several years. Wools from the new clip in the Southern Hemis-

phere will not be available in quantity until the final quarter- of 1937.

The preliminary estimate of the quantity of wool shorn or to be shorn in

the United States in 1937 is about 367 million pounds, which is an increase of

2 percent over 1936, and is practically the same as the average for the 5 years,

1931-35. The increase is the result of the larger number of sheep shorn and a

larger average weight per fleece in 1937 as compared with 1936. This estimate

does not include wool pulled from slaughtered sheep and lambs, which averaged

65 million pounds annually in the 5 years, 1931-35.






WOOL-8


The total supply or:-apparcl wool in the United States on July 1 plus

the part of the domestic production which will become available in the next

few months, was about 5 percent larger than a year earlier. Since stocks of

apparcl wool held by dealers and manufacturers on June 26, totaling about

142 million pounds, scoured basis, were 5 million pounds smaller than a year

earlier, the quantity of wool on farms on July 1 apparently was larger than on

July 1, 1936. Although larger than a year earlier, total supplies of wool

in the United States were smaller than in lost other recent years.

Consumption of .apparel wool on a scoured basis by United States mills

in the first half cf. 1937 was 16 percent larger than in the first half of 1936,

and was larger than in the same months of any year since 1923. It is probable,

however, that there h-.s been some accumulation of stocks of finished good in

the various channels of trade, and mill consumption in the last half rf the

year is not likely to be so large as in the saom months of 1936.


DOMESTIC SITUATION

BACKGROUND The domestic wool situation thus far
in 1937 has been featured by very larg" mill con-
sumption, below average stocks, and a level of
domestic prices higher than for any similar period
since 1929. The favorable conditions in the
domestic market were accompanied by strong demand
and relatively slmlall supplies of wool in foreign
countries. Prices declined in May in both domestic
and foreign markets but the decline was checked in
June. Mill consumption in the United States has
declined gradually in recent months.


W-ol Sales and Prices

Wool prices in the United States remained firm during the first half
of July, although trading was light. After the middle of the month sales
increased, and slightly higher-prices were reported on some lines of domestic
wool at Boston. Trading at country points increased considerably in the latter
part of July. Sales were reported in the Western States as well as in Texas
and to a lesser extent in the fleece wool sections of the Middle West.


-2-







WOOL-8


-3-


Sales of wool in the Bo.ston, market in July were chiefly of the finer
grades of western grown wools in original bags. Good French combing fine
territory wools and good 12-monthsTexas wools in original bags were sold the
latter part of July at from 95 to 97 cents a pound, scoured basis. The upper
end of this range is slightly higher than that for prices quoted at the
beginning of the month. Graded territory wools were sold in small lots and
prices in the latter part of July were higher on the coarse wools, including
low 1/4 blood.

Sales of fleece wools at Boston were small in July, but asking prices
were firm to slightly-higher. .Offerings of country packed lots of Ohio
fleeces, consisting of combing and clothing length 3/8 and 1/4 blood grades,
were quite firm near the end of the month-at 43 cents in the grease, delivered
to Eastern markets. Similar wools were offered at 42-cents a month earlier.


Stocks Held by Dealers and- Manufacturers

Stocks of apparel wool held by United States dealers and manufacturers
reporting to the Bureau of the: Census on-June 26, 1937, totaled about 142
million pounds scoured basis, compared with-121million pounds on March 27 and
147 million pounds on June 27 last year. Stocks of domestic wool were 13
million pounds smaller on June 27 than a year earlier, while stocks of foreign
wool were about. -million pounds larger. Less than a million pounds of
foreign apparel wool were reported afloat to United States dealers and
manufacturers on June 27.

-Dealers' stocks on June 26 were 9 million pounds-smaller than in June
1936, while manufacturers stocks' were slightly larger than a year earlier.
Total stocks reported on June 27 were equivalent to 246 million pounds of
shorn wool, greasy shorn basis, and 40 million pounds of pulled wool, greasy
pulled basis. Stocks in late June 1936 on a grease basis were about 254 million
pounds of shorn wool and 42 million pounds of pulled wool.

Total supplies of apparel wool in the United States including wool on
farms and the unshorn portion of the 1937 clip were about 5 percent larger on
July 1 than a year earlier. This would indicate that the quantity of wool
on farms on July 1 was somewhat larger than on July 1,1936. Receipts of
domestic wool at Boston from April to June of this year were 4 percent smaller
than in the same months of 1936, while production is expected to be about 2
percent larger than last year. Although larger than a year earlier, total
supplies of wool in the United States on July 1 were' smaller than in most other
recent years.






