The wool situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00034

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation

Full Text















WooL-53


POUNDS
( MILLIONS )

300


250


200


150


100


50


0 -


vv--w-- SITUATION

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

MAy 1941





STOCKS OF APPAREL WOOL REPORTED IN AND AFLOAT
TO THE UNITED STATES. APRIL 1. 1935-41
(GREASE BASIS)


1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941
STOCKS HELD BY DEALERS AND MANUFACTURERS. BUREAU OF CENSUS DATA
STOCKS AFLOAT ESTIMATED FOR 1916 AND 1986
STOCKS ON FARMS AND RANCHES AND IN LOCAL WAREHOUSES IN WESTERN STATES. A. M. S. DATA.
FARM STOCKS NOT REPORTED IN 19S1. AND LESS THAN I MILLION POUNDS IN 1956. 1917. AND 1941


U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULluRE


NEG 38767 BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


THE CARRY-OVER OF DOMESTIC WOOL IN THE UNITED STATES ON APRIL I
THIS YEAR WAS THE SMALLEST IN 7 YEARS OF RECORD. BUT STOCKS OF FOREIGN
WOOL REPORTED IN OR AFLOAT TO THE UNITED STATES ON APRIL I WERE LARGE,
AND TOTAL APRIL I STOCKS (CARRY-OVER) WERE MUCH LARGER THAN IN MOST RE-
CENT YEARS. THE APRIL I STOCKS, HOWEVER, WERE NOT LARGE IN RELATION TO
THE CURRENT RATE OF MILL CONSUMPTION OF APPAREL WOOL IN THIS COUNTRY.


UNhIV OF FL LIB
DC CUL'MEITE DEPT




11 nPfcPOITORY


h 3a41 53


THE





1AY 1941


THE WOOL S ITUAT I OP


Sumrrary

Farr.ers now marketing their 1S1 rool clips are receiving higher

prices, generally, than at any time since the early months of 192C,. The

average price received by farmers on April 15 was 34.7 cents a pound.

This was 8.6 cents higher than a year earlier. The large use of wools

in army fabrics and increased demand for wool for civilian purposes are

important factors in the increase in prices of domestic wools. The pros-

pect of a record mill consumption in 1l41 will be a strong supporting

factor to domestic wool prices in tea current marketing season.

Stocks of apparel wool reported b' dealers and manufacturers and

stocks of old clip wool on farms and ranches in Western States totaled

283 million pounds, grease basis, on '!arch 2E' compared ;.it: 134 million

pounds a year earlier. The 1941 sto!-.s included 85 million pounds of wool

afloat to United States dealers and manufacturers. If wool afloat is ex-

cluded the stocks held in this country on Iarch 29 totaled 1S8 million

pounds. The carry-over (stocks) this year "ras somewhat larger than in

most recent years but it was not large in relation to the current rate of

mill consumption.

:ill consumption of a:-parel vool in the United States in March was

more than twice as large as in March 1940, and the March rate of consump-

tion was a new high for the 23 years of record. Mill consumption of ap-

parel wool has been at a record level since November. Consumption in 1941

is expected to be larger than in any previous year. Consumption of ap-

parel wool on a grease basis in the first quarter of 1941 totaled 222.9

million pounds.


- 2 -








Tmports of arparel wool for consumption totaled 156.6 million pounds

in the first 3 months of 1941 compared with 65.8 million pounds in the same

months last year. Irr.,:or:s in the first quarter of this year were larger than

in ary corresponding period of the last 20 years. South American supplies

of fine wools suitable for United States purchase are clearing rapidly. With

the new domestic clip now becoming available, United States imports are like-

ly to decline in the late spring and summer. But imports probably will be

large in the fall and winter of 1941-42.

The wool markets in South America were seasonally quiet in April with

the selling season finished on many wools. Exports from Argentina and

Uruguay in the first 6 months (October-March) of the current export season

totaled about 324 million pounds, and were larger than those for the same

months of any recent year. About 85 percent of the shipments from October

through March were to the United States.

