The wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00043

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text














BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Q MARCH


I 1942


WOOL. SHORN: PRODUCTION. PRICE.AND CASH
FARM INCOME. UNITED STATES. 1919-41


PRODUCTION
POUNDS
I MILLIONS


400




300




200




100




INCOME
DOLLARS
20MILLIO 1



120


n.
s;
E:


PRICE




10




30


0
INCOME
DOLLARS
1 1uILLIom 1


WOOL PRODUCTION IN 1941 WAS THE LARGEST ON RECORD. WOOL PRICES IN
1941 AVERAGED HIGHER THAN IN ANY YEAR SINCE 1928, AND CASH FARM INCOME
FROM SHORN WOOL WAS THE SECOND LARGEST ON RECORD. AT CURRENT PRICES,
INCOME FROM THE 1942 CLiP IS LIKELY TO EQUAL THE RECORD INCOME OF 147
MILLION DOLLARS REPORTED IN 1918. UNDER PRESENT MAXIMUM PRICE REGULA-
TIONS LITTLE ADVANCE FROM CURRENT PRICE LEVELS IS ANTICIPATED.


THE


WOOL-63


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lIL II~I1 IUruli rII(Yll~ Ir*OILI






WOOL CLOTH: UNFILLED ORDERS REPORTED BY 119 MILLS
UNITED STATES. BEGINNING OF EACH QUARTER, 1937-42


LINEAR
YARDS
(MILLIONS )



100




80




60




40




20




0


1937


I Government
Other
























11 1-1


DATA FROM NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF WOOL MANUFACTURERS.
DATA FOR 19.7 ARE ESTIMATED.


U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG 39511 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


FIGURE 1.-- UNFILLED ORDERS FOR WOOL CLOTH HELD BY 119 MILLS
ON DECEMBER 31 WERE 50 PERCENT LARGER THAN A YEAR EARLIER AND
WERE MUCH LARGER THAN AT ANY TIME IN RECENT YEARS. MORE THAN
HALF OF THE ORDERS HELD AT THE BEGINNING OF 1942 WERE FOR GOV-
ERNMENT ACCOUNT, REFLECTING THE IMPORTANCE OF ARMY ORDERS TO
THE WOOL TEXTILE INDUSTRY. ORDERS FOR FABRI CS FOR CIVILIAN USE
DECLINED SHARPLY IN THE LAST HALF OF 1941 AND THE DECLINE PROB-
ABLY WILL CONTINUE IN 1942 AS CONSUMPTION OF WOOL FOR CIVILIAN
USE IS BEING CURTAILED BY GOVERNMENT ORDER.


9 ... :










----------- ----------
^ .... ... T'HE WO QL SITUAT ION


Summary

The number of-sheep on farms and ranches at the beginning of.1942 was

I j, percent larger than a year earlier, and wool production in 1942 probably

S;,iill'.be a little larger than the record 1941 production of 455 million pounds

.greasy horn and pulled basis., The new clip is being contracted in Western

:i.States at prices which are about 5 cents a pound higher than a year earlier

a5 .and the highest in 14 years. At current prices cash farm income from the

j-1942 clip probably will equal or exceed the record income of 147 million

:dp llars in ,1918. The 1941 income, second largest on record, totaled 138

'* l million dollars. Under present maximum price regulations little advance

'1 ;::from-present prices is anticipated.

.:. .A uniform scale of maximum prices, clean basis, by grades for greasy

Shorn domestic wools, became effective on February 28. The schedule does

':.not fix a maximum price to growers, but clean prices are those which corre-

:' spond to an.average price of .7.1'cents a pound for grease wool, the

United States average local market price on December 15, 1941. This is

S the highest of the four prices below which maximum prices for wool cannot

be established under the Price Control Act. Market prices for graded do-

mestic wools advanced in the early part of March. Boston prices for most

Swools are now close to the maximums permitted under the Office of Price

, -Administration price schedule. *

,.:. Further curtailment of newwool use for civilians has been ordered

by the War Production Board for the second quarter.of 1942. The use of ap-



I.(*woolens) and 20 percent .(worsteds.) of- the quarterly average for the first
parel woolsfor civilian fabrics f.r this. period is restricted"to 10 percent



















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BACkPSRG!OD.;--' boiestic wool production. in 194.1 totald 14, 4:
million pounds, the..largest on record. It 'as less thIian3
as great as- total mill consumption, howevere, w h ..,b.i~; M:
of record size. Stimulated by lage 'or ders ,for :ool:, V'
for the armed forces of this country' and', bly idreasedL:' i
comes of consumers, mill consumption of apparel wooL
totaled 977 million pounds, about 5.0 percent mbrethtB i'I
1940 and 70 percent'more than the 1935-39 averags ,7 ai ;
sumptidn. Prices received by farmers' for'w-n? s.h'-.'l.Bi
were higher than at any time since 1928, Bc..t.a wle.e.'..e
prices for domestic wool advenoed sharply in thi, .
of 1940,' but they did not change much during thte 'e,~4.B4
of 1941. .

The outbreak of war with Japan in early Ded~sier
quickly followed by control measures relating to. cO-nai.mpi?;
tion and prices of wool. Temporary i.axzinmn piflbet for -ti4
and semi-manufactures were announced by the Office: of .*ifA
Administration on December 18. Early'in .Jsauar *1' bl .ib1l. 16
servation program was instituted which restriatsrthe ulie:n
new wool.. in the manufacture of Iateriale for d fl-tii l UI tas ;
This letion 'was taken because of the iTh;e 'iltx '..i.
ments which mast be met, and becanude :oto:'ipfl1WhrL3,
importing large quantitieA of wool andelr1. wra t B
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consumption of apparel wool agdin will. be I.rgi:'in 194. "'

Production o'fwool in 12 Southsrn .EemiA5ih',e aouuntr:i "es

season is now estimated at 2,35 Omall:ion pounds, '-uopard- ith

production of 2,360 million pounds in each of the, 193.9-40 and "1:i

Most of the wool entering international trade is. produced i slf

With most European countries out off from.the mgret I yk.te 1 s. i 1 r

States s .the principal outlet for South American wools at the ...p.
''* i:
In view of the shortage of ocean shipping.it is likely that rej j

large quantities of the 1941-42 .clips in the..Br.itilh' DbminloiiJ" "

.South Africa, and Vew Zealand, are still stored in'those coaut..o
E" C *" ''.=I.Mi

-- :March 17,

: "'REVI OF RECENT DEVELOPED TS









t AL4i Streingethen at E.iBoia Fol lowing
tbcati-cn of Pice Setlings

Interest in domestic wools in February'and'the early part of March
S.s centered chiefly on wools contracted ftom the new'clip, according to re-
oprts f the Agricultural Marketing Service.. Boston dealers were reported
o be turning over contracts to manufacturers early in February at $1.10-
i.12. a pound scoured basis for average to good fine western wools. Follow-
the publication on February 21 of the maximum price schedule for greasy
thorn domestic waols, prices advanced to $1.12-$1.15 a pound. Contracts for
V/8 blood combing wools'sold at $1.00-$1.03 a pound scoured basis.

Quoted prices of graded fine' staple combing territory wools at Boston
vBraged $l.19 a pound scoured basis in the first week of March compared with
i: ,16 in the early part of February. Quoted prices for 3/8 blood graded
ie-?comibing territory wools averaged $1.02 a'pound in the first week of March,
i-:, cents above'a month earlier. Sales of spot domestic wools were small in
lA .brt.ur'y and early March.

... Fairly large quantities of foreign fine wools were sold at Boston
iAiar. l1y in February following the announcement of awards of Government con-
.liracts-for wool cloth. Average to' ood 64s 70s Australian topmaking wools
oA.^;
F:xiMaximum Price Schedules Published
.K ,:. for Domest Wools

:Bdasy Shorn Wools,- A uniform scare ormaCkium prices clean basis, by grades,
.r. greasy s i domestic wools was published by the Office of Price
. O.Administration on February 23 and became effective February 28. The schedule
d i.'oes not set prices to growers but clean prices correspond to the United
*;. 4iates average price received by farmers for wool on December 15, 1941 of
.: .'31 cents per pound. This is the highest of the four prices below which
i xma.BUximum prices for wool cannot be established under the Price Control Act.
The approximate prices received by farmers for wool in the periods specified
i.i. the Agricultural Section of the Price Control Act were as follows:

Period Price per pound
Cents

110 percent of parity 1 29.6
October 1, 1941 2/ 36.3
December 15, 1941 37.1
Average July 1919-June 1929 34.1

1/. February 15, 1942. 2/ Estimated, local market
prices available only on or about the fifteenth of
each month.

S "The new regulation, No. 106, supersedes Price Schedule 58 insofar as
.i'Xtcorers domestic shorn wool. The complete regulation was-published in the
Federal. Register .March 3, 1942.

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r t* l..'. e 4n.aU 4O nU AW a; "wJ "LA WV'
4: ,pripe prevailjng on October ., 1941 or on Deoe Aer 5, T~1
classas, -kiid, type, condition 'and grade of scoured d it.tie~$. h.
va:f ided, that, i there were-.ao suh market pfriae.The a Eipa. rio
Fi;:,J: %the highest vriee contracted fror- r~oeeive6.bythee selJer frt..
l.: delivery during the period between ,October 1, 1941-anda...IDeaaai
Inc::: elusivee, of scoured' amestic shorn wool of the same -las&, Ii$I .
condition, and grade to a prcha ser of the same.ge.aepl.:lass .,
if.';said period no such sale or delivery were made, tLhe Vxitxr1i4pi i
.:X;. a' price in line with the maxiamu prides for !related kilrda,; t'.
,. and grades, determined in accordance with this -paragraph .to'.1 aTo
the same general class. ,

!F, 1 'lWlled Wools.- Maximum prices for domestic pulled woolsd *et-
1,the price schedule issued by the. Office of Prige .Adminietratioi
', Nb revisions of this schedulegwere specified in Regulation 4o .
SJnua ry 29 -schedule- for domestic pulled wools wasr given..n tii
V f.., orf-'c bruary 1942. *:- .. ,.

Other Woeos.- Revised Price So'pdule ,o. 58, which i.a inssiu
esgated.the period' October 1-De e iber 15; 1941, vinc.i. a:
"to' be used in computing maximum prices eaeept wherg spictfic.i,
/ ,.'wen ..i.oept for ;scoured shorn wools; fo risiw of this
-;.. specified in Regulation-no. 106..

To March 1, specific scheduled 6tmnaimmpioes had bei^
-Aj.. for the .following: ".,.

Wool top futures
r Gease wool futures
Certain South American ad .Oapeeoi i : "'
.. Certain wool tops and-afis fr lar.fabi cs
Domestic pulled ools
Dcnestic shortn wools .. '
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S-nfilled Orders for Wopi Cloth at Recrd '.o k;
M.aore than Half of Total for G ri e *eT' '
-Unfilled ordsai .for '.o. loth 4e~orid:t tfo aldt 119
't ot aled. 102A.d'milion linear: yrsi :a"rdtc 4"tfolt i -
~;. national Asisoitit of "wool hts. :Scv .re ;T
la are than. a'y r a e to

a? qw. ,









.ii,'q-egnaqe i.ing-or A7Isuw. more Mnen nazr or 0 r.e oraers reported on uecemoer ea
Bi ,'tBfor Go'vernrlen" account, reflecting the importance of Government buying
i the wool textile industry. Unfilled orders for men's wear and women's
'iw ear -cloth for civilian uses declined in the latter part of 1941 but orders
'..fir. civilian cloths were considerably larger than in most recent years.
I:I'The accompanyiig table shows unfilled orders reported by 119 mills, by
Quarters, 1940-42.

Table 1.- Wool cloth: Unfilled orders reported by 119 mills,
United States, beginning of each quarter, 1?-10-42 1/

Quarter' : en's w omen's : Auto :
:eginning .Government: Other T'Tntal : wear : cloths 2/: a
,1000, 000 1,000 1,0o0 1,000 1,000
'. ;'.. linear linear linear linear linear linear
Yards yards yards yards yards yards
0 940
Jah.. 1,576 23,438 24,814 9,204 2,005 36,023
...Apr. 748 21,297 22,045 4,429 1,136 27,610
S!- .'July : 9,436 17,564 27,000 12,933 3,G04 42,597
;i.' Oe. 12,806. 19,200 32,C06 10,919 2,927 45,652

Jar. : .28,457 25,7P9 54,256 11,403 2,494 68,153
A'. : 20,148 40,256 60,404 12,170 2,675 75,249
J:.:i'y 23,018 49,315 72,333 10,961 5,605 96,899
Oct. : 29,010 48,546 77,556 17,805 3,097 98,458
;194 2
: Jar. 3/ 54,126 34,1P9 88,315 12,470 1,508 102,293

l'';i'i'i 1.,eompil c from Mafithly Statistics of Wool Manufacture, published by the
ii'..i..:-*.. .National Association of. Wool manufacturers Statistics are for cloth con-
':i,"tai'ning by weight over 25 percent of yarns spun on the woolen and worsted
i sytem. 'Cloth less than 50 inches wide reported in equivalent 54-inch
... yardage.
.'1/ yReports are for specified dates near'the beginning of each quarter.
1'" Excludes cloth with pile or jacquard design. 3/ December 28, 1941.

M:. .-Mill Use of Wool for Civilians to be
Cut Sharply in Second Quarter
,< .-
Further curtailment of new wool consumption for civilian use has
been ordered by the War Production Board for the second quarter of 1942. At
the same time restrictions on total use of wool by mills have been removed.
This will.permit mills to fill military orders in full without considera-
S.tion of civilian, quotas.. In the first quarter of 1942, the use of new wools
for all purposes was restricted to 80 percent of the quarterly average for
the first-half of 1941.

The allocation for consumption for civilian uses for the first two
.. qua: ''r6ters '.of 1942 is based on one half of the new wool consumed by each mill
i:;n: duri't.e first half of 1941, known as the basic quarterly poundage. The
i^ ota,,,p .by systems, in'terms of the basic quarterly poundage, are as follows:














System of manufacture I
S ___irst-quber
*': ..' erOen t : -


Worsted s3
Woolen sys
Ploor cove
All -other


stem .................
rtem ............... '
,tern .... .
rings ..............., :
..... . .. .. .


50 ,

40


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It was estimated by the l.r Production Board that thdiS
wools finer than 44e to be fllocatod for civilhZn use in the a
of 1942 would totil about 22 million pounds. Gonsumptioh of I-
wools nnd mohair could be considerably Inrger',thl this. SAi
the conservation order for the second quarter of 1942 was Witi
Federal Register February 27, 1942. .

OUTLOOK :

The number of sheep on farns anid. ranchi. at the.bogiibing .
3 percent Inrger than a year earlier and wool prOwUdtion i~i'19442,p
be a little larger thhn the record 194l1 idutioM of .45 nlllitot
greasy shorn and pulled basis. The now,'clip ip being contracted':
Western Statoe. Prices received by fanmers in-those States il .ii
of March were reported to be .about 5 cons a pouni higher.tha.t"
and were the highest in 14 years. Under present maximum pricode.i
little advnnco from current levels is anticipated.: 'At burrent'j
income received by producers for the 1942 clip is likely tb
the record incno: of 147 million dollars eport9d in 1918.. T?:!.
second largest on record, totaled 13S million dollars.. ::

As the wool outlook has not changed greatly in the aZes:t
following points are .suna' ried. in ?irt froi the February: Vot




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1_ Basic quarterly poundage one half the quantity usqd for
during the first 6 months of 1941.
2/ Quotas for the second quarter may be modified by the use oft
finer than W4s and also mohair.

The use of new wool for nondefense materials for the seo
1942 is sharply reduced as compared with first quarter quotas,'
may be modified to some extent., however, by the use of grqgwvn pi
wools not "nedod in the defense program. The order providdat i
pound of grown mohair (not including kid mohair) or wool o6 d ra*
coarser, put into process within the quotal1mit, the user. l '.a'b
to proceed, in addition to his wool quota, .2 pounds of grown fl
,of grades '44 and coarser if operating on the worbted syBtemS,'i:
such mohair or wool if operating on the woolen, eotton,'or'foi
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bo i:of apparel wool again will be l.rgo in 1942. With a prospective
Easb of about 2 million men in the armed forces in 1942, there ;rill be a
: .for not less than 200 million pounds of scoured wool (about 400 million
i a of grease'wool) for the equipment of these men in addition to wool now
g processed for the needs of the present army. Mill consumption of new
l -for civilian fabrics will be sharply curtailed in 1942.

S (2) .Supplies of wool now on hand in the United States, including the
22 production, are the largest in many years. Present supplies probably
iiiii be sufficient to fill most of the'1942 requirements but large inven-
eiii' i nust be maintained to assure continuous mill operations in the early
i a)& 'of 1943 as the domestic clip is not available until late spring.

(3: () Wool imports will be limited by the large requirements for ship-
p,:ppace for strategic materials yand for military purposes, but imports are
ly to be larger than in recent pre-war years. Large qur.ntities of wool
berly exported to Europetn countries are available in South Aeorica, prin-
Pally in Argentina and Uruguay. If Pacific shipments are cut off, United
-aes imports may be supplied largely by South American countries.

