The wool situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00041

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation

Full Text








31 I U %j IJ I L |
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

h-61 JANUARY 1942


MILL.CONSUMPTION OF APPAREL AND CARPET WOOL
SCOURED BASIS, UNITED STATES. 1935-41
(WEEKLY AVERAGE FOR EACH MONTH)


JAN. JULY JAN. JULY JAN. JULY JAN JULY JAN. JULY JAN. JULY JAN JULY
1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941
DA.4 FROM BUREAU OF THE CEIS US


RTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


NEG 39073 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC!


MILL CONSUMPTION OF APPAREL AND CARPET WOOL ROSE TO RECORD LEVELS
IN 1941. THE AVERAGE RATE OF CONSUMPTION IN THE FIRST II MONTHS OF THE
'YEAR WAS 70 PERCENT HIGHER THAN THE 5-YEAR AVERAGE, 1935-39. UNDER THE
'CONSERVATION PROGRAM RECENTLY ANNOUNCED BY THE 0. P. M. THE USE OF NEW
;WOOL IN THE MANUFACTURE OF MATERIALS IN THE FIRST QUARTER OF 1942 WILL
BE RESTRICTED TO 80 PERCENT OF THE RATE WHICH PREVAILED IN THE FIRST
OLF OF 1.941.


. *3>4,.':.".
L :


..% .
n -:).". : .





JAUJARY 194 2


-~rrrr~--------------r-------
THE WOOL SITUATION 1


Sumrmary

Mill c'. s1T.:tlor. of wool in the first quarter of 1942 v.ill be limited

to 80 percent of the rate which prevailca in the first half of H141 under a

wool conservation Iro)pre recently announced by, the Off'ice of Production

Management Consumption was at a record lev-el in 194 1, anid probably v'ill be

much larger in 1942 than in most recent years. As prospective large mili-

tary requirements must be met, the reduction. villa be attair.ed by restrict-

ing consumption for civilian uses to 40 or 50 percent of the quantity used

in the 1941 period.

Mill consumption of apparel wool in ILovcmbor declined slightly from

the record rate maintained in September and October, hbt with this exception

the November rate of consumption -:as higher than in arny previous month.

Consu-ption on a greasy shorn and pulled basis totaled 891 million pounds

in the first 11 months of 1941 compared vith 570 million pounds in the same

months of 1940.

Temporary ceiling prices for raw wool, vwol tops, and yarn were

established by the Office of Price Aldinistration on December 18 e.t the

highest prices which prevailed between October 1 and December 6, 1941. For

most raw wools the ceiling prices Iro;a.blly are hi,.er tChn at any time since

early 1929. Revised schedules cc.vering woal and wiool products will be is-

sued when detailed studies have been completed. pricess vrere firm at Boston

in December and moderate quantities of wool were sold. Sales were generally

at the maxim2:m permitted under price regulations.

Farm ircome from wool in 1942 probably will be fully as large as the

1941 income, if not larger. The 1941 income, tentatively estimated at 143

million dollars, was the largest since 1918.


-- January 12, 1942


- 2 -







REVIEW OF RECENT' DEVELOBE~I TS

BACKGROUMiD.- Since June 1940 the domestic wbol situation haTs
been largely dominated by the defense program. Stimulated by .
large orders for wool goods for the arr.ed forcezof this.coun-.-
try and by increased incomes of consumers, mill consilution- ..
of wool rose to record levels in 1941. Consumption of ap-
parel wool through most of the year was at an annual rate of
a billion pounds grease_ ba s.iQ.copared with the 5-year aver-
age (1935-39) of 575 million pounds. Domestic wool produc-
tion was at a record high 'of abut 464.4 million pounds' in,
"1941 but production was less than half of indicated
consumption. : "

The great increase in'the need for raw wool was re- :
flected in wool imports. In the first 9 months o'f1941 about
550 million pounds of apparel wool-and 170 million pounds of
carpet wool were imported for immediate consumption or for
commercial storage, the largest imports -ever, reported."' In ad- .
edition, Australian w ool' -as imported for storage *by the Defense
Supplies Corporation as a strategic "stockpile."