WOOL-8


-4-


Stocks of raw wool, top and noil held by dealers, topmakers and
manufacturers in the United States,scoured basis,
June 26, 1937, with comparisons


: 1936 : 1937
Item : June 27 : Mar. 27 :
: / : 1/ : June 26

: 1,000 lb.' 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.

Apparel wool, total........: 147,057 120,526 141,850
Dealers ....................: 76,794 36,929 68,119
Domestic ................: 62,652 19,075 57,794
Foreign on hand ........: 13,255 13,826 9,855
Foreign afloat ..........: 887 4,028 470
Manufacturers and topmakers : 70,263 83,597 73,731
Domestic ...,............: 48,246 39,616 40,085
Foreign on hand .........: 21,993 36,650 31,333
Foreign afloat ...........: 24 7,331 2,313

Carpet wool, total .........: 34,230 37,462 35,612
Dealers ............. : 2,211 2,434 2,873
Manufacturers .............: 32,019 35,028 32,739

Tops ......................: 22,257 23,528 25,576
Noils ............. .....: 10.978 12,496 12,067


Compiled from Bureau of the Census Quarterly Wool Stock Report,
June 26, 1937. The statistics are believed to include more than 96
percent of the total stocks held by and afloat to all dealers
(including commission houses, pullers and cooperatives), topmakers and
manufactures in the United States on the dates specified.

1/ Revised.


Wool I~ports

Imports of apparel wool into the United States declined in June and
were only slightly larger than in June 1936. For the first 6 months of
this year, however, imports of such wool for consumption, totaling 121 million
pounds, were almost twice as large as in the same months of 1936 and wore
larger than in any similar period since 1926.

In view of the present relatively small dorjestic supplies, United States
imports of wool in the first half of 1938 may be fairly large. With prospects
for smaller mill consumption in the second half of this year, however, imports
are likely to be considerably smaller than those of the first half of the
current year.






WOOL-8 -5-


Mill Consumption

Consumption of apparel wool on a scoured basis by United States mills
declined gradually from March to June, but consumption for the first half
of the year was 16 percent larger than in the first half of 1936 and was
larger than in the same months of any year since 1923. The weekly average
consumption of apparel wool for the 4 weeks ended June 26 was 5,011,000
pounds, scoured basis, compared with 5,716,000 pounds in May and with
5.,019,000 pounds in June 1936. The rate of consumption. in June was'the
lowest since July 1936.

The consuL.ption of apparel wool in the first 6 months of this year
was equivalent to 253 million pounds of shorn wool, greasy shorn basis and 42
million pounds of pulled wrol, greasy pulled basis. Mill consumption on a
grease basis in the first half of 1936 was equivalent to 226 million pounds
of shorn wool and 39 million pounds of pulled wool.

Latest reports of the New York.Wocl Top Exchange Service indicate a
further slight recession in the general level of mill operations in July.
New business in wool goods continued light and unfilled orders have been
sharply reduced as a result of the relatively high rate of mill activity in
recent months. Present indications are that the new lines of spring fabrics
will not be opened before early September.


OUTLOOK FOR PRODUCTION, 1937-38

As estimates of wool production for 1937 have now been received for
several important wool-producing countries, including the United States,
Australia and the Union of South Africa, it is possible to give some
indication of the outlook for supplies in the 1937-38 marketing year.

Preliminary estimates for 12 countries producing a little more than
one-half of the, world's production, exclusive of Russia and China, show an
increase of 4 .percent as compared with 1936. World production in 1936,
exclusive of Sussia and China, reached 3,386,000,000 pounds according to
present estimates, an increase of 1 percent above 1935. Production averaged
3,398,000,000 pounds for the 5 years 1931-35 compared with 3,245,000,000
pounds for the 5 years 1926-30. (See tables 3 and 4).

Stocks carried over into the.1937-38 season in the Southern Hemisphere
are even smaller than they were a year ago when they were the lowest for
some time. It is too early as yet to state whether the reduction in stocks
in th4 Southern Hemisphere is great enough to offset the expected increase
in PXoduction there in 1937-38.






WOOL-8


Domestic Production


The preliminary estimate of the quantity of wool shorn and to be shorn
in the United States in 1937 is 367,359,000 pounds, which is an increase of
2 percent above 1936 and practically the same as the average for the 5 years
1931-35 according to the release of August 3, issued by this Bureau. The
increase is the result of the larger number of sheep shorn and a larger
average weight of fleece, whichwas 7,95 pounds in 1937 and 7.89 in 1936.

Production in the Western Sheep States, including Texas, was
266,200,000 pounds, an increase of 2 percent above 1936. The increase in
these States was the result of the larger number of sheep shorn, as the
average weight of wool per sheep was smaller than a year ago. Most of the
increase was in Texas where production rose 18 percent from 64,265,000 pounds
in 1936 to 75,538,000 pounds in 1937; this is more than one-fifth of the
United States total production of shorn wool.

The native sheep states produced 101,200,000 pounds of wool this year,
an increase of 3 percent above 1936. The larger production in the Native
States this year resulted from the heavier average weight per fleece, since
the number of sheep shorn was smaller than in 1936.

In addition to the shorn wool produced, some wool is pulled from
slaughtered sheep and lambs. The amount pulled averaged 65 million pounds
for the 5 years, 1931 to 1935.


Southern Hemisphere Production

As yet estimates are not available for the new clip in all of the
Southern Hemisphere countries, where shearing takes place principally in the
last few months of the calendar year. Preliminary estimates indicate an
increase of about 65 million pounds or 5 percent in Australia and the Union
of South Africa, the chief world sources of Merino wool. May was a dry month
in these countries but early winter rains, occurring in June, relieved the
situation; and if more rain is received, the winter feed situation will be
greatly benefited.

Estimates of production for Now Zealand, Argentina and Uruguay, which
produce mainly medium and coarse wool, should be available within a month
or two. Weather conditions in these countries have been generally favorable
to the new clip during most of the wool growing season. Recent reports,
however, indicate dry conditions in the interior of Argentina.


-6-





WOOL- 8


FOREIGN SITUATION

Sales and Prices

London auctions

Prices were well maintained at the 4th series of London wool auctions
which opened July 6. While opening prices on some wools were lower than
at the close of the previous series on May 6, advances during the series
brought most wools to be May level when the sales closed on July 16. The
chief decline in prices as compared with the May series was on slipped wools
of which large quantities were available. England and France were the chief
buyers at the series. Practically no buying was reported for the United
States. The next series of London sales will open on September 14.

Southern Hemisphere

Marketings of the 1936-37 clip of the Southern Hemisphere havebeen
about completed, and Southern Hemisphere-markets are now preparing for the
1937-38 selling season. The first series of sales of the new season in
Australia will open at Sydney on August 30 and continue to September 9.
Sales also will be held at Adelaide and Brisbane, Australia, in the first
half of September. Average prices received at Australian sales in the final
months of the 1936-37 season were lower than during the main selling season,
but this was attributed to the poor selection of wools available. Prices of
wools of good quality and condition were reported to be well maintained
during June.

New clip wools will be available in the Union of South Africa in
September, but the season in South America and New Zealand will not open
until October and November.


Exports from Southern Hemisphere Countries to June 30

Exports from the five important Southern Hemisphere countries -/ up to
the end of June were somewhat above expectations based on estimates of apparent
supplies for the entire season. These estimates were based on reported
carry-over at selling centers plus production. It seems probable that the
keen demand for medium and coarse wools has brought out supplies which had
been held over from year to year during the period of relatively slack demand
for these types. It is also possible that production in South America has
exceeded early estimates somewhat.

Exports from-the three Southern Hemisphere countries, in which the
season closed on June 30, amounted to 1,359,000,000 pounds, according to
preliminary estimates, a reduction of only 5 million pounds as compared with
1935-36. Including Argentina and Uruguay, exports up to June 30, from the
five Southern Hemisphere countries reached 1,739,000,000 pounds, an increase
of 1 percent above 1935-36 and about the same as the preceding 5-year average.


1/ Export season ends June 30 in Australia, New Zealand and the Union of
South Africa.


-7-







WOOL-8


-8-


Present indications, based on an estimate of apparent supplies on June 30,
are for smaller exports than a year earlier from Argentina and Uruguay in
the last quarter of the current export season, i.e., from July 1 to
September 30.

Exports to.the United States from Argentina and Uruguay during the
9 months ended .June 30 reached 99 million pounds and exceeded those of
a year ago by 48 percent. Argentina supplied 72 million pounds or 73
percent of the total.

Shipments to the United States-from the British Empire countries of
the Southern Hemisphere for the 11 months of the season up to May 31
reached 112,400,000 pounds, an increase of a little over 150 percent
compared with a year earlier. Two-thirds of this quantity came from
Australia while almost the entire remaining third was from Now Zealand.


Manufacturing Activity in Importing Countries

Conditions in the wool manufacturing industries of European
countries continued somewhat irregular in June and the early part of July.
The British Ministry of Labour reports that 8.7 percent of insured workers
in the woolen and worsted industry of the United Kingdom were.registered as
unemployed on June 21, compared with 10.1 percent on May 24 when the
figures ivere affected by a holiday *period' had 11.1 perBceht in June 1936.

Higher combing charges are to come into effect in Bradford on
August 20, and a high rate of combing activity is expected prior to that
date for the purpose of building up stocks at the lower charges.

Further slight recessions were-reported from the wool manufacturing
industries of France and Belgium in June, due largely to political and
economic uncertainty. Steadily rising activity was reported for the
Italian wool textile industry in June as arosult of increased export
trade in wool products. It should be remembered in connection with current
European developments that the present recession in the wool textile industries
of France and Belgium follows a period of relatively favorable activity in
those countries, while the Italian industry is just emerging from the low
level of activity resulting from sanctions and unfavorable economic
conditions in 1935-36.

In Germany, mill activity continues fairly high through increased
use of reclaimed wool and substitute fibers. Imports of raw wool continue
well below.those of the same months of earlier years.






WOOL-8


Table 1.- Price of wool per pound in specified markets and prices
of textile raw materials in the United States, selected periods,
1935-37


:: : : 1937
Market and description :Average.Average. 1936 : : 1
..: 1935 1936 July May June : July


: Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


Boston:
Territory combing,scoured basis-:
64s, 70s, 80s, (fine) .......:
56s, (3/8 blood) ............:
46s, (Low 1/4 blood) .......:
U. S. farm-price (15th.of month):
Grease basis ................:
London 2:
Average quality, clean cost / :
70s .....:
56s ........... ........... ..:
46s ........................:
Bradford /.:
Scoured basis -
64s warp ... .......... ...:
50s .. .. .... .. ...... ....:

Southern Hemisphere

United States:
Textile fibers -
Wool, territory fine,scoured
basis ..........
Cotton, 7/8 Middling /.....
Silk, Japanese 13-15
Rayon yarn 150 derier .....


74.8
63.6
51.4


9.2.0
80.4
63.9


19.4 1/26.9


47.5
29.0
18.6


47.7
23.2


58.4
35.1
23.8


59.8
29.7


89.0
76.3
63.5


104.9
90.0
71.8


102.0
88.5
68.5


27.5 32.7 31.4


56.5
31.9
23.8


57.5.
24.1


69.0
51.5
44.3


71.0
48.4


70.4
51.4
44.2


72.0
49.4


Cents


102.0
88.5
70.5

31.3


70.4
49.7
44.2


71.5
47.7


End of season prices not representative


74.8
11.8
163.3
57.3


92.0
11.9
176.6
58.6


89.0
12.9
.171.4
60.0


104.9
13.1
184.8
63.0


102.0
12.5
182.7
63.0


102.0
12.1


Foreign prices have been converted at prevailing rates of exchange.

_/ Preliminary.
/ Average, of quotations for each series of London sales as reported by the
London Office of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. For months when
no sales were held.figures are interpolated.
3/ Top and noil in oil.
/ Quotations reported about the 25th of the month by the London Office of the
Bureau of Agricultutal Economics.
51 Average at 10 -markets.
78 percent white, at New York.


-9-







-10-

Table 2.- United States: Wool imports, consumption and machinery
activity, specified periods, 1936 and 1937


: Jan. June


Item 1936

: 1,000
: pounds


June May
1937 1936 1937

1,000 1,000 1,000
pounds pounds pounds


Imports for consumption -
Actual weight / :
Apparel .............: 61,788 120,574 9,062
Finer than 40s .......: 48,864 103,296 -6,535


16,019
14,636


Not finer than 40s ...: 12,924 17,278 2,527 1,383 1,628
Carpet,including camels :


hair ..................: 62,486


Consumption, scoured basis 2/:
Weekly average -
Apparel ..............*:
Carpet ................*:
Aggregate -.
Apparel .................:
Carpet ............... .:


5,051
1,751

131,328
45,526


: Percent


115,139


5.875
2,727

152,753
70,890


Percent


8,143 13,629


5,019
1,798

20,076
7,192


5,716
2,588

22,862
10,350


Percent Percent


Machinery activity 2/.
(40-hour shift) -
Worsted combs ........:
Worsted spindles ....:
Woolen spindles ........:
Looms broad ./ ........:
Looms narrow ..........:
Carpet and rug looms ...:


114..1
75.8
114.0
102.3
49.5
61.5


145.2
103.9
131.2
119.3
67.7
86.6


115.9
72.0
111.7
93.6
45.4
60.5


140.7.
102.0
128.2
117.7
64.5
85.4


126.2
90.5
120.2
112.0
56.6
82.2


Import figures from official records of the Bureau of Forcign and Domestic
Commerce. Consumption and Machinery activity figures from the Bureau of the
Census.