WOOL PRODUCTION IIT 1941-42

'States Production Sets Record in
Ac Income fron Wool Largst Since 1918
SProduction of shorn and pulled wool in the United States in 1941 is
ated by the Dopartnont of Agriculture at 455 million pounds, greasy shorn
'"ulled basis, the largest on record. Of this total 389 million pounds
wi::..shorn wool and 66 million pounds were pulled wool. The 1941 production
t& .,ppercent larger than the revised estimate of 437 million pounds for 1940,
Bif h 3ich 375 million pounds were shorn wool nei. 62 million pounds wore pulled


:" Wool prices in 1941 were higher than in any year since 1928. The local
'rket price of shorn wool averaged 35.5 cents a pound, compared with 28.3 .
hi ts in 1940.. Cash farm income from wool in 1941 is estimated at 138 million
Aj'ars compared with 106 million dollars in 1940 and a 5-year (1935-39)
*.age'g of 86 million dollars. Cash income from wool in 1941 was the second
aiagest on record, being exceeded only in 1918.

Estimates of shorn wool production for the years 1934-41 were recently
kevvi.sedd downward by the Department on the basis of revised estimates of sheep
erps and fleece weights indicatc. in the 1940 Census of Agriculture. Most
'ite revisions in the production estimates are accounted for by changes in
eq f figures for the East North Central and Western rugionss ITo revisions
made in- production estimates for the years prior to 1934. Wool pro-
Ai'i6on estimates, together with estimates of the number of sheep shorn,
tiqgh .per fleece, local market price, and cash income 1919-1941, are shown

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.- was only slightly sm-ller than the recdrd pront.tion in 1939~ ..."fi
according to latest estimates. oPzcl..;ion in 12 Southern HEdisphr i
tries is estimated et 2,350 million. c-.-As compared idth 2 ,30 mUll
S, in each of the two previous, seasons. :.ost of the wool entering inte.
', "trade is produced in thse-countries. ;.

As wold wool-procuction in .concentrated largely in thli S'o-
Hemisphere, it has not as yet been seriously .offectsd by the w 'rli
:." British.Dominions, the principrI difficulties probably have been.a"i,
of labor for shearing and transportation to central li.arkets,. Ilnvi.
shortage of ocean shipping it is likely that relatively large .qaitl
the 1941-42 clips of Australia,, New Zealand, and South Africa are.;
in those countries. The entire production of those countries has
Chased by the British Government for the duration of .the .wark J b'lit
resold to United States buyers by the BritisF "Wool Control,

European Countries Cut Off From Suplies .
European countries which formerly took large quantities e.o.
'. Argentina and Uruguay are largel,. cut off from this supply by: 'he..
United States is the principal .olitlet for Souh American wools. ;v.
i e.: Hence conditions in the United States wool market are in
Affecting South American wool sales. In the 1940-41 export se.fts
States buyers took 83 percent of the wool r.hipped 'from Argentina.:S

.. Factors restricting'United States p.urchas.k in SouthbAmeri
Sin the current season have been the uncertainty concerning wool:-,i
i:. and civilian cons-mption'quotas and the fact that stocks of wool4.
:. United States dealers and manufacturers in the latter part of l9.k1 ig.
;:. largest in many years. ..'

Table 2.- Wool exports from Argentina and Ur-dguay in the.first"
S(October-January) of the'eroort season, 193-0 / .'..:. ...

S Period Argentina Ur g.y .: Two. on
beginning :United Totf : TTnit ed :. "Ta ted. .St .
O::: october 1 States States : .S t States ":
.: Million Million Million Million Million
pounds pun-s pou.dL pounds poinds-,.: .:i

1935 : 22.h4 -91i.. 12.1 50.4 34.5
1936 :39.3 130.9 .19.0 66.9 5`.3<
1937 : 2.3 57.5 0.2 .24.1 2.5
1938 : 33.2 1~..9 1.8 36.5 35.0
i.. 1939 :63.2 107.7 16.1 33.' 79. .
1940 122. 14g.7 52.8 .63.0 1750 W

Compiled from commercial reports.
o.. ....d.' s kin~z .~ .
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Weight of greasy, f o oacasy c mecilsc ue, our "ed and &i won wool d6,..,.. :::. .." '" : ~,.:':: '.;, .,,., ,. ; :"" ), ,.,.,
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-~-- r --r- --
Scountries 1937-h1 J/

.......: : 1940-41 : 1941-2
C Oountry 1937-38 1938-33 : 1939-o 401 .
': Million Million Million Million Million
.,:"T .ouncts J2


S:..;.. : pounds p

kni~th American.
: l gentina ............ 366.0
guay ,..... ..... 116.3
39.7
.r................. 33.0
i ... .....21.0
1 42dc Islands .... 4.6
other .............. 6.5

..:: Total ..........: 587.1

i'tfish Dominions
,''a.:aiustralia ............: 1,023.4
.iB ish South Africa : 233.0
i:.,ew Zealand ........: 296.8

.T:otal ..........: 1,553.2 1,

^ .l: SSouthern .
fmi sphere ......... 2,1403 2


pounds pounds pclunds pounds


399.0

41.0o
35.0
19.0
3.6
6.5


4433.0 474.o0 3/ 474.0
133.9 1F9.o 4/ 118.0
4o.s 40.0 4o.o
30.0 32.0 35.0
19.0 16.0 14.o
3.5 3.5 3.5
6.5 6.5 5.5


629.5


711.0


93.6 1,128.1 1,044.0
241.0 246.2 270.5
3'7.7 310.0 332.0


691.0


1,070.0
260.0
332.0


559.3 1,6s4.3 1,646.5 1.,662.o


,18I.8 ,2,361.0 2,357.5 2,353.0


i.GP pS;fed frdm official sources or reliable- commercial sources except as
.'1 Jju dia coated.
I',/ea.son begins October 1 in most South American countries, July 1 in
;jitfa alia, New Zealand and British South Afric..
g .Preliminary.
%/ Estimates reported by Agricultural Attache Paul 0. Nyhus.
'Estimate based on reported decrease from 1940-41.
/-Revised estimates based on recent reports of the Junta iTacional de la
tz I.dnstria Lanar.
S.6'/ Latest estimate 'carried forward.
*'.g Includos Bolivia, Ecuador, and Paraguay. Rough approximations.
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Tal 01prod C lorn pr, a


Year -fin pr thotrzi e ine
4~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 moee:ag) 3Dn
head~~ -oLmds pounds arU
1919, 360417 7.3p 2704.09 if,7
1920 ; 34v!621' 7420 250995.911,2
1921 :33:090 7,30 241,7W3 I,7. 4i i E2
1922 3 31412 73.30 228 367 ,I 649
1923 : 30v953 7.0 23 0, 1, 6 8 9 0,
i1924 : 31.,790 7.50 .R 38205, .4, 87.4
1925 : 339564 7,,50 2 1,0.P3: 3 .599*99A,
1926 : 93 97 T,70 249, 26i O9 pp
1927 37 414 70 syo 33 800
'1929 391p795, 7,0 3480 3. 1 87
19,29 .42,v1 O.s 3779,5, Q 029 5
1930 : 44549 .90 321 .5 6s_73
19313 461,$32 8 o4 37,0 36 40
19l3a 45% 207. 7.76 350o9956 86 3,
1-933 : 46,oo05 9.13 391521 gw67,6
1935 : 641 79 38g02, o,7
1935 44,91 800 361 531 1,3 663
1935 441,6P-3 7.91 352$956. 26,9
1937 :5j 4,4 o 37454 32o61'5
1939 45 030 8,02 3110 1. 91
1939 : 45 428 8.1 363,716, 24 8 0
194o :46-1645 5.3 74,54 2. o
'1941 : 4IP970 1.1 39-8 55 13 5,--








blE ,5.- Prices per,, pund of wool and other textile raw materials in
Sthe Urnited States, selected periods, 1939-42

I tem Ave : 42
: 1939 : 1940 1941 : Feb. : Dec. : Jan,: Teb.
N .... : Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents
aon market-
ijerritory, scoured basis- :
S i, 70s, 80s (fine)
: .: le ..............: 827 96,3 10s.8 107.5 115.5 116.0 116.1
6 3/8 blood) combing.: 69.3 79.7 91.2 86.2 96.8 97.0 97.9
46a (low 1/4 blood) ...., 62,6 76.1 82.3 79.5 86.5 86.5 87.4
tight fleece, greasy- :
Ni p, 70s, 0ss (fino) =
g iaine ...........;..,: 32.9 38.0 43.1 43.0 45.3 45.5 : 45.8
(3;/8 blood) combing : 36.2 41.2 46.s 44.0 51.2 51.5 51.6
a'6 (low 1/4 blood) ....,: 35.5 41.o 46.5 43.5 50.0 50.0 50.2
A r eign wool in bond I
at~Bf;, oston / .. .
Sydney scoured basis a
i:-s, 70s, combing ..,,:. 58.6 67.9 72.7 74.0 74.2 75.5 75.5
G:i'ape scoured basis :
12 months, combing .....: 53.7 62.9' 70.9 72.5 72.0 73.0 73.0
Mi;'I;ontevideo grease :
l: a sis- .
M,,; erinos (60-64s) ...,...@ 26.1 31.2 40.4 37.4 43.4 43.6 43.0
'~s. (56s) ...,.........: .28,3 32.4 38.6 35.8 45.5 45.4 42.2
&Ir'^.cs. received by farmers, : *
WT5glcease basis, 15th of :
nth ;............ .. ?. ,3. 28.3 35.5 32.1 37.1 37.2 37.1

