The wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00042

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text





THE


SITUATION

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

WOOL-62 .P FEBRUARY 1942


MILL CONSUMPTION OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN APPAREL WOOL,
SCOURED BASIS. UNITED STATES. 1937-41
(WEEKLY AVERAGE FOR EACH MONTH)
.POUNDS
(MILLIONS)
Foreign


6 Domestic ---

I
I
I

4I




\ A\ V /V /
2
2 >-- I Ir


% 40


0l T .i .1 1 I I
4AN. JULY JAN. JULY JAN. JULY JAN. JULY JAN. JULY J
1937 1938 1939 1940 1941
DATA FROM BUREAU OF THE CENSUS


U. 5 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG. 39312 BUREAU OF AI.RRllI TilRAL ECONOMICS


CONSUMPTION OF DOMESTIC WOOL BY UNITED STATES MILLS USUALLY IS
MUCH GREATER THAN CONSUMPTION OF FOREIGN WOOL BUT IN 1941 ONLY 43
PERCENT OF THE TOTAL MILL CONSUMPTION WAS DOMESTIC WOOL. DOMESTIC
PRODUCTION OF WOOL DOES NOT CHANGE GREATLY FROM YEAR TO YEAR. WITH
THE MARKED INCREASE IN CONSUMPTION OF WOOL IN THE LATTER PART OF
1940 AND IN 1941 LARGE QUANTITIES OF FOREIGN WOOL WERE REQUIRED TO
SUPPLEMENT DOMESTIC PRODUCTION.
UNIV OF FL LIB
DOCUMENTS DEPT




U S. DEPOSITORY


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FEBRUARY 1942


THE WOOL SITUATION


Summary

Strong demand for wool for military uses and curtailment of shipping

space available for wool imports under war conditions will be strengthening

factors in domestic wool prices in 1942. With maximum prices now in effect

for wool and with prices of domestic wools about at ceiling levels, changes

from present levels are likely to be moderate. Mill consumption for civilian

uses is being restricted by Government order.

Stocks of apparel wool held by dealers and manufacturers, including

wool afloat, totaled 356 million pounds on December 31; in addition, there

were about 21 million pounds of domestic wool of the 1941 clip still on

farms and ranches .nd in local warehouses in Western Sheep States. The

December 31 stocks were 114 million pounds larger than a year earlier and

about 50 percent larger than average December 31 stocks in the 5 years

1935-39. The reported stocks do not include wools stored by the Defense

Supplies Corporation as a strategic reserve. With a prospective high rate

of mill consumption in 1942 and shipping facilities uncertain, large in-

ventories are necessary to efficient working conditions.

Mill consumption of apparel wool in December established a new record

rate of 11.3 million pounds a week, scoured basis. The December consumption

was 32 percent larger than in December 1940. Consumption on a greasy shorn

and pulled basis totaled 977 million pounds in 1941 compared with 641 mil-

lion pounds in 1940 and a 5-year average (1935-39) of about 575 million

pounds. The 1941 consumption was by far the largest in 24 years of record.

The base period to be used in computing maximum prices for wool was

extended by the Office of Price Administration early in February. On the


- 2 -






WOOL-62


basis of the change maximum prices. for domestic shorn wools shall not be

higher than the highest price received or contracted for during the period

October 1-December 15,, 1941. The cirage was made necessary by provisions for

agricultural commodities in the Emergrency Price Control Act.

Sales of domestic wool at Boston were relatively small in January.

Prices were firm and were generally close to the maximums permitted under

price regulations. Manufacturers' stocks of raw material were fairly large

and mills were in a position to wait for further clarification of price maxi-

mums before taking.on additional supplies.

February 11, 1942

REVIEW OF RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

BACKGROUND.- In the last half of 1940 and in 1941 the domestic
wool situation was largely dominated by .the defense program.
Stimulated by large orders for wool goods for the armed forces
of this country and by increased incomes of consumers, mill
consumption of wool rose to record levels in 1941. Domestic
wool production was at a- record high in 1941 but production
was less than half of mill consumption.. In the first 9
months of 1941 about -.550 million pounds of apparel wool and
170 million pounds of carpet wool were imported for immediate
consumption or for commercial storage. In addition, Australian
wool was imported for storage by the Defense Supplies Corpora-
tion as a strategic "stockpile".

After .advancing sharply in the last half of 1940, mar-
ket prices for wool fluctuated within a narrow range in the
first months of 1941 and then advanced moderately through
November. Prices of domestic wools in November were close to
the highest levels since 1928-29.

The outbreak of war with Japan in early December was
quickly followed by .control measures relating to consumption
and prices of wool. Temporary maximum prices for wool and
semi-manufactures were announced by the Office of Price Ad-
ministration on December 18 at the highest levels which
prevailed between October 1 and December 6, 1941. Early in
January a wool conservation program was instituted which
restricts the use of new wool in the manufacture of materials
during the first quarter of 1942 to 80 percent of the average
quarterly consumption in the first half of 1941. Consumption
for civilian uses is limited to 40 or 50 percent of the basic
quarterly poundage.






FEBRUARY 1942


Wool Market Qiet, Prices Unchanged.in January

Sales of domestic wool at Boston were relatively small in January.
Purchases by mills were limited to moderate quantities needed for immediate
use. Prices were firm and were generally close to the ceilings permitted
under price regulations issued in December, according to reports of the
Agricultural Marketing Service. The ouietnes3 in the market was attributed
largely to uncertainty regarding the effect of Government regulation of
wool consumption and to the fixing of maximumprices for wool and wool tops.
Manufacturers' stocks of raw material are fairly large and mills are in a
position to wait for further clarification of maximum prices before taking
on additional supplies.

Quoted prices of fine combing (staple) territory wools averaged $1.16
a pound, scoured basis, in January and prices of 3/8 blood combing territory
wools averaged 97 cents a pound. The January averages on these wools were
8 to 10 cents a pound higher than a year earlier.

The average price received by farmers for wool was 37.2 cents a
pound on January 15, compared with 37-1 cents a month earlier and 31.3 cents
a year earlier. Prices for wool in local markets in recent months have been
higher than at any time since 1928.

Maximum Prices for Wool Revised

Maximum prices for wool were revised by the Office of Price Adminis-
tration in an amendment to.price schedule 58 effective February 2. The
revision was made necessary by provisions for agricultural commodities in
the Emergency Price Control Act of 1942. By the amendment the period that
must be used to compute maximum prices, except where specific maximums are
given, is changed to October 1-Lecember 15, 1942. The original order issued
in December used the period October 1-December 6 as a base period.

On the basis of the February 2 revision, prices for domestic shorn
wool shall not be higher than the highest price received or contracted for
during the October 1-December 15 period. Maximum prices for domestic
pulled wools were specified in a price schedule issued on January 29 by the
Office of Price Administration. No revisions of this schedule were speci-
fied in the February 2 order. The January 29 schedule for pulled wools is
shown in table 6.

Maximum prices for wool top futures and grease wool futures contracts
on the New York Exchange are fixed at $1.327 a pound for wool tops and $1.035
a pound, scoured basis, for grease wool by the February amendment. These
are the highest prices at which contracts sold during the October 1-December 15
period. The original maximums based on the October 1-December 6 period were
$1.279 for wool top and 95.8 cents for grease wool.

Temporary Price Schedules Issued for Certain
Wools and Semi-Manufactures

Temporary price schedules were issued in January for South American
wools and for certain types and grades of wool tops and yarns used in the






manufacture of military cloths. The schedules became effective on January 16
and 17. Prices quoted were on a clean basis, duty paid ex dock or ex ware-
house. Detailed schedules were published in the F..~rral Register for
January 20, 1942.

Wool Stocks Above Ave'-re on December -1

Stocks of apra.xel rool held by dealers and manufacturers, including
wool afloat, totaled 356 -il'.ion pounds greasy shorn and pulled basis on
December 31, 1941. In addition, the Department of Agriculture estimates
'that there were about 21 million pounds of domestic wool of the 1941 clip
still on farms and ranches and in local warehouses in 13 Western Sheep
Sts:es. TheI December 31 stocks were 114 million pounds larger than a year
earlier and about 50 percent larger than average December 31 stocks in the
5 years 1935-39. The totals for aMl years include foreign wools afloat to
United States dealers and manufact-~ers. Stocks of wool held by the Govern-
ment in 1941 as a strategic stockpile are not included.