After advancing sharply in the last half of 1940 marl:et .
prices for wool fluctuated within a narrow range in the first .
8 months of 1941 and then advanced moderately through Iovember. ... -
Prices of domestic wools in November were close to the highest: .
levels since 1928-29. ,

Prices Firm at Boston in December
at Maximum Under. Price Regulation

Trading was quite active in the Boston wool market in the first week
of December following the announcement of invitations for bids, on vol
overcoating and lining cloth for Army use. Prices were firm, mostly atthe.
top of the ranges quoted in late November, according to'reports of the
Agricultural Marketing Service. The market strengthened following the out-
break of war with Japan but the announcement that a ceiling would be estab-
lished on wool prices checked the advance in prices at Boston. .Prices
remained firm, however, and fair sized quantities of both domestic and ':
foreign wools were sold during the latter part of the'rionth. 'Prices of
domestic wools were generally at the ,maximum permitted under price regula-
tions issued December 18.

Average priees.prevailing at Boston for domestic wools of various
grades 'and types when ceiling prices were established on December 18 are
shown in table 5. The table also shows comparable'prices at selected,
periods in recent years. The comparison shows that for- a majority of:wools
the price regulations inow in effect permit prices.higher'than those re. .
ceived for similar wool-s pt any time since'' 1928-29. .Foor some wools, how-:7
ever, the ceilings appear to be slightly beloy-vmaximum prices reported
during brief periods in 1937 or 1939.

The average price of wool received by, farmers in mid-December. s a. .
37.1 cents a pound, This was 5.9 cents higher than: a year earlier and.-thee'


- 3 A


WOOL-61





JANUARY 1942


highest reported since July 1928. The average prices of wool received by
farmers, 1927-41, are shown in table 4.

Farm Income from Wool in 1941
Largest Since 1918 .

Income received by farmers and ranchers from the sale of wool in
1941 is tentatively estimated at 143 million dollars, the second lareset
total-on record. It is exceeded only by the 1918 income of 147 million
dollars. The large income received for wool in 1941 resulted from a record
wool production and prices which were considerably hither than at any time
since 1928-29. It is expected that farm income from w;ool will be fully as
large in 1942 as in 1941, if not larger.

Ceiling Prices Established for Raw
Wool, Wool Tops, and Yarn

Temporary "ceiling" prices for raw wool, .wool tops, and yarn wre
established by the Office of Price Administration on :emcerber 18, at the
highest prices -which prevailed between October'1 and December 6, 1C41.
Detailed schedules covering the various grades ard types were not issued
with the December order. The Office of Price Administration states that
after completion of studies now being made revised schedules covering wool
and wool products will be issued. With every likelihood of an increase in
wool requirements of the armed forces of the United States and vith war in
the Pacific threatening curtailment of imports, ceiling prices were con-
sidered necessary to protect against excessive increases in the cost of
clothing, blankets, and other articles essential to health and well being.

The order provides for monthly reports- of affirmation of compliance
to be submitted to the Office of Price Administration and recliras that
records and reports on all sales of wool or. ,ool tops or yarns made after
December 17, 194.1 shall be kept for inspection by the Office of Frice
Administration for a period of not less than one year.

The order establishing the basis for ceiling prices follows:

Maximum prices for wool and wool tops and yarns. (a) Or and atrier
December 18, 1941, no person shall sell, offer to sell, deliver or transfer
wool or wool tops or yarns at prices higher than the maximum prices estab-
lished herein; except that contracts entered into prior to December 18,
1941, calling for a price higher than the maximum prices may be carried out
at the contract price.

(b) (1) The maximum price shall be the highest price contracted
for or received by the seller for the sale or delivery during the _.riod
between October 1, 1941 and December 6, 1941, inclusive, of wool or 0:ool
tops or yarns of the same class, kind, type, condition and grade, to a
purchaser of the same general class.

(2) If during said period, no such sale or delivery ias nade,
the maximum price shall be the price contracted or received by t he seller
for the last sale or delivery made prior to October 1, 1941, of wool or
wool tops or yarns of the same class, kind, ti,-e, condition and -rade, to


, 4 -








a purchaser of the same general class, -except that in the case of a sale of
wool by-or for the account of an individual grower the maximum price shall
be the highest market price in the sane market during said period of wool
of the same class, kind, condition and grade to purchasers of the same
general class.

(3) In all other cases, the maxiram price shall be the highest
market price during the said period of wool or wool tops or yarns of the
same class, kind, type, condition and grade, to purchasers of the same
general class.

(c) The maximum prices determined in accordance with paragraph (b)
above shall be the maximum prices for all transactions except for grease
wool and wool tops futures contracts traded on the Wool Associates of the
New York Cotton Exchange, Inc. For such contracts, the maximum prices shall
be the highest prices for December deliveries on said Exchange during the
period between October 1, 1941, and December 6, 1941: Provided, That
contracts entered into on said Exchange prior to December 18, 1941, call-
ing for a price higher than the maximum prices may be carried out, at the
contract price. Such maximum..prices are as follows:

Wool Top Futures 127.8 Cents
Grease Wool Futures 95.5 1/

(d) Sales at retail are excepted from the operation of this Schedule.

Less than maximum prices. Lower prices than the maximum prices estab-
lished by this Schedule may be charged, demanded, paid, or offered.

Near Record Mill Consumption
maintained in November

Mill consumption of apparel wool in November was slightly smaller
than the record consumption in September and October but was larger than in
any previous month. The decline in consumption in Eovember probably was
due to seasonal factors. Consumption in November averaged 10.5 million
pounds a week, scoured basis, compared with the record average of 10.7
million pounds in September and October, and 8.5 million pounds in November
1940. Consumption on a scoured basis in the first. 11 months of 1941 was
70 percent larger than in the same months of 1940. Consumption of apparel
wool greasy shorn and pulled totaled 891 million pounds from January through
November 1941 co.-i.ared with 570 million pounds in the same months last year.

Consumption of carpet wool declined in November but consumption for
the month was 6 percent larger than in November 1940. Consumption of carpet
wool from January through November 1941 was 38 percent larger than in the
same months last year.

Import Data no Longer Available

Publication of statistics of wool receipts at principal ports and of
import and export statistics has been suspended, probably for the duration
of the war.
1 The ceiling on grease wool futures was raised to 95.8 on December 26.


WOOL-61


- 5 -





JANUARY 1942


Wool Conservation Program Calls for
Curtailrenft of C'liar Connumnption in 1942

Because of the large requirements for wool goods for the armed forces
and the necessity-of i'mortinS large quantities of wool under difficult ship-
ping conditions, a wool conservation program has been instituted by the
Office of Production Yanagement. Use of nev wool in the manufacture of ma-
terials during the first quarter of 1942 will be restricted to 80 percent of
the rate which prevailed during the first half of 1941. .As military re-
quirements will be met in full, the restriction will bear heavily on civilian
requirements.

The program for the first 3 months of 1942 provides for use of raw
wool for civilian manufacturers as follows:

1. Manufacturers 6f worsteds will be cut to 50 percent of their
1941 use of wo6l for a similar period.

2. Manufacturers of woolens will be cut to 40 percent.

3. Manufacturers of floor covering will be limited to 50 percent of
the carpet wool they used during the same period of 1941.

4, All other manufacturing systems using wool will be cut to 40
percent.

The program is designed primarily to conserve wool and to spread work
among the entire industry, according to a statement of R. R. Guthrie, Chief
of the textiles branch, Office of Producti'on Management,

Total Consumption in 1942 Will be Large
Despite Restricted Use for Civilians

The wool consumption outlook for 1942 has been altered by the con-
servation program detailed above. Early indications were for a continuation
of the 1941 rate of consumption through the first half of 1942 at least.
The order issued early in January is expected to restrict consumption for
the first quarter of 1942 to not more than 80 percent of the rate which
prevailed during the first half of 1941. Even if consumption in the first
quarter of 1942 is reduced as indicated, the rate of consumption may be
about one-third higher than the average rate of consumption in the 5 years
1935-39. The rate of consumption of apparel and carpet wool in the first
6 months of 1941 was about 65 percent higher than the 5-year average.

