The wool situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00038

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation

Full Text



S3. CTHE


THE


'UNITED

WOOL-58


LIJIV OlF FPL LB




IDJ EPOSITOR,'



SITUATION
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

OCTOBER 1941


APPAREL WOOL, SCOURED BASIS: MILL CONSUMPTION IN
UNITED STATES AND PRICE AT BOSTON, 1927-41
MPTION I PRICE
NDS CENTS PER
IONS ) Mill consumption* POUND

)0 I 125
Price, territory
fine combine g
O -- 100


)0 75


)0 ------- 50



)0 --- -- 25


) O
1927 1929 1931 1933 1935 1937 193.9 1941
'tEAR BEGINNING JULY
COtEUMF-TION DATA FROM BUREAU OF THE CENSUS A PRICE DATA FROM A. M. S.


U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTIIPE


NEG. 39632 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


'CHANGES IN DOMESTIC WOOL PRICES IN RECENT YEARS HAVE BEEN CLOSE-
LY ASSOCIATED WITH YEARLY CHANGES IN WOOL CONSUMPTION. ON THE BASIS OF
FIGURES FOR YEARS BEGINNING IN JULY, MILL CONSUMPTION AND PRICES SHOW A
STEADY DOWNWARD SWING FROM 1928-29 THROUGH 1931-32, FOLLOWED BY A SOME-
WHAT IRREGULAR RECOVERY THROUGH 1936-37 AND ANEW UPWARD SWING AFTER
1937-33. THE USE OF THE JULY-JUNE YEAR FOR MILL CONSUMPTION DATA HAS A
DECIDED ADVANTAGE FROM THE MANUFACTURING STANDPOINT BECAUSE OF THE SEASON-
AL DISTRIBUTION OF ACTIVITY IN THE INDUSTRY.





OCTOBER 1941


--~------ ---- ------------~UIL-
THE WOOL SITUATION
----~-----------------~~----------

Summary

The current rate of mill consumption of apparel wool in the United

States is about 75 percent above the average of recent years (1935-39), and

consumption is likely to be maintained at the present rate during the re-

mainder of 1941 and in the early months of 1942* In view of the high rate

of consumption and possibilities of delays in ocean shipping, end-of-season

stocks in the United States likely will be kept considerably above the level

of recent years. And United States purchases of wool in the Southern

Hemisphere during the 1941-42 season again will be large, possibly 400-500

million pounds* United States purchases of apparel wool in the Southern

Hemisphere in 1910-41 probably totaled around 600 million pounds.

Because of the small carry-over of wool in Argentina and Uruguay on

October 1, supplies available for export from those countries in 1941-42

will be considerably smaller than in 1940-41. In 1940-41 exports from

these countries totaled around 550 million pounds of apparel and carpet

wool. Supplies of wool available in Australia and South Africa in the

1941-42 season will be relatively large. Commercial reports indicate that

United .tateL buyers are placing orders in considerable volume in Australia

for wools of the new clip.

lill consumption of wool increased seasonally in August. The weekly

rate of mill consumption of apparel wool was 9.96 million rounds, scoured

basis* This was only slightly below the record rate of June and was 60 per-

cent larger than in August 1940, Consumption on a scoured basis from

January through Julywas almost twice as large as in the same months last year.


- 2 -






'WOOL-5 8


Import s of apparel wool for consumption in the first 7. months of this

year totaled 400 million pounds comp-red with 108 million pounds in the same

months of 1940. Receipts of forcing apparel wool at three ports, Boston,

New York and Philadelphia, continued relatively large in August and September,

but the weekly rate of receipts was much smaller than in the first half of

the year. Total supplies of apparel wool in the United States on September 1,

including 1941 production, were about 140 million pounds larger than a year

earlier.

Sales of wool at Boston increased sharply in September following the

invitation for bids on wool blankets and cloths for Army use Prices ad-

vanced or most grades of wool, with the greatest advance (3 cents a pound,

grease basis) reported on medium grades.

S- -- October 10, 1941

REVIEW OF, RECENT DEVELOTI~TS

Sales and Prices Up in September

The dullness which characterized trading in the Boston wool market in
August and the early part of September wvas broken with the Quartermaster's
invitation to bid.on sizable .quantities ;of tol goods for Army use. Sales
of wool increasedd sharply and prices advanced on most grades of wool, ac-
cording. to reports of the Agricultural Ia:-!:z3'ing Service. Demand was strong-
est for medium grades of wool. Prices of 3/3 and 1/4 blood, combing, fleece
wools advanced 3 cents a pound, grease basis, during September.

Quoted prices of 3/8 blood combing territory wools at. Boston averaged
94 cents a pound scoured, basis in the first week of Cctober compared with
89.5 cents a month earlier and 84 cents a year earlier. Quoted prices of
fine combing (staple) territory wools averaged 108.5 cents a pound scoured
basis in the latter part of September and first itek of October, an advance
of 1.5 cents a pound over the previous quoted price which had remained un-
changed at .;1.07 a pound since April. The avera;:e price of fine combing
territory wool at Boston in the first week of October 1940 was 97 cents a
pound. Most of the demand in September was for graded wools in the ter-
ritory group. Manufacturers urgently needed the wools they bought and con-
fined purchases largely to wools that required little preparation .for
manufacture.





OCTOBER 1941


Twelve-months Texas wools were sold in fairly large quantity in
September, and prices strengthened v.ith the advance in prices of fine ter-
ritory wools. Prices on most sales of 12-months Texas wools during
September were in the range (.1,05-3.08 a pound, scoured basis. Fall Texas
wools of the new clip were quoted nominally at .97-4.1.00 a pound, scoured
basis, at LDston,

The average price of wool received by farmers in mid-September was
36.3 cents a pound compared with 35.7 cents a month earlier and 28 cents a
year earlier. Prices received by farmers for wool shorn this year vere the
highest in at least 12 years.

Government Orders

Army contracts were awarded early in October for about 2 million
blankets and 8 million yards of woolen and worsted cloth. Bids for these
items were opened September 15. The original invitation called for bids on
1 million blankets. After negotiations with bidders awards i-re made on
almost double that quantity. This purchase was said to have completed the
Quartermaster's blanket purchase program for the 1941-42 fiscal year.
There were indications that additional awards might be made on woolen and
worsted items on the basis of the September bids.

The blanket orders call for the use of all domestic wool and will
require about 21 million pounds of grease wool grading 56s to GOs. Delivery
is to be completed within 150 days of award of contract. Purchases of woolen
and worsted items will contain both domestic and foreign wools. The quan-
tities specified in original invitations (8.7 million yards) were equivalent
to about 25 million pounds of grease wool. Delivery of most items is to be
completed within 130 days of award.

Mill Consumption Up in August

The varekly average mill consumption of apparel wool in '.ugust was
9.96 million pounds, scoured basis* This is 6 percent above the July rate
of consumption and is only 5 percent below the record rate of June. August
consumption was 60 percent larger than in August 1940, Consumption of ap-
parel wool on a scoured basis in the first 8 months of 1941 was almost
twice as large as in the same months last year and was the largest on
record for the industry. Consumption on a greasy shorn and pulled basis
from January through August totaled 625 million pounds compared with 352
million pounds in the same months last year.

Mill consumption of carpet wool also increased in July. Consumption
of carpet wool on a scoured basis in the first 8 months of this year amounted
to 90 million pounds compared with 60 million pounds for the same months
last year,

Imports Decline Seasonally in July

Imports of apparel wool for consumption totaled 52.5 million pounds
in July. The imports in July were 10 million pounds smaller than in June


- 4 -









but were five times as large as in July 1940, and were the largest July
imports on record. The decline in imports in July compared with the pre-
ceding month probably was seasonal. In the first 7 months of 1941 imports
for consumption amounted to 400 million pounds compared with 108 million
pounds in the corresponding months of 1940.

General imports of apparel wool (entries for immediate ccnsu:nt-ion
and into bonded warehouses) totaled 538 million pounds in the first 7 2::-rths
of 1941, This total includes about 72 million pounds of Australian vwool
imjnorted for British account and held for reserves. Total imnorbs for
British account from January through August were about 85 million pounds.
Receipts of foreign apparel wool at three ports, Boston, 7e:., York, and
Philadelphia, continued fairly large in August and September, bu' the vwekly
rate of receipts has declined considerably as compared with the avc r-:e
weekly rate in the first half of the year.

Imports of carpet wool for consumption totaled 19.1 million pounds
in July compared with 7.5 million pounds in July 1940. In the first 7 months
of 1941 imports of carpet wool for consumption were 138 million pounds com-
pared with 88 million in the first 7 months of 1960.

South America Sales

The 1941-42 season has opened in South Ayaerica.althouJgh wool from the
new 'olip i not likely to be' available for ship'nt in aey o-ensideraile
quantity before November or December. Early October reports indicate that
some 4 or 5 million pounds of new clip wools had been sold in Uruguay for
future, shipment. Prices were strong in both .i'l-tc'ideo and Buenos Aires and
were reported to be slightly higher than prices quoted on the last sales of
1940-41 clip wools in those markets. Because of the small supplies of old
clip wool remaining for sale, prices in recent months have been largely
nominal.

South America Exports

During the first 11 months (October-August) of the 1940-41 season
exports of wool from Argentina and Uruguay totaled 548 million pounds. The
October-August exports were almost 50 percent larger than in the correspond-
ing months of 1939-40 and ere the largest in many years. In contrast to
earlier years, about 83 percent of the exports were to the United States.
From 1934 through 1938 only 16 percent of shipments went to the United
States. Other countries taking an appreciable quantity of wool from
Argentina and Uruguay in the 1940-41 season were Japan, Russia, and Sweden,
each purchasing considerably more than usual. The United i:inr o.:,, formerly
one of the principal buyers in South America has filled reequiremrnts chiefly
from Empire sources. Most continental European countries are largely cut
off from the South American markets by the British blockade.


WOOL-58


- 5 -







OCTOBER 1941


Exports of wool from Argentina and Uruguay in the first 11
months (Cctober-August) of the export season, 103-!-40 1/

Period : Argentina : Uruguay : ':*.o co.,-:r.'.:es
beginning : United : :t United Total united : al
Oct. 1 : States 2/: Total : States : Total s
: Mil.l lb. ll. lb, : l i lb. 7.1 J I.. Ib. a .i .

1934 : 39.5 297.0 3.8 11_.2 4;.3 10.2
1935 : 52,7 270.1 23.0 13C."_ 7'o7 .0.5
1936 : 77.5 294.4 26.9 l7.i 1041.- 4156.0
1937 : 22.8 264.2 1,4 E7.4 2' ., 351.6
1938 : 60.1 346.5 15.1 123.(C T .2 4G69.5
5-year
average 50.5 294,4 14,0 11C.E 64 .5 405.3

1939 : 125.2 268.6 33.0 iCl.0 15 3.2 370,5
1940 : 337.4 404.5 117.8 1-3. C 455.2 447.5

Compiled from commercial reports supplied by the .3uenoZ Air-s Office of Foreign
Agricultural Relations.

W/ eight of greasy, scoured and skin wool as reported.
Includes small shipmerts to Carsia in: some years.

OUT L CC:"

PAi'P.CGOUITD.- Stimulated by large Government orders ar.J increased
incomes of consumers, mill consumption of apparel wool in the
United States in early 1941 advanced to the 1.f:---st le-"el on
record for the industry. Consumption in the first ,alf of the
year was fully twice as large as in the correspo-.di.-r months of
1940. The increase in mill consumption in 1940 and 'c4l -ir1s
accompanied by a marked increase in wool prices. IPr:c:. re-
ceived by farmers for wool shorn this year were 25 to 30 per-
cent higher than a year earlier and were the 1..1-Lest in at
least 12 years.

The marked increase in consumption resulted in ripid
depletion of stocks of domestic wool, and irnorts increased to
record levels in the early part of 1941.

United States Requirements from Southern
Hemisphere again Large in 1941-42 Season

On the basis of reported carry-over (stocks) on April 1 and imports
and mill consumption from April thro'uh August the calculated supply of
foreign and domestic apparel wool in the United Sittes on September 1, in-
cluding 1941 production, was about 580 million pounds greasy shorn and
pulled. The September 1 supply on this basis was about 140 million pounds
(32 percent) larger than a year earlier.


- 6 -







WOOL-58


Allowing for minimum carry-over stocks of 200 million pounds and a
monthly rate of consumption of about 80 million pounds during the remainder
of 1941 and early months of 1942, requirements for the period September 1,
1941 to April 1, 1942 would total about 760 million pounds, and minimum
import requirements for this period would be about 180 million.pounds.
Stocks on April 1 probably will be larger than 200 million pounds, and
actual imports for the period September 1941-March 1942 probably will be
considerably greater than 180 million pounds.

As no additional supplies of domestic wool vill be available much
before June or July 1942, additional large quantities probably will be im-
ported in the second quarter of 1942. With the current rate of mill con-
sumption about 75 percent above the average of recent years (1935-39), and
with possibilities of delays in ocean shipping, it seems likely that end-of-
season stocks will be kept considerably above 200 million pounds. And total
purchafses of wool by United States buyers in the Southern Hemisphere during
the 1941-42 season again mill be large, possibly 400-500 million pounds of
apparel woolo

South American Supplies Smaller in 1941-42

As reported in the September Wool Situation supplies available for
export in Argentina and Uruguay in 1941-42 will be considerably smaller
than in the 1940-41 season and supplies are likely to be smaller than the
5-year average (1935-36 1939-40). The prospective decline is due chiefly
to the small carry-over into the current season.

In view of the current large import requirements of the United
States prospects for disposal of the 1941-42 clips appear favorable even
though the U.ited States, Japan, and possibly the United Kingdom and Russia
are now the only import an- markets for South American wools, In the
1940-41 season exports of wocl from Argentina and Uruguay to the United
States exceeded 450 million pounds, and countries other than the United
States took about 100 million pounds. These totals include carpet wools
as well as apparel woolso

Other Southern Hemisphere Supplies

Supplies of wool available in Australia and South Africa in the
1941-42 season will be relatively large. This wool has been purchased by
the United Kingdom and is released by the British Wool Control under strict
regulation of prices and destination. Commercial reports indicate that
orders are being placed in considerable volume by United States buyers for
Australian wools of the new clipo If United States imports of apparel
wool of the 1941-42 season total 400-500 million pounds considerable wool
must be obtained from Australia and South Africa. Purchases of Australian
and South African wool by United States buyers in the 1940-41 season
probably totaled around 250 million pounds.


- 7 -






OCTOBiER 1941


WCCOL CC]SL,'LPT.I~1 IN. TIE UNITED ST:'ES ON
A JULY-dir 315 IS

Annual statistics of wool consumption generally are shoi;n on a
calendar year basis. In recent years, prior to 1940, consumption on this
basis showed a marked "up and down" movement a tendency for a decrease
in consumption to follow a year of increasing cor.nzinption. This movement
was not in line vdth yearly cla%-ies in industrial production alnd did not
accurately portray the sw-ings in consumption of wool -.hich had considerable
effect on wool prices.

As shown in the chart on the cover rage, this "up and dorn" movement
is not T.rpare-.t in ann,:sl statistics for the years berimning July 1. Cn
this basis, mill cojIsuiLtilon shows a steady downward swing from 1928-29
through 19L1-32, followed by a somewhat irregTul r recovery through 1936-37.
Changes in wool prices in these years are closely associated with the yearly
consumption clnjiges, and the rel'aionship is maitainined through 1940.

T-he use of the July-June year has a decided adT-&ztaig from the manu-
facturing standpoint because of the seasoral distribution of activity in
the industry. The legir...ing of the calendar year is a midseason period of
high manufacturing activity in the wool industry. Eeca.ise of the lag of
several months between the use of raw wool at mills and the r-rchase of
finished garments by the retail trade, mill consumption of wool for the
spring season in men's wear is chiefly from 'ovela.:cr through February. The
use of the calendar-year basis for mill consumption thus splits the men's
wear spring season probably the most important season between 2 report-
ing years* A considerable part of the cloth for the fall seasor is pro-
duced by mil-z before Jul-, 1. Hence, consumption on a fiscal year basis
is fairly representative of the yearly acti ity in the industry.

The use of the J':l-June :ear has advantages from the supply stand-
point, also. The bulk o'- the wool clip in the United States is shown in
April, I.ay, and June w~.th some fall shearing in the Southwrest. Because of
the time involved in slipping wool to eastern centers and in sorting,
gradin,, etc., the wool of a given clip does not enter the manufacturing
process in any considerable quantity before July ,1 Thus most of the wool
clip of 1940 was consumed by mills from July 1940 through June 1941.

Wool imports into the United States are largest in the earl:, months
of the calendar year when they are needed to suTnr-ler.r.t the domestic clip
of the previous year. The middle of the year generally is a tir.ie of rela-
tively small imports. The July-June year thus is also more representative
for supplies from the Southern Hemisphere where wool is shorn mostly in
the last half of the year.


Florence -M. Hamilton


..- 8 -





- 9-


Wool, Territory, grades 64's, 70's, 80's (fine staple combing) scoured basis
average price per pound, Boston, by months,'1927-41


Year


begin- : : : :
July A:g.:Sopt.: Oct.. Nov.. Dec.. Jan.. Feb. Mar.. Apr.. May June
ing* : I
July :: : : : : : : : : :
: Ccits Cnt Cents nts Cents Cets Cs Ce Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


1927 : 110.6 111.0 111.4 112.5 112.5 112.5 116.0 116.5 116;5'117.2
1922 : 119.3 115.3 112.5 112.5 113.2 113.5 113.5 110.5 107.8 104.5
1929 : 94.2 9h.0 93.1 89.9 8g.0 84.5 82.2 79.0 73.2 75.9
1930 : 7(.0 76.0 76.2 75.0 73.1 72.1 68.4 66.5 66.5 65.7
1931 : 61.9 6-.5 62.1 59.4 59.0 59.0 57.8 56.0 53.8 49.1
1932 : 36-5 0.6; 47.8 4.5 46.7 45.0 44.0 4..0 45.6 48.5
193 *: 77c4 79.1 .81.8 83.0 84.0 85.0 86.2 87.0 87.0 85.5
1934 : *.5 76.0 76.0 76.0 76.0 76.0 76.0 71.0 66.0 65.8
1935 : 755 75.5 78.8 80.2 83.9 84.2 g8.1 93.8 94.0 s8.9
1936 : C9.0 !.0 89.0 90.0 99.0 106.8 114.0 114.0 130 113'0 .0
1937 : 102.o 12.) 9..5 95 21 85.9 80.9 77.4 70.6 69.0 69.0
1938 : 6g.6 71.2 70.0 71.0 72.8 71.9 72.2 735.8 71.8 69.0
1939 : 71.9 74.0 98.8 109.5 105.4 105.8 104.7 99.0 93.6 88.5
1910 "83.4 g9.0 92.4 104.5 103.5 108.5 108.1 107.5 10O.5 107.6
1941 :10 1, 07.0 lOsq.1
Compiled from reports of the Agricultural Markeying Service.


119.3
100.2
75.2
63,5
43.6
62.4
84.7
67.2
88.0
1o4.5
69,o
69.8
88.5
107.0


120.5
97.4
76.0
61.5
38.4
70.0
g4.5
74.0
89.0
102.0
65.0
70.8
90.4
107.0


Mill consumrrtion of apparel wool, scoured basis, United States, 1918-40


Year begin- Yr bcoin"-
ning July .: Mill con -itin nin Jul : Mi
ni July of ppp:' i I of
: Million "o:oaoas : : M

1918-19 : 272 5 : 1930-31
1919-20 342.5 : 1931-32
1920-21 : 226.C : 1932,-33
1921-22 316.7 : 1933-34
1922-23 : 335.9 : 1934-35
1923-24 :259.5 : 1935-36
1924-25 244.3 : 1936-37
1925-26 252.0 : 1937-38
1926-27 : 266.1 : 1933-39-
1927-2 3 241.0 : 1939-40
1928-29 247.9 :
1929-30 :226.1 : 1940-41


11 consumption
apparel wool
million pounds

213.5
192.9
227.7
223.7
S226.7
309.4
327.3

276.5
231.1

.434.6


eau of the Census Wool Consumption reports.


~~I~~


WOOL-58


:


Compiled from Bur






OCTOBER 1941


United States: Wool imports, consumption, and machinery activity,
selected periods, 1939L-41

Ite Yemar : r.--ulJ : JuI', : June : July
.... : q19_______I : ; i'i : !'0 : 1qS~l : 1941 11
: 1,000 1,00) 1i,c", 1 )0 3.O 1,CO0 1,000
Imports for consumption, : pouads r;runr poldss points poj'ids pounds pounds
actual weight /
Apparel ,................: 98,194 222,933 107,759 400,274 o9,18 61,9S8 52,468
Finer than 40s .........: 74,612 199,149 95,409 371,209 q,264 56,293 47,S81
Not finer th~na vs ....: 2?,582 23,834 12,'50 29,065 1,554 5,695 4,537
Carpet, inclu.L--,r
camels hair ..........:144,875 134,691 ,121 18,267 7.' 3 22,416 19,101
: Year : Jan:.-Au, July : Aug.
S17i3 : .940 :T :iT 191 : 191
Mill consumption: 3/


Grease basis 4/
Apparel ................. :63,150 60,871 352,063 624,756
Carpet ................ :1, 513 137,494 83,358 130,053
Scoured baris -
Aggregeae -
Apparel ...............:293,03 310,021 17,339 332,249
Carpet ............. :103,421 97,852 60,199 90,002
Weekly a-erage -
Apparel .......;........ : 5,636' 5,952 4,9g81 9,492
Carpet ................: 1,999 1,882 1,720 2,571


-,5 25 37,770
:',112 16,400


24,799
7,571


46,750
11,320


75,498
16,095


39,824
11,144


6,200 9,350 9,956
1,>93 2,264 2,786
in hourss


Weekly av: r-go


Machinery activity: J :
Hours operated per
machine in place -
Worstcd combs ..........:
Wrstod spindle- .......:
Woolen spindles ........:
Woolen at.d worsted
looms -
Broad ............... :
Narrow .,................
Carpet and rug looms ;
B:oad ..................:
Narrow ........... ......:


51.8
39.6
39.g


4o.7
13.2

37.4
22.7


55.1
37.7
43.2


47.6
32.2
38.6


39.0 34=6
13.6 :13.0


84.7
58.9
61.8


5".6
1'. .7
47.4


59.5 Do.9
25.1 13.2


33.2
60.0
63.9


59.2
27.1


37.9 35.8 50.0 3'.4 45.6
21.9. 20.4 31.0 22.1 27.7


Import figures from the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Cormmerce. Consumption and
machinery activity from the Bureau of the Census.

I/ August imports not yet available.
2/ Weight of greasy, scoured, and skin wool added together.
3/ Figures for August based on 4 weeks, July on 5 weeks, January-August on 35 wook
No adjustments made for holidays.
4/ Total of shorn and pulled wool. Pulled wool, grease basis, is in condition
received from pulleries and is mostly washed.


82.7
64.5
71.3


64.4
31.8

53.8
33-0


-.10 -





- 11 -


Prices of wool per pound in specified markets, and prices of textile
raw materials in the United States, selected periods, 1939-41


United States:
Boston market-
Territory, scoured basis-:
64s, 70s, 80s (fine)
staple .. ........... :
56s (3/S blo 'i) combi,--.
46s (low 1/4 blood) ..:
Bright fleece, greasy-
64s, 70s, 0Os (fine)
delaino ...........:..
56s (3/8 blood)combing.:
46s (low 1/4 blood) ...:
Foreign wool in bond
at Bostcn 2/
Sydney -coured basis :
64s, 7'1-, combing ...:
Cape scoured basis
12 months, combing ...
Montevideo grease
basis
MIrinow (60-64k) .....-.
1 n ( -' ) .............
Prices re.v.ived by farmers,:
grease basis, 15th of
month ..................:

Textile fibers:
Wool, territory fine
staple 4/ ... .......:
Cotton, 1./161 idlingg 5:
Silk, Japarese 6/ .......:
Rayon yar.i, 150 senior _/:
Rayon staple fioer /
Viscose 1-1/2 denier ...
Acetate 5 denier .......:


Average : High : Sept. : 1941
19 -9_- C9n 19239 L: 1940 : July : Aug. : Sept.
Cents Cents Cents Ccrts Cents Cents Cents


82.7
69.3
62.6


32.9
36.2
35.5



58.6

53.7


.26.1
23.3


96.3
79.7
76.1


38.0
41.2
41.0


109.5
94.1
87.5


43.0
48.8
49.0


92.4
78.5
76.0


36.0
41.2
41.2


107.0
91.5
81.8


42.6
46.4
47.0


107.0
90.4
83.4


42.0
45. 6
48.0


108.1
92.4
85.0


42.2
48.0
50.0


67.9 79.2 63.5 72.8 70.8 70.5


62.9 73.8 61.6


.31.2-- .36.5,-
32.4 38.5


22.3 3/28.4


82.7
9.30
271.8
51.5

25.0
46.0


96.3
10.17
278.1
53.0


26.8
28.8


71.1 68.8 68.5


41.o
39.5


41.0
39.5


41.4
39.5


28.7 28.0 36.3 35.7 36.3


109.5
10o84
392.1
53 0


92.4
9.48
256.1
53.0


107.0
1.5.58
304.9
53.0


107.0
16.14
No quot.
53.0


108.1
17.10
No quot.
54.2


25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0
43.0 46.0 43.0 43.0 43.0 43,0


Compiled from reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service except as otherwise
noted.

1/ Highest monthly avernae price.
Before payment of duty. Compiled from the Boston Cormorcial Bulletin.
Preliminary.
Scoured basis, Boston market.
SAverage at ten markets.
White, 13-15 denier, at New York, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Domestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
8/ F.o.b. producing plants, Bureau of Labor Statistics.


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