The wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00044

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text









S ITjUATION -
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W. REAUF AGRlCU LTl L EC 'OM S "
.tiX XIT.s ,.> A R titE NT; .of'A G iB^CjiLIU R E :' :i OF 'p U U
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,, Ap L 1942. 19

.ne A.
ICER ,IT6RSSj0 REED BASISe AVERAGE
j. ". ; BOSTON. 24-4. ,M. .. C ". ..D 4 4 I
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ICES. A BOS'O.- V RES OO 2:"'O C .NGES'". ... CE .I
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?1S3.; ..'.-I~3 ~vT'i84 93 :; 1938. 1940 '1942'-
f"i" CO TRL .O .WO. "F t""r. "2"q ." .A. X.
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e AT BO8l'o HVE RESP T;o CHANGESS -.i'N CEIL.G
-C ES.N$'r B 6 ON DECEINERII
........ '6".t ON .P.....uAR6A Y 2g.,.:
.A :; .......... r ..04.... D'* N'.I.N, E'F. 'CT '
",L-E ., DO ,,,,. MONTHS, ,-I)IP -RT5
WPLL$ifwI)EL..S TRS MAT OR:C$QB.E, TO
1 trT C &E:ROA I'SL. V AELS .I NTICIPATED.
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u :: ::ry : "'..
Wool prices inthe Boston market have followed. C: l

Sing rather closely since Government price, control became t

SDecember 18i.:141. The February 28 price schedule for :

permits generally higher prices than had been in effect pr9ig,
March prices advanced to or close to the new maximums on mBsta

important factor in the advance in prices of'domestic vool
"k i:
invitation of the Army 4iartermaster Division for bids o:

wool cloth and blankets to contain not lesg than 50 percent 4

Price Schedule No. 58 on wool, wool topse.ad yf7 'li

Office of Price Administration on March 27. The reviaio as

Sum prices on most domestic and foreign voole. and seiaan
than domestic shorn wools. The martsiu prices alloe4 in thI

;.on are generally higher than prices permitted under the i.ar

The increases ware made to conform with the higher prices o.

domestic shorn woole under Price Regslation'l106, issued & i .4;'1*i

I!..: In the first quarter of 1948 the Army eprterrnc tettli.
for bids on approximately 93 million yards of wool cloth '12X

blankets add considerable quantities of underwear, mocpp.'d

. : .. : .. l. i;;;
ing wool. Delivery of most of these items is t6,be complstai

S1942. In addition, a considerable quantity of wool vill l eEs,

complete Army materials ordered in 1941 for dellerl in,:
Mill consumption of apparel wool in January was at a ne

of 11.2 million pounds, scoured basis, per week. the:a-q uayA

s., upt o .on van 3 percent higher thlia the. Sceot -*ta AA
3cA :4 S-:,;::iA '
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idy#ed, i'b a il two-shift basis (40-hour shifts): n alli divieions
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S4 '' EVIEW 97 RECENTT DEVELOPMENTS.. .
RtOUNfl' Domettic wool production in 191 totaled 455
SUi' on pounds, greasy shorn and pulled, the largest on
ii~~dr.t. It was less than half as great as total mill con- .
ltiq, aon. however, which also-was of record size.. Stimu-
.Sl. by large orders for wool goods for the armed'forces
V1 br':incteassed incomes of c6neumers, mill consumption of
i o 'wo n 1941 totaled 977 million pounds, greasy .
1.i.and pulled,.-ahout 50-percent more than in .1910 'and 70
Vlpia~t'nt more than the 193 5-39 average"-annual consumption.
*I-:,?^ receivedvd by farmers ftol-ool shor n 1941'were higher ':,
,lift.: .ii.t e;htSsie. since 1928, Boston market prices for domes-
*'"t -cl .advanced sharply in the latter part df 1940, but 'I ,
Si;"!ii n.' t change much during the greater part of 1914I. ":":':i
': .the utbre.k of war with Japan in early December was .
4t ;oU.o-lAF owed 'by control measures'relating to consumption
at rii ea pool. Temptrary maximum prices for wool and
i2 mUanila h vi wres we announced by the Office of Price
.'Adit tsrtp.on Deiember 18. Early in January a wool con-
me i6n: pioraisva institute' which restricts the use of
new :: ahe ma nu.ture of materials for'.cLviliar.use
: f iacptV Was taken because of the large miittary require- .
.i e. t t" be.et, and ba4oses of the difficulty of
.tia 'i re. :quantities of wool under iar conditions.
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t.[e* gs Advance '
W.. .
ret beae quite active in March following the..
carter aster..oQ 1 bid on large quantities of woo~ cloth
fl1 C not lks,.tha 50 pteent of.domestic wool, Interest i
t .'~ .'lw lip o 's contracted.in the West. Contracting ;
;,:.., the .,arly .ppat of the season became quite
may~IA
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Administration Price Schedule No. 106. "