In the first half of 1941 mill consumption of apparel and carpet wool
totaled 313 million pounds, scoured basis. The weekly average rate of con-
sumption was 12.04 million pounds, scoured basis; consumption of apparel
wool averaged 9.45 million pounds and consumption of carpet wool 2.59
million pounds a week. A rate of consumption equivalent to 80 percent of
the 1941 rate would indicate a weekly average of about 9.63 million pounds
of apparel and carpet wool combined. If consumption of carpet wool is
limited to 50 percer.t of the 1941 consumption or about 1.29 million pounds
a week, a rate of 8.34 million pounds would be possible for apparel wool


- 6 -






WOOL-61 7 -

consumption in the first quarter of 1942 under present restrictions. The
rate of consumption actually maintained in 1942 will depend largely on
military requirements. Wool required for military use will, of course, be
supplied in full. The restrictions will apply entirely to civilian uses.

Weekly average mill consumption of apparel and carpet wool, scoured
basis, 1935-41 is shown in table 1. Table 2 shows mill consumption of ap-
parel and carpet wool on a grease basis, by years, 1935-40, and by quar-
ters, 194'1. Latest data on 1941 consumption (January-Fovember) are shown
in table 3.




JAITJARY 1942


in OJ74 Mt^ CM


S- o No C\i LH 'n Wi


k' O it' M t C\ LCU
0'd CUJ f00rk0>
U to1C\7 m t\ LV 3



r- lrm LC\c
*\M 0 C00 0 Ci t T
* o d rjo O00 O



a 0 o F-.. .. CU c -

a) -o C\- c rnMn toN -
D m






Im S 0 LO mrc Cu
> NO N- CU H- N -
a -0 m ME N-t
0n ) o LC\tON nU CO
In r-l c-. r-n-d -i co
C)O I J 0' HC I -C
to 1 -- *f Lt
S* O t OcO toflO






0 %x o c c\ int o

D O J N- 2 C -,- -O







r-t CJ r'.0 -l
0i m c o c am b--o h


C0 r4 '0 0 "\ 0


0 -0 -t 0 i 0




.0 r-- rjo L\'o -4D cr\
-o ULf\0 M. C> r-

r p r< M PCT N V-E O 0t
>0 0 ON r-rMo-




r 0 P r- I H r-i ro H
* o3 O 0N UH U L O- 0


















A H
me ----V) -- c r









rC l



H) P4 H r 1
c0


t0 UNCu
to0 O0 o cu CObo
H; CU CU! H H H


to in rN-- 0 -.,-
tO iC HO 0 H-4 r
st to r-cm cm P-
O-I C\J r-4 r-l CM

CU too o0 CU -o
ltoC r> cN-8 Ki




0 r0 N-C C\-LU
CUC U:H CJUCU C
LIC cm r-- CU Uc\ 0


cm H q a cr- i o N
o LOtVO CUO cm L-"
r-4O ro-4 H W C N





0rl r.-ol i U -lC




3UD o D (TIN o-l c Ct
1- CM 0' 0 .i \ rH 'D
N 10 L \ C CV0! (\I
C\ r- r- r-EMO CM

m o iMOW r0 rN




cr o 0 -cO r iH N-





0I Nk0 -O r.00 1r'
o o---r o \Ut I--














c r C. r CU r-. C
N-tO H LCVo N-
rv-i -- U1 --- -






CH rl CJ CU H CU
0 r-'-o0 '.02D rel D



0 ---t r*f C tU\



CM Z-O cr-i c-tl N-M"
2- to CUr C -C\
SN-'o 1u .--% M10 r--

~1- 4 r4'l N-cM cu N

4' LO N-t > c.














H m r-4 r-IH H H H
02
--PLM ~-C <-\0 r
H rH^rM A N-d d
OP H MO ^C^0 T T ^0


aa
4'




,n






a


01


4 4








0 )
a
a) a)







o
a0



0 $4
*H 4






0 P
4 4

o 0
a


0
U) 4


a a0
- o

I m












W re
aD
a) o
co


r e0
0
0 0







-'-4
a -I
0*0

F4'





ok
4H



0 *H


a) H








r4.. Ci'





WOOL-61 9 -"

Table 2.- Mill c6nsmption of Apparel. and carpet wool, grease basis,
United States, annul 193q -40, by quarters 1941 1/


Dome s
Milli
pound

624
477
350
437
551


122
99
123


A : paj _l .. : Carpet : Total
..' .:. .. : all : apparel and
tic Foreign Total : foreign carpet
.on Million. Million Millibn Million
Ls pounds pounds pounds. i, pounds

35 659 .141.. goo
99 576 151 727
142 492 150 642
3. 475 : 93 ... 56
79 630 .149 779


155

102
138
123


641 1.37.

224 47
237 51
.246 : 47


Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census. 'The data for all years are
compiled from preliminary monthly reports. Final reports.Qor the years 1935-37
were somewhat larger than preliminary.figures. Eevised.data are not available
on above basis. ...


I/ Total of greasy shorn and greasy pulled.
is not converted to a shorn basis.


In these estimates pulled wool


' Period :.
."


1935'
1936
1937
1938
1939

1940
1941
1st qua
2nd qua
3rd qua


"-- '
: ,

I
: *
*. :


*rter .
*rter
rter
.rter


_, .


"""'"
.;-.. .





JAUTARY 1942


Table 3.- Mill consumption and machinery activity, United States,
selected periods, 1939-41


Y ear : Jan.-No v.
Item : 1939 : :1940 : 1940 : 194:
: 1,000 1,O00 1,000 .1,000
Mill consumption: j : pounds pounds pounds pounds
Grease basis- 2/
Apparel ...............:630,150 640,871 569,935 890,747
Carpet .................:14,513 137,494 124,138 175,635
Scoured basis&
Aggregate-
Apparel .............. :293,083 310,021 276,009 470,805
Carpet ............... :103,421 97,852 88,496 121,864
Weekly average-
Apparel ...............: 5,636 5,962 5,750 9,808
Carpet ...............: 1,989 1,882 1,844 2,539


Nov.
1940
1,000
pounds

71,610
12,958


33,821
8,969


Oct.
S1941
1,000
pounds

102,685
17,676


53,718
12,257


Nov.
1941
1,000
pounds

81,244
13,545


41,982
9, 84


8,45 10,744 10,495
2,242 2,451 2,371


Weekly average in hours


Machinery activity: I/
Hours operated per :
machine in place-
Worsted combs .........
Worsted spindles ...... :
Woolen spindles .......:
Woolen and worsted
looms-
Broad ................
Narrow ...............:
Carpet and rug looms-
Broad ................:
Narrow ...............:


51.8
39.6
39.8


40.7
13.2


55.1
37.7
43.2


53.5
36.5
42.2


39.0 37.8
13.6 13.5


86.0
60.2
63.4


60.5
27.4


37.4 37.9 37.5 50.9
22.7 21.9 21.6 30.9


Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census. Data on
available.


imports no longer


e/ Figures for November based on 4 weeks, October on 5 weeks, January-November on
8 weeks. No adjustments made for holidays*
2/ Total of shorn and pulled wool. Pulled wool, grease basis, is in condition
received from pulleries and is mostly washed.


71.9
50.2
53.6


50.8
15.4

42.8
25.1


92.2
65.1
68.6


63.5
32.8

54.3
31.7


87.2
62.6
66.2


63.7
36.5

51.6
29.3


*. 10 -





.WOOL-61


Table 4.- Wool, shorn: Averng' price per pound received by farmers,
United States, 1927-41


Yer Jan.' Feb. Mar.: Apr.:
r 15 : 15 15 : 15 :
.


:Cents


30.9
33.2
35.9

27.4
17.4
12.5
8.9
24.6
18.8
24.1
31.3
21.6
20.0

28.1
31.3


Cents Cents Cents


31.1
34.4
35.9

25.9
16.4
13.0
8.8
25.4
18.2
25.6
31.6
20.3
20.2

27.8
32.1


31.3
35.4
35.5

23.7
15.9
12.5
8.9
26.9
17.4
26.5
31.7
19.2
20.0


30.4
35.6
33.8

21.4
15.6
11.0
10.1
26.2
16.2
26.2
33.2
1s.5
19.7


1927
1928
1929

1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939

1940
1941


May .June
15 : 15


July
. 15


Aug.
15


Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


30.1
37.0
31.3

19.6
14.4
8.8
17.7
23.4
16.1
25.8
32.7
Ig.8
21.0

27.6
36b.1


30.2
38.7
30.2

19.2
13.0
7.2
.21.3
21.9
19.8
27.8
31.4.
18.0-
21.9


30.7
37.6
29.4

19.2
12.7
7.0
22.4
-21.4
: .20.5
27.5
.31.3
19.0
21.8'