-- May 10, 1941

REVIEW OF RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

Farm prices of wool in April
highest since 19290

The United States average price of wool received by farmers was 34.7
cents a pound on April 15 compared with 33.4 cents on March 15 and 26.1 cents
on April 15, 1940. The average price received by farmers in April was the
highest since the early months of 1929. Prices of domestic wools increased
steadily in the last half of the 1940 marketing season. The large use of do-
mestic wools in army fabrics was an important factor in the price increase.
The average farm price for wool in April was 1.5 cents higher than in April
1937, the previous high for recent years.

Sales of domestic wools at Boston
small in April

Sales of domestic wool at Boston were rather small in April. Supplies
of spot domestic wools were limited and most sales were on wools to be ship-
ped from country points in the near future. Asking prices on many offerings
of new clip fleece wools were higher than mills generally were willing to pay.
Prices of combing 3/8 and 1/4 blood grades of Ohio and similar bright fleece


WOOL-5 3


- 5 -






MAY 1941


wools averaged 45 cents a co'.ud, grease basis, at hoston in the latter part
of April. This represented an advance of 1 cent a pound during the month.
Prices of such wools were 8.5 cents a pound, grease basis, higher than a
year earlier.

Tra 'in ir fine :ar.- 1/2 blood wools was liiht. Gr'sded fine combing
territory wools 'were quoted at 107 cents a pound, scoured basis, ir the
last week of .-.ril compared with 108.5 cents a month earlier and -.C.5 cents
a year earlier. (rotations on graded territory wools at BoEton were
largely nominal. Fine territory wools of average comb.inl lengths, in
original bag lots available for immediate shipyrj-rt front .resE'ern points were
quoted in Boston at $1.00-41.02 a pound, scoured basis ii, April. Buying
in Western States increased as shearing progressed.

Trading in foreign wools fairly active
at Boston; prices r-ra.Ined firm

Sales of forrei-n. a.parel wools at Boston in April v:ere chiefly on
fine grades but medium crossbred South American vwools v,ere quite active,
according to reports of the Boston office of the Agricultural Tiarketing
Service. Considerable quantities of fine Australian wools arrived in Boston
during the month and a large oo:-tion of these wools were entered, duty
paid, for immediate consu ..tion. Prices of foreign wools at Boston were
firm during the month. Averare combing fine.Australian wvools sold at $1.00-
$1.02 a pound, scoured basis, including duty, and 1/2 blood South American
wools sold at r3-C8' cents a n.-:nd. South American cross'breds sold at 88-92
cents scoured basis, including duty, for 3/8 blood combing ard at 85-A8
cents for 1/4 blood.

Carry-over of wool on April 1
larger than'last year

Stocks of .arnar-l wool reported by dealers and manufacturers and
stocks on farns a:.d ranches and in local warehouses in V'ectern Sheep States
totaled 2-.; million pounds, .rcase basis, on Earch 29 co-.ared ..ith 184
million pounds a :-.. r earlier, and a .-year (1935-39) average for April 1
of 224 million pounds, according to re-orts of the P?.urea-; of the Census.
The stocks r,-,orted on Yarch 2-: included 5 million r.ou3s of wool afloat
to t-ec United States. If wool afloat is excluded, the ztoc:- field in this
country on :arch 29 totaled 1.F8 million pounds. This f" -ure is 20 million
pounds larger than stocks held on archh 30, E'.' and l1:"', but it is 17
million pounds smaller than the corresponding aveer.-fe ifr t.pril 1 in the
5 years 1955-39.

The carry-over of domestic wool on Tarch 29 totaled 88 million
pounds, grease basis, compared with 109 million rponds reported a year earlier.
Dealers reported only 26 million pounds of domestic wool and manufacturers
reported 62 million round. Stocks of old clip wool or farms were negligible.
Stocks of foreign wool held b; or afloat to dealers ard manufacturers on
March 29 were the largest in recent years. (See table 1 at end of report.)
Because of thi lare percentage of foreign wools, which are light shrinking,
in the carry-over this year, the April 1 stocks on a scoured basis, includ-
ing wool afloat, were the largest in 6 years of record.