ti :Textile fibers:
;" bb territory fine :
.i staple 2/ .,..,,,......,,, 82,7 1-963 1D. 107.5 115.5 116.0 116.1
Option, 15/16" Middling 13 9.30 10.17 13.92 10.13 17.26 18.99 19.23
i a n -yarn, 150 5denier 7 51.6 53,0 53.6 53.0 55.0 55.0 55.0
P n `yon staple fiber.~J .
: 'tiscose 1-1/2 denier ...;: 25.0 25.0 25.0 -25.0 250 25.0 25.0
rA0stte 5 denier ,......: .46.0 43.0 30 43.0 43.0 3.0 43.0

0* Compiled from reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service except as otherwise
tl'teft~I plag m of duty. Compiled from the Ibston Commercial Bulletin,
scored basis-, Boston market.
SAvrerage at 10 markets,
r :/. ombstic yarn, first -quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics,
So.b. producing plants, .Bureau of Labor Statistics,


MIL: .







MARCH 1942 .6 4 i

'Table 6.- Maximum prices for.domestic shorn wools,
OPA Price Regulation No. 106 ..
.. .. .: .- "
"T'e prices set forth below are maximum prices for domestic shoar'..
weel's of afcrange of good character. The maximum prices for w;oils of- '"oic:
- -charaeter,- fo: i:-frlor wools end for wools -sold in lots conte.ping; Ef %Sd&
grades or lntc':'-- s!'-u. i j; determined in accordance with paragraphs .($),
(0) and (D) blo. ,

HAll narim-' ri-.-' n.re prices per pound clean basis and shall include,
* all commissions dar'd ociCe cLharges except as provided in paragraph (2) below.

(A) WOOLS OF A'7MAEL TO GOOP CHARACTER


* *
SWorsted Typr
Grade and Lengths


Fine, 7s, 2 inches pnd longer ......*. .,......
. Fine, 64s and finer
2-1/2 inches and longer .............. .............
1-1/2 to 2-1/- -n'; R ...........................
1/2 bl o>1 and. fin, :Js 64a
2-.'2 inches nd longer ........... ............
1-1/2 tu 2-1/2 inches .........................
S1/2 blo'd 0s .
3 inches and longer ...................... .........
i-1/2 to 3 inches ....................................
. 1/2 blood 5es *
3 inches and longer ...........................
2 to 3 inches ............................ ........
3/8 blood 5bs .
3-1/2 inches end longer *.. ................'.'.'... e

1/4 blood 506
4 inches end longer .................. ....'......
2 tp 4 inches ............ ....s.,.. .....'.'.'......
1/4 blood 43e *
4 inches.ar.d longer ..................... .............
2 to 4 inches .... .............................
Low 1/4 blooa, 46s
.5 inches nd 'longer ...........................
3 to 5 inches *....................................
Under 3 inches ........................ .......
Common and braid, 36s, 40s, 443
5 inches and over ................................
Under 5 inches .................................


SPrices
Cents per
pound
Clean basis

$1.20

1.18'
1.1 .

1.16


1.15
1.11




1.04
i.o'i

o96
.93

.93
.91

.92
.90
.88

.93
.88


Continued


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,: OOL-63 -15 -

Prices
S. Cents per
Woolen type pound
rade and length Clenn basis

?Fine, 64s and finer, under 1-1/2 inches ................ $,08
1/2 blood GOs, under 1--'-; inches ..... ....*.... 105
1/2 blood 58s, under 2 niches ....... ..1......... 1.01
3/8 blood 56s, under 2 inches ......... ...... .......... .96
1/4 blood 50s, under 2 -j.-es ,,........................ .90
1/4 blood 4.s, under 2 inches ........................ .89

The maximum price on any sale of domestic shorn wool shall be t+he
applicable price set forth above; where wool is shipped, such m-dxinum
price must .e computed in accordance with subparagraphs (1), (2) or (3)
S below. Where such maxiLum is a shipping point price, the total delivered
price may not exceed the shipping point price plus actual cost of trans-
portation from shipping, point to destinKtion. Where such maximum is a de-
livered price, the shipping point price may not exceed such delivered price
less actual cost of transportation from shipping point to destination.

Whenever delivery is mnde in the seller's conveyence, the trpns-
S portation charge sh-ill not exceed thp charge which would be applicable on
an identical shipment from the same shipping point to the same destination
S at the lowest available commercial rate. In such czses, the transportation
charge must be separately shown in the invoice or similar document delivered
t o the purchaser.

(1) Shipments from 3sten to other points.

On shipments from Boston to other points, the maximum price shall be
a shipping point nrice no higher than the applicable rice set forth above
ex warehouse at Boston.

(2) Shipments to Boston from other points.

On shipments to Boston from other points, the maximum price shall be
a delivered price no higher than the applicable price 3et forth above f.o.b.
S at destination in Boston.

(3) Other shipments.

On other shipments, the maxinrm price shall be a delivered price no
Higher than the applicable price: Provided, that (1) if the transportation
charge per pound from shipping point to the railroad siding nearest the
point of destination at the lowest railroad carload rate applicable to ship-
." ments of greasy wool is more than such charge from shipping point to Boston,
then the amount of such excess may be added; and (2) on resales of wool where
the point-of shipment is in the same locality as the point of destination,
: the cost of local cartage and loading may be added.

Mi .
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The maximum prices for wools of choice character shall be the :
prices set forth above plus the following amounts:


--- (-1) Grades 70s..to 58s, inclusive, 3 cents per pound.

(2) Grades 56s to 48s, inclusive, 5 cents per poun&d


. '
S. ..:

De ..4


(3) Grades 46e and coarser, 8 cents pei0 Punds :
".* 1 ,>
(C) Inferior wools

The maximum prices for inferior wools shall be determined by !dL-e41
from the applicable maximum price for wools of average to good bcharatit i
forth in paragraph (A) above, the following amounts:
; I: :* :
(1) Slightly stained wools, 2 cents per pound.

(2) Yellow or heavily stained wools, 5 cents per pound. '

(3) Seedy or burry wools not requiring carbonising (accordhin-
established trade practice), and cotts, 3 cents per pound, after &ad sil
has been made for color in accordance with (1) or (2) above."- .7

(4) Seedy or burry wools requiring carbonizing (according t 0a.
listed trade practice), 10 cents per pound. After adjustment has ~u
in accordance with (1) or (2) above: Provided, that where such woD .&
sold in a carbonized state the actual carbonizing charges plus am>.
for actual shrinkage may be added to the maximum price so long as suh
and shrinkage allowance are set forth in the invoice or similar doc pkit.i
livered to the purchaser.

(5) Black or gray'wools, 20 cents per pound. "i

(6) Dead wools, 25 cents per pound. .

(7) Karrakul wools, 35 cents per pound.

(8) Wools tied with sisal or loose-spun Jute twine, 10 cents per p.

(9) Improved Navajo wools, 5 cents per pound. :"

(10) Unimproved Navajo wools,. 10 cents per pound. :::.:

(D) Wools sold in lots containing mixed grades or lengths

When wools are sold in original bags or in lots containing .dif t.
grades or lengths, the amount of each grade and length included sha
determined by grading a sample portion of the lot or by an estimate.
accordance with established trade practices, and the maxima pri et.,:
tity sold shall be based upon the applicable maximum price for eacit
length included.

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;In cases where a purchaser or a seller of domestic shorn wool employs
o.ksr or othot agent to make a purchase or sale on his behalf, a com-
iibn of not to exceed 1 percent of the applicable maximum price may be
aged for such services and added to the applicable maximum price. A
mission, may not be charged to both bayer and seller on the same lot of
alo. Such conmmissians shall be payable only if (1) ths wool is purchased
ta. price not exceeding the maximum price established by maximum Price
ulatgon No. 106, (2) it is shown as a separate charge on the invoice or
Imiilar document delivered to the purchaser, and (3) the commission is not
lit, or divided with the seller or with an agent or an employee of the
eiler,



b1.tl'shed in the Federal Register, March 3, 1942.










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