31.2
37.0
29.2

19.8
13.1
7.4
22.5
20.4
20-.0
27.2
31.4
19.8
22.0


28.6 27.9 27.3
36.5. 36.3. 35.7


31.2
36.5
29.0

20.2
13.2
9.1
23.0
19.5
20.9
26.5
30.8
19.1
24.3

28.0
36.3


Oct. Nov.: Dec.'eIht
. ." ed
S15 : 15 15: .
Cents Cents Cents Cents


30.9
36.0
28.6

19.6
12.5
9.5
23.6
19.3
21.3
26.4
29.2
20.1
2S.7

29.9
36.3


31.1
35.9
28.5

19.0
13.1
9.4
23.8
19.2
22.6
27.2
26.0
20.7
27.6


32.0
35.6
27.8

18.4
12.9
9.2
24.2
18.5
23.3
30.1
23.6
20.3
27.5


30.3
36.2
30.2

19.5
13.6
8.6
20.6
21.9
19.2
26.9
32.0
19.1
22.3


31.5 31.2
36.7 37.1


Compiled frr-m reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service.


27.3 26.1
33.4 34.7


--


- 11 -


(






JANUARY 1942


- 12 -


Table 5.- Prices of domp[tic wool at Boston,
specified periods, 192S-41


: : : 1939_ 1-0 1941
:1928-29: 1937:Sept.2: : -ow : Hi( h :ec. 1q
: high : high: (pre-:High (A..- :(cv.-: 1
wjr) 1/ 4y)_: :e p : -____


Boston market: Cents
Territory scoured basis-
Fine i c.-oing (staple) 64s, 70s, :
SOs ....................... .. 120.5
Fine French combing 64s, 70s,80s:. 112.5
Fine clothing 64s, 70s, SOs ....: 107.5
1/2 blood combing (staple)58s,60s 113.5
1/2 blood French combing 5Ss,60s: 1C0-.5
1/2 blood clothing 58s, 60s ....: 102.5
3/g blood combing 56s ..........: 107.5
3/S blood clothing 56s ........: 100.5
1/4 blood combing 48s, 50s ......:/100.5
Low 1/4 blood 46s ..............: 89.5
Common and braid 36s, 44s......: 77.5

Bright fleece (Ohio and similar)
Scoured basis-
Fine combing (delaine) 64s, 70s,:
O0s .......................... : 120.5
Fine clo'hi-n 64s, 70s, SOs ....: 102.5
1/2 blood combing 58s, 60s .....:-/109.0
3/g blood combing 56s ..........io05.5
1/4 blood combing 4gs, 50s .....:L/ 95.5
Low 1/4 blood 46s .............. : 4.5
Common and braid 36s, 44s ......: 72.5


Grease basis-
Fine combing (delaine) 64s, 70s,:
80s .......................... :
Fine clothing 64s, 70s, SOs ....:
1/2 blood combing 58s, 60s ..... :1
3/8 blood combing 56s .......... :31
1/4 blood combing 48s, 50s ..... .
Low 1/4 blood 46s ............. :
Common and braid 36s, 44s ...... :