- 4 -






WOOL-53


United States: Stocks of apparel wool reported
on April 1, 1935-41 1/


Scoured basis Grease basis
April i:
:Including : Excluding : Including : Excluding
: .wool afloat : wool afo1.at : wLool afloat : wool afloat
: millionn pounds M.lillion pounds iHillion pounds iliiiion pounds

1935 : 135 2/ 134 29 2 87
1936 : 105 2/ 96 190 2/ 176
1937 : 121 109 213 194
1938 : 109 108 239 237
1939 : 95 89 167 179
1940 : 99 95 184 178
1941 : 163 114 2:3 19?

Compiled from Wool Stocks Reports, Bureau of the Census.
I/ Reports are for Saturday nearest April 1.
/ Partly estimated.

Stocks of carpet wool reported by dealers Fud manufacturers includ-
ing wool afloat totaled 70 million pounds grease basis on March 29 com-
pared with 67 million pounds a year earlier. April 1 stocks of carpet wool
averaged 50 million pounds in the 5 years 1935-39. The accompan-ying table
shows stocks of apparel and carpet wool reported by dealers and manufac-
turers on March 29, 1941, witn comparisons, on a scoured-equivalent basis.
Stocks reported by quarters, l ,35 to date, are shc-wirr on -a Lresze b.asis in
table 1 at end of report.

Stocks of British-owned Australian wool
held as reserve in Lnited States

In the first 5 months of 1941 about 45 million pounds of British-owned
Australian wool were received in the United States for storage under Gov-
ernment control. Under the agreement with the British- Grovernment a total
of 250 million pounds is to be stored in the Uiit-d States as an emergency
reserve. Ownership of the wool remains with the British Governm.ent. lio
withdrawals will be possible excerp where deficiencies appear in the supply
of domestic wool, or .where normal imports are interrupted.

The wools are stored in private warehouses under contract with the
Defense Supplies Corporation. Such stocks are not included in the Quarterly
Wool Stocks reports which cover only commercial stocks held by dele-rs and
manufacturers.


- 5 -






MAY 1941


Stocks of raw wool, tops, and noils held by dealers, manufacturers-
and topmakers, United States, ;larch 29, 1941 with comparisons

; Scoured basis
Item : 1940 : 1941
: March 30 7 :December 31 / March 29
: 1,000 pounds 1,000 pounds 1,000 pounds

Apparel wool, total .........: 98,860 142,152 162,962
Dealers ....................: 38,748 47,084 49,119
Domestic .................: 22,353 17,538 14,517
Foreign on hand ..........: 15,377 15,833 20,058
Foreign afloat ...........: 1,018 13,713 14,544
Manufacturers and topmakers : 60,112 95,068 113,843
Domestic .................: 28,653 39,122 30,373
Foreign on hand ..........: 28,431 29,470 48,717
Foreign afloat ...........: 3,028 26,476 34,753

Carpet wool, total ...........: 46,889 39,968 43,903
Dealers ....................: 2,859 1,281 1,012
Manufacturers ..............: 44,030 38,687 47,891

Tops ..........................: 27,177 17,722 18,295
Ioils .......... ...............: 11,431 11,949 11,447

Compiled from Bureau of the Census Quarterly: Wool Stocks Reports.
/ .Revised data.

Imports continue large in March

Imports of apparel wool for consumption 1/ totaled 50.1 million
pounds in I:arch compared with 54.7 million pounds in February and 20.7
million pounds in March 1940. Imports for the first 3 months of this year,
totaling 156.6 million pounds, vere more than twice as large as in the
same months last year and were the largest for any 3-month period since
1921. About 112.6 million pounds (72 percent) of the apparel wool imