The wool situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00040

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation

Full Text






THE


SITUATION


IOOL-60


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

R q- DECEMBER 194.


WOOL. TERRITORY. SCOURED BASIS: AVERAGE
PRICES AT BOSTON. 1924-41


CENTS
PER
POUND


U S DEPARTMENT OF AGrICULTuRE


NEG 19684 SBuEau OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


AFTER FLUCTUATING WITHIN A NARROW RANGE FROM NOVEMBER 1940 THROUGH
AUGUST 1941 PRICES OF ALL GRADES OF DOMESTIC WOOL AT BOSTON TURNED UPWARD
IN SEPTEMBER AND PRICES CONTINUED TO ADVANCE IN OCTOBER AND NOVEMBER.
STRENGTHENING FACTORS IN THE LAST FEW MONTHS HAVE BEEN THE AWARD OF LARGE
ARMY ORDERS FOR WOOL MATERIALS, A RECORD MILL CONSUMPTION, AND A SEASONAL
DECREASE IN WOOL SUPPLIES IN THE UNITED STATES. PRICES OF DOMESTIC WOOLS
IN NOVEMBER WERE CLOSE TO THE HIGHEST LEVELS IN MORE THAN A DECADE.


n/ 5(, y 1(1 -









WOOL PRODUCTION IN PRINCIPAL SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE
EXPORTING COUNTRIES. 1930-41
S( GREASEE BASIS I
POUNDS
S'ILLICNS I MEDIUM AND COARSE WOOL PREDOMINATES -


800



600



400



200


0
1.600


1.400



1.200



1.000



800



600



400



200


1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941
*YEAR bEGAO ,Ih C OC rOdis tA BEc i C. .'d V
D47A fil aVr0 AND r1IIARE PEELIM&ARh
U.S. m DEA NR I 0 > 1 .cufu I .: .. : .** -- .. -.... m .ntoNiC
FIGURE I.- PRODUCTION OF WOOL IN FIVE PRINCIPAL SOUTHERN
HEMISPHERE PRODUCING COUNTRIES IN 1941-42 IS ESTIMATED TO BE
THE SECOND LARGEST ON RECORD. MOST OF THE APPAREL WOOL ENTER-
ING INTERNATIONAL TRADE IS PRODUCED IN THESE COUNTRIES. PRIOR
TO THE WAR LARGE QUANTITIES OF WOOL WERE SHIPPED FROM THESE
COUNTRIES TO CONTINENTAL EUROPE AND JAPAN, BUT AS A RESULT OF
THE PURCHASE OF THE "CLIPS" OF AUSTRALIA, SOUTH AFRICA, AND
NEW ZEALAND BY THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT, AND THE BRITISH BLOCK-
ADE OF THE EUROPEAN CONTINENT, EXPORTS ARE NOW LIMITED LARGELY
TO THE UNITED KINGDOM AND THE UNITED STATES.





WOOL-60


- 3 -


THE WO O L SITUATI O


Siunmary

Prices of domestic wcol P.t Boton in :Tovember advanced for the third

consecutive month. Strengthening factors in 'he last few months have been

the award of lrgex Army criers fcr wool m.teriFil, a record mill consumption,

and a seasonal decrease in uonl supplies in the United Stite;. Prior to

the current increase, prices at Bostcn hpd fluce t.it.d withinn narrow limits

since the latter part of 1940. On December g it ws announced by the Office

of Price Administration that ceiling price-r '.rili be established for raw wool

at approximately the lev-el that prevPiled dlu-iri tihe week ended december 6.

Formal schedules 'rill be ir-.redas oon .s th- nece-ss-ry details can be worked

out.

Mill cons,-Lmution of apparel '.rcl in Octob,-r established a new record

rate of 10,744,00'l) pounrd.s a_ wec-k, scO'ur-d basic. ITew "?i.ghE" in conuunption

of apprrel wool have been establi-hed by mills in S of the last 12 months.

Consumption on a greasy shorn and pulled b:k-is in th-e l. t few months has

been at the rate of more thar.n a billion pounds a e;'r. In vi:.w of the large

backlog of unfilled orders held by mills, it is likely that the current rate

of consumption will be mr-inta.ined through the first half of 1942. Unfilled

orders for wool cloth for civilian and Gov-'rment uie held by 119 reporting

mills at the end of September, plus Army orders scheduled for .wrrd in the

final au-rter of 1941,were eouivclent to about 6 months of activity at the

September rate of production in reporting mills.