Stocks of domestic wool, totaling 191 million pounds, on December 31,
1941 were larger than at the end of 1959 and 1940, but were about equal to
average December 31 stocks in the 5 years 1935-39. Stocks of foreign wool,
totaling 186 million pounds, were much larger than December 31 stocks in
any recent year.

Stocks of carpet wool reported by dealers and manufacturers including
wool afloat totaled 67 million pounds, grease basis, on December 31 compared
with 57 million pounds a year earlier and a 5-year average (1935-39) of 53
million pounds. The pscoJhmran:ing table shows reported stocks of apparel
and carpet wool on a scoured-equivalent basis. Stocks on a grease basis, by
quarters 1937-41, are shown in table 4.

Stocks of raw wool, tops and noils held by dealers, manufacturers,
and topmakers, United States, December 31, 1941 with comparisons

: Scoured basis
Item 1 41
: December 31 : September 27 De r
: ._I____ : 1e 1mber3
: 1,000 pounds 1,000 pound 1_,000 pounds
Apparel wool, total .........: 142,152 191,556 190,780
Dealers ...... ..........: 47,0o4 65,556 60,605
Domestic ................: 17,538 45,990 28,034
Foreign on hand .........: 15,833 17,304 17,878
For.- :- afloat .........: 13,713 3,262 14,693
Manuiactrrers and topmakers: 95,068 124,604 129,905
DoreS ic ................: 39,122 46,648 49,508
oei on hand .........: 29,470 69,131 56,075
Forein afloat ..........: 26,476 8,825 24,322

Carpet wool, total ..........: 39,968 54,o44 46,945
Dealers ..................: 1,281 2,392 1,409
Manufacturers and topmakers: 38,687 51,652 45,536

Tops ****..................:. 17,722 20,438 21,610
Noils *****..................: 11,949 15,421 16,363
Compiled from Bureau of the Census Quarterly Wool Stock Report DAcembfr 31.


COL-62


-5-





FEBRUARY 1942


Mill Consumption Sts nT~ e Recrd in December;
jIj 1LTot s L T.lh in snv 1'-r.vious Year

Mill consumption of apparel wool av*: -g2d 11.3 million pounds a week
scoured basis in D-ce'imbr compared with the previous record of 10.7 million
pounds a week in September and October. The December consumption was 32
percent larger than in December 1940. New highs in consumption of apparel
wool were established by mills repeat .l-r in 1941. Consumption on a scoured
basis for the year was 66 percent larger than the 1940 consumption and was
almost 40 rerccnt 1-rc-r than the 1918 consumption, previously the largest
in 23 years of record. Consumption of apparel wool, grea.sy shorn and pulled,
totaled 977 million pounds in 191 compared with 641 million pounds in 19h0
and an average of about 575 million pounds in the 5 years 1935-39.

Consumption of domestic wool was 43 percent of the total apparel wool
consumption on a scoured basis in 1941. Mill consumption of domestic wool
usually is much greater than consumption of foreign wool. In 1940, domestic
wool was 69 percent of the total and in the 5 years 1935-39 domestic wool was
81 percent of the apparel wool consumed by United States mills.

Mill consumption of carpet wool increased in December ane consumption
for the month was much larger than in most recent years. Consumption of
carpet wool totaled 192 million pounds, 7grasy shorn basis, in 1941 compared
with 138 nil"ion pounds in 1940 and a S-ye'Er average (1935-39) of 138 mil-
lion pounds.

Mill cons~nurtion of apparel and cArp it wool on a scoured and greasy
shorn basis, 191S-412 are shown in table 2. T- blc 1 shows consumption of
domestic and foreign apparel wool by United States mills.

OUTLOOK

Requirements for Wool in 10142 Will be Large

Requirements for apparel wool for Army use in 19142 will be large.
On a combat basis, the requirements per man are calculated at a minimum of
100 pounds, scour:! weight, for the first yenr of service, and maintenance
requirement per man is calculated at 40 nounds of scoured wool per annum,
according to a statement of Brigadier General C. L. Corbin, Office of
Quartermaster General at the National Wool Growers Convention in Jnnuary.
These estimates are tentative, as complete data concerning wastage and
losses under present war-time conditions are not available.