.poted prices for graded fine staple combing territory%:i
were $1.20-$1.23 a .pound scoured basis, in the early part *fa t Kj1
with $1.18-$1.20 a month earlier and $1.07-$1.'10 year eart ie91*
prices for 3/8 blood combing territory wools were $1.02-$41.65 aI :i
basis-in the week ended April 4 compared with $1.00-$1.04 a ~O


88-90 cents a year earlier.

The average price received by farmers for wool was 38.3 ie
on March 15 compared with 37.1 cents on Februaty 15 and 33.4 caee:
S 1941. .

Record Consumption.Cqntinues
Through January .

Mill consumption of apparel wool in January was at a ~i,:
of 11,212.000 pounds, scoured basis, per week. The January r~:t
tion was 3 percent higher than the December rate and was 40 p61
than in January 1941. More than half of the apparel, wool conaU
in January was of foreign origin. The January consumption wa";i
about 90' million pounds greasy shorn and pulled, compared with :*j
average of about 81 million pounds in 1941 and a monthly averawi
pounds for the 5 years 1935-39. '


Consumption of carpet wool declined sharply in January. .
rate of consumption of 1,513,000 pound, 'edoured basis,; was~e'
as large as the December rate and was 30 percent below that of- a|
I i. "' :,;
The classification of ppparel and carpet class tool in int'tii
tion reports has been changed slightly, beginning with January 1..
For the purpose of consumption stattistics, pparet wool now. incldi
domestic wools and .all duty-paid foreign. wobl'. Carpet wouls nnow 'i
foreign wools entered free o -duty. In earlier' reports, wools ot
native carpet wools but- not finer, than 40s, both dutiable an.id- ei
included with apparel wools; such wool. if duty free are 3.pW uol4
carpet wools. Small quantities of so-called native carpet. wool.:
duty is paid are now included with apparel wod1s in c6nsmpt1-On :i
Consumption statistics in table-1 hate been adjisteA to the nea.
comparison with.ourrent statistics.

The increase in mill consumption of apparel topol ini ibta,
despite the restrictions-on.prpessing Of wool i. the .rit ..
year. However,. the restrictions apply to' the'.:ntlie..quar.:
.. : .


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V6.e W 4'it erts scourig bbwle for combing into tops and noils.
\ep r I-: that; th .a e used Itaeqsuring restrictions is not strictly com-
'hiW thbat iAarlly used in measuring raw wool consumption.
.Machtilery 'titity statistics indicate that the activity of worsted
dd4 iedelned iout7 percent in January from the December level., This
A:ld eem t id 'indat curtailment zn' the processing of wool tops during
ary. The fact that restrictions apply after the combing.process may make
sOssible to .buildr.up supplies of wool top.for emergency needs. The comb-
.rano&i ot'the'ithdtstry has been.mote' fully employed in recent months than
l.:eaoti6to of the industry.. Machinery capacity in most s.ctions.of. the
I s t s suffiaPleh% to permit considerable expansion of activity for emer-
ni:s.'- The wekly' average hours operated per machine ixL place is still
t'itulV' two-shift'bbasis (40Lhour shifts) in all divisions except worsted
.'(Se 'able 2.) '

jff^ ._,e" w ... .I.:."
S '. A ehe :lA-.'artermaster in Januady- invited bids for, about.19 million
ia6.Ool 6loth, -2 million-blankets, and considerable quantities of under- i
i'. glvei containing wool. This.Vwes followed in March .by invitations
di .* .7l4 million yards of-wool cloth, 10-million blankets, and 1Q mil-
:lI*a'of wool, socks; Schedules specified-in the invitations call'for
`rf most of the above items by,the end of 1942. In'addittpn,a acon-
be iiquantity of irool: required-by mills to complete Army materials
.1itrl9l 41 ider'tie.'defense program for.delivery in 1942,. The,orders
aS e.sd for'1942 will enagge a large pat.of the activity.ot the wool
a 'industry.t .
S SUPPLIES AVAILABLE FOR WARTIME NEEDS

Sn the :yebrs .1935-39 domestic productlan of wool accounted for
i 'tO percent d i#United States mill consumption of apparel. wool.. The '
,igtg 36 percent was 'imported.'. Imports came principally froj five
iern atemi pheree''countri.es, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Argentina
thug h produce .most :of .the apparel wool entering international

etI^he united S ates.now produces about 500 million pounds of wool, greasy
i Ba -isi. ,AsjiAtpdizction does. not change greatly from year to year, any
a'ln4 cease i ,. ll consumption must be met by a corresponding increase
prt. unless ..e carry-over stocks are available.
I; imports of wool were large in 1941 and commercial and farm' stocks 'in
tid.'sAteeet',at" the beginning of 1942 totaled approximately 330 million
id a, grbasy shorn: basl about 40.-million pounds more than the average
lPy i' stocks th the 5 years .1935-39. About 66 million pounds of apparel
so .were.epodted afloat to United States dealers and manufacturers on
', :.'"ihetbe daipplies together with wool held in..Government stock pile
p 'i 2ti44.ate!doestic production of wool in 1942 (about 500. million

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appware rsawr L* uuIpar.Sun w.Lb u nuaCyLLLJ L. ajyparWa*LUi suappJ.a a ..i
years. It is approximately a.12-month supply on the basi. of th~.
rate of mill consumption of about 90 million pounds. But in 1943 "i
clip will not be available to mills until late spring, and large li
must be maintained to assure continuous mill operations in the early Y:ai
of next year.

Supplies of wool in Southern Hemisphere countries are lar&.' P.60
tion in the British Dominions--Australia, New Zealand and South. iC.
totals about 1,650 million pounds a year, and approximately ?00 4'l.11 np
are produced yearly in South America (see the Wool Situation, Ranih,,, .1Y
Most of this wool is available for export. With European counted lat
cut off from supplies, the United States-and the United Kingdom ';sfr' i
important markets for Southern Hemisphere wool. But the quantitty-tvdoi
can be imported by the United States will depend-upon the shipp 44 i1

To assure the needed supplies of wool for military requi itj|^
event that imports are curtailed, the War Production Board has.
curtailment of wool use for civilian purposes (see The Wool .Sitt
1942) and has ordered certain style changes in apparel with a vwt
ing civilian needs for clothing and other, necessary materials Wi. i ii
use of new wools. The curtailment of wool use for civilians ~wlUliA40o
at least in part by greater use of noils, recovered and reused..*o
cotton and rayon staple fiber. The War Department also has deve4,.&. *
native specifications for Army textiles to permit extensive use' o:of
of the foregoing materials if this should prove necessary. ::

WARTIME CONTROL OF WOOL PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES

Wool prices in the United States advanced sharply followin.ti-be
break of the present war in Europe in September 1939. Although- tli.
advance was not fully maintained, prices again advanced in'the lLrp
of 1940, and in November 1941 prices of many wools were at the hitE 4:
since 1928. Because wool is of prime importance to the armed for .:
as being a substantial factor in the cost of liVing of the civilii.,pi .
tion, and because further advances in prices would seriously ianbr'e#:
cost of the war effort and place a burden on persons of limited i..pae,-
controls for wool were instituted by the Office of.Price AdminiatA't* 4l ..
shortly after the entry of the United States into the war in-Ded ibr

Early Measures of "Freepge Type.- .

