The wool situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00035

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation

Full Text






vsv-- SITUATION

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


QJ


WooL-55


JLY 194


WOOL. APPAREL: MILL CONSUMPTION AND IMPORTS FOR
CONSUMPTION IN THE UNITED STATES. 1933-41


POUNDS
I MILLIONS I


80



60



40



20



0


U S DEPARlMENT OF A llICULTURi


HEG 3265, 6UrAIuOI AGIrCULIUrAL ECONOMICS


INFLUENCED CHIEFLY BY LARGE GOVERNMENT ORDERS AND INCREASING
INCOMES OF CONSUMERS, MILL CONSUMPTION OF APPAREL WOOL IN THE FIRST
5 MONTHS OF 1941 HAS BEEN ABOUT DOUBLE THAT OF THE CORRESPONDING
MONTHS OF 1940. FOR THE ENTIRE YEAR OF 1941 MILL CONSUMPTION PROBAB-
LY WILL BE MUCH THE LARGEST ON RECORD. THE INCREASE IN DOMESTIC MILL
CONSUMPTION SINCE LAST SUMMER HAS BEEN ACCOMPANIED BY A MARKED IN-
CREASE IN IMPORTS OF APPAREL WOOL, IN RECENT MONTHS IMPORTS ALSO HAVE
BEEN AT RECORD LEVELS.


LUil'. Or FL LIB
DOCL._ MENTS DEPT




L S DEPOSITORY


THE


1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941
CONSUMPTION ESTIMATES OF NEW VORK WOOL TOPEXCHANGE SERVICE
IMPOR I ELEuiAU OF FOREI I AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE
















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WOOL-55


THE I~ 00OOL SITUATION


Sumrnary

Mill consumption of wool in the United States has been at record

levels in recent months, and imports of apparel wool have been the largest

in at least 20 years. Present indications are that mill consumption will

continue large during the remainder of 1941, but no material change in

domestic prices is expected during the next few months. Reports indicate

that most mills have already purchased domestic and foreign wool for their

needs for the next several months. The major part of the 1941 domestic

clip has already been sold by producers.

Domestic prices of wool have not changed much during the oast few

months after the marked advance in the isst half of 1940. The average

price received by farmers for wool in mid-June was 36.5 cents ner pound,

compared with 28.6 cents a year earlier. Prices received by farmers for the

entire country in 2ay and Juni this year were the highest reported since

1928. Pr.ice quotations on domestic wool at Boston were largely unchanged

during Jun., and the volume of sales of domestic wool on the Boston market

was small during the month. Sor-e increase in sales was reported in late

June as a result of the invitations for bids by the United States Army for

a large quantity of wool piece goods and 1.5 million blankets.

The weekly rate of mill cr.nuCigrr.tiri:n of apparel wool in May was 10.3

million pounds, scoured basis. This is the highest rate for r v month on

record, and it is more than double the weekly rate of consumption in May

1940. Mill consumption of foreign wool has increased greatly since last

summer. In the early months of 1941, for the first time in many years,

mill consumption of foreign wool exceeded consumption of domestic wool by

a substantial margin.


- 3 -





JULY 1941


T,noo-rt. of apparel wool for consumption in !.he first 4 mcrnt.s of

1941 totaled 229 million pounds, compared with 78 million pounds in the

c:,r-e:or icr months of 1940. Imports are likely to continue larce I :ring

the remainder of this year. A large part of the imports in recent months

has come from Argentina and Uruguay, but remaining stocks in those two

countries are reported to be small. The nsw clip in South American coun-

tries will not b.- available until next No'vember, and in the next few months

a large part of the United States imports of wool will come from Australia.

-- July 10, 1941

REVIEW OF RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

Prices firm

Sales of wool on the Boston market were mall and price quotations
were largely :nc. .;-ed during June, according to reports of the Agricul-
tural A-, rketing Service. Tha slackness in trading was chiefly the result
of large direct purchases of for i. i woole by manufacturers and of the fact
that deliveries of ir r: quantities of domestic wool, purchased on contract
last winter, were made during June.

Quoted prices of fine combing territory wool at Boston averaged .P$.07,
scoured basis, in late Jun%, about the same as in late May and late Aoril
but a little lower than at the end of March. The average price of fine
2i:'.:ir.,: territory wool at Boston in late June 1940 was 91 cents per -r.ind.
1,.: .ed prices of 3/8 blood territory wools (combing) averaged about 91 cents
in late June this ar. This was about the same as a month earlier but it
was ti.-,her than in othor months of this year. The average price of wool re-
ceived by farmers in mid-Jne was 36.5 cents per pound, grease basis. This
was fractionally it!h:'r than in r.id--.e;, but it was about 8 cents higher
than in mid-June last year.

'Mills penli eily ar) rcporte,' to have on hrnd 1 -re part of the wool
needed for goods to be delivered dar'-.L- the last h?.lf of this "'ar. Un-
filled orders arc large ?.nd it is ._-orted thr.t storage capacity of many
mills for raw wool is crowded to canawity.

Il-w Government orders

In June the !United States Army requested bids for about 19 rdllion
y-rds of wool goods and 1.5 million blankets. Contracts were award-ld on
the blankets in early July. The Arn,"'s requests for bids for .-oods and
blankets in June arz equivalent to about 75 million pounds of grease wool.


- 4 -





WOOL- 5


Request for these bids stimulated some interest in the domestic market for
fine and 3/8 blood territory wools in late June. But apparently the needs
for wool by most mills for the next few months have been covered by pur-
chase of imported wools and by deliveries of domestic wool purchased on
contract before the shearing season.

Mill consumption at record rate in

The weekly average mill consumption of apparel'wool in May was 10.3
million pounds, scoured basis. This is the highest rate for any month in
the period beginning with 1918 for which records are available. In May 1940
the weekly rate of mill consumption was 4.3 million pounds. !,ill consump-
tion of apparel wool, greasy shorn and greasy pulled, totaled 384 million
poun-ds in the first 5 months of 1941, compared with 197 million pounds in
tth first 5 months of 1940. On a scoured basis, mill consumption of apparel
wool totaled 204 million pounds from January through Mlay 1941, compared with
102 million pounds in the corresponding months of 1940.

Jill consumption of carpet wool also has been larger thus far in 1941
than in corresponding months of 1940, but the increase has been much less
pronounced than in the case of apparel wool.

Imports increase in Airil

Statistics on imports of wool in May are not yet available, but im-
ports in April were largest for any month in 20 years at least. Imports for
consumption bof apparel wool in April totaled 72.3 million pounds, compared
with 12 million pounds in April last year. In the first 4 months of 1941
airports for consumption Paounted-to 229 million pounds, compared with 78
million pounds in the corresponding period of 1940.

General imports of apparel wool (entries for immediate consumption
and into bonded warehouses) totaled 96.7 million pounds in April. This com-
pares 'rith 86.4 million pounds in March and 9.8 million pounds in April last
year. The figures for general imports of wool inl'i..e Australian wool im-
ported for British account and held for reserves, but figures on imports for
consumLption, of course, do not include wool imported for British account.
From January through M:ay 1941 receipts of British-owned Australian wool for
res3rv; stocks totaled about 64 million pounds.

It should be noted that, for any period, the reoorted receipts of
British-owned wool for reserve stocks pile may not all be included in the
gn ra-i imports for that period, since the receipts of British-owned wool
may b reported before formal entry into-warehouses.

Receipts of foreign wool at three ports, BEston, New York, and Phila-
delphia, continued large in June. The average 1meekly rate of receipts at
thl-se three ports in June was about the same as the weekly rate in May. The
avJerag.e weekly rate of receipts of foreign wool at the three ports in both
ay anrd June was less than the average weekly rate in April.

Imports of carpet wool for consumption totaled 18.9 million pounds
in .,oril, r~rly twice as large-as in April 1940. For the first 4 months


- 5 -







of .1941 imports of carpet wool for crnusmLo+ion were about 79 rIillion pounds,
compared with 64 million pounds in the first 4 months of 1940.

Imports for consumption of apparel wool into the
United States, by months, 1934-41 2/


Month :1934 1935 : 1936 : 1937 :1938 :1939 : 1Io : 1l41

:1,'0 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,uCO 1,000
n: pounds pounds onpounds ound pounds pounds p:-nds pounds

Jan. 3,279 3,080 11,000 25,120 2,068 6,099 24,256 51,809
Feb. : 4,532 2,640 10,933 25,682 1,462 5,236 20,791 54,698
Mar. 5,404 2,077 13,675 24,832 929 9,316 20,733 50,057
Apr. : 2,934 1,516 10,069 19,443 1,000 6,304 12,038 72,306
May 1,405 2,317 7,048 16,019 1,169 6,536 9,65e
Jane 1,735 2,317 9,062 9,479 2,043 5,311 10,555
July : 1,351 3,035 6,895 5,448 2,911 5,506 9,818
Aug. 941 2,244 6,063 8,016 3,202 L,6i0 9,861
Sept. 1,335 3,636 6,523 5,078 2,338 12,4L1 15,194
Oct. 1,958 5,926 6,406 4,461 4,777 Q,380 25,598
Nov. 2,549 6,246 10,376 3,802 4,140 11,374 23,293
Dec. 1,835 6,950 12,662 2,780 4,371 1S,8c1 41,175

Total :29,258 41,984 110,712 150,160 30,811 98,194 222,983
Compiled from Monthly Summary of Foreign Commerce of the United States.
_/ Formerly combing and clo-thinrg; v'tisht. as reported is for greas;,-, scoured and
skin wool added together.

Exports ..rgentina and Uruguay

Total exports of wool from Ar.'entina and Uru;r3y from october through
May 1940-41 were about 439 million pounds, the largest from th-.es countries
in many years. In marked contrast to earlier y-r-rs, about S5 percent of the
1940-41 exports from Argentina and Urug rny have been c'ndisirCd to the United
States. Exports to the United States from the two countries total 377
million pounds in 1940-41, compared with 130 million pounds in 1939-40 and
the 5-year, 1934-38, average of 50 million pounds. The virtual closing of
continental Europe to exports of wool by the war and the strong demand for
wool in the United States have been the chief factors in incr-asied South
American wool shipments to this country.

For several months South American countries have been the most im-
portant sources of United States imports of apparel wool. But imports from
Australia for commercial account also have been lrg- in recent months. It
is reported that stocks of wool in !.rgentina and Uruguay are relatively small
and that a large part of the available supplyy has been exported. United
States imports from these countries, therefore, are likely t. decrease shrp-
ly until new clip wool becomes available late thi, f--ll. Supplies of wool
in Australia probably are su-ffcient to maintain a s .bstantial volume of ship-
ments to this country, and the pr.oprti-:n of United States imports from
Australia probably will increase during the next several months.


-6 -


JULY 1941






W`OOL-55


Exports of wool from ;rgentina and Uruguay in the first 8 months
(October-May-) of the export season, 1934-40 _/


Period Argentina Uruguay Two countries
beginning United : United : : United
October 1 : States 2/ : Total States : Total : States Total
: Million Million Million Million Million Million
:pounds sounds ps pounds pounds pounds

1934 .... : 23.3 231.6 1.3 81.9 24.6 313.5
1935 .... : 41.2 235.0 21.3 95.9 62.5 330.9
1936 .... : 68.7 252.8 26.4 109.1 95.1 361.9
1937 .... : 9.1 192.2 0.6 65.7 9.7 257.9
1938 .... : 52.4 278.7 7.2 82.0 59.6 360.7
5-y ear
average 38.9 238.1 11.4 86.9 50.3 325.0

1939 .... : 102.8 230.3 27.3 90.0 130.1 320.3
1940 .... : 272.5 320.3 104.8 118.9 377.3 439.2

Compiled from commercial reports supplied by the Buenos Aires Office of Foreign
Agricultural Relations.
1/ TWeight of greasy, scoured, and skin wool as reported.
2/ Includes small shipments to Canada in some years.

OUTLOOK

BAC;:.'1.jiD. Domestic wool prices advanced sharply during the
last half of 1941 but have not changed much in the first half
of the present year. Prices received by farmers for wool shorn
this year were the highest in at least 12 years. 7 strong
demand for wool in the United States resulting from large Army
orders and increases in consumer incomes have been important
factors responsible for the nigher prices this spring and sumn-
mer than a year earlier.

Chiefly because of large Government orders for wool goods,
the rate of mill consumption of wool in the United States has
more than doubled in the past year. The marked increase in con-
sumption resulted in rapid depletion of stocks of domestic wools,
and imports of wool have increased to record levels in recent
months.

Mill consumption

In the first 5 months of 1941 the average monthly mill consumption
of wool has been nearly 75 million pounds, greasy shorn and greasy pulled.
In view of the large volume of unfilled orders now held by mills, it seems
probable that consumption will be maintained at this rate or a hig'."r one
during the remainder of 1941. This indicates a total mill consumption for
1941 of 900 million pounds or more, which would be much the larr-st annual
consumption on record.


- 7 -






JULY 1941


T.,tal domestic production of wool ir, i '4 r::. bai-ly will be about 450
million pounds, or about one-half of the indicated consumption for this year.
Hence, if commercial stocks at the end of this year were to be maintained at
about the level of the beginning of the year, approximately 450 million
poi~nd of wcol would be imported, excluding imports for reserve ruoplics.
General imports of apparel wool in the first 4 months of 1941 vers about 312
million pounds. In fact, the monthly rate of general imports, including im-
ports for reserve supplies, in the first 4 months of the year was about equal
to the average monthly rate of mill consumption during the period. Some de-
crease in imports from the high level of April apparently has already oc-
curred, but in view of the requirements for building up reserve supplies of
wool in the United States, general imports of apparel wool for the whole year
1941 probably will exceed 500 million pounds, provided that shipping space is
available.

No marked change in wool prices exps.cted

Wool prices already have risen to the highest level in more thar: a
decade. And even though mill consumption probably will continue 'rr-, a.riny
mills apparently have already purchased foreign and domestic wool to 7-12r
their ne3ds for several months. With imports cxo.ctjd to continue iil good
volume, suppliJs of wool probably will be fairly adequate for prou-rctive
needs. 'hus, from the standpoint of mill demand, a marked advance in prices
does not seem likely during the next few months.

On the other hand, the bulk of the 1941 domestic clip has been sold
by producers, and no large volume of wool from this year's clip is yet to
become available. Supplies of wool in .r,- .nrtina and Uruguay have been
largely sold, and the large exports this season indicate that current stocks
in those two countries are small. Ne."' clip wool from South American coun-
tries will not be available before l 'I;:.r.t'r and Decceaber. Imported supplies
in the next few months arc expected to be largely Australian wool. Australian
wool has been released for export by the British ".'*l Control at a sch.-dule
of fixed prices which has not been chanFed recently.







Weekly average mill consumption of domestic and foreign apparel
wool, scoured basis, United States, 1935-41

Year and:
iter a Jan.: Feb.: Mar., Apr.: May June. July: Aug.:Sept. Oct.: Nov. Dec.' Year
iteg :
:1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1, 000 1, 000 1 ,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
jlb_ lb. lb lb lb. 1 lbI. It. I.. lb. lbbl
1935
Domestic:5,071 4,387 4,268 5,100 5,982 5,358 5,509 6,286 5,385 6,742 6,111 4,770 5,378
Foreign : 414 443 365 34 335 325 381 353 417 653 796 778 46
Total :5.4s5 4,g30 4,633 5,449 6,317 5,683 5.890 6,639 5.802 7.395 6.907 5.548 846
Percent
domestic: 92.5 90.8 92.1 93.6 94.7 94.3 93.5 94.7 92.8 91.2 88.5 86.0 92.0
1936 :
Domestic:4,704 4,761 3,423 2,676 3,023 3,845 3,993 4,570 4,217 4,126 4,711 5,241 4,090
Foreign :1,001 1.406 1,629 1.435 1,301 1,174 964 1,187 1,152 1,046 1.271 1,721 1.261
Total :5.705 6,167 5,052 4.111 4,324 5,019 4,957 5.757 5,369 5,172 5.982 6,962 5.351
Percent :
domestic: C2.5 77.2 67.8 65.1 69.9 76.6 80.6 79.4 78.5 79.8 78.8 75.3 76.4
1937 :
Domestic:3,s4g 3,546 3,480 3,175 3,140 3,143 2,801 3,762 3,205 2,351 2,000 2,037 3,041
Foreign :1~26 2,909 3135 2.653 2.578 1.877 1.301 1.247 1,098 868 651 569 1.731
Total :5,774 6,455 6,615 5.828 5,718 5,020 4,102 5,009 4,303 3.219 2.651 2.606 4.772
Percent :
domestic: 66.& 54.9 52.6 54.5 54.9 62.6 68.3 75.1 74.5 73.0 75.4 78.2 63.7
1938 :
Domest'c:2,100 2,543 2,267 2,242 2,923 3,481 4,134 5,203 4,339 4,302 5,168 5,317 3,664
.ForeigL : 2 480 336 283 313 386 415 581 566 622 710 621 479
Total :2.5L-2 3.023 2.603 2.525 3.236 3,867 4.549 5.784 4.905 4924 5.78 5.938 4,143
Percent :
domestic: 02.6 84.1 87.1 88.8 90.3 90.0 90.9 90.0 88.5 87.4 87.9 89.5 88.4

Dom.tic:4,494 4,772 4,248 2,989 4,106 5,130 4,790 5,331 5,358 5,523 5,225 4,085 4,654
Forc n : 634 s8 l..l; 50 925 955 813 708 846 894 1,274 1,384 1,5i0 982
Total :5.1S3 5.612 5.278 3.914 5.061 5,943 5.498 6.177 6,252 6.797 6,609 5.595 5.636
Percent
domestic: 96.6 85.0 80.5 76.4 81.1 86.3 87.1 86.3 85.7 81.3 79.1 73.0 82.6
1940
Domestic:3,451 2,853 2,194 2,053 2,471 3,565 4,545 4,906 5,738 6,062 6,159 5,710 4,129
Foreign :2.1G7 2,473 2,233 1.441 1.795 1.278 1,141 1,294 1,414 1.786 2,296 2.793 1,822
Total :5,.63 5.326 4.427 3.494 4266 4,843 5.686 6,200 7.152 7.848 8.455 8,503 5.951
Percent :
domestic: 6.1.2 53.6 49.6 58.8 57.9 73.6 79.9 79.1 80.2 77.2 72.8 67.2 69.4
1941
Domostic:4,303 4,188 4,080 3,309 3,524
Foreign :3.720 4.870 5.774 6.085 6.734
Total :C.023 9,058 9.854 9.39410,258
Percent :
domestic: 53.6 46.2 4i.4 35.2 34,4
Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census.


'toL-55


- 9 -






JULY 1941


Prices of wool per pound in specified markets, and prices of textile
raw materials in the United States, selected periods, 1939-41


SAverage : High : June
Market and description : 1939 : 1940 :1999 1/: 1940
United States: : Cents Cents Cents .Cents


Boston market-
STerritory, scoured basis-
64s, 70s, 80s (fine)
staple ..............
56s (3/8 blood) combing .:
46s (low 1/4 blood) .....:
Bright fleece, greasy-
64s, 70s, 80s (fine)
delaine ...............:
56s (3/8 blood) combing :
46s (low 1/4 blood) .....:
Foreign wool in bond at
Boston 2/
Sydney scoured basis
64s, 70s, combing ......
Cape scoured basis
12 months, combing .....:
Montevideo grease basis:
Merinos (60-64s) ......
is (56s) ...............
Prices received by farmers,
grease basis, 15th of month:

Textile fibers:
Wool, territory fine
staple 4/ ...............:
Cotton, 15/16" I iddling 5/ :
Silk, Japanese .........:
Rayon yarn, 150 denier 7/ *:
Rayon staple fiber 8/
Viscose 1-1/2 denier .....:
Acetate 5 denier ......:


82.7
69.3
62.6


32.9
36.2
35.5



58.6

53.7

26.1
28.3


96.3
79.7
76.1


38.0
41.2
41.0


109.5
94.
87.5


43.0
48.8
49.0


90.4
77.1
75.1


34.5
39.5
39.5


^: 1941
: Apr. : May i June
Cents Cents Cents


107.6
89.4
79.5


42.8
44.8
43.5


107.0
90.8
80.0


42.8
46.1
44.2


107.0
91.5
81.0


43.0
46.8
44.5


67.9 79.2 67.5 74.0 74.0 74.0

62.9 73.8 61.0 72.5 72.5 72.5

31.2 36.5 33.0 41.0 41.0 41.0
32.4 38.5 33.0 37.4 37.8 39.5


22.3 3/28.4


82.7
9.30
271.8
51.5

25.0
46.0


28.7 28.6 34.7 36.1 36.5


96.3 109.5 90.4 107.6 107.0 107.0
10.17 10.84 10.4S 11.09 12.44 13.79
78.1 392.1 272.4 2[3.4 288.6 301.9
53.0 53.0 53.0 53.0 53.0 53.0

25.0 25.0 25.. 25.0 25.0 25.0
43.0 46.0 43.0 43.0 43.0 43.0


p


Compiled from reports of the Agricultural Marketing Service except as otherwise
noted.

I Highest monthly average price.
2/ Before payment of duty. Compiled from the Boston Conmercia] Bulletin.
3/ Preliminary.
SScoured basis, Boston market.
Average at 10 markets.
White, 13-15 denier, at New York, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Domestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
SF.o.b. producing plants, Bureau of Labor Statistics.


.- 10 -


.


2






lOOL-55


United State-,: Wool imports, consupTnlion, and machinery activity
selected periods 1939-41


Year : Jan.-Apr. 1/


t.: ; Year : Jan.-Apr. I/ :
: 1-99 :9 1940 : 1940 1941 :
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000


Apr. : ar. Apr.
1940 1941 :1941
1,000 1,000 1,000


Imports for coinsu-imption, pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds pounds
actual weight 2/:
Apparel ............. 98,194 222,985 77,828 228,869 12,038 50,057 72,306
Finer than 4Cs ........: 74,612 199,149 69,941 213,871 10,259 46,776 68,170
Not finer than 40s ...: 23,582 23,834 7,887 14,998 1,779 3,281 4,136
Carpet, including
camels hair ......... 14.4,875 134,691 64,361 79,179 9,837 21,950 18,894
S Year : Jan.-May : May : Apr. : May
: 1939 : 1940 : 1940 :194 : 1940 : 1940 : 1940


Mill consumption /:
Grease basis/ -
Apparel ..............: 630,150
Carpet ................: 148,513
Scoured basis -
Aggregate -
Apparel ..............: 293,083
Carpet ...............: 103,421
Weekly average -
Apparel ............: 5,636
Carpet .............: 1,989


640,871 197,451
137,494 57,318


384,381 32,715 85,505 74,784
81,374 8,804 19,019 15,352


310,021 101,736 203,763 17,065 46,970 41,032
97,852 40,769 56,368 6,524 13,097 10,588

5,962 4,624 9,262 4,266 9,394 10,258
1,882 1,853 2,562 1,631 2,619 2,647


Weekly average in hours


Machinery activity 3/:
Hours operated per ma- :
chine in place -
Worsted combs .........:
Worsted spindles ......:
Woolen spindles .......:
Woolen and worsted
looms -
Broad ................:
Narrow ...............:
Carpet and rug looms :
Broad ................:
Narrow ..............:


51.8
39.6
39,8
39.8


40.7
13,2

37.4
22.7


55.1
37.8
43.1


38,8
13.5

37.8
22.0


42.1
29.4
35.8


32.5
12.4

39.1
21.6


Import figures from the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic
machinery activity from the Bureau of the Census.


84.1
56.8
59.0


36.4
5/29.9
5/35.1


58.0 5/29.2
22.3 11.6


85.9
59.3
61.2


87.1
60.5
63.7


60.0 60.9
29.7 29.9


49.4 31.8 51.4 51.3
30.6 18.6 32.8 31.8

Commerce. Consumption and


SMay imports not yet available.
Weight of greasy, scoured, and skin wool added together.
3 Figures for April based on 5 weeks, May on 4 weeks, January-May on 22 weeks.
fto adjustments made for holidays.
4/ Total of shorn and pulled wool. Pulled wool, grease basis, is in condition
received from pulleries and is mostly washed.
5/ Revised.


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IfIE.SITY OF F ORIDA

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