1/ Weight of greasy, scoured and skin wool added together.
2/ Figures for May and June based on 4 weeks, January to June on 26 weeks.
No adjustment made for holidays.
3/ Over 50 inches.


WOOL-8


. June.
: 1937

1,000
pounds


9,479
7.851


18,751


5,01.1
2,393

20,045
9,571


Percent


~----- ---


*" '* .





-11-


Table 3.- Estimated production of wool in specified countries, 1932-37


:1932 : 1933 : 1934 : 1935 : 1936 :1937 1/


SMil.lb. Mil.lb.


SOUTHERiJ HEMISPHERE
Australia ..............: 1,062.6
New Zealand 3/ ......... : 288.4
British South Africa 2/ : 319.4
Argentina 7/ .........:. 364.0
Uruguay j/.............:8/ 110.2
Total above countries..; 2,144.6
Other So.Hemis. countries: 77.5
Total Southern Hemis. : 2,222.1


995.9
300.5
275.2
364.0
8/104.7
2,040.3
80.3
2,120.6


Mil.lb. Mil.b. Mil.lb. Mil.b.

1,015.4 968.3 975.0 2/1,014.0
275.9 316.5 295.0
210.0 237.8 5/264.0 6/ 290.0
364.0 335.0 351.0
.2/119.0 113.0 8/112.4
_1,984.3 1 970.2 1,997.4
2683 81.2 78.9
2,068.6 2,051.8 2,076.3


NORTHERN HEMISPHERE
North America -
United'States -
Shorn ............... 351.0 374.2 370.3 364.7 360.3 367.4
Pulled __/........... 67.1 64.2 __ 60.5_ 66.0 66.2
Total .............: ___ 8.1 438.4___4300.8 430.7 42&5
Canada .................... 20.5 19.3 19.5 19.4 19.2
Mexico ..................: 9(9.0) 9.6) 10.3 10.3) (10.3)
Total .............: _7.6 467.23 460.6 60.4 45 6.0
Other .................: 0. 4__ 0. 0.4 0.4 0;4
Total North America ...: 448.0 467.7 461.0 460.8 456.4

South America (Northern) (12.0) (12.0) (12.0) (12.0) (12.0)


Europe -
United Kingdom(England :
and Wales,Scotland,
and Northern Ireland) :
Irish Free State ......:
France ................:
Spain .................: 10/
Italy ...... ....... :
Germany .... ......... 10/
Rumania ............:
Total above countries:
Other ....... ...... ..
Total Europe exclud-
ing Russia .........
Africa -
Morocco ...... ........: 10/
Algeria ..............
Tunisia 10/.........
Total .............
Other ........, .. ,
Total Africa exclud-.
ing British South
Africa ............


118.5 119.9 112.3 108.6 106.7 10/106.7
19.6 19.6 17.0 16.5 17.6
43.2 43.0 42.3 42.3 42.3 10/ 43.3
70.0 67.6 (68.0) 71.0 (71.0)
40.0 39.0 38.1 37.5 10/36.3
30.8 30.0 10/29.8 10/30.7 10/34.5 10/ 38.1
62.7 61.5 68.0 60.1 (60.1)
38_48 380.6 375.5 366.7 368.5
124.9 130.0 135.0 .14.8 148.3


509.7 510.6 510.5 507.5


516.8


20.6 30.9 10/29.1 33.4 33.4
39.3 19/39.3 10/41.2 10/43.6 j0/47.9
L 4. 5-2 -5.5 5.5 5.5
64.3 75.. 75.8 82.5 36.8
11.9 12.0 12.1 11.9 12.2


76.2 87.4 87,9 94.4 99.0

Continued -


WOOL-8


Country


: Mil. lb. Mil. lb.





WOOL-8


Table 3.- Estimated production of wool in specified countries, 1932-37
Cont d.


