The wool situation

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Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00036

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text






US DEPOSITORY


I- SIT NATION

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

AUGUST 1941


'WOOL: PRICE RECEIVED BY FARMERS. PRODUCTION. AND CONSUMPTION. UNITED STATES, 1927-&1
rm PfICE
IM I A I. o I I It


k J I I M30

&0* 0c 20





.* J __ ____ 10


1927 '29 '31 '33 '35 '37 '39 '41
5blO0l AmO AULsO AAPADmr CLAOS. tSASA JnOeM OASIS OBUtfAu OP CTCMUS DATA DATA PON I A4ES ASTMATAED
u *s Mu Tim*oI a *ruhu.l HI. D.OM lulil oI I.ICuLTUIU COMMI

STIMULATED BY LARGE GOVERNMENT ORDERS AND INCREASING INCOMES OF
'CONSUMERS MILL CONSUMPTION OF APPAREL WOOL IN 1941 IS EXPECTED TO TOTAL
MORE THAN 900 MILLION POUNDS, GREASE BASIS BY FAR THE LARGEST CONSUMP-
TION ON RECORD. DOMESTIC PRODUCTION ALSO WILL BE AT A RECORD HIGH IN
1941 BUT PRODUCTION WILL BE ONLY ABOUT ONE-HALF OF THE INDICATED CON-,
SUMPTION. THE INCREASE IN MILL CONSUMPTION IN 1940 AND 1941 HAS BEEN
ACCOMPANIED BY A MARKED INCREASE IN WOOL PRICES. PRICES RECEIVED BY
FARMERS FOR WOOL SHORN THIS YEAR WERE THE HIGHEST IN AT LEAST 12 YEARS.
IN RECENT MONTHS IMPORTS HAVE BEEN AT RECORD LEVELS, AND NO MA-
TERIAL CHANGE IN DOMESTIC PRICES IS EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT FEW MONTHS.
THE MAJOR PART OF THE 1941 DOMESTIC CLIP HAS ALREADY BEEN SOLD BY PRO-
DUCERS.


THE


WooL-56


S3.99: 5(p







AUGUST 1941


THE VOOL SITUATION


Su,...--.ry

Mill consum.tior of appoar-l wool in 1941 is expected to exceed 900

million pounds, grease basis, This would be much the largest annual consump-

tion on record. Dorostic production of wool also will be at a record high

in 1941, but the production will be only about one half of indicated consump-

tion. Imports have increased to recorC levels in recent months, and general

imports of apparel wool for 1941 probably will exceed 500 million pounds,

provided that shipping space is available,

Wool prices in the United States already have risen to the highest

level in more than a decade, and no material change in prices is expected in

the next few .months. Mills have already purchased wools to cover their needs

for several months, The major part of the 1941 domestic clip has been sold

by producers.

The quantity of wool shorn, or to be shorn, in tie United States in

1941 is estimated at 400 million pounds. This is about 3 percent larger than

the previous record production of 334 million pounds in 1940 and 9 percent

above the 10-year (193C-39) average. The estimate does not include wool

pulled from slaughtered sheep and lambs, which has averaged 64 million pounds

annually in recent years,

Stocks of apparel wool reported by United States dealers and manufac-

turers on June 28 totaled 392 million pounds, grease basis. This total

includes 51 million pounds of wool afloat to United States dealers and

manufacturers. The stocks reported at the end of June this year were almost

50 percent larger than a year earlier and were larger than in any recent year,







WOOL-56


-3-


The reported stocks do not include fairly large quantities of wool held on

farms and ranches in producing States at this time of year.

The weekly rate of mill consumption of app-rel wool in June was 10.5

million pounds, scoured basis. This is the highest rate for any month on-

record. Consumption of apparel wool in the first half of this year was fully

twice as large as in the corresponding period last year. Since FTbruary 1941

rill consumption of foreign wool has exceeded consumption of domestic wool by

a substantial margin.

Imports of apparel wool for consumption in the first 5 months of 1941

totaled 286 million pounds compared with 87 million pounds in the corresponding

months of 1940. Receipts of foreign rpp~rel wool at the three ports, Boston,

New York, and Philadelphia, continued relatively large in June and July.

Imports are likely to continue large during the remainder of this year.

-- August 11, 1941

REVIEW OF BECENTT EVELOPMEiTS

Wool prices r-.i unchanged in July

Wool prices were generally firm and unchanged at Boston in July.
Demand was small in the early part of the month, according to reports of the
Agricultural Marketing Service, Sales increased substantially following
awards of C- ~ei-rrc!ent contracts for wool goods in mid-July. A considerable
part of the trading involved the exercise of options which buyers had taken
pending the award of Government contracts, With a large part of mill require-
men-ts for raw wool for the next several months already on hand, mill demand
slackened in the latter part of July,

Quoted prices of fine combing (staple) territory wool at Boston
averaged $1.07 a pound, scoured basis, in July. Quoted prices on this wool
have remained unchanged since early April. The average price of fine combing
territory wool at Boston in late July 1940 was gg cents a pound, Quoted
prices of 3/8 blood combing territory wools averaged about 91 cents a pound,
scoured basis, in late July this year, unchanged from a month earlier, but
somcwhnat higher than in the early months of this year. The average price of
wool received by farmers in mid-July was 36,3 cents a pound compared with
36.5 cents a month earlier and 27.9 cents a year earlier. Prices received
by farmers for wool shorn this year were the highest in at least 12 years,







AUGUST 1941


Government orders

In mid-July the United States Army awarded contracts for about 19
million yards of wool goods for ,.hici bids were opened in June. The awards
included 6 million yards of 1?oiuice c-':g, 5 million yards of 10-1/2-ounce
flannel shirting, 3.5 million yards of 32-ounce overcoating, 3 million yards
of 12-ounce lining cloth, and small quantities of miscellaneous cloths, The
bulk of the materials are to be made from domestic wools although awards for
a few items were for all foreign wool or a combination of domestic and
foreign wools,

The July awards for wool goods plus blanket awards announced last month
are equivalent to about 75 million pounds of grease wool. These awards, in
addition to earlier Army awards, assure a high rate of mill activity on Army
goods for the remainder of 1941.

Stocks reported on Juno 28 largest
in. r ?ent years

Stocks of apparel wool held by United States dealers and manufacturers,
including wool afloat, totaled 392 million pounds, jrcasc basis, on June 28,
according to reports to the Eu1.cau of the Cons.us, Such stocks were almost
50 percent larger than a :,yar earlier and were larger than end-of-June stocks
in any recent year. Stocks held by manufacturers on June 28 were about twice
as large as en.-o'-June stocks in most recent years, in kooping with the cur-
rent high rate of mill consumption. DealersZ stocks on Juno 28 were slightly
larger than in 1939 and 1940 but were smaller than end-of-Juno stocks in the
4 years 1935-38.

The increase in stocks this year was entirely in stocks of foreign
wool, Stccl:s of foreign apparel wool on hand in the United States totaled
150 million pounds, grease basis, on June 28, and in addition there were 51
million pounds of foreign wool afloat to United States dealers and manu-
facturers, On June 29 last year stocks of foreign wool on hand totaled 47
million pou- is, and only 5 million pou-lds were afloat to the United States,
Stocks of foreign wool reporto' by dealers and m~au.acturors do not include
Australian wool stored for British Government account. Stocks of domestic
wool held by dealers and manufacturers amounted to 191 million pounds on
June 28 compared with 211 million pounds a year earlier. These totals do
not include stocks of now clip wool held on farms and ranches in producing
States, and hence do not include the total supply of wool in this country
at the bogi:inng of July.

On the basis of the reported carry-over (stocks) of domestic wool on
April 1 and mill consumption April through June, the estimated supply of
foreign and domestic apparel wool in the United States on July 1, including
1941 production, was about 602 million pounds, greasy shorn and pulled basis,
The July 1 supply on this basis was about 72 million pounds (13 percent)
larger than a year earlier,







wdcL-56


Stocks of carpet wool reported by dealers and ian;ifacturers including
wool afloat "totaled 96 million pounds, grease basis, on June 28 compared with
64. million pounds a year earlier. Carpet wool stocks at the end of June were
the largest in recent years. The accompanying table shows reported stocks of
apparel and carpet wool on a scoured-equivalcnt basis.

Stocks of raw wool, tops, and noils held by dealers, manufacturers and
topmakers, United States, June 28, 1941, with comparisons

s: Scoured basis
Item 1940 : 14
: June j I : March 29/ : Jvie 28
1: 1,00 pounds- 1,000 pounds 1.07C^ pounds

Apparel wool, total ........,: 128,585 164,331 207,754
Dcalcrs *,........ ,, ........,29 49,119 7169
Domestic ............-. : 48,025 14,517 42,906.
Foreign on hand ..,......: 10,982 20,058 20,938
Foreign afloat .,....,,.. 1,284 14,5 44 71 849
Manufacturers and topmakers: 68,294 115,212 135,899
Domestic ............,,: 46,594 29,749 42,391
Foreign on hand ........: 19,711 50,258 71s878
Foreign afloat ,,.........: 1,989 35,205 21,630

Carpet wool, total .-.,,,,,: 46,-244 4s,903 65-P79
Dealers ...,..........,, 2.598 1,012 2,317
Manufacturers ......,,...., 43,646 47,891 63,562

Tops ...,...................: 22,946 18,980 20,995
Noils ............. ......: 10,886 11,481 l3,286

Compiled from Eureau of the Census, Quarterly Wool Stock Report, June 28,
1941.
J/ Revised,

Mill consuEption again at record
rate i- Jane

The weekly average mill consumption of apparel wool in June was 10.5
million pounds, scoured basis, This is slightly larger than in May and is
the highest rate for any month in the period (beginning with 1918) for which
records are available. The weekly rate of mill consumption in June 1940 was
4,8 million pounds. Consumption of apparel wool, greasy shorn and greasy
pulled, totaled 461 million pounds in the first 6 months of 1941, compared
with 237 million pounds in the first 6 months of 1940, On a scoured basis,
mill consumption of apparel wool totaled 246 million pounds in the first half
of 1941 compared with 121 million pounds in the corresponding months of 1940.

Mill consumption of carpet wool also has been larger so far in 1941
than in the corresponding months of 1940, but .the increase has been less
pronounced than in the case of apparel wool,


- 5 -





AUGUST 1941


-6-


Imports continue lare i M a

Statistics on imports of.wool in June are not yet available. Imports
of apparel wool for consumption in May, totaling 56.9 million pounds, were
smaller than the near-record imports in April but were the second largest
monthly imports in 20 years. Imports in Ma: last year totaled 9.7 million
pounds, In the first 5 months of 1941 imports for consumption amounted to
286 million pounds, compared with 87 million pounds in the corresponding
period of 1940. Imports exceeded 50 million pounds in each of the first 5
months of this year.

Receipts of foreign apparel wool at three ports, Boston, New York,
and Philadelphia, continued relatively large in June cr.l July. The average
weekly rate of receipts in July, however, was less than the avcrago weekly
rate in May and Juno,

Imports of carpet wool for consumption totaled 17.6 million pounds in
May, twice as large as in May 1940, For the first 5 months of 1941 imports
of carpet vool for consumption were 97 million pounds compared with 73 mil-
lion pounds in the corresponding months of 1940.

Exports from Argentina and Uruguay
largest in ny years

Exports of wool from Argentina and Uruguay from October through June
1940-41 amounted to 491 million pounds. The exports were 44 percent larger
than in thi corresponding months last season and were by far the largest
exports in recent years. In marked contrast to earlier years, about 85
percent of the 1940-41 exports from Argentina and Uruguay have been consigned
to the United States. Exports to the United States from those two countries
totaled 421 million pounds in the first 9 months of the season compr.ro. with
138 million pounds in 1939-40 and a 5-year (1934-38) avcrago for those months
of 55 million pounds. The strong demand for wool in the United States in
the current season has more than offset the loss to Argentina and Uruguay
of the European market,

Japan has been second in importance as an outlet for South American
wool exports in the current season. Exports to Japan from Argentina and
Uruguay from October through June totaled 33 million pounds, compared with
18 million pounds in the corresponding months last season and the 5-year
(1934-38) average of 13 million pounds.

Stocks of wool available for export in Argentina and Uruguay are
reported to be relatively small. Hence exports are likely to decreaso
materially until the now clip comes on the market in October and Novembor,
Exports of wool from Argcntina and Uruguay by principal countries of
destination are shown in tables 5 and 6,

OUTLOOK

BACKGROUND. Domestic wool prices advanced sharply during the
last half of 1940 but have not changed much in the first half
of the present yoar. Prices received by farmers for wool
shorn this year were the highest in at least 12 years. The
strong demand for wool in the United States resulting from






WOOL-56


-7-


large Army orders and increases in consumer incomes have been
important factors responsible for the higher prices this
spring and summer than a year earlier,

Chiefly because of large Govsrnment orders for wool
goods, the rate of mill consumption of wool in the United
States has more than doubled in the past year, The marked
increase in consumption resulted in rapid depletion of
stocks of domestic wools, and imports of wool have increased
to record levels in recent months.

As the wool outlook has not changed materially in the past month the
following important points are summarized from the July issue of The Wool
Situation:

(1) Mill consumption of apparel wool, greasy shorn and pulled, in 1941
is expected to total 900 million pounds or more, which would be much the larg-
est annual consumption on record, This estimate is based on the record rate
of mill consumption in the first half of the year and the large volume of
unfilled orders now held by mills,

(2) Total domestic production of wool in 1941 probably will be about
one half of the indicated consumption for this year. Hence, if commercial
stocks at the end of this year are to be maintained at about the level of the
beginning of the year, approximately 450 million pounds of wool would need to
be imported excluding imports for reserve supplies. In view of the require-
ment's for building up reserve supplies of wool in the United States, general
imports of apparel wool for 1941 probably will exceed 500 million pounds,
provided that shipping space is available,

(3) From the standpoint of mill demand a marked advance in wool prices.
does not seem likely during the next few months, even though mill consumption
is expected to continue large. Many mills apparently have purchased wool to
cover their needs for several months. If imports continue in good volume as
now seems likely, supplies of wool probably will be fairly adequate for
prospective needs,

On the other hand, the bulk of.the 1941 domestic clip has been sold by
producers and no large volume of wool from this year's clip is yet to become
available. Developments in foreign markets in the next few months are not
likely to weaken the domestic price situation, Supplies available from
Argentina and Uruguay will be relatively small until the new clip is shorn
in October and November. Supplies in Australia and South Africa probably are
large but further extension of the war may increase shipping difficulties in
coming months,

United States wool production at
new high in 4

The quantity of wool shorn and to be shorn in 1941 is estimated by the
Agricultural Marketing Service at 399,941,000 pounds. This is about 3 per-
cent larger than the previous record production of 387,763,000 pounds in 1940
and 9 percent above the 10-year (1930-39) average. The larger production this
year compared with last was a result both of an increase in the number of
sheep shorn and a larger average weight of wool per sheep shorn,





AUGUST 1941 -

These estimates do not include the quantit; of wool pulled from
slaughtered sheep. Prciuction of pulled wool totaled 62 million pounds in
1940 and averaged 64 million pounds for the years 1930-39, The number of
sheep and labs slaughtered in the first half of 1941 was larger than in thb
same months last -yezr, and it seems likely that production of pulled wool in
1941 will appro:ima:te the 10-year Fver%-,c of 64 million pounds. Total pro-
duction of shorn and ptllcd wool probably will be close to 464 million pounds
in 1941, the largest on record. Total production in 1940 anournted to 450
million pounds.

Estim-ntes of shorn wool rrorduction. "o States -and regions for 1941 and
1940, and the 0Lyear (1930-39) average, are shower in table 1.

sal.e 1,- Wool shorn in the United States, by States,
Lvenac:o 1930-39, annual 1940-41
State- and : 0.era-: 1940 941 State and : Average: q : 1941
division : l 3O-: o : division I 19 -)l __q
: 1,000 1,CGO 1,000 : 1,0CO 1000 1,000
: 2o11-md puncs pounds :: : j.-ds pounds pounds

Me, .........: 359 254 242 ::Ky. ........: 0,0os 5,908 5,099
N. G....... 82 50 50 ::Tenn .......: 1,558 1,659 1,925
Vto. 0.,....: 192 122 117 ::Ala. ,....... 143 160
Mass, .....,., 52 42 42 :Miss, ,..,,,, 220 201 197
E. I. ... ..: 12 12 2 :.:Ak. ..'... : 257 277 338
Conn. .....40 34 29 ::La. *..,...,: 752 752 818
N. Y. ......: 2,626 2,257 2,187 ::01la, ...... 1.455 2,114 2,262
N. J. .......: 36 32 32 ::Tex. ........: 65.031 0S,352 gg,462
Pa. ..... l1 2t. 54 ::S. Central .._ 1Z2j- 3 q9,4gl 9q.261
N. Atlantic ._. -,54 .~i j__L rY, Z 'Mont. .......: 31,371 29,946 32,796
Ohio ........: 18,197 17,840 17,3 ::'Idaho .......: 17.5 16,627 16,800
Ind. ........: 5219 5,052 59242 S:Vyo ........: 31,502 33,271 33,947
Ill. ........: 5,405 5,16 5,957 ::olo, .......: 1 3 14,170 13,562
Mich, ....,.,: 8,415 8,725 7,987 ::N'..Mex,. ..,,: ,285 15,944 16,071
wis, ........: ,Og7__ 2,S18 2.412 ::Ariz. .......: ;,tl 4,471 4.740
E. N, Central: ; .36 3~69_..9,21_::Utah .,....,,: 2%,546 20,531 19,917
Minn, ......: 7,130 8,262 8,880 ::Nev. ........ 74 5,40 5,905
Iowa ........: 8,988 10,616 11,291 ::Wash. .......: ,073 5,804 6,138
Mo. ........,t 8,098 9,928 10,250 ::Oreg.,., 1.,973 16,446 16,647
N. Dak. ....: 6,613 7,108 8,081 ::Calif. ....., O 5,69 27.2SO~ _g-899
S. Dak ......: 9,142 11,706 13,841 ::Western .....: 1'i.22 c18.3g0 195.121 '
Nebr. ......: 2,814 3,274 3,358 ::United Stat'.s: 3o6,43o 357,763 399,941
Kans ... ...: 3.o404 4. _4.s4 :
#,. N. Central:_?_ 46,1g, 7
Del. ........: 21 20 19 ::
Md. .........: 493 416 391 :
Va. ......... 2,009 1,794 1,794 :
W. Va. ......: 2,808 2,366 2,295 ::
N. C. .......: 315 211 216 ::
S. C .......: 46 40 31 ::
Ga ... ,....,: 105 111 106 ::
Fla. ........ 10 99 6 ::
S. Atlantic :. 5,905 5,057 4,94g ::
Compiled from reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service.







WOCL-56


Table 2.- Wool, shorn: Average price per pound received by farmers,
United States, 1927-41

.* : : : : : :* :Weight-
Year Jan. Feb.. Mar. Apr.. May *June July Aug. Sept. Oct., Nov. Dec. e
Year 1 15 1 : ed
: 15 15. -15 15 15 15 5 15 15 15 15 : 15 : 15 average
:Cents Crents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents


1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1934
1935
19~36
1937
193s
1939
1940
1941


30.9
33C2
35.9
27.4
17.4
12.5
2.9
24.6
18.3
24.1
31.3
21.
20.0
23.1
31-3


34.4
3-.9
2,.90
16.4
I7.O
2.4

2.6
1. .b
203
2: .2
27.3
32.1


31.3
35.5
23.7
15.9
12.5
8.9
26.9
17.4
26.5
31.7
19.2
20.0
27.
33.4


30.4
35.6
33.8
21.4
15.6
11.0
10.1
26.2
16.2
26.2
33.2
18.5
19.7
26.1
34.7


30.1
37.0
31.3
19.6
14.4
8.8
17.7
23.4
16.1
25.8
32.7
18.8
21.0
27.6
36.1


30.2
38.7
30.2
19.2
13.0
7.2
21.3
21.9
19.8
27.8
31.4
18.0
21.9
28.6
36.5


30.7
37.6
29.4
19.2
12.7
7.0
22.4
21.4
20.5
27.5
31.3
19.0
21.8
27.9
36.3


31.2
37.0
29.2
19.8
13.1
7.4
22.5
20.4
20.0
27.2
31.4-
19.8
22.0
27.3


31.2
36.5
29.0
20.2
13.2
9.1
23.0
19.5
20.9
26.5
30.8
19.1
24.3
28.0


30.9
36.0
28.6
19.6
12.5
9.5
23.6
19.3
21.3
26.4
29.2
20.1
28.7
29.9


31.1
35.9
28.5
19.0
13.1
9.4
23.8
19.2
22.6
27.2
26.0
20.7
27.6
31.5


32.0
35.6
27.8
18.4
12.9
9.2
24.2
18.5
23.3
30.1
23.6
20.3
27.5
31.2


30.3
36.2
30.2
19.5
13.6
8.6
20.6
21.9
19.2
26.9
32.0
19.1
22.3
28.4


Compiled from reports of the-A~gricultural Marketing Service.


- 9 -







AUGUST 1DLl


Table 3.- Prices of wool per pound in specified markets, and prices of textile
raw materials in the United States, selected periods, 1939-41

ad Average : Hi. -h : J y :, 19_41
Mr:--t and description 199 : 19407:939 9 : 1940 J: l : June : Julyy
United States: : Cents Cents Cents Cents Cr.ts Cents Gents


Bostor. market-
Territory, scoured basis-
64s, 70s, 80s (fine)
staple .................
56s (3/8 blood) combing .:
46s (low 1/4 blood) ....:
Bright fleece, greasy-
64s, 70s, 80s (fine)
delaine ................
56s (3/s blood) combing .:
46s (low 1/4 blood) .....
Foreign wool in bond at
Boston 2/
Sydney scoured basis
64s, 70s, combing ...... :
Cape scoured basis
12 months, combing .....:
Montevideo grease basis:
.Merinos (50-643) j.......:
is (56s) ..............
Prices received by farmers,
grease basis, 15th of month:

Textile fibers:
Wool, territory fine
staple 4/ ....... ........
Cotton, 15/16" I.5/ilin 5/ :
Silk, Jfn!r-.e 6/ ......... :
Rayon yarn, 150 denier 7/ .:
Rayon staple fiber g/
Viscose 1-1/2 .enier .....
Acetate 5 denier .........:


82.7
69.3
62.6


32.9
36.2
35.5



58.6

53.7

268.3
28.3


96.3
79.7
76.1


~4.0
1.2
41.0o


109.5
94.1
87.5


43.0
48.8
49.0


88,4
75.4
76.0


34.4

41.0o


107.0
cO.0
go.o


42. C
4.2
1414.2


107.0
l1.5
Fl.0


4,.0
46.8
44.5


107.0
91.5



42.6
46.4
47.0


67.9 79.2 63.5 7h.o 74.0 72.8

62.9 73.8 610o 72.5 72.5 71.1


31.2 36-5
32.4 38.5


22.3 ]/28.4


82.7
9.30
271.8
51.5

25.0
46.0


96.3
10.17
278.1
53.0


27.5
29.5


41.0
37. J


91.5


41.0
39.5


28.7 27.9 1.1 36.5 36.3


109.5
10.84
392.1
53.0


88.4
10.38
254.0
53.0


107.0
12. Y4

53.0


107.0
13.79
301.9
53.0


107.0
15.58
304.9
53.0


25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0
43.0 46.0 43.0 43.0 43.o 43.0


Compiled from reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service except as otherwise
noted.

SHighest monthly average price.
Before payment of duty. Compiled from the Boston Commercial Bulletin.
SPreliminary.
Scoured basis, Boston market.
Average- at ten markets.
SWhite, 13-15 denier, at Uew York, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
7 Domestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
SF.o.b. producing plants, Bureal of Labor Statistics.


- 10 -


- -~-- ~~-- ---





WOOL-56


11 -

Table 4.- United States: Wool imports, consumption, and machinery
activity, selected periods, 1939-41.


S__ ear Jan.-Mary May : Apr : May
Item : 19,9 1940 : 19- : 19j. : 1940 : 1941 :19411/
1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
Imports for consumption, : pounds pound-s poundnds pounds pounds poLnds pounds
actual eight: 2/
Apparel ..............: 98,194 222,983 87,486 285,818 9,658 72,306 56,949
Finer than 402 ........: 74,612 199,149 78,104 267,035 8,163 68,170 53,164
Not finer thqn 40s .... 23,532 23,834 9,382 18,783 1,495 4,136 3,785
Carpet, including
camels hair .........: _', 875 134,691_ ,901 96,751 850 18,894 17,572
: Year : Jan.-June : --June' : 'May : June
1: 19 : 19-40 i9 : 19 q 1940 : 1941 : 194
Mill consumption: 3/
Grease b'-sis- 4 /
Apparel ...............: 630,150 640,871 237,492 461,485 4o0,41 74,784 77,104
Car.,et ................: 147,513 137,494 64,920 97,517 7,602 15,352 16,143


Scoured asis- :

Appar-l .............. 293,0S3 310,021
Carpet ...............: 103,421 97,852
Weekly average-
Apparel .............. 5,636 5,962
Carpet ............ : ~2. .939 1,882


121,109 245,666 19,373
46,567 67,540 .5,798


4,658
1.7913


9,449 4,843
2.598- 1.45.0


41,032
10,588


41,903
11,172


10,258 10,476
2.647 2,793


Weekly average in hours


Machinery activity: / :
Hours operated per ma- .
chine in place-
Worsted combs .........:
Vorated spindles......!
Woolen spindles .......
Woolen and worsted .
looms-
Broad ................:
Narrow ...............:
Carpet and rug looms- S
Broad ....... ........
arrow ...,......


Import figures from the Bureau of


Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Consumption and


machinery activity3'from the Biureau of thb Census.


SJune imports not yet available.
/ Weight of greasy, scoured, and skin wool ddded together.
3 igu~re -for May and Juno based on 4 weeks, January-June on 26 weeks, No
adjustments made for holidays.
4/ Total of shorn and pulled wool. Pulled wool, grease basis, is in condition
received from pulleries and is mostly washed.
5/ Revised data for 1940.


51.8
39.6
39.8


40.7
13.2

37.4
22.7


5/55.1
5/37.7
5/43.2


5/37.9
5/21.9


44.1
3o .o
30.0
36.5


33.1
12.9

38.0
21.0


85.3
57.9
60.0



23.7

50.2
31.3


./5'4.5
5/32.2
5/39.5


5/33.7
5/14.5

5/32.2
5/17.8


87.1
60.5
63.7


60.9
29.9

51.3
31.8


92.0
63.9
65.9


63.3
31.3

54.8
34.9


____ ___





ATOUST 1941


- 12 -


Table 5.- Argentina: Wool exports by principal country
destination, specified periods, 1934-41


UNIERii TY OFFLORIDA

3 1262 08861 5886

*ies of i1
i.


: Year beginnings Oct.-June
Country of : Oct. 1 _
destination : Average : 1939 : Averae : 1939-0 194-4
: 1934-38 : 197,4-1 19- : -
: 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 Ib. 1,000 lb.
United States ..........: 53,450 136,914 42,g38 110,027 310,948
Japan .................: 7,087 15,066 6,206 1 ,719 25,968
United Kingdom .........: 85,025 26,277 72,852 24.,564 9,544
France .................: 48,367 34,088 41, 64 3L,088 1,188
B elium ................: 20,458 11,091 18,313 11,091
Italy ..................: 18,962 18,803 15, bi9 1i, 903
Germany ................: 484,940 --- 46,5 47
Netherlands ............: 2,150 10,227 1,621 10,227 ---
Sweden ..............1,230 8,201 876 8,201 3,457
Finland ................: 408 853 279 93 816
Ruz- i ...... ........ -- --- --- --- 5,981
Other countries ........: 18,578 20,272 1.,352 17.659 2,376
Total ............. 304,655 281,792 2C2,272 242,465 360,278
Compiled from commercial reports supplied by te Bu3enos Aires office of Foreign
Agricultural Relations.
Table 6.- Uru.igy: Wool exports by principal countries of
destination, specified periods, l144-41
: Year beginning :ct.-
O Country of Oct. 1 : _Oct.-June
destination : Average : : Average : 1 40' 19h0-41
19,00 g 1939 1 -38 : 193-4 194o-41
3 944 1934 : :
1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb.
United States ..........: 14,718 36,880 12,515 28,024 110,303
Japan ..................: 7,890 5,531 6,840 4,664 6,886
United Kingdon ......... : 20,489 1,423 17,774 1,42 ---
France ........... .... : 7,225 1,137 6,667 1,137
Belgium ..............: 10,465 3,628 7,673 3,572
Italy ..................: 13,484 13.341 11,231 13,32 --
Germany ............. : 30,511 4,4 6 25,461 16 ---
Neth.erlands ............: 3,963 13,552 3,083 13,552 -
Sweden .................: 2,178 15,4l 1,779 12,474 4,835
Finland ..................: J 149 934 1/ 144 45 60
Russia .................: -- -- --- 557
Other countries ........: 4,125 9,759 3,263 9,677 2,103


Total ............. 115,083 106,402 96,315 92,325 130,304
ComjAilud from commercial reports supplied by the Buenos Aires office of
Foreign Agricultural Relations.
I/ 1938 only.


I"


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