On December 8 it was announced by the Office of Price AdazBia
that ceiling prices would be established for raw wool at approxiam
levels that prevailed during the week ended December 6. ._

Formal action was taken on December .8 when Temporay Pr'i
No. 58 became effective. This schedule was a -.freesa type whtot4
"ceiling" prices for raw wool, wool tops and raras at thb 4ighe,.44'
-





10116.- T -

SIi chi 'ailed between. October 1 and December 6, 1941. The maximum for wool
:f top futures under this order was-$1.278 a pound, and for grease wool futures,
5:..8' cents a pound. No specific prices were published for other items, but
th6 order directed that the maximum prices permitted would be the highest
..: pride contracted for or received by the seller for the sale or delivery during
...the period between October 1, 1941 and December 6, 1941, inclusive, of wool or
-*'-wool tops or yarns of the same class, kind, type, condition and grade, to a
Purchaser of the same general class.

Amendments Set Temporary Schedules For
T:.' Certain Wools and Semi-Manufactures

Six amendments to Schedule No. 58 were issued between December 18 and
J:ebruary 2.

k 4::.. Amendment 1 provided for adjustment of price ceilings on foreign wools
.. to-cover changes in costs of war-risk insurance and ocean shipping rates.

Amendments 2, 3, 4, and 5 set specific maximum prices for certain
:I.. Grades and classes of wool tops and yarns for military fabrics, for South
|i,<:. z-BAerican and Cape (South African) wools and for domestic pulled wools. The
i~li.. schedule for domestic pulled woole was published in the February Wool
ti;; Situation. The schedules were indicated to be ef a temporary nature and
IS. covered chiefly the kinds of wools required in the production of fabrics for
!i'.:..Army materials on which large orders were pending.

R'I: Revision of Base Period for
;..:.;. : Determining Maximums
g::.^: ,' -.- -----
Amendment No. 6 was issued on April 2, 1942. By this amendment the
period to be used in determining individual maximum prices, except where
:.: specific maximums had been published, was changed to the period October 1-
..ecember 15, 1941. Domestic shorn wool, according to the amendment, carried
maximum .price based on the market price of October 1 or December 15. which-
ever was higher. This amendment was made necessary by the provisions for
Agricultural commodities in the Emergency Price Control Act which became
effective January 30. No change was made in the dollars and cents maximum
prices for South American wools, domestic pulled wools and certain tops and
yarn for which maximums were specified in amendments 2 to 5. The maximum
price .for wool top futures on the New York Exchange was increased under the
amendment to $1.327 and the maximum for grease wool futures was increased to
$1035.

Uniform Scales of Maximum Prices Set
for Wools and Semi-Manufactures

On February 28 a uniform scale of maximum prices for greasy shorn
5:.f. domestic wools became effective under Maximum Price Regulation No. 106. By
this schedule, maximum prices are set by grades on a clean basis and are
based on the Boston market. The maximum prices for domestic shorn wools in
;:.r::'. Schedule 106 are considerably higher than the maximums previously in effect
: for these wools. The schedule of prices by types and grades'was published
i.: ,in the March Wool Situation,











en ajwuw. w *m *wvUB'm*. saw. o Wa-mammU mi A U4 UrWs. u ju uW;s uuYWFr : ,n f'.i4R .I
domestic:pulled wools,. scoured domestic .shorn Wnols, wvol' ta op ',U
yans, qll foreign.pulled wools,. South-.Amerliea ahdrn yolq t4i4 rtC
shorn wools.- Prices of wool wasted and othet 'wools nt speifiaeit
in the new schedule or in Regulation 106 (domestic shorn ieol): are
frozen at the October 1-DeceMber 15 level. .:

The maximum prices allowed in the March 27 revision..are'getl
higher than prices permitted under earlier regulations. Theq .tp
made to conform with:the.higher maximum-prices established' for 'd
wools under Price Regulation 106. No revision wasmade in -the 8
wool schedule. The new maximum for wool top futures traded on tUi wi
- Exchange is $1.40 'as against the previous maximum 6f:$1.32-7."h E 4
grease wool futures remains unchanged at $1.035, scoured basis. '.:Jii

Separate provisions are made for South American-and-BrIt-6
shorn wools in the March 27 amendment to Schedule.No. 58.. For'.,.
shorn wools,maximum prices established by the-schedule are gene Es
higher than levels prevailing prior to..the war. For British Emptb
prices are governed by the*British Wool Control..Prices. The.ame
a dealer's margin of 10 percent of the "in bond" price or of. 5
above this price, whichever margin is greater. -In allowing the',
it is hoped that larger imports will be financed by dealers from.i
and Empire countries. The availability of shipping space will Vi
determining factor in imports. Provision is made in the ordeft ...
maximum prices of foreign wool in accordance with changes in war. .
rate .

The new schedule of prices for domestic-pulled wools is't
at the end of this report. The complete revised Price Schedule i'
published in the Federal Register March 28,.1942. .. .

Domestic Wool Prices Follow
Changes in Ceiling Levels '

Prices of domestic wools at Boston have followed. changes t.: ii
ings rather closely since wartime price control was instituted n -.Ai
poted prices of graded domestic wools were mostly at.the.high~st e:tl
mitted under Price Regulation No. 58 when control became effective'~li
December 18 and prices remained generally unchanged until the latt$ ,i
February. The schedule of maximum prices for.demestic shorn b:oi.stW8l;
on February 23 to be effective February 28-pbrrmitted generally high.3
than had been in effect previously, and in March prices advanAed' t"A.h
to the new-maximums on most grades'..- .

'ioted prices of graded fine staple:combing territory ,ol'
advanced from a range of $1.15-$1.18 a pound, scoured basis., In t
of February-to a-range of $1.20-$1.23 in the first yzek of Apri 4i~
mum price permitted under the Office of.Price .ministrati6a shes
fine 70s, 2 inches and longer of average t6 goodd: charbt.ar...yt:ar

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rlr ,ices 1fo.66 / oo4 combing 'territory wools in
... A": .s.n'd, scoured basis, compared with
9'2~' t V I .'o eal' F february U i f rinumis permitted for .3/8 blood
Ie : wU la rr ge from $1.01 to $1; 9' t1.9 tnd scoured btsis, according
.gth .d.ohi&i~Artet4 The advance in prices of domestic wools in March
,anlied'the annonmcement.of the 'lartermaster Division that large quan-
aof W6SO l c oi til-nnd blankets would be purchased. for the armed forces in
li'.ar future a &',tha items aust contain not lesn than 50 percent of
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Domestic. reign tTotal Da st n o ti n oe Tot
'176 1,00,10000000 1100 100 1"000
rounds 'Porndes. .pounds pounds : nound ounds
Jaa 4,424 700 5,1194 1,,951. 3'401 2,169
Feb : 472 k07 5,579, 2,1227-. ,5 ,,5
hr : 4,24 1,019 8,267 245 ,94 4,A2
Apr. t 2,98,9, .526 3 915. 1,6IM; 2,063; 14
My: 4,106 947 5 053 1,4-7 1 20471 7s91
JunI 5$130 818 So 948 14568 t 3 P565. Ive$.
July... 4,79b 701 5,49;10 1604: 4)54.5 1 15
Aug, V 5,331 1 823 6 154 2,424s 4: 906 1,2
Septb.: S"358 831 6,18S 2,275s 5,738: 438
Oct. 5,523 1,261 6,784 2,268; 6062 1763
Nov. 52225 1'.360 6,585 2,334: 6,159 Z,f2i6
Dec. : 4,085 1,482 5,567 1 944: 71 2,4
loar t 40654 967 -5,621 2,004 t 4.133 1,1
1941 -14
Ja.a 4,303 3, 710 8,013 2,203i 5'138 60041 1
'Pebo 4,188 4,i799' 8,987 2p749:-
jMar, s. 4,080 6'769 9,842 2, 7 64
Apro. 3,309 60030. 9,339 2,674;
I-4














Mh : 3,524 ,6,655 10 179. 2, 726t
Jun -& ,808 6,556, 10, 454'285
JUly, z 3,618 5,705 9j321. 2-S293 :
4Sg 3 4,77 5,5S61 90928 210814:
S ept: 4, 931 5,510 '10, 441 2,803:
Oct, t 4$!D04. 5,0495 10,399 2#798-:
Sor, t 5 136 6,029 10, 185! 2, 675's
De,: 554 50420 10,'924, 2. 027:
t-Oar 4,290 5,500 9, 790, 2 '71,
compiled from Bureau of the Census Raw 0. ol aosm pto reo 'AP,
Carpet, classes in this table have Ibeen adjtstedI: to a, basib to Mprbl`1
dOpted by the Bureau of the Censue in Janu r-192.n That As 1
foreign wools have been classed as% apparel wools, eand alfrii
di~y have been classed as carpet wools.' ItnW. thesaiic
figures previously reported.
64t








54I:::.'i,-; Table 2.- Mill consumption and machinery activity, United States,
i .. .;. selected-periods, 1939-41

.^; Year : January:December: January
Item : 1939 : 1940 : 1941 :1941 1 : 1941 2/: 1942 2/
S: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
L?. ,on : pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds
%-i' consumption
rea se basis- 3/
SApparel .............,630,150 640,871 977,075 79,705 84,696 85,772
i:Carpet ............... :148,513 137,494 190,065 15,770 16,296 9,200
.~Pcoured basis- :
-ggregate- :
:.:::ppareL ...............:293,083 310,021 515,708 40,066 43,696 44,848
Carpet ...............:103,421 97,852 132,259 11,015 11,708 6,052
"l, weekly average-
.Appa re1 so.............: 5,636 5*962 .9,917 8,013 10,924 11,212
....:.arpet. ............ : 1,989 1-,882 2,543 2,203 2,927 1,513
I. Weekly average in hours
..R chinery activity:
oTIhLOurs operated per
Nb '.t''machine in place-* :
|f|t!.lvorsted combs ........: 51.8 55.1 86.6 77.3 93.2 93.9
ifSr::-radford ..............: 42.2 43.5 -74.5 63.2 84.9 81.5
:ren ch .................. 72.8 79.4 110.9 106.3 109.8 118.3
:.rsted spindles ......: 39.6 37.7 60.7 52.0 66.4 61.6
: ~.polen sDindles ......,: 39.8 43.2 63.7 53.7-' 67.4 72.5
iiW :'0aol en and worsted -
;'" ; "looms- :
ii: .road ................: 40.7 39.0 61.2 53.4 69.4 73.3
': :Na.rrow-...............: 13.2 15.6 -27.6 268 31.6 37.1
Carpet and rug looms-
S Broad ................: 37.4 37.9 50.9 43.2 50.3 50.9
Narrow ...............: 22.7 21.9 30.8 26.4 29.5 29.4

I Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census- Data on imports no longer
.available. The consumption str.tistics for appr.,-el and carpet woal in this
.::'table for the years 19.9 .4 are as reported by the Bureau of the Census in the
i:,yelars indicated, and havT not bo-n adjusted to the new basis adopted in January
i,:71942.. Data for January aid Detember 1941 have been adjusted to a basis comparable
,iwjh the Janruary 1942 figures.
':5-week period.
S4-week period. No adjustments made ,'or holidays.
.Tta.l of shorn and pulled wool. Pulled wool, grease basis, is in condition
ceived from pulleries and is mostly washed.





5: .7

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Boston market- a
Territory, scoured basis-
64s, 708, 80s (fine) a
staple e....*...m...i ...s* 3
56s (3/8 blood) combing .I..
46a (low 1/4 blood) ......er
Bright fleece, greasy
645, 70s, 80s fine)
delaine ...u..s......f...i
56s (3/8 blood) combing ..
46s '(low 1/4 bl.pd) *......:


82.7
69.3
62.6


32.9
36.2
55.5


96,3
79.7
76.1


38.0
41,2
41.0
41,0


. .

91.2
82.5


43.1
,46,.
46.5


W..
* .
108.5 116. t
87.1 s9.0 9Tg
79.5 868,5. sQ



.44.0. 518 S....5
* 4.5 .50.P';.:9,


Foreign wool .in bond
at Boston 1/
Sydney scoured basis a '
64s, 70s, combing .,...... 58.6 67.9 72.7 74.0 175 1' i :
Cape scoured basis ::::::
12 months, combing ...... : 53.7 62.9 70.9 72.58 736l
S Montevideo greasee -
basis ..
Merinos (60-64s) ......... 26.1 31.2- 40,4 .394.4. 453..:
1s (56s) .......,..;.'.: 28.3 3524 38.6 .36.7 ..45.4
Prices received by farmard,
grease basis, 15th ef .
month 2., ..,..*.... 5.,S 22,3 28.3 35-5 .3553,4 5, S
p U S : J:
Textile ,fibers ..
Woolj territory fine a .. ..--
staple 2/ ..............a.. 82.7 96.S 108.8 108.5 -116.0 fh11t'
.Catton. 15/16" Middling / 9.30 10;17 13,92 10,68 18.991:.i
Rayon yarn, 150 denier 4 a 51.6 53.,0" .$'6. 53.0 56 0 :::
Rayon staple fiber 5 / .
Viscose 1-1/2 denier ...... .25,0 25.0, 25.0 25.0 .25.0 W2.(
,Aoetate 5 denier ..,......t 46.0 4350, 45.0 43.0 45,0 A43(

S compiled from reports of the Agricultural Marketing .Adiinistratioa .x. I
otherwise noted.
Before payment of duty. Compiled from. the Boston .Commeroial,.B.i..tl.
Sooured basis, Boston market.' ..
Average at 10 markets..
Domestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistios .
SF.o.b. producing plants, Bureau of Labor Statistics. :
SI:."




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f average trg.q4 charter. The maximum prices.for vools of choice
i)erz, ftorir ff; kbr wo4i1, and for inferior wools shall be 'determined
ciardsce vwit zaarataphs (b), (c)., and (d) of this section.

ii A-: l m1*axiirlces are prices per pound f.o.b. chipping 'point and. shall
aide all pomitikatens and other charges except as' provided in paragraph (e)
'is section. '.erms of sale shall be cash less 1 pericut up to 10 days or
.a5 net cash' ..


..(a) Wools of Average to Good Character


'vorusted Type

i$adoe and Lengths

2 ,.. inches end longer
i:: and tiner
24:'':-'2- inches and longer
-141-2 to 2-1/2 inches

.1,2-1/i2 Inhes and longer
-1-L/2Sto 22I/t.imnchese -


3 tIncohes and longer
.11/2. to 3 inchee

4'3 inches and longer
: to.-} inches

-1/2 inche'anmd longer
.2 to 3-1/2 itchaes

.3-1/2 inches and longer
"::i :;2 2to' -1/2 inches
Inches and .longer
i to t4-inches

S inches and longer

';; 4'. 1a inches and longer
^a o tso 50s
".' 4 inches and longer

44 as) .foled g'Tpe
1.. 7
.a And Lengthe

::rUnder l-l/ inches e
Ine :;...... j -1/2 inches
... :.+:. .. 4 ..'*1..


Clean Basia

$1.22


*1.20
1.15


1.18
1.12


1.16
1.13

1.12
1.08

1.08
1.4
1.04


1.00

1.02
.95


Clean &l1i
$1.12
1.09


Scoured

$1.28


1.26
1.21

1.24
1.18


1.21
1.19


1,13.

1:13
1.09

1.09
1.05

1.07
1.00

.1.03

.99

.97


Scoured

1.15


. .. r


,










Grade and lengths Clean Baets *' eS

60s Under 1-1/2 inches $1-.07
588 Under 2 inches 1.04
56s Under 2 inches 1.00
50s, 56s Under .2 inches .96
50s Under 2 inches .92
49s Under 4 inches .93
46a Under 4 inches .91
44s to 50s Under 4 inches .90

(b) Wools of Choice Character ...t
,"* ::;.
The maximum prices for pulled wools of choice character shall be thi'.nj: m
price set forth above, plus the following amounts:

(1) Grades 70s to 58s inclusive $ .0
(2) Grades 56s to 4gs .. ;
(3) Grades 46s and coarser "68

(c) Off Color Pulled Wools Choice Character 'I
S '-..., i:. !E,


Prices of


Black


60s, 64s
58s, 60s
56.s 58s
Gray

60s, 64s
60s
56s, 58.
56s, 50.
50s, 56s
48s, 50s
46s, 48se
40s, 44e

Shank

44s to 50s


Clean Basis

$1.o6
1.02
.97



1.05
1.02
.95
.88
.s6
.86
.84
.80
.58.


The maximum prices for Gray and Black wools of
be 3 cents per pound leas than the applicable maximum
pulled wools of choice character set forth above.


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average chara:i
price for of:
-* .. '


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SGrade







-15--

', (d) Inferior Pulled Wools

S The maximum prices for inferior pulled wools shall be determined by
't:ednacting from the applicable maximum price for pulled wools of good character,
Aet forth in paragraph (a) of this section,the following amounts:

(1) Slightly tinged wools 2 cents per pound.


(2) Yello1

S((3) Seedy
', raBs practice, do not
l :..ment has been made for
Ilo. above.
.. .


f:1 ;:.; ....

it ;. ;.4:
": ..: "...
-
s'


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, l
S'- -

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w or heavily stained wools 5 cents per pound.

or burry wools which, in accordance with established
require carbonizing 3 cents per pound, after adjust-
color in accordance with subparagraphs (1) and (2)


(4) Seedy or burry wools which, in accordance with established
trade practice, require carbonizing, 10 cents per pound, after adjustment has
been made for color in accordance with subparagraphs (1) and (2) above:
Provided, that where such wools are sold in a carbonized state the actual car-
bonizing charges plus an allowance for actual shrinkage may be added to the
maximum price so long as such charges and shrinkage allowance are set forth
in the invoice or similar document delivered to the purchaser.

(e) Brokers' Commissions

In cases where a purchaser or a seller of domestic pulled wool employs
a broker or other agent to make a purchase or sale on his behalf, a commission
'of not to exceed 1 percent of the applicable maximum price may be charged for
such services and added to the applicable maximum price. A commission may not
be charged to both buyer and seller on the same lot of wool. Such commission
shall be payable only if (1) the wool is purchased at a price not exceeding the
applicable maximum price, (2) it is shown as a separate charge on the invoice
or similar document delivered to the purchaser, and (3) the commission is not
split or divided with the seller or with an agent or an employee of the seller.


Published in the Federal Register, March 28, 1942.




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
i lIiIIHJl/IIIIIfllH~i ll
1111 1P~ H111 1111111*.f
3 1262 08861 5850


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