Country : 1932 : 1933 : 1934 : 1935 1936 : 1937

: Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb. "Mil.lb. Mil.lb.
NORTH ERU HEMISPHERE -Contd:
Asia 11/ .................
Turkey ................. 24.7 34.3 30.9 35.3 42.0 41.9
Iraq .................:, 18.7 16.3 17.7 18.5 21.5
Syria ............ .. .: 11.0 9.3 9.8 6.8 8.4 8.2
India ............... ..:. _87.0 87.1 87.7 843 (84.3) .
Total above countries ..: 141__L 470 146.1 144_. 156.2
Other ..................... '_ 66.0 64.0 64.0 69.1 _-.1 -
Total Asia excluding
Russia and China .......: 207.4 211.0 210 1 214.0 225.3
Total Horthern Hemisphere
excluding Russia and
China ................... : 1,253_.~ 1,288.7 1,281.5 1,288.7 1,309.5
World total excluding
Russia and China ........:_ 3,475.0 3,409..0 3,350O, _..3.3_40.0 3,386.0
Russia ................... :0/ 142.0 141.0 135.0 10/167.0 10/200.0
China 12/ ...............: 7__ 78.0 78.0__ 78.0 78.0 7.0
World total including
Russia and China ........: 3,695.0 3,628.0 3,563.0 3,585.0 3,664.0


Official sources unless otherwise stated. This table includes wool shorn and
pulled during the calendar year in the Northern Hemisphere and that shorn during
the season beginning July 1 or October 1 of the given calendar year in the
Southern Hemisphere, the bulk being shorn during the last 6 months of the
given calendar year. Pulled wool is included in the total for most important
countries at its grease equivalent. Wool exDcrted on skins included for the
important exporting countries reporting such data. Figures in parenthesis are
interpolated or carried forward.
1/ Preliminary. Subject to revision.
2/ Pre-shearing estimate of Australian wool brokers and growers in convention,
converted to pounds, grease equivalent.
3/ Estimates based onexports alone, or exports, stocks, and domestic consumption
and any other available information.
/ The quantity exported on skins not included for lack of recent estimates.
These exports averaged 19 million pounds for the five seasons ending June
30, 1934.
/ Revised on basis of receipts for season.
6/ Unofficial estimate based on reported 10 percent increase above a year ago.
7/ Estimates of Argentine Ministry of Agriculture. Subject to revision.
8/ Estimates supplied.by United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural
Attache' in Argentina.
9/ Published as reported by pulleries and is mostly washed.
10/ Estimates based on sheep numbers at -date nearest shearing and other available
data.
11/ Estimates for Asiatic countries rough approximations only.
12/ Unofficial estimates based -on sheep numbers in 1933. Owing to unsettled
conditions in recent years exports of sheep's wool not reliable index of pro-
duction.


-12-






WOOL-8 -13-


Table 4.- Wool: World production, 1921 to date 1/


: Production : : : Production
: excluding :Soviet :China including
Year :Soviet Union:Union : // :Soviet Union
: and China : : : and China
: Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb. Mil.lb.

1921.............: 2,662 298 89 3,049
1922.............: 2,701 244 89 3,034
1923 ............: 2,650 256 89 2,995
1924..............: 2,822 294 89 3,205
1925..... 2955 315 89 3,359
1926.............: 3,140 351 78 3,569
1927..............: 3,175 371 78 3,624
1928..............: 3,291 392 78 3,761
1929..............: 3,302 394 78 3,774
1930............... 3,319 306 78 3,703
1931..............: 3,413 4/ 212 78 3,703
1932..............: 3,475 1/ 142 78 3,695
1933..............: 3,409 141 78 3,628
1934.**...........: 3,350 135 78 3,563
1935.*............: 3,340 4/ 167 78 3,585
1936 5_/ .......: 3,386 V/ 200 78 3,664



1/ Revisions -f estimates published in the Wool Situation March 10,
1937; World Wool Prospects November 1936 and May 29, 1936.
2/ Unofficial estimates based on official estimates of sheep
numbers in 1920 and 1933.
2/ Exports are not a reliable index of production during this
period owing to the unsettled condition in China.
L/ Estimates based on sheep numbers and average yield as derived
from official estimates.

/ Subject to revision.


- -0- -




II ~llHIJIBIBII I HI lll Il I l I AlIlIII l BlIl IIl
3 1262 08861 5579



'I
I
*.




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ESP8UIZNA_ZI8XPD INGEST_TIME 2012-10-26T22:22:36Z PACKAGE AA00011232_00045
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES