The wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00039

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

I F.1DOC, iE T DEPT




IH E \ US DEPOSIT.RY
"L^ s -- ATI

SITUATION
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

VWOOL-59 6N NOVEMBER 1941


APPAREL


WOOL: PRODUCTION AND NET IMPORTS,
UNITED STATES, 1900-1940


POUNDS
( MILLIONS I

500 Production

PNet imports

400


300

I Il
200 i-1 -
4 I 11 f

100 t # % I



1900 1905 1910 1915 1920 1925
YEAR BEGINNING JULY


1930 1935 1940


*PR,'LUCTIOtI DATA FROM A M S a IMPORT1DATA FROM DEPT. OF COMMERCE
DATA FOR 1940 ARE PRELIMINARY
u 5 DEPARTMENT OF AGRPIULTURE NEG. 39702 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


IN TIE 12 MONTHS ENDED JUNE 1941 IMPORTS OF APPAREL WOOL FOR CON-
SUMPTION TOTALED 473 MILLION POUNDS, THE LARGEST TOTAL EVER REPORTED.
THE LARGE IAMORTS REFLECT THE GREAT INCREASE IN THE NEED FOR WOOL GOODS
FOR MILITARr uSE AND INCREASED CIVILIAN DEMAND. IMPORTS ARE LIKELY TO
CONTINUE AT A RECORD LEVEL IN 1941-42 PROVIDED, OF COURSE, THAT SHIPPING
SPACE IS AVAILABLE. CHANGES IN IMPORTS SINCE 1939 HAVE BEEN SIMILAR TO
THE CHANGES IN THE EARLY YEARS OF THE FIRST ',OPLD WAR. THE DECLINE IN
IMPORTS IN 1916-17 PROBABLY WAS DUE IN LARGE PART TO THE INCREASING WAR
DEMANDS OF THE UNITED KINGDOM AND TO SHIPPING DIFFICULTIES. DATA FOR
THIS CHART APE GIVEN IN TABLE I.
























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WOOL-59


THE WOOL SITUATION


Summary

rrice quotations on domestic wools at Boston advanced 2 to 4 cents

a pound, scoured basis, in October and are now close to the highest levels

in more than a decade. The price advance followed invitations for bids on

large additional quantities of wool cloth for Army use. Mill consumption

of apparel wool in September reached a new high of more than 90 million

pounds, grease basis., With Government requirements still large, consumption

is likely to continue close to record levels through the early months of

1942 and this will be a strong supporting factor to domestic wool prices.

Stocks of apparel wool held, by United States dealers and manufactur-

ers on September 27 totaled 377 million pounds, grease basis. This total

includes 21 million pounds of wool afloat to the United States. The stocks

reported at the Pnd of September this year were more than 100 million pounds

larger than at the corresponding dates of 1939 and 1940 and were the largest

end-of-September stocks in recent years. The reported stocks do not include

Australian wools stored under Government supervision in this country as a

strategic reserve.

In the 12 months ended June 1941, imports of apparel wool for consump-

tion totaled 473 million pounds, three times as much as in 1939-40 and the

largest total ever reported. Although stocks of raw wool in the United

States are larger than in most recent years, they are not unusually large in

relation to the current rate of mill consumption. In view of the large

consumption in prospect and the need for building up reserve supplies in

this country imports are likely to continue close to record levels in

1941-42 provided, of course, that shipping space is available.


- 3 -






NOVEMBER 19h1 -4 -

In most recent years prior to 1940, the major part of United States

imports of apparel wool came from Australia, New Zealand, and the Union of

South Africa. Although Australian and South African wools have been re-

leased for export to the United States in large quantities in the last 2

years, the major part (58 percent) of United States imports for consumFtion

in 1940-41 came from South America.

ExTorts of wool from Argentina and Uruguay in the 1941-41 season

(October-September) totaling 563 million pounds, were 45 percent larger

than in 1939-40 and were larger than in any previous year. About 85 percent

of the season's exports were to the United States. The strong demand for

wool in the United States offset the almost complete loss to South American

countries of the English and continental European markets which previously

took about 80 percent of South American wool exports.

The reciprocal trade agreement with Argentina which goes into effect

on November 15. provides for reductions of 11 or 12 cents a pound in the

tariff rate on certain coarse wools grading not finer than 44s. Domestic

production of these types is only about 1 percent of total United States

production.

November 10, 194l

REVIEW OF RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

Boston Wool Prices Increase Further in
October; Are Near "High" of Decade

Sales of wool at Boston were fairly large in C:tober and prices ad-
vanced 2 to 4 cents a pound, scoured basis, on most _gr-'des, according to
reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service. The award of Army con-
tracts on about 10 million yards of wool cloth in the early .art of the
month, followed by invitations for bids on 33 million yards of worsted cloth
for Army use, were the important factors in the increased sales of raw wool
at Boston.

The advance in prices of graded domestic wools at Boston in September
and October carried prices close to the highest levels in more than a decade.
Prices received by farmers for wool shorn this spring were 25 to 30 percent j
higher than a year earlier and were the highest since 1928.







Demand at Boston in October was chiefly for fine and half blood
combing wools, the grades required in new Government orders for serge and
shirting. Quoted prices of fine combing (staple) territory wools averaged
111'cents a pound, scoured basis, in the latter part of October compared
with 108.5 cents a month earlier and also a year earlier. Quoted prices
of 3/8 blood combing territory wools at Boston averaged 96.5 cents a pound,
scoured basis, in the last week of October, an advance of 2.5 cents a pound
during the month. The average price of 3/8 blood combing wools in the last
week of October 1940 was 88.5 cents a pound.