Supplies of oppprol wool on hand on a greasy shorn and pulled. basis in

the United Strtes on lUovember 1, excluding wools impcrt:-d for Government"stock-

pile", probably w re about 150 million rounds larger th:. a yorr earlier when






DECEi, ER 1941 4 -

supplies were relatively small. As no considerable aurntities of domestic

wool from the 1942 clip will be available for mill use before June or July,

large quantities of wool probably will be imported from the 1941-42 clips

of the Southern Hemiispher? which are now available. Imports of apprrel

wool for consumption in the first 9 months of 1941 totaled 4q1 million pounds

,-mcrp:'.:ed with 133 million pounds in the corr.=".ronding months last y-ar. The

greatest increase in imports was in fine wools.

"'ool production in 1941-42 in 12 principal Southern Hemisphere pro-

ducing countries is now estimated at 2,350 million pounds. This is slightly

larger than last year's production and is second only to the record 1939-40

production of 2,361 million pounds. Most of the. aprrrel wool entering in-

ternational trade is produced in these countries. Prior to the wrr more than

half of the exports were shiprcd to continental European countries and Japan,

but as a result of the purchase of the clips of Au=tralin, South Africa, and

New Zealand by the British Government and the British blockade of the European

Continent, exports are now limited largely to the United Kingdom and the

United States. It is expected thrt Irrge quantities of wool will be avail-

able to United States buyers in South America, Australia, and South Africa.

Shipments from Australia, however, will depend upon the shipping situation

in the Pacific.

-- December 11, 1941

PRVIEW ..'F RI-C1T PDEVELIP-TTS

Wool Pric-s Up at Boston in Nov:r'ibr

A large quantity of domestic fine and 1/2 blood wool wrs sold in the
Boston wool market in rlovember and prices on thcse grades advanced 2 to 3
bonte.a pond, scoured brasis, above lnte October nuotations according to re-
ports of the Agricultural Marketing Service. Mo-t of the trading took place
in the 2 weeks following NIovember 10 .uring *-hich rw-.rds were made on serge
and shirting flannel for Army use. Very little wool was sold in the last
week of November but quotations were firmly raint:-ined. Medium and coarse
grades of wool did not share in the increased demand during November.




WOOL-60


Quoted prices of fine combing (.staple) territory wools averaged
$1.135 a pound, scoured basis, in the l-itt r p-rt of November comp-'red vith
$1.11 a month earlier and $1.035 a year earlier. Quoted prices of 5/S blood
combing territory wool averaged 96.5 cents a pound, scoured basis, in late
November, the same as a month earlier. In the last week of November 1o40
similar wools averaged 38.5 cents a pound. The average price of wool received
by farmers in mid-November was 36.7 cents a pound. This was 5.2 cents higher
than a year earlier and wrts the highest reported since August 15, 1928.

Army Awards Serze and Shirting Contracts,
Invites Bids on "foolen M .teri.-ls

Aw-rds were announced b.- the Arr;.y Qurrtc-rmazter in November covering
18.6 million yards of IP-ounce ser-e and I?.h million yr:rds of shirting
flannel. Bids on these items were received up to ITovember 4 but awards were
made in part through negotiation. Th invitaticns. secifid that delivery
be completed within 235 days (9-1/2 months) of d':e of aw-rd. This rill
carry delivery sch,?dules through Auu--s:t 1942. On the b'-is of reported awards,
about 2.8 million ;-rrds will be .made of rll dx m"tic wool, 4.5 million yards
of all foreign w-ool, and 2-.7 million y--rls .rill be a 50-50 combination of
domestic and foreign wools.

Early in Lecember the Arr.y 1rquest.ed off:r on 12.8 million ,yards
of woolen cloth. The re.uir-ements include :3.5 million .:rrds of T2-ounce
Melton overcovting, 3.5 million y'-rds of 12-cunce lining cloth, and cmnll
quantities of miscellaneous suitin s, f.lt, r-nd cc''ert cloth. Offers will be
.accented up to D;cenber 17. Delivery of overcoc ting is to be corple-ted '..'ith-
in 240 da.ys of awn.d rind lining cloth within: 210 dr,?. Thus deliveries will
run throut-h .ugust 1942, the sie period si:'ecified on Novelmber c:v rds for
serge -nd shirting.

Mill Consuprtion Establi shes IT.:-_ Record
in October

Mill consunmption of apparel wool 1.ver g:-d 10,7L4,000 pounds .n aek,
scoured basis, in October conprred with the previous record of 10,714,00C
pounds in Septe:ber and 7,1r'4S,0O' nDouncs in October 1940. New hi-hs in con-
suTmption of apparel wool have been -et:.blished by mills in S of the l--st 12
months. Consumption on a scour-d basis in the fir-t 10 months of 1941 wrs
77 percent larger than in the s:me no.:ths 1 st y:ea-r nd exceeded consul.mtion
in the entire 12 months of any previous y-r. Coiuzmntion of ppar'el wool,
greasy shorn .nd pulled, totr-led 210 million pound- from Janujry through
October 1941 cormpo'rpd with h49 million pounds in the szoie months lrst ynar.

M'ill consunntion of c- rn-t wool declined in October but consunrtion
for the month was the largest in r.-ce.-t :.'.rs.. Cnsuiiption of carpet wool
from Jrmu-.ry through October of this ;,''r w- 41 percent lrLrger th;n in the
sane months list : ear.

Unfilled Orders Sho" Furthe-r Increase
in Third Qur-rtcr

Unfilled orders for woven cloth re-orted by 119 .ills on Septenber 27
totaled 95.5 million liner .yards according to -tctisticp reported by the






DECEMBER 1941


National Association of Wool Manufacturers. The September total was 1.6
million yards larger than orders reported at the end rf June and was a new
high for reporting mills. At the end of Sept3mber last year unfilled orders
totaled 45.9 million yards. Orders for civilian cloth reported on September
27 were slightly smaller than rn June 28 but the decline was more than offset
by the increase in orders for Gcvernment account. Unfilled orders for Govern-
ment agencies on September 27 totaled 29 million yards, chiefly Army materials.
This total was increased sharply in October and November when awards were
mr-de on about 140 million yards of wool cloth for Army use. The accompanying
table shovs unfilled orders reported by 119 mills at the beginning of each
quarter 1939-41.

Unfilled orders for woven cloth reported bl 119 mills, beginning
of each quarter, 1939-41 1/

~: M~~ ear : W'omen's ut
Quarter Mei ear. ns Auto total
beginning :Government. Other Total wear .cloths 2
: 1,000 1,0000 1,00 1,1 : 1,000 1,000
:linear linear linear linear linear linear
: yards yards yards yards yards yards
1939
Jan. 844 24,456 25,300 8,051 1,782 36,033
Apr. 565 22,905 2- ,470 5,252 P34 29,556
July 661 19,913 20,574 11,526 1,24 33,924
Oct. : 65 31,,?7 32,522 9,260 3,244 15,026
1940o
Jan. : 1,376 723,13 24, 14 9, ?4 2,005 36,023
Apr. 748 21,297 ?2,~5 4, 29 1,136 27,610
July : 9,436 17,566 27,0''0 1,93 3,064 42,997
Oct. : 12,8:06 19,200 32,006 10,919 2,927 45,852
1941
J-A. : 28,457 25,799 54,256 11,h03 2,494 68,153
Apr. 20,148 40,256 60,404 12,170 2,675 75,249
July : 23,018 49,315 72, 33 1,961 5,605 96,899
Oct. I/ : 29,010 4s,546 77,556 17,05 3,097 98,.58

Cormiled from Monthly Statistica of Wool Manufacture, published by the
National Assoic-tion of Wool Manufacturers. Statistics are for cloth con-
taining by weight ov=r 25 percent of y.rns spun on the woolen and worsted
system. Cloth leo's t V-n 50 inches wide re-nrter' in enuivalent 54-inch yard-
age. The 119 renortin. m nill- -re euip-,r-d with 26,000 Looms.

_/ Re-orts are for specified dates, n,- r the beginning of each quarter.
2 Excludes cloth with pile or .acqu..rd&. deig1n.
2/ Sept. 27.

Imports Continue Much L-.rgcr Than
in An:, R-cent Year

Imports of apparel wnol for consumption in September tot:aed 46.4
million pounds compared with 44.7 million pounds in August and 15.2 million
pounds in September 1940. In the first 9 months of 1941 imports for consumptl


- 6 -









totaled 491 million ocunds compared with 1 3 million pounds in the correspond-
ing months .of 1940 and a 5-year (1935-35) average for those months of 64
million pounds. All grades of wool sha.red. in the increase in imports in the
first 9 months of this year but the greatest increase has been in fin- wools.
About three fourths of the apparel wool imported for ccncumntion from January
through September was wool grp.ding finer than 56s. The proportion of fine
wools in total imports is the largest in rec-nt years. Imports by grade
groups are shovm in the accompanyin, table.

General imports of apparel wool (entries for immediate consunoD'ion
and into bonded warehouses) totaled G'44 million pounds in the first 9 months
of 1941. This total includes 93 million pouGr's of Australian wool imported
for British account rnd held r.s a reserve "s'toc!1pile" in this country. Im-
ports for consumption d not include wool fi.r British account. Receipts of
foreign app rel wool at three portsBotoii, lew York., :nd Philadelphia ,in
October were the sm-ll!st for any monthiC}: -ince the e;rly port of the y'ar.
Receipts of foreign wool increased slightly in i'over:mer.

Imports of c-rpet wool for consumr-jtion in the firct 9 months of ghL1'
amounted to 171 million polunds compr.'ed wit!- I01 million pound.- in t.e same
months last year.

Imports of aponrel wool for con-'uiption b.y grado groups, United St.'.tes,
annual 1936--40, Jrj-u.: :y-Sept.-mber 1'3 0-41


: hot finer : : Finer
Period :thnn 4s i: 44s ; 6s-5b : thn ~s : Total
:Million Million Million Millicn Million
: pou-Lnds pounds pounds pcu,,s pounds

1936 : 6.0 10.1 Cs.o 36.6 110.7
1937 : 23.6 10.4 31.7 S4.5 150.2
1938 : 12.4 2.6 ';.7 9.1 3D.8
199 : 23.6 7.0 19.- 143 9S.2
1940 : 3.8 6.3 44.2 1 3.6 22 .0


Jan.-Sept.
1940
1941


15.8
38.2


4.6
9.9


27.0
81.7
2 1. .
8l.'j


85.5
361.6


1,2.9
491.4


Comniled from reports of the Bureau of F:.rei:;n r-nid Eon-atiz Cnmr.:erce.

1/ Includes fr e nnd dutia.ble wcols.

South Tnmerica Sales

Prices of new clip wools w.ere report d tfronrg in Cctc'tr as the 1, 41-42
season opened in Argentinn and Ur-.iuuay. Lc.rl (Argentin-) mills ver-r the
chief bu.;,rs in the Euenop Airs market and .nnll sal-es %7ere made to Sweden,
the 1letherlands, and Japan. Am:-ric-.n T.urchnses were small in October. Prices
declined somewhat in icvsnber a.nd demand from United t atces buyers increased
for fine crossbred wools.


WOOL-60


- 7 -





DECEMBER 1941 8 -

Exports from Argentina and. Udigury in October totaled 10.3 million
Founds corp.-:red '-ith 27 million pounds exported in October 1940. Exports to
the United States in October q14l amirnted to 7.4 million pounds.

CUTL DUK

BACK'iPOU'YD.- Stimulated by large Gov'ernment orders Znd increased
incomes cf consumers, mill co:..srpti-on of apparel -.ool in the
Uni-.= St-tes in 1941 has rdvance-d to the [highest level on record
for the industry. Consumartion in the first 10 months of 1941
was 77 percent larger than in the same months last .year. The
record consumption has been accrrnpanied by a marked increase in
wool pric-s. Prices of domestic wools at joston in November were
close to the hignest levels in more than a decade.

The large cons-uption resulted in rapid depletion of
stocks of raw wool in the United Stntes and imports have been
at record levels in 1941.

Mill Consumntion x-pected to Continue
at Record Level

On September 27 mills reporting to the National Association of Wool
Manufacturers held unfilled orders for '-'ool cloth totaling 93 million linear
yards. Such orders, together with Arry orders scheduled for award in the
final 'u-r-t-r cf 1941, were e'iuival nt to o months of activity- at the Sep-
tenber rate of production in reporting mil s. Evcn if nrwr orders for civilian
cloths are relatively s:.iall, mill ccnsumrnption is likely to be maintained at
present levels through the first half of 14'42. Since Jul:,, monthly consumption
of ap-arel wool h'is averaged about .S million pounds, gre:nay shorn .nd pulled,
which is equival-nt to more th:.n a billion pounds a year.

Import R.quirenents Large

On the br.sis of reported c'rry-over ( toc!:-) on April 1 -nnd irrmorts
and mill consumption from -pril through Oc'tob.-r, thM calc ilated -upply of
foreign and domestic apparel w.ol, gre.rsy shorn :.ni pull.-di b5Fii, in the
United States on :ovember 1, excluding r-.ustralian -crols inmorted for Govern-
ment "stockpile", was ab'o-:ut 150 million pounds l..rg-r th- a y--1' earlier
when supplies were. relatively mrr-.11. ;so :cnsiderr '.e nu- .titit s of domestic
wool from the 19h? clip :ill be '.-vr il'oe 'or mill1 use b:forr June or July.
If the current monthly rE.te rf consn.rtion is to co.-tinu-s through the first
half of 194"', and if re,-rve toc.ks :re to be mnirnt.incd, large cuartities
of wool probably 'ill b,. imported fro-. the 1,41-42 clin of the Southern
Hemisphere which ;.re nou avnilr.ble.

SOTH:-RIT 1I ISPT-EE WOOL SUPPLIES FOR 1941-42

Wool Production in 1941-12 may be
Second Hirhest 'n Rccord

Production of wool in the Southern Hemisphere in the 1941-42 season
probably will be slightly Irrger than in the preceding season but will not






equal the record production of 1939-40, according to preliminary estimates.
Production in 12 Southern Hemisphere countries in the current season is
estimated at 2,350 million pounds compared with 2,338 million pounds last
year and 2,361 million pounds in 1939-40. Most of the apparel wool entering
international trade is produced in these countries.

Production in Australia in the 1941-42 season is estimated at 1,070
million pounds. This is 2.5 percent larger than last ;err's production and
is second only to the 1939-40 production of 1,128 million pounds. Production
in British South Africa and New Zealand is expected to be about the same this
season as last, and about 6 percent larger than in 1939-40.

Wool production in Argentina is estimated at 474 million pounds for
1941-42, about the same rs that of la:st season. Production in Argentine has
increased rapidly in the last few years and is now larger than at any previous
time in the current century. Preliminary estimates of wool production in
Uruguay vary widely but it is reported thrt production will be 10 to 15
million pounds smaller thrn in 1940-4l. The 1940-41 production is now esti-
mated at 130 million pounds. Production in ether South American countries is
not expected to differ much from that of last season.

Wool production in principal Southern Hemisphere countries, 1937-41 I_/


Country


S: : : 1940-41 : 1941-42
: 1937-38 ; 1938-39 : 1939-40 : 2/ : /
: Million Iillion Million Million Million
: pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds


South Americ-P
Argentina .............
Uruguay ...............
Brazil ................
Chile .................
Peru 6/ ...............
Falkland Islands ......
Other 8/ .............
Total ...............
British Dominions
Australia .............
British South Africa ..
New Zealand ...........
Total ...............
Total Southern
Hemisphere .......


366.0
116.3
39.7
: 33.0
21.0
: .6
: 6.5
: 57.1


1,023.4
233.0
290.
1,553.2

2.140.3


399.o0 3/
125.4 -
41.c0
35.0
19.0
3.6
6.5
629.5 _


983.6
242.o
127.7
1,559.3


443.0 3/ 474.0 3/ 474.0
133.9 / 130o.o 5/ 115.0
40o. 0o.o 4o.o
30.0 32.0 35.0
19.0 16.0 14.0
3.5 z/ 3.5 7/ 3.5
6.5 6.5 6.5
676.7 702.0 bsS.o

,122.1 1,044.0 ,070.0
246.2 260.0 260.0
310.0 32.0 532.0
,64.3 1,636.0 1,6.2.0


2,18..g 2,361.0 2,335.0 2,350.0


Compiled from official sources or reli-.ble commercial. sources except as
indicated.
1/ Season begins October 1 in most South American countries, July 1 in
Australia, New Zealand anid British South Africa.
2/ Preliminary.
SEstimates reported by Agricultur-1 Attache Paul 0. Tyhus.
SEstimate based on receipts .t Montevideo and stocks at country points
October 1, 1940.'
/ Estimate based on reported decrease from 1940-41.
b/ Revised estimates b-sed on recent reports of the Junta Nacional de la
Industrial Lnunr.
7' Latest.estimate carried forward.
8/ Includes Bolivia, Eciudor, and Paraguay. Rough approximations.


L


WOOL-6o


- 9 -






DECEMBER 1941


- 10 -


Supplies Available for Export

Approximately 70 percent of the wool produced in the Southern
Hemisphere is now under.control of the British Government as a result of
measures adopted to carry out war objectives. The British Government has
purchased the wool clips of Australia, New Zealand, and the Union of South
Africa for the duration of the war and one clip thereafter. Wool available
for export from these countries is sold by the British Wool Control to
approved buyers at fixed prices. The South American markets, which account
for about 30 percent of the Southern Hemisphere production, are the only
important free markets.

British Empire Supplies Relatively Large

Data on disposals and carry-over in the 1940-41 season in British
Empire countries have not been published, but in view of the near record pro-
duction and reports of above average stocks in these countries it is probable
that supplies in Australia, South Africa, and New Zealand are relatively
large. Exports from these countries cre now limited largely to the United
Kingdom and the United States. Prior to the war, more than half of the ex-
ports went to continental European countries and Japan (table, page 12).

Wool reauiremsnts of the United Kingdom at the present time are chiefly
for medium grades of wool which are used in Army materials in that country,
Civilian purchases have been drastically curtailed under war rationing pro-
visions but the effect of civilian restriction probably is offset in part by
the extensive use of uniforms in the Home Guard nnd various auxiliary organi-
zations of both men and women. Official estimates of consumption are not
available. 'Reliable commercial sources indicate that retained imports in the
first year of the war November 1939 through October 1940 were close to one
billion pounds but imports declined sharply in the 1940-41 season The
estimated imports include apparel and carpet wools from British India and
other Northern Hemisphere countries as well as imports from the Southern
Hemisphere.

It is expected that rlrge quantities of wool will be available for
United States buyers in Australia and South Africa. These countries produce
chiefly fine gr:.des of apparel wool, the grades now in greatest demand in
the United States. The shipping situation in the Pacific will be an impor-
tant factor in the exports to the United States from Australia. Russian re-
quirements also may be a factor in the 1941-42 disposals. Shipments of
Australian wools to the United States for commercial purposes were given
preference over shipments for reserve storage in the 1940-41 season.

Purchases of wool by United States buyers in Australia and South
Africa in the 1940-41 season probably totaled about 250 million pounds, and
through October 1941 an additional 126 million pounds of Australian wool were
shipped for storage in the United States under Government supervision.
Present arrangements call for additional shipments of 50 million pounds of
Australian wool for storage by the end of 1941. About 176 million pounds of
Australian wool have recently been purchased by the Defense Supplies Corpo-
ration to be held as an emergency reserve. The Defense Supplies Corporation
has also arranged for the storage of 125 million pounds of South African
wool in the United States as a part of the emergency stockpile.




WOOL-60


because of the large use of medium and coarse grades of apparel wool
in military cloth ii, the United ZinEdom very little pNew Zealand wool has
been available to foreign buyers in the last 2 years. In the 12 months
ended June 1941 only 4 million pounds of ITsw Zealand wools were included in
United States imports for consumption.

South American Wool Supplies Smaller
This Terr '-tian List

Supplies of wool available for exno.'t from Arrentina and Uruguay in
1941-42 are now estimated at about 590 million po'uiLn. his estimate is 13
percent or 90 million pc~,uds srj:11er than r :vi'iona e-i-Ates for last
season. The reduction in sul:iplies is chiefly- the resil'Z of a smaller carry-
over into the current se-son iand orcspects for increased local consumption.
About 100 million .runids of 'io':l vill 'be pr'lducd in c thi-r couth American
co'uitries in the 1-1-'i- renron ('rble, p-e ). Abcuit SO1 percent of this
wool is :stinm.ted tc. be rvAriln7ble for er-,cprt. L?.', cn c..rr;,-over are not
available for these countries.

Prior to the w"r -rbout four fifths of South Amerrican wool exports
were shinped to Europ:rn m:.rket s, in.].u-inr the United. lin:dom (see accompany-
ing table). At the rsent tiie shim-nits tc contin:-.ntr European countries
rre largely cut off by tic Bri i sh blockvd, ...nd Wool recnui regents of the
United Kingdom are beir.g filled mo:tl;.w' ith wools from E7r.;re sources. Hence
the bulk of Scuth Americiarin 'wool .1ruplis cr "'v"ri ble to United States buy-
ers. rE:port- from r,gcntina rnd Uruu.n-y in 191.0-41 tot. id 533 million pounds,
gre.as basis. United St-:tes buyers took E3 perce nt of Ith reason's exports.

The major part of the wool proiuccd in South -merics.n countries is
medium and coars-e graics but these coumtrie: riso prnoauCe considerable quanti-
tie- of fine wools. D-.tn on g~nterrl import.: of wool into three United States
ports in the 12 months ended Septerber 1941 shor, that imports from Argentina
included bout 110 million pounds of wool gr:..i:.ng finer th:-n 56s. Imports
from Uruguay in the snie period included 57 r.illior pounds grading finer than
56s. Argentine production l'so iinclur.e c. lrrgc nurntity of carpet class
.eools, probably :round 100 million po-unds.

Estimated supplies -.nd distribution of uIol in
Arg-ntinn rand U'r'uig'-, 1940-hl r.d 1941-42
Gr-'se brsis
: A-g rt.''. : Uru ay
It n
I ]0qo- 17: lIYLI 2 l9U0-h1 : 1 tI-42
141 Mil. lb. Mil. llb. i-:il il. b.

Stocl-s, Oct. 1 ..........: 121 2 27 2/ 5
Production ..............: 4: 7'. / 13~ / 115
Total -supply .......... : 55 550 120
For ioncstic nills ...... 7: 7 / 10
Available for e:qcort ....: 529 479 170 110
Exports ................ : 44S 145

Com:,iled fron official sources nnd reliable coi r ercial sources.

I/ Estimates reported by Paul 0. ITyhus, agricultural Attnchetat Buenos
Aires.
2/ Olcul ated.
S/ Provisional estimate.


- 11 -






DECEMBER 1941


*1/
As


- 12 -


Wool exports from five Southern Hemisphere countries, yearly average,
pre-war, 19q4-3 I |

: Cointry of shipment
: South American
British Emoire countries / : out es : TotalA
Country to which cos
exported 2 : Total :Arpen- Iru- : Total : five
Astra-: South : Iw : three : ta a : two coun-
lia : Africa:Zealand : coun- / : : coun- :tries
:____ __ tries : : : tries _
:Million Million Million Million Million Million Million Milliol
:no uns pounds pounds pounds pounds pouns s pounds pounds


United Kinedom ...:
United States .... :
Continental Eurc.e:
Germany ........ :
Italy ............
France ..........
Belfium .......:
Netherlands ....:
Poland .........:
Czechoslovakia
Total seven
countries .:


Japan ............: 172
Totel all
countries Q3': 27


521
43


64 7 111
16 6/ AS
50 25 1s5
21 1i 151
7/ 7/ 14
S S/ 3 19
7/ 7/ 11


4g 529


21 18 171 7


274 1,332


0o 191
53 71
55 24o
51 182
6 20.
.2 31
2 13


69 219 74

8 15 186


420 1,752


Compiled from official sources and reliable commercial sources.
1/ Includes exports of ereasy, scoured, and washed wool in actual weight but is
mostly greasy. Does not include wool exported on skins.
2/ Does not necsrarily represent final destination. Considerable quantities of
wool are reexported from the United Yingdom to continental European countries.
SYear beginning July 1.
/ ear bepinninr Oct. 1.
2 Exports from Argentina and Urueuay by countries, 19q3 and 140 were reported in
the IIov. Wool Situntion.
6/ Less than 500,000 16.
SHot separately reported.
8/Three-:,ear average.
/ Incliud. s export. to countries not listed.






oo001-60


1 -

United States: Wool imports, consumption, and machinery activity,
selected periods, 10 9-41


te 1 5 Ya'ar: Jan.-Sc't. : S t. : Aug. : Sept.
_Itm: 193 : 1940 : 1q40 : l141 : iq40 : 19ql ;1q91 1/
: 1,000 1,00'0 1,000 1,000 1, 0,(0 1,000 1,000
.Imports for consiumrtion,: poiandi opuinds po unds p. p -. pluni pounds
Actual weight: 2/
Apparcl ............... 03,194 222, 3 1Iz2,13 401, 0 15,194 44,b69 46,-89
Finer than 40s .......: 74,612 lQn,149 117,122 453,152 13,31? 40,525 41,359
Not finer than 40s 3/ : 23,552 2.,834 15,746 i3,225 1,575 4,172 4,c91
Cartict, including
camels hair 4/ .....: 144,.75 134,601 100,604 170,636 6,42 17,7 14 ,654
S Year : J-n.-Oct. : Oct. : Sept. : Oct.
: 1 l9 1q40 : laf4 : iO4l : 10,0 : 191 : 1q4l
Mill consumption: 5/


Grease basis 6/
Apparel .............. : 6 0,150
Carpet ............... : 147,513
.Scoured basis -
Agcre ate -


Cho,?71 h14n ,25
137,404 111ii,10


13",q 03 r ? lS
162,O 16,329


Apparel .............: 2q3,0 3 310,021 242,1 72
Carpet ..............: 103,421 47, 52 70,527 112,7 ,
Weekly average -
Apparel .............,: 5,63 5, 9i2 5,504 C, 7 -
Carpet ..............: l,q?9 1,3 2 1, -07 2,5ch

Weclrly. av'.cras-c


11, '4o
-'A7 ZC"


S2, r,2
14, 361


42, v56
10,11Q


102,685
17,676


53,718
12,257


7,, 13 10,714 10,744
_277 2,530 2,451
in hc-irs


Machinery activit,-: 5/ :
Hours oncrcatcd per
machine in place :
Worsted combs ........
Worsted spindle .....:
Woolen pindle ........
Woolen and worsted
looms -
Broad ...............:
Narrow ..............:
Carpet and rue looms -:
Broad ...............:
Narrow ..............


51.
3.6




17.2


22.7


55.1
47.7
7


43.0

13.6

37.
21.9


51.S

41.2

-7

1 .4


21.2


2r, q
60.0
63.2


r2.1


6:,.2 45.
26.6 16.3

50. S 45.2
31.0 25.5


?S.2
63.5
68.6


62.S
31.8

53.5
3.0.3


92.2
65.1
6bS.6


63.5
32.8

54.3
31.7


Import f'. ?.-res from the Bur'eau-c.r7 K .-ici1 iar Domestic Commerce. CornsunifTr I and
:machiner;,y a.cti-iti; from the Burea-u :.f the Census.
.1/ Oct. imports not ,yet available..
Weight of greasy, scored, and s!.'in wool added together.
SIncludes free and dutiaslle "other wool. r.-t finer than 0os" i.e. 7Cs-40s.
Includes free and dutiable Donskoi, Smn;.rna, etc. with-out M:crinc or English
blood, and all camels hair.
5/ Figures for Oct. based on 5 wee':s, Ser.t. on 4 weeks, Jan.-0ct. on 44 weeks.
No adjustments made for holidays.
6/ Total of shorn and pulled wool. hPlled wocol, creese basis, is in condition
receired from pulleries and is mostly washed.
.. :




UNIVERSiTy OF FLORIDA
-CEVJ3ER 19i1 14 -
3 1262 08861 5702
Prices of wool per pound in specified markets, and prices of textile
raw materials in the United States, selected periods, 1939-41

e: Average : High : Nov. 1941
I 1Q39 : 9 U0 :1939 1/: 194o : Sept. : Oct. : Nov:.
United Stat-s: : Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents -CentC


Boston market-
Territory, scoured brsi- :
64s, 70s, SOs (fine)
staple .................
56s (3/8 blood) combing
46s (low 1/4 blood) .....:
Bright fleece, crea y'-
64s, 70s, SOs (fine)
delaine ................
56- (3/8 llood) combing
46s ('low 1/4 blood) .....:
Forciri wool in bond
at Boston 2/'
Sydney scoured basis
64s, 70s, ccmbing ......
Cape scoured basis
12 months, coming .....
Montevideo greasee
tasiz
Merinos (60-64n) .......
Is (56s) ...............
Prices received by farmers,
grease basis, 15th of
month ..................... :

Textile fibers:
Wool, territory fine
staple 4 ...............
Cotton, 15/16" Middling 5/
Silk, Japanese / .........
Rayon yarn, 150 denier j .:
Rayon staple fiber S/
Viscose 1-1/2 denier .....
Acetate 5 denier .........:


S2.7
69.3
62.6


32.9
36.2
35.5



58.6

53.7


26.1
2g.


96.3
79.7
76.1


33.0
41.2
41. c


109.5
94.1
87.5


43.0
4s.
4..0


10..5
88.5
79.5


45.0
46.4'
44.5


10S.1
92.4
85.0


42.2
43.0
50.0


109.5
95.0
85.2


43.0
49.5
50.0


44. a
50.2:
50o.r


67.9 79.2 65.2 70.5 70.5 70.5

62.9 73.5 63.5 6s.5 68.7 69.0


31.2
32.4


22.3 _/2E.4


82.7
9. 30
272.3
51.6

25.0
46.0


96.3
10.17
27S.6
53.0


36.5
39.5


39.5 41.4 41.5
32.5 39.5 39.5


25.7 1.5 3.3 36.3 36.7


109.5
10.84
392.1
53.0


108.5
9.66
258.5
53.


25.0 25.0 25.0
43.0 46.0 43.0


10.1
17.10

54.2


109.5
16.49

55.0


112.
16.

55..


25.0 25.0 25,
43.0 43.0 43,


Compiled frnm reports of the Agricultural Mar!ketinc Service except as otherwise
no ted.
SHighest monthly averspe nTrice.
J/ Before pa-yment of duty. Compiled from the Poston Commercial Pulletin.
/ Preliminary.
4/ Scoured basis, Boston market.
S Average at 10 markets.
SWhite, 1-15 denier, at New York, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Not quoted af
July 1341. .i
7/ 3roe .i. yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics. .
SF.o.b. produi.ingr plants, Bureau of Labor Statistics. :