49.5
39.0
52.0
57.0
55.5
48.5
44.0


Cents Cents Cents Cents C'.ntq Cents


114.0
109.5
101.5
112.0
105.0
98.5
100.5
91.5
91.0
g4.o
9!i .0
74.0




113.5
101.0
110.0
99.5
91.0
s4.o
74.0



47.0
41.0
49.0
53.0
53.0
47.0
43.0


74,0
69.o


65.0
61.0
61.o
57.0
59.0
56.0
54.0




74.0
68.0
67.0
61.o
58.5
56.0
54.0



29.5
25.0
30.0
32.5
33.0
32.5
31.5


112,5
10o.5
97,.5
97.. 5
107o.5
-100.5
97.5
96.5
88.5
90.5
87.5
81.5




111.0
103.5
101.5
94.0
89.0
85.0
80.5



44.0
38.5
44.0
50.0
50.0
49.0
47.0


83.5
75 0
76.5
83 .5

75.0
7-.0
69.0

71.0
69.0




86.0
76.5
F0.0
69.0
64.0
61.5
59.0o



33.5

,4.5
36.0
35.0
34.0


103.5
10 C4.5

104.0
99.5
92.5
S8.5
8o .0
83.5
79.5
76.0




112:.5
99.5
100.5
86.5
81.5
73.5
7' .0



^.5


46.5
47.0
44.5
42.5


116.0
111.5
102.5
109.0
107.0
101.5
97.0
93.0
91.5
86.5
85.0




115.0
102.5
105.5
97.0
91.5
s6.0
85.0



45.5
37.5
47.0
51.5
51.5
50.0
50.0


Prices are r.verrages of weekly range quotations.


Agricultural


M-.rketing Service data.


1/ Prices reported in September or October shortly after outbreak o-f war in Europe.
These prices were not maintained for more than a week or two on most wools.
2/ Prices on December 19 were at highest point of year.
j Strictly combing. Not quoted in later periods.


Item


-----~~------------





- 13 -


Table o.- Prices of wool per pound in specified markets, and prices of


textile raw materialT in the United States, selected periods,


1939-41


--7
Item
United St-res:
Boston market-
Territrjr', -co,.ired bazis--
G64 70s, .30s (fine)
staple .................
56s (3/ blo.-o'.d combinrJ .
46s (low. 1/1; blco.d) .....:
Brig.ht fl-ece, rasy-:,,-
64s, 70js, So (fine)
delaine ................
56b (7/$ blod) combing .
46s (lo\r 1/4 bl,-d) ..... 0
FcrPign wnol in bbond
at Boston 2/
Sydney scoured ba-i :
64s, r70 combine, ......
Cape scz.ured bsi ~
12 month", combing .....
Mornte','i Li, -"e-an
b- sis-
Meri r.o ('--6L ? ) .......
Is (1 56 ) ............... :
Prices rec:eiv, ,c b;. f-rmn rs, :
grease ba-is, 15th of
month ....................


Average


: 1940


1939 1940 :1941 1/: Dec.
Cents Cents Cents Cents


82.7
69.3
62.6


32.9
36.2
35.5



58.6

53.7


26.1
28.3


96.3
79.7
76.1


38.0
41.2
41.0



67.9


108.8
91.2
82.3


43.1
46.8
46.5


108.5
86.s
79.5


45.5
45.2
44.5


: Oct.
Cents



109.5
95.0
85.2


43.0
49.5
50.0


1941
: Nov.
Cents



112.5
96.2
86.5


44.2
50.2
50.0


: Dec.
Cents



115.5
96.8
86.5


45.3
51.2
50.0


72.7 70.5 70.5 70.5 74.2


62.9 70.9 65.2 68.7 69.0 72.0


31.2 40.4 33.5 41.5 41.5 43.4
32.4 38.6 33.5 39.5 39.5 45.5


22.3 1/28.4 1/35.2


31.2 36.3 36.7 37.1


Textile fibers:
Wool, territory fin-
Staple 4.' .... ...... ...
Cotton, 15/'11c' Middling 5/.:
Silk, Japanese 6/ .........
Rayon yarn, 150 denier / .:
Rayon staple fiber 8/
Viscose 1-1/2 denier .....
Acetate 5 denier .........:


82.7
9.30
272.3
51.6

25.0
46.0


96.3
10.17
278.6
53.0


108.8
13.92

53.6


108.5
9.86
256.2
53.0


109.5
16.49

55.0


112.5
16.38

55.0


115.5
17.26

55.0


25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0
43.0 43.0 43.0 43.0 43.0 43.0


Compiled from report- of the Agricultural Marketing Service except as
noted.
1/ Preliminary.
/Before pay3ent cf duty. Compiled from the Boston Commercial BullE
~ Un.-'-eiihtd average.
/ Scour-ed bacis, Boston market.
/ Average at 10 markets.
/White, 13-15 denier, at New York, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Nol
Jil y 1941.
7/ jomectic yarn, fir:t quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
/ F.-,h. pr,'Ai-ring pl.:.Lnts, Bureau of Labor Statistics.


otherwise


etin.



; quoted after


WCOL-61




UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


3 1262 08861 5991