Western Wool-Auctions Held in October

Auction sales of western-grown wools were held at Denver, Colorado,
on October 15,.16, and 17; at Ogden, Utah, on October 18; and at Billings,
Montana, on October 20 and 21, 1941. Offerings at the three points totaled
7,550,675 pounds, according to reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service.
Total sales, including wools sold at private treaty immediately following
the auctions, amounted.to 4,151,400 pounds. Clearances of graded-wools were
relatively greater than for original bag wools.

Bidding was most active in the final sales held at Billings, Montana.
This reflected partly the good selection of wools and partly an increased
demand arising from invitations for bids on.new Government needs for wool
cloth. Scoured-basis prices at the.Western wool auctions.showed a rather
wide range as the result of the variety of wools offered and the difference
in competition for various lots. On original bag wools scoured-basis prices
ranged $1.03-$1.12 for good French combing and staple combing fine wools;
$0.97-$1.03 for short French combing fine wools; and $0.95-$1.03 for mixed
grade lots containing a large proportion of fine wools. On graded wools,
scoured-basis prices ranged $1.05-$1.12 for good French combing and staple
combing and $0.97-$1.05 for short French combing, fine; $0.97-$1.07 for 1/2
blood; 90-98 cents for 3/8 blood and 80-88 cents for 1/4 blood.

Army to Purchase Additional Quantities
of Worsted Cloth

In October the Army requested bids on 20.5 million yards of 18-ounce
serge and 12.6 million yards of 10-1/2-ounce shirting flannel. Bids were
received up to November 4 but no public opening of bids was scheduled. It
was expected that contracts would.be awarded by negotiation on the basis of
prices and quantities offered. If the entire quantities specified in in-
vitations are contracted for, this will be the largest single purchase of
serge and shirting flannel made so far in the defense program. The invita-
tion specified that delivery be completed within 285 days (9-1/2 months) of
rereipt of award but this provision was open to negotiation.

The quantities specified in the invitation are equivalent to about
93 million pounds of greasy domestic wool of grades 64s or finer and 22
million pounds of. grades 60s or finer.

Mill Consumption at New-High in Serttember

Mill consumption of apparel wool averaged 10.7 million pounds a. week,
scoured basis, in September compared with 10.0 million pounds in August end


WOOL-59


- 5 -






-6-


the previous high of 10.5 million pounds a week in June, The September
consumption was 50 percent larger than in September 1940. Consumrtion
of apparel wool, greasy shorn and pulled, totaled 707 million po-unds from
January through September 1941, comprarei with 414 million pounds in the
same months last'year, Consumption on a rsoured basis in the first ?
months of 1941 was 85 percent larger than in the same months last year
and was the largest on record for the industry.

Mill consumption of carpet wool declined in September but consump-
tion was the larIest for the month in recent years. Consumption of carpet
wool in the first 9 months of the year wan 47 percent larger than in the
same months last year.

Stocks Reported on September 2J Much
Lar-er Then in Last 2 Years

Stocks of apparel wool held by United States dealers and manufactur-
ers totaled 356 million pounds, grease basis, on September 27 and in
addition there were 21 million pounds afloat to United'States dealers and
manufacturers, according to reports of the Bureau of the Census. Trh stocks
on hand at the.end of September were 113 million pounds l.r.r-r than a ycar
earlier, 119 million pounds larger than 2 years earlier, and were the largest
end-of-September stocks in recent years.

Stocks of both domestic rnd foreign wbol reported by dealers and
manufacturers were larger on September 27 this year than on the correspond-
ing dates of 1939 and 1940 but by far the greatest increase was in stocks of
foreign wool. Stocks of foreign wool on hand totaled 137 million pounds on
Septerbeibr 27 this year compare with 44 million pounds a year earlier.
Stocks of foreign-wool reported by dealers and manufacturers do not include
Australian wools imported as a strategic reserve under supervision of the
Defense Supplies Corporation. Stocks of domestic wool reported by dealers
and manufacturers on September 27 totaled 219 million pounds compared with
about 200 million pounds reported on the eorresponlint dates in 19j3 and
1940. These totals do not include domestic wools still on farms .nd ranches
and in local warehouses in producing States; hence, they do not cover the
total supply of wool in this country at the end of Seotcrmbr.

On the basis of reported carry-over (stocks) on April 1 and ir-orts
and mill consumption from April through Septernber, the calculated total sup-
ply of foreign and domestic apparel wool in the United States on October 1,
including 19i'4lproduction, was about 565 million pFeunds, greasy shorn and
pulled. The October 1 supply on this basis was about 179 million pounds
larger than a year earlier.

Stocks of carpet wool reported by dealers and manufacturers, includ-
ing wool afloat totaled 80 million pounds, grease basis, pn Septenber 27
Comared with 54 million pounds a year earlier. The accompanying tr.ble
shows rer.orted stocks of apparel and carpet wool on a scoured-equivalent
basis. Stocks on a grease basis, by quarters, 1936 to date, are shovn in
table 5.


NOVEMBER 1941







Stocks of raw wool, tops, and noils held by dealers, manufacturers,
and topmakerl, United States, September 27, 1941
with comparisons

: Scoured basis
Item : 1940 1941
:Sept. 28 1/ : June 28 1/ : Sept. 27
:1,000 pounds 1,000 pounds 1,000 pounds

Apparel wool, total ................: 127,546 208,345 188,493
Dealers ................. .........: 52,784 71,693 66,556
Domestic .......................: 39,152 42,906 45,990
Foreign on hand ................: 9,208 20,938 17,304
Foreign afloat ..................: 4,424 7,849 3,262
Manufacturers and topmakers ......: 74,762 136,490 121,541
Domestic *.......................: 47517 42,814 46,109
Foreign on hand ....,............ 19,397 71,901 66,607
Foreign afloat ................: 7,848 21,775 8,825

Carpet wool, total ..................: 40,082 65,889 55,618
Dealers ..........................: 1,114 2,317 2,392.
Manufacturers and topmakers ......* 38,968 63,572 53,226

Tops .............................:.. 20,912 21,093 20,438
Noils ..............................: 10,914 13,367 15,336

Compiled from Bureau of the Census, Quarterly Wool Stock Report,
September 27, 1941.
Ij Revised.

Imports Smaller in August

Imports of ap-arel wool for consumption totaled 44.7 million pounds
in August compared with 52.5 million pounds.in July and 9.9 million pounds
in August 1940. The imports in August this year were the largest August
imports on record. Imports have declined seasonally from the peak of 72.3
million pounds imported in April. In the first 8 months of 1941 imports for
consumption amounted to 445 million pounds compared with 118 million pounds
in the corresponding months of 1940.

Imports of carpet wool for consumption totaled 17.8 million pounds
in August compared with 19.1 million pounds in July and 6.1 million pounds
in August 1940. In the first 8 months of 1941 imports of carpet wool for
consumption were 156 million pounds compared with 94 million-pounds in the
first 8 months of 1940.

United States Purchases Strategic Reserve
of Wools for Defense Needs

The Defense Supplies Corporation has announced the purchase of
176 million pounds of Australian wool to be held as a stock pile for emer-
gency defense needs. This wool is from the British-owned Australian wool
being stored ina-he United States. About 126 million pounds had been shipped


- 7 -


wOOL-59







ro0 c E R 1941 8 -

by late October and about 50 million pounis moral are expected to be shipped
before the end of the year.

Because of the difficulty in obt-inin' enough of the desired quality
of Australian woo7.s, the Defense Supplies Corporation ihas P.greed to arrange
for the storage of about 125 million pounds of the highest types nf British-
owned South African wools. The 176 million pounds of Australian wool,
together with 125 million pounds from South Africa, 'will -ake a total of
301 million pounds stored for defense needs. The Office of productionn
Management has recommended that a stock pile sibstatiall.; lurgjr than this
be stored in the United States.

Argentine-United States Trade Agreemont 'Grants
Tariff Concessions on Coarse Wools

The reciprocal trade agreement with Argeitia whica goes into effect
provisionally on "ovcmb'.r 15 grants tariff concessions on certain coarse
grades of wool imported into the United States. Unier th: most favored
nation treatment, concessions by the United States .pply to all countries
except Germany. The types of wool covered 'in the agreement are grades not
finer than 44s. Domestic production of these types is only about 1 percent
of the total United States production, and mill requirements for such wools
must be filled almost entirely by imports.

The following specified t:;pes are covered in the agreement:

1. Paragraph 1lOla, Tariff Act of 1930-carpet wools, and other
wools, not finer than 40s, not imported under bond for the nr.ufacture of
carpeting and certain other specified articles.

The duty on such wools is reduced 11 cents a pound, clean content,
under the Argentine Apr-m.?ent.

2. Paragraph 1102a, Tariff Act of 1930--wools not ;picitlly provided
for and not finer than hi's, i.e. 40/44s. The duty on such wools is reduced
12-cents a pound, clean content, under the Argentine Agre.ne.it.

Specific rates on the above types.are as follows:

: Rate under :Rae -ider Arg.ntine
Condition in : 1 90 Tariff 1/ : Agreement 1/
which imported :'ot finer: :40/44 ::ot firer : 40/44s
:__than 40s : _:hn Os_ :
CoI;ts Cnt-s Cents Cents

Greasy or washed ................: 24 29 13 17
On skin ............. .......... : 22 27 11 15
Sorted ror natchings, not scoured .: 25 30 14 18
Scoured ....................27 32 16 20

1/ Rate levied per pond of clean content. The bulk of the wool imported
under these classifications is entered in the grease.





WOOL-59


The Act of 1930 provides free entry of carpet wools and of other
wools not finer than 40s when imported under bond for the manufacture of
carpeting, rugs, press cloth, knit or felt boots, and heavy fulled iumber-
men's socks. This provision is bound a ainst change in the Agreement.

The only production of true carpet wools in the United States is
about 100,000 pounds a year shorn from flocks owned by Indians in the
Southwest. 'Hence, the entire mill demand for such wools must be supplied
by imports. Domestic production of wools other than carpet wools but not
finer than 40s is also relatively small, probably about 2 million pounds
a year. United States annual average production of 40/44s is less than 4
million pounds.

South America Sales

New clip wools began to arrive in the Buenos Aires market in the
latter part of October but the volume of early arrivals was small. Prices
were reported strong in October in Buenos Aires and Montevideo, with local
(South American) mills paying relatively high prices for all grades. Small
purchases were made by Sweden and Holland for possible export or storage.
Japan also entered the market in late October. American purchases of the
new clip have been small. Because of the small demand from the United
States pre-shearing purchases of wool by local exporters were small this
year. The fear of a more than usual amount of burry wool in the new
Argentine clip also retarded forward buying.

South American Wool Exports in 1940-41
Season Top All Previous Years

Exports of wool from Argentina and Uruguay in the 1940-41 season
(October 1940-September 1941), totaling 563 million pounds, were 45 percent
larger than in 1939-40 and were larger than in any previous year. Exports
from both countries included a considerable quantity of wool carried over
from the 1939-40 clip. As a result of the strong demand, principally from
United States buyers, almost all of the 1940-41 clip was disposed of during
the season and the carry-over of wool into the 1941-42 season was small.

Aside from the record quantities exported, an outstanding feature
of the 1940-41 season in South American markets was the large quantities
purchased by United States buyers, who dominated the markets in Argentina
and Uruguay. About 83 percent of the exports from Argentina in 1940-41
went to the United States, compared with 49 percent in 1939-40 and 18 per-
cent in the five previous seasons. Shipments to the United States were 82
percent of total Uruguay shipments in 1940-41, 35 percent in 1939-40, and
13 percent in the five seasons 1934-35 through 1938-39.

The strong demand for wool in the United States offset the almost
complete loss of the markets in the United Kingdom and continental European
countries which previously took about 80 percent of South American wool ex-
ports. Shipments to Japan increased sharply in 1940-41 but were only a
small part of total exports.

The following table shows the percentage of total exports from
Argentina and Uruguay shipped to major markets in recent years. Quantities


- 9 -






- 10 -


exported to principal countries of destination are :hown in tables 3
and 4.

Percentage of total wool exports shjir..d to principal mprketz
from Argentina and Uruguay, Zver : ? 1934-38, annual 1937-40

: -'ea b3ginri.iZ 0Ct. 1
Country of shiDment and Avere
destination ._ : 4- 1937 : 1938 1939 : 1940
:Percer-t Percent Percent Percent Percent
Argentina to


United 3 ;tes .................... : 17.5 9.2
Unit- Eil ;om ....................: 27.9 26.2
Co;tif ::-~ Srope and Russia ..,. 50.8 60.1
Jap .............................: 2.3 2.8
All o' r ......................... : 1._ 1.
Urugr yo '
United States ...................: 12.8 1.5
Uni- e: :r ngdom ...............: 17.8 22.7
Coninenbtal Europe and Russia ...: 62.4 71.
Japan .... ................. .9 4.0
All other .......................: 0.1 0.0


13.3 48.6 8s .5
33.5 9.3 2.3
46.1 34.9 5.4
1/ 5.3 7.5
2.1 1.9 1 .3


13.0
8.4
77.5
1.1
1/


34.7
1.3
58.5
5.2
0.3


08.4
0.0
10.8
5.2
1.6


Perc -ntaies based on quantities shown in tables 3 and 4.
l/ Less than .05 percent.

THE WAR AND UITITED STATES WOCL IMFCRTS

The importance of wool in the defense program is clearly shown by
the marked increase in United States wool imports. The United States has
always imported a considerable amount of apparel wool as well as the total
-.rouirements of carpet wool. The rapid increase in domestic wool production
after 1922, however, greatly reduced import requirements of apparel wool.
Imports also were discoursed by the business d--rressicn during th.e e-rly
1930's. A sharp increase in mill consumption in 1935 and 1936 stiriul-ted
imports to some extent but they remained much smaller than in the Enrly
1920's.

With the initiation of the defense program in the second half of
1940, large purchases of wool goods were made for our armed forces and
there was also a sh?,rp increase in civilian demand. As a result, imports
increased gr:.tly and reached record levels in the early months of 1941.
In the 12 months ended June 1941 imports of apparel wool for consumption
totaled 473 million pounds, three times as much as in 1939-40 and the largest
total ever reported.

Although mill consumption in 1940-41 was about 50 percent 1,rgor
than in the previous year, stocks of wool in this country on July 1 were
considerably l',rger than a year earlier. But supplies were not large in
relation to the current rate of mill consumption. Imports declined some-
what after April, but from July through September 1941 they were nbnut 100
million pounds larger than in the same months of 1940. The current rate of
mill orsuimption of apparel wool is about 75 percent larger than the average


TCOrI.MBER 1941






wooL-59


rate of recent years, and consumption is likely to be maintained at the
present rate through the early months of 1942. In view of the need for
building up reserve supplies in this country, imports are likely to continue
at or close to record levels in 1941-42'provided, of course, that .shipping
space is available.

It is interesting to compare the present war period to date with
that of 1914-18. United States imports of apparel wool increased sharply
in 1914-15, the first year of the World War, and reached record proportions
in 1915-16. In the early years of the World War, prior to the United States
entry into the conflict, wool imports were stimulated by large exports from
the United States of uniform cloth and other military goods to the Allied
Nations. It seems likely that the decline in imports in 1916-17 was due in
large part to the increasing war demands of the United Kingdom and to ship-
ping difficulties. In contrast to the present situation, Australian wools
were not available to the United States in any considerable quantities after
1916-17, when the United Kingdom purchased the entire Australian production.

Imports of combing and clothing (apparel) wool into the
United States by countries, 1913-17

: Year beginning July 1
.. Country of shipment :191-14 1914-15:1915-16.1916-17.1917-18
:Million Million Million Million Million
:pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds
British Empire:
Australia .................. ...: 24.0 66.4 157.5 0.8 30.0
Union of South Africa ..........: 0.5 23.7 61.9 23.8 55.8
New Zealand ....................; 4.7 0.4 16.7 0.3 4.1
United Kingdom .................: 57.5 47.5 34.3 1.6 0.2
Canada .........................: 4.8 7.4 6.5 8.9 10.0
Total 5 countries ............: 91.5 145.4 276.9 35.4 100.1
South America:
Argentina .....................: 31.2 65.5 113.3 194.8 165.8
Uruguay ......................: 8.0 14.6 9.2 33.3 17.9
Total 2 countries ............: 39.2 80.1 122.5 228.1 183.7
All other 1/ ..................: 13.1 11.6 .0 33.0 34.0
Total all countries .......... 13.9 237.1 416.4 296.5 317.8
Compiled from Commerce and Navigation of the United States.
I/ Includes some British Empire and South American countries not separately
listed.

Shift in Sources of Imports

Although wools from Australia and South Africa have been released
for export to the United States in l.rge quantities in the last two seasons,
there has been a considerable shift in sources of supplies during the present-
war. In the last 2 years the United States has obtained a much larger per-
centage of total wool requirements from South American countries. In most
years prior to 1940 the major part of United States imports of apparel wool
came from British Empire countries, chiefly Australia, New Zealand, and South


- 11 -






NOVEMBER 1941


Africa. In the years 1930-39 about 60 percent of United States imports of
apparel wool finer than 40s was from the three British Empire countries,
28 percent was from South American countries, and 12 percent from all other
countries. In 1940 and the first half of 1914 about 40 percent of imports
of wools finer than 40s came from the three British Empire countries and
58 percent from South America.

It should be noted that the above percentages are based on Quantities
imported for consumption. They do not include Australian wool imported
under supervision of the Defense Supplies Corporation and stored in this
country as a strategic reserve. Imports of such wool through June 19q1
totaled about 66 million pounds.

South America, principally Argentina, has become the outstanding
source of United States imports of carpet wool also in the last few years.
In the years 1930-37 United States imports of carpet wool came chiefly from
Argentina, British India, China, and the United Kingdom. Control of the
supplies of wool in North China since early 1938, however, has largely closed
the Chinese market to United States importers. In 1940 and 1941 the large
military requirements of the United Kingdom for medium and coarse wools, rnd
the difficult shipping situation, sharply curtailed exports of British India
wools to the United States.

The accompanying table (table 2) shows United Stctes imports of
wool by countries of production for specified periods, 1925 to date. In
this tabulation imports of wool not finer than 40s have been included with
carpet wool imports in averages for the years 1930-39 but have been reported
separately in annual statistics 1937 to date. In 1925-29 such wools were
included with apparel wools. As they 'were not separately reported by coun-
tries prior to 1937 it has not been possible to make the data for all periods
strictly comparable.


- 12 -






WOOL-59


Data for cdrt on cover page

Table 1.- Apparel wool: Production and net imports,
United States, 1900-1940

Year be-: ,Total pro- : :Year be-: Total ro- :
ginning :diction (shorn: :et innir :duction (shorn: et
July 1/ and pulled) : imports :July l/ : and pulled): imports
: 1,000 pounds 1,000 pounds : :-1,000 pounds 1,000 pounds

1900 : 288,637 32,666 : 1920 : 293,788 253,-'
1901 : 302,502 69,193 : 1921 : 290,223 98,633
1902 : 316,341 54,228 : 1922 : 270,367 335,008
1903 : 287,450 55,679 :1923 : 272,668 83,390
1904 291,783 734,283 : 1924 : 282,005 126,510
1905 : 295,488 98,145 : 1925 : 300,003 208,911
1906 : 298,915 91,511 : 1926 : 318,861 105,587
1907 : 298,295 57,665 : 1927 : 339,504 94,518
1908 : 311,138 163,839 : 1923 : 366,720 98,128
1909 : 351,179 139,798 : 1929 : 382,295 75,751


1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919


345,834
342,552
319,380
309,388
293,621
281,175
287,637
276,914
295,993
318,391


45,414
85,532
80,797
142,846
223,185
410,225
292,559
315,996
329,544
327,688


1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939

1940 /:


414,029
442,401
418,096
438,352
430,829
430,667
426,527
432,809
436,472
441,897

449,763


52,161
22,288
7,294
49,300
23,890
89,797
170,485
37,054
60,669
156,881

472,737


Production from the Agricultural Marketing Service. Imports
of Foreign and Domestic Commerce.


Net imports


from the Bureau


General imports minus reexports, rinus domestic exports 1900-
1932-33.


Beginning 1933-34 net imports are imports for consumption
minus domestic exports.
/ Production is for calendar year. iet imports, year beginning July.
/ Preliminary.


- 13 -












Table 2.- Wool: United States imports by countries of production,
annual 1937-40. and January-June 1941


averages 1925-39,


r r- wool including
camel hair



Argentina .
Uruguay .
British India .. .
China . .
Iraq . .
Syria .
Turkey .
Egypt .
United Kingdom .
Treland .
France .
Italy . .
Portugal .
*ew Zealand .. ...
Union of So. Africa .
. i Countries .
Total .


Average
1925-29
1.000
pounds

11,354
60
25,616
49,479
4,976
9,969
4,188
3,346
18,564
1,865
3, 152
3,849
826
5
65
12.002
148.416


Average
1930-341. 2
1 000
pounds

26,226
730
11,653
27,629
3,454
3,005
632
2,198
7,728
1,272
647
2.796
740
583
30
4.7?4
94,097


Average
1935.- 39
1,000
pounds

49,810
1,868
25,835
21,840
6,455'
6,447
712
4,176
15,569
1,773
3,767
635
1,290
12,393
$43
4,710
1S7.823


1937

1.000
pound

43.161
607
25,965
28, 358
8,632
9,076
1,628
5,785
12,066
1,195
7,920
589
1,559
17, 190
$61
1,799
172,091


1938

1,000
pounds

25,997
208
14,781
2,290
2,755
5,144
501
2,548
8,367
748
3,722
225
272
1,878
891
1.,81
71,908


1939

1 000
pounds

45,609
598
38,236
2,663
10,520
8,386
1,367
4.168
10,157
2,513
4,052
1.653
2.503
8,019
1, 196
3.234
144,874


1940

1.000
pounds

66,413
216
20,211
7, 123
14,152
5,280
225
2,062
7,278
3,600
178


84
1.TM

134,491


19413
Jan- June
1.000
pounds

80,580
561
4, 102
4,317
8,907
88
0
510
10,087
3,321
20
7
1,688
74
1.009
1.898


Apparel wool not (4) (
finer than 40's () ( (
Argentina .. 12,317 6,426 13,932 2. 40 21, 89
Ur'guaay . 1.815 782 634 1.'215 1. 219
British India 316 139 SS2 130 3
United Kingdom 1,338 1, 254 1,475 -- 380
Ireland . 266 87 177 5 2
New Zealand 5,683 3,135 5,640 548 46
Canada .. 328 117 135 117 BI
China 317 200 IS6 14 3!
Other Countries 1,179 229 881 1 233
Total ...... S23.559 12,369 23.582 2.S34 24.478

Apparel wool
finer than 40's (6)
Ar.-e.nt in .. ... 22,782 4.012 6,802 13,696 3, 105 8,079 65,473 103,998
', ,ey .. 21.369 4,930 12,281 19.870 2,040 16,062 43.144 70,791
S 3,750 501 1,029 1,005 416 1, 217 4.396 2,663
Canada . 6,613 2.874 2,389 2.076 778 2.015 3,193 340
United Kingdom .... 9452 2.714 3215 4.327 1,578 2,211 1.082 380
Australia ........ 42, 553 14,686 29.233 69,026 6.511 29, 113 39.358 115,624
New Zealand .. 18,618 5.210 7.660 11, 86 3,330 6,697 3,974 2,152
Union of So. Africa 7,439 2.200 S.54 4,398 525 8,329 31.233 17,402
Ireland .. .. 60 ,2t 217 3 4 96 217 534 419
Other Countries 2.586 346 29 623 64 671 6,762 9,559
Total ...... ... 1. 133.222 37,744 66,674 *26.601 18,443 74,611 199,149 323,328


Compiled from Monthly Sumary of Foreign CoiNrce of the U. S., December issues Part II.


Includes wool not finer than 40's.
2Imports for consumption beginning 1934.
3Preliminary.
4Included with apparel wool finer than 40's.
$Included with carpet wool; cannot be oepsarted prior to 1937.
Includes apparel wool not finer than 40's.







WOOL-59 15-. -

Table 3.- Argentina: -Woolrexports -by principal.countries of
destination,, pre-war aavera{e-1934-38, annual 1937-40

: Year beginning 'Otober 1 _
Ccittry cf destination :Average : 1938 1939 19
31937 1958' 1939 .1940
_______________ :1934-3 : ________:________
: 1,000 1,000.- 1,000 1,000 -1,000
: pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds


United St-ites ......
Ile:< ico .............
Other HaIIericir .....
United Kindonm .....
F'rane .............
Beigiua ............
It aI ........ .... .
GerrrmLi ............
Iletherian.s ........
S it zerlanrd ........
Sweden .............
Poland .............
Russia .............


......... : 53,450 25,399
..........: 968 831
...........: 1,570 1,687
..........: 85,025 72,560
..........: 48,367. 49,246
..........: 20,458: 20,393
..........:.18,962 11,100
..........: 48,940 66,478
..........: 2,150 1,940
..........: 12 15
..........: 1,230' 1,122
...........: 10,172 11,177
.......... "


65,499 136,914 348,574
930 809 1,389
2,722 2,489 1,647
119,531 26,277 9,544
57,366 34,0.:3 1,188
22,710 11,091 ---
7,172 18,803 ---
44,163 ---
3,386 10,227
S37 6,764 2,407
3;117 8,201 4,616
19,656
-- 13,267


Other Europe .................: 4,546 4,695 7,04&4 9,241- 1,096
Total continental Europe :
and Russia ..............:154,837 166,166 164,651 98,415 22,574
Japan ........................: 7,087 7,652 '1,497 15,066 31,129
All other ....................: 1,718 2,210 2,45L. 1,822 -2,741

Total all countries .......:304,655' 276,505 357,284 281,792 417,598

Compiled from commercial reports supplied by the Buenos Aires Office of
Foreign Agricultural Relations.






NCV3E;BER 1941 16 -

Table 4.- Uruguay: Wool exports by principal countries rf
destination, pre-war average 1934-38, annual 1937-40

: Year begii-iin~ Octobr 1
Country of destination :Average : 1937 1938 1939 1l40
:1934-38g : :: : :
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1, 100 lO
: pounds pounds po.mns pounds pouris


United States ................... 14,718
Mez ico ..........................: --
Be@I~ee B~eP ,,, t .. 6


1,395 16, 581


Uiter Ajieria ....................... : L ---
United Kingdom ...................: 20,489 21,098
France ...........................: 7,225 4,735
Belgium ..........................: 10,465 5,657
Italy ...... ......................... : 13,484 7,47'
Germany .........................: 30,511 36,41 46
Netherlands ......................: 3,968 2,953
Switzerland ......................: -- --
Sweden ................ ............ : 2,178 1,70Q8
Poland ...........................: 2,370* 3,500
Russia ................... ........: -- ---
Other Europe .....................: 1,624 4,063
Total continental 3u'o-'-ne and
Russia .......................: 71,827 66,549
Japan ............................: 7,890 3,661
All other ......................... ...-- ---


92 170
10,763 1,423
6,463 1,137
18,253' 3,626
16,065 13,341
35,169 4,416
3,367 13.552

3,075 15,841
7,651 ---

3,129 3,??L


99,171
1,3 5


62,2PS

99


Total all countries ...........: 115,083 92,711 127,992 C106,402 1L5,210

Compiled from comm-rcial reports supplied by the Buenos Aires Office of
Foreign Agricultural Relations.


113,691
1,231
641






1,707
7,769

5,574
-.0


36,gEO
---






-L 17 -


Table 5.- Stocks of wool held by dealers' and manufacturers, and stocks on
farms and ranches in Western States,-.United States, 1936-41


Greape basis
__: Apparel wool : Carpet
: Domestic : Foreign :On farms : wool
:: Manu- : : : Total : and : (all
: Dealers :facturers: On hand : Afloat reporteded : ranches : foreign)
:: 1/ : : : 2/ : 3/
:1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.


41,836
: 136,325
: 128,845
67,353

S 34,873
: 131,967
:139,085
:134,623


1936
Mar.
June
Sept.

1937
Mar.
June
Sept.
Dec.
1938
Mar.
June
Sept.
ec.
1939
Apr.
July
Sept.
Dec.,
1940
Mar.
June
Sept.
Dec.
1941
Mar.
June
Sept.


117,226
169,043
1i1,E47
116,635

68,554
107,910
75,245
44,051

40,392
110,783
91,110
35,055
26,161
100,076
104,096


80,581
105,108
93,696
102,208

81,488
87,989
85,303
66,037

63,396
95,397
104,559
82,225

64,345
103,857
125,084
81,491

58,017
99,883
108,031
86,991

60,986
91,928
114,719


4/ 67,088
52,448 1,265
35,912 3,145
36,537 40,783

77,585 18,804
63,024 4,407'
49,721 2,069
37,568 1,259

33,510 2,640
32,069 1,213
32,306 2,445
31,365 8,178

'39,764 8,276
38,575 5,425'
36,637 7,896-
51,749 25,243
68,618 6,656
47,165 5,111-
44,311 .20,141
71,795 67,779


112,169
150,185
137,347


85,994
51,101-
.20,665


189,505
295,146
261,598
246,881

212,750
287,387
276,178
239,487

216,772
297,722
321,157
238,403

180,939
255,767
244,862
202,534

173,683
262,942.
263,593
261,620

285,310
393,290
376,827


350 55,o49
49,o60
47,462
1,800 53,959

330 53,923
51,172
59,846
31,600 63,471

22,500 49,64)
43,927
37,969
S13,340 43,137

6,290 48,527
46,860
53,705
S14,384 53,942

10,786 66,971
63,789
53,624
1,463 57,302


5/ 69,926
96,075
80,318


Compiled from Bureau of tho CTnsus, Quarterly Wool Stocks Reports. These statis-
tics are believed to include over 95 percent of the total stocks held by, and
afloat to, all dealers, manufacturers, and topmakors in tho United States.
Ij Includes topmakers' stocks.
SEstimated by the Department of Agriculture. Estimates are of wool on farms
and ranches and in local country warehouses in 13 Western Sheep States, not includ-
ing any wool of the next season's clip., No estimates available for dates where no
figures are shown.
Includes carpet wool afloat to the United States.
Wool afloat not separately reported until June 1936.
Negligible quantity.
Preliminary.


WOOL-59


Date


:




6/:






ITC-rEI.EER l-l


Tlec 6.- United States: Wool imports, consumr'tion, and machinery activity,
selected periods, 1l39-41


Item Year : J n.-Aug. : Aug. : July : ug.
: 1939: 140 1-401 : 101 : 19400 : 1q41 :0l1l I/
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000


Imports for consumption, : pounds
actual weight: 2/
kAparcl .................. 9 ,19,
Finer than 40s .........: 74,61
Not finer than 40s .....: 23,58;
C?rt-Ct, including
camels hair ..........: 144,87'
Y
S1939
Mill consumption: j]
Grease basis 4/
Apparel ................: 630,151
Carpet ................. : 14 ,51
Scoured basis -
A_ "rr 'te -
Apparel ...............: 293,08
Carpet ................ : 103,42
We-ekly average -
Apparel ...............: 5,63<
Carpet ................: 1,q?


4
2
2


pounds pounds po undu pounds pounds


117,723
103,802
13,921


444,971
411,734
33,237


9,h4
8,393
1,471


52,4h3
4,,S31
2,587


44,697
40,525
4,172


222,983
199,149
23,834


5 134,691 94,181 156,032 6,060 lC,101 17,764
ear : Jan.-Sept. : Sept. : Aug. : Sept.
: 1940 : 1940 : 1q41 : q140 : 1q4l : 1941


0 640,871 413,707 706,818 61,644 75,C4
3 137,494 94,851 144,414 11,503 16,oc5


3 310,021 202,948 375,105
1 97,852 68,140 100,121


28,609 30a,29
7,941 ll,l44


82,061
14,361


42,e56
10,119


5,962 5,204 9,618 7,152 q,956 10,714
1,882 1,747 2,567 1,05 2,786 2,5F0
.v ekl:r average in hours


:I


Machinery activity: 3/ :
Hours operated per
machine in place -
Worsted combs ..........:
Worsted spindles ......:
Woolen spindles ........:
Woolen and worsted
looms -
Broad .................:
IT rr ow ................:
-arpet and rug looms :
Broad .................:
Narrow ................


51.8
39.6
39.8


40.7
13.2

37.4
22.7


55.1
37.7
43.2


49.1
33.3
39.8


39.0 35.4
13.6 13.0

37.9 36.0
21.9 20.7


Import figures from the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic
machinery activity from the Bureau of the Census..


85.1
59.4
62.5


59.8.
25.8


50.4
30.9


Commerce


62.6
43.0
49.6


82.7
6u.5
71. 7
1 i.


88.2
63.5


/ Sept. imports not yet available.
SWeight of greasy, scoured, and skin .wool added together.
3j Figures for Aug. and Sept. based on 4 weeks, Jan.-Scot. on 39 weeks. No
&Ejijutments made for holidays.
4/ Tojtal of shorn and-pulled wool. Pulled wool, grease basis, is in condition
received from bTulleries and is mostly washed.


42,2 t-4.4 b2.b
12.7 31.8 31.8

37.5 53.8 53.5
23.0 ?.0 30.3

Cronumption and


- 1S -


~1




1


6








Table 7.- Prices of wool -cr pouni in succified markets, and prices of textile
rew materials in the United St.tes, .elected periods, 1939-41


It: Average : Hi h Oct, : 104
___Iem :I3Q : 1q40 :lq.o i/: 1940 :Aug.: Sent. :
united States: : Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


Boston market-
Territory, scoured bnsis-:
64s, O7s, 50, (fine)
staple ................:
56s (3/8 blood) combing :
46s (low 1/4 Hrd) ....:
Bright fleece, greis.y-
64h, 70;, SO3s fine)
delaine ............... :
56s (13/ blood) combing :
46s (low 1/'4 1ooi) .....:
Foreii wool in bond
at Boston 2/
Sydney scoured b -i1 :
64z, 70s, comribin .....:
Cape scoured basis
12 months, com"in .... :
Monteviden -r-.see
t as s
Merinos (60-64c) ......:
Is (56. ) ..............:
Prices received b. fprriers,:
grease ba.-is, lth c-f
month .................... :

Textile fibers:
Wool, territory fine
sts ple 4/ ..............:
COttorn, 15/16" Middling 1/:
Silk, Jarane-e 6/ ........:
Rayon yarn, 150 denier :
Rayon staple fitCr j:
Viscose 1-1/2 denier ....:
Acetate 5 denier ........:


2 .7
-C.. -
60.3
62.6


-'.9
.6 2






C7 .7


26.1


96.3
79.7
76.1


38.0
41 .2
41. 0


10! .5
94. 1
T7.5



43.0
49. 0


104.5
87.2
78.5


42.1
45.0
43.6


107.0
90.4
83.4


42.0
45.6
4g.o


108.1
92.4
85.0


42.2
48.o
50.0


Oct.
Cents



109.5
95.0
85.2


43.0
49.5
50."


67. 7-'.2 63.5 70.S 70.5 70.5

6-.1 73.8 63.5 68.8 68.5 68.7


31.2 36.5
32.4 :-s.5


22.3 ^/2'.4


82.7
9.3o0
271.8
51.5

25.0n
6.0


19' 3,
10.17
273.1
r-".


32.5 41.0
31.5 39.5


41.4
39.5


41.5
39.5


2-.7 29.9 35.7 36.3 36.3


i -"T). 5
o1. 84
792.1
5 ..o0


104.5
9.38
269. s
53.0


107.0
16.14

53.0


25. 25.0 25.0 25.0
4-3. 46.0 43.0 43.0


108.1
17.10

54.2

25.0
43.0


109.5
16.49

55.0

25.0
43.0


Compiled fr'm reports -f the Agricu.ltiur'l NMer'eting Service except as otherwise
noted.

Highest monthly, average rrire.
Before pa,-ment of duty,. Cmoriled from the Foston Commercial Bulletin.
Prelipminrary.
Scoured basis, Bc'ton market.
Average at 10 m.arrkts.
SWhite, 1i-15 denier, -et Iew York, Bureau o.f Labor Statistics. Not quoted after
July lq41.
jDomestic yarr., first quality, -ure.au of LsIor Statistics.
F.r,... Uroir.)during plants, Eurepu of Labor Stt-tistics.


- 1q -




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