With a prospective increase of about 2 million men in 1942 there will
be a need for not less than 200 million rounds of scoured wool (about 400
million pounds of grease wool) l/ for the addition to Army forces, according
to Bri-acgier General Corbin. The quartermaster division already has enough
wool items on hand, or contracted for as of January 1942, to supply combat
needs for the present Army through 1942. Some of these items', however, are
to be produced and delivered in 1942 and hence will add to the 1942 raw wool
requirements.

I/ Assuming the use of about 50 percent domestic wool and 50 percent foreign
wool.


- 6-






WOOL-62


Demand for wobl for civilian uses will be strong in 1942 within quota
limits. Increased incomes of consumers rnd curtailment in production of
durable consumer goods such as automobiles,: radios, etc., will increase the
demand for clothing and nondurable goods

Supplies Available. for'192 : :

Stocks of apparel :wool in the Uited-States'on January 1, 1942 in-
cluding Government reserves probably were'the largest' Jnuary 1 stocks in
20 years, and the 1942:domestic wool clip whichh will be available this
spring is expected to equal :the record: production of '1941. The 1942 supply
is being supplemented by imports.

In most years prior to 1940 the major part of United States imports
of apparel wool came from British Empire countries, chiefly Australia and
New Zealand. Large quantities of wool formerly exported to European coun-
tries, are now available in South America, principally in Argentina and
Uruguay. Production of apparel wool in South America in 1941-42 probably
will total around 500 million pounds, and the greater part 6f this wool is
available for export. If Pacific shipments are cut off, United States im-
ports in 1942 may be supplied largely by South American countries. In the
first 9 months of 1941 United State's imports of apparel wool for consumption
included about 275 million pounds from South America.

The-great increase in requirements for shipping space for strategic
materials and for military purposes will be a limiting factor in wool im-
ports in-194b2 but imports are likely to be larger than" inz recent pre-war
years. Although stocks on hand plus domestic production probably would be
sufficient to fill a large part of the 1942 requirements under quota limits,
it is necessary that:,stocks be maintained at a safe level to provide for
early 1943 requirements as the domestic clip is not available to mills in
any considerable quantity until late spring. Relatively large inventories
also must be maintained to fill the wide range of requirements as to grade
and type.

Price Changes May.Bo Moderate in 1942

The strong demand for wool for military and civilian uses in the
United States and curtailment of shipping space available for wool under war
conditions will be strengthening factors-in domestie-wool prices in 1942.
Prices for most domestic wools are.now-at-the-highest level since 1928-29.
As ceiling prices are .now in effect -for-wool and semi-manufactures, changes
from present levels are likely to -be-moderate.,. .......

Wool Prices Under Price Control Bill

The Price Control Bill signed by the President on January 30 provided
certain conditions governing prices of agricultural commodities which will
apply to maximum prices established for wool. The Bill provides that no
maximum price shall be established or maintained for any agricultural com-
modity below the highest of any of the following prices, as determined and
published by the Secretary of Agriculture:






FEBRUARY 1942


14 110 percent of the parity price for such commodity, adjusted
by the Secretary of Agriculture for grade, location and sea-
sonal differentials, or, in case a comparable price has been
determined for such commodity, 110 ner centum of such com-
parable price, adjusted in the same manner, in lieu of 110
per centum of the parity price so adjusted;

2. The market price prevailing for such commodity on October 1,
1941;

3. The market price prevailing for such commodity on December 15,
1941; or

4. The average price for such commodity during the period July 1,
1919 to June 30, 1929.

For the purpose of the Act, parity prices shall be determined and
published by the Secretary of Agriculture as authorized by law. No maximum
price shall be established or maintained for any commodity processed or
manufactured in whole or substantial part from any agricultural commodity
below a price which will reflect to producers of such agricultural commodity
a price for such agricultural commodity equal to the highest price therefore
specified above.

The Price Control Act does not restrict the movement of prices below
the established maximums.

The approximate prices received by farmers for wool for the periods
specified in the Agricultural section of the Price Control Act were as
follows:

Period Price per pound
Cents

110 percent of parity ................ ... I_ 29.4
Average July 1919-June 1929 ................ 34.1
October 1, 1941 (approximate) ............. 36.3
December 15, 1941 .........................* 37.1

Compiled from reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service.
1J January 15, 1942.


- g -







Data for chart on cover page

Table 1.- Mill consumption of'domesti.c and foreign apparel wool
scoured basis, United Sta sA, 1937-41

_______ (Weekly average for each month) ____
: .. Average : 1940 .... 1941
Month : 1-935-3 1/ :
:Do- :Foreign:Percent: Do- :Foreign:Percent.: Do- :Foreign:Percent
:mestic : :domestic mestic:; :domestic mestic. :domestic
:1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
: pounds pounds Percent pounds pounds Percent pounds pounds Percent

Jan. 4,043 895 81.9- 3,451 2,187 61.2 4,303 3,720 53.6
Feb. : 4,002 1,216 76.7 2,853 2,473 53.6 4,188 4,870 46.2
Mar. : 3,537 1,299 73.1 2,194 2,233 49.6 4,o80 5,774 41.4
Apr. : 3,236 1,129 74.1 2,053 1,441 58.8 3,309 6,05 35.2
May : 3,835 1,096. 77.8 2,471 .1,795 57.9 3,524 6,734 34.4
June : 4,191 915 -82.1 .565 1,278 73.6 3,898 6,578 37.2
July :'4,245 754 84.9 ,545 1,141 79.9 3,618 5,732 387
Aug. : 5,o30 843 85.6 4,906 1,294 79.1 4,367 5,589 43.9
Sept. : 4,501 825 84.5 5,738 1,414 80.2 4,931 5,783 46.0
Oct. : 4,609 893 83.8- 6,062 1,786 77.2 4,904 5,840 45.6
Nov. : 4,643 962 82.8 6,159 2,296 72.8 5,136 5,33 49.1
Dec. : 4,290 1,04o 80.5 5,710 2,793 67.2 5,504 5,748 48.9

Year :
2/ :4,165 984 80.9 4,129 1,822 69.4 4,290 5,627 43.3
Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census.

Ij Data by months for the years 1935-39 were reported in The Wool Situation
for July 1941.
2/ Derived from yearly totals will not equal average of monthly averages.


jOOL-62


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FEBRUARY 1942


- 10 -


Table 2.- Mill consumption of wool by classes, United States, 1918-41

SScoured basis Grepsy shorn basis 1/
Year Total
SApparel Carpet Total : Apparel Carpet Total
: Million Million Million Million Mil) on Million
: pound pounds poundds pounds poup1s pounds


1918 : 371.2 28.1
1919 : 2s3.1 46.o


49.9
43.7
93.7
111.1
92.5
98,2
88.0
95.4
100.8
114.9

62,5
73.3
41.6
71,6
62. 1
98.5
106.3
106.5
64.9
103.4

97.9
132.3


399.3
329.1
314.2
343.4
4o06.5
422.4
342.2
349.9
342.7
354.1
333.2
368.1

263.2
311.0

317 1
229.7
417,5
4o6.1
380.8
284.5
396.5


676.0
563.7
510.9
597.4
640.4
603.1
518.0
525.2
524.1
551.1
511.9
554.7
447.9
545.2
439.8
572.2
381.4
748.4
666.4
579.5
513.9
673.9


1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929

1930
1931
1932
193
1954
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941


Compiled from wool consumption reports of the Bureau of the Census.
Calendar years 1918-33, thereafter totals cover 52-week periods approxi-
mating calendar years except 1938 which covers 53 weeks.

l/ In these estimates pulled wool has been converted to a greasy shorn
equivalent weight.
2 Preliminary.


264.3
299.7
312.8
311.3
249.7
251.7
254.7
253.7
232.4
253.2

200.7
237.7
188.5
245.5"
167.6
319.0
299.8
274.2
219.6
293.1

310.0
515.7


407.9 683.3
648.0 1,021.5


39.0
63.9

69.3
60.7
130.1
152.2
126.7
134.5
120.5
130,7
138.1
157.4

85.6
1035. 2
58.6
100.8
88.7
141.7
152,5
152.7
93.0
149.2

137.6
192.4


715.0
627.6

580.2
658.1
770.5
755.3
64h.7
659.7
644.6
681.8
650.0
712.1

533.5
648.4
49&.4
673.0
470.1
890.1
818.9
732.2
606.9
823.1

820.9
1,213.9


:





WOOL-62


- 11 -


Table 3.- Mill consumption and machinery activity, United States,
selected periods, 1939-41

I: Year : Dec. : Nov. : Dec.
_..l ____ L : 1940 1941 : 1941
1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1, 000
Mill consumrrticn: 1/ : pounds pounds pounds pounds po inds ouds
Grease basis- 2/ :
.Aparol ...............:6x0,150 640,871 977,075 70,936 g1,010 86,562
Ca-pet ................;. i8,513 137,494 190,063 13,356 13",545 14,428
Scoured basis-
AgnfeiTPte-
A-oparo.ll ............:293,083 310,021 515,708 3L4,012 41,876 45,008
Carprt .. ............:103,4021 97,852 132,259 9,356 9,496 10,395
Wea!ki1: average-
Apre ........2.....: 5,636 5,962 9,917 8,505 10,469 11,252
Carpet ...............: 1,989 1,882 2,543 2,339 2,371 2,599


Weekly average in hours


Machinery activity: / :
Hours operated per
machine in place-
Worsted combs ........ .
Worsted spindles ......:
Woolen spindles .......
Woolea and worsted
looms-
Broad ....o ..*.........0
.arrow ...v.... ........
Carpet :and rug looms- :
SBroad ...............:
Narrow .............:


51 *s
39.6
39.8


4o.7
13.2

37.4
22.7


55.1
.37.7
43.2


86.6
60,7
63.7


39.0 61.2
13.6 27.6


74.5
52,0
55.0


87.2
62.6
66.2


54.2 63.7
14.6 36.5


37.9 50.9 42.3 51.6
21.9 30.8 26.0 29.3


93.2
66.6
67.4.


69.4
29.6

503.
29.5


Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census. Data on imports no
longer available.

l/ Figures for.November and December based on 4 weeks. No adjustments made
for holidays.
d/ Total of shorn and pulled wool. Pulled wool, grease basis, is in con-
dition received from pulleries and is mostly washed.







FEB3RJA.Y 1942


Table 4.- Stocks of wool held by dealers and manufacturers, and stocks on
farms ani ranches in Western Strtes, United Strter, 1937-41
Grease basis
: __ Appjjarel vool : Carpet
S Domestic : Foreign : :On frrms : wool
Date : Kanu- : Totl : and all
Dealers :facturers: On hand : Afloat :reported : ranches : foreign
: : : : :__ : 2/ : 3/
:1,000 lb. 1,0: lb. 1,000 lb. 1,3O l.b. 1,00l b. 1,0 lb. 1,000 bb.


1937
Mar. 27
June 26
Sept. 25
Dec. 31
1938
Mar. 26
June 25
Sept. 24
Dec. 31
1939
Apr. 1
July 1
SeDt. 30
Dec. 31
1940
Mar. 30
June 29
Sent. 28
Dec. 31
1941
Mar. 29
June 28
Sent. 27 :
Dec. 31 5/:


87,96-
85,303
66,037

63,396
95, 397
104,559
82,225

64,345
103,857
125,084
gl,491

58,017
99, I3
10o,031
86, 91i

6o, 9g6
91, '28
103,232
110,499


77,585
63,024
49,721
37,568

33,510
32,069
32,306
31,3'15

39,764
33,575
36,637
51,749

63,61S
47,165
44,311
71,795

112,169
150,185
141,000
120,263


1!,s04
4,407
2,069
1,2 9

2,6.,0
1,213
2,4 45-
8,17-c

s,276
5,425
7,9 C
25,243

6,656
5,11
20,141
67, 77':

85.9q't
51.1'i.
20,665
65,742


212,750
287,387
276,178
239,487

216,772
297, 722
321,157
23, 403

1 '0,939
255.767
24'1, 32
202,534

17 ,65~
262,.342
263,593
261,,6 o

285, 310
393.290
36, 99 1
35o,175


330 53,923
51,172
59,846
31,600 63,471

22,500 49,640
43.927
37,969
13,340 43,137

6,290 48,527
46,86o
53,705
14,384 53,942

10,786 66,971
63,789
53,624
1,463 57,302

_1/ 69,926
96,075
78,035
21,033 66,938


Compiled from Bureau of tnc Ccrsus, .u- rtrrl:'


Jool Ltocks renorts.


These statis-


tics are believed to include over 95 Dercent of the total stocks held by, and
afloat to, all dealers, manufacturers and toprekers in the United States

1/ Includes topmakers stocks.
/ Estimated by the DeIartment of Agriculture. Ezti.mtes are of vool on farms
and ranches and in local country warehouses in 13 liestern Sheen States, not in-
cluding any wool of the next season's clip. lio estimates available for dates
where no figures are shown.
SIncludes*carpet wool afloat to the United States.
Negligible oraantity.
Prelimrinary.


34,873
131,967
139,085
134,623

117,226
169,o43
181,847
116,635

6s, 54
107,910
75,245
44,051

40.392
110,783
91,110
35,055

26,161
100,076
104,096
59,671


- 12 -






WOOL-62


- 13 -


Table 5.- Prices per pound of wool and other textile raw materials in
the United States, selected periods, 1939-42

Item Average 1 : 191 : 1942
____ 19J3 : 1940 :1941 1/: Jan. : Nov. : Dec. : Jan.


Boston market-
Territor-:, scoured basis- :
64s, 70s, 80s (fine)
staple ..................
56s (3/8 blood) combing .:
46s (low 1/4 blood) .....
Bright fleece, greasy-
64s, 70s, ?0s (fine) :
delaine ................:
56s (3/8 blood) combing .:
4bs (low 1/4 blood) .....
Foreign wool in bond
at Boston 2/
Sydney scoured basis
64F, 70s, combing ......
Cape scoured basis
12 months, combing .....:
Montevideo grease
basis-
Iterinos (60-64s) .......
Is (56s) ..............:
Prices received by farmers,
grease basis, 15th of
month ....................

Textile fibers:
Wool, territory fine
Staple 4/ ............... :
Cotton, 15/16" Middling :
: aon yarn, 150 denier 6/.:
Rayon staple fiber j
Viscose 1-1/2 denier ....:
Acetate 5 denier ........:


: Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


82.7
69.3
62.6


32.9
36.2
35.5


96.3
79.7
76.1


38.0
41.2
41.o


108.8
91.2
82.3


43.1
46.8
46.5


108.1
86.5
79.5


43.3
44.8
43.9


112.5
96.2
86.5


44.2
50.2
50.0


Cents Cents


115.5
96.8
86.5


45.3
51.2
50.0


116.0
97.0
86.5


45.5
51.5
50.0


58.6 67.9 72.7 73.3 70.5 74.2 75.5


53.7 62.9 70.9 70.5 69.o


26.1-
28.3


31.2
32.4


22.3 1/28.4


82.7
9.30
51.6


96.3
10.17
53.0


108.8
13.92
53.6


40o.4
38.6


34.7
33.5


41.5
39.5


72.0 73.0


43.4
45.5


43.6
45.4


31.3 36.7 37.1 37.2


108.1
10.10
53.0


112.5
16.38
55.0


25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0
46.0 43.0 43.0 43.0 43.0


115.5
17.26
55.0


116.0
18.99
55.0


Compiled from reports of the Agricuitural 'Mrketing Service except as otherwise
noted.
I/ Preliminary.
2/ Before payment of.duty, Compiled from the'Boston Commercial Bulletin.
Unweignted Fverage.
Scoured basis, Boston market.
SAverage at 10 markets.
Domestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
F .o.b. producing plants, Bureau of Labor Statistics.


25.0 25.0
43.0 43.0






FEBRUARY 1942


- 14 -


Table 6.- Maximum prices for domestic nulled wools: Amendment to
Office of Price Administration Price Schedule 51

The prices set forth below are maximum prices n-r coand f.o.b. ship-
ping point. Terms of sale shall be cash less 1 percent ua to 10 iJ ys or 60
days net cash. Prices are ap:liceble to sales, offer cf F-le, deliveries
or transfers on and after Jan. 29, 1942.

(A) Strictly combing pulled wools:
Prie Per Lb.
Choice White
Grade Cl-sn Fasis

58s, 60s, 3 inches and over ............... $1.09
56, s, 3 inches and over ............. 1.07
54s, 56s, 3 inches and over ............... 1.01
50s, 54s, 3 inches and over ............... .97
50s, 44s, 4 inches Lan over ................ 5

(B) Worsted type pulled

Price Per Lb.
Croice White
Grade Clean lssis Sccured

64s, 1-1/2 inch and over ... ...... $1.14 $1.20
62s, 1-1/2 inch and over .............. 1.12 1.17
60s, 1-1/2 inch and over ............. 1,09 1.14
58s, 2.inches and over ................ 1.07 1.12
56s, 2 inches and over ................ 1.03 1.08
54s, 2 inches and over ................ .96 1.00
50s, 2 inches and over ................ .92 .96
44s, 50s, 3 inches and over ........... .. o .93

(0) Woolen T.Tre and Lambs Pulled Wools:

Price ver Lb.
Choice White
Grade Clean bssis Scoured

64s, under 1-1/2 inches ............... $1.10 $1.16
62s, under 1-1/2 inches ............... 1.07 1.13
60s, muder 1-1/2 inches ............... 1.07 1.12
58s, under 2 inches ................... 1.05 1.10
56s, under 2 inches .................. 1.01 1.06
54s, under 2 inches .................. 94 .98
50s, under 2 inches ................... .90 .94
44s, 50s under 3 inches .............. .Fb .91


- Continued







Table 6.- Maximumn prices for domestic pulled wools: Amendment to
Office of Price Administration Price Schedule 58 -Cont'd

(D) Off-Color Palled Wools:

Grace and Descrirtion Clean basis Scoured

Super grey 60s ........................ 1.00 1.05
Super gray 5Ss ........................ .95 1.00
Super light gray 5os ................. .95 1.00
Super -ra:y 5s, ,s ............ .... .92 .96
Average gray 50s ...................... 86 .90
Average -rEy ,C 5 s, 46s ................. .82 .86
Shank gray 44s, .0s ................... .66 .70
Black 60 and fiaer .................... 1.03 1.08
Black 56s, 58 ....................... .95 .99

!AXINM';I PRICES

(E) The maximnuir prices for ir.fFrior wools of the types and grades
set forth above shall be the- mnirium prices set forth above with the fol-
lowing adju-tments:

1.- The maximum price for slightly tinged wool shall be 2 cents less
than the applicable maximum price.

2.- The maximum -rice for yellow or heavily stained wools shall be
5 cents less than the applicable maximum price.

3.- The maximum price for seedy or burry wools which, in accordance
with established trade practice, do not require carbonizing shall be 3 cents
less than the applicable price after adjustment has been made for color in
accordance with sub-paragraphs 1 and 2 above.

4.- The maximum price for seedy or burry wools which, in accordance
with established trade practice, required cErbonizing shall be 10 cents less
than the applicable maximum price after adjustment has been made for color
in accordance with sub-naragraphs 1 and 2 above: Provided that where such
wools are sold in a carbonized state the actual carbonizing charges plus an
allowance for actual shrinkage may be added to the maximum price so long as
the amount of such charges is set forth in the invoice or a similar document
delivered to the *urchaser.

C01 ISSIONS

(F) Broker's Commissions.

The maximum prices set forth above shall include all commissions and
other charges: Provided, that where a purchaser employs a broker or other
agent to make a purchase on his behalf, a commission of not to exceed 1 per-
cent may be charged for such services and paid by such purchaser. Such
commission shall be nermissable only if (1) the wool is purchased at a price
in compliance with this schedule and (2) the commission is not split or
divided with the seller or with an agent or employee nf the seller.


(Executive orders Nos. 8734, 8875, 6 F. R. 1917, 4483).


WOOL-62


- 15 -




UNIVERSITY/ OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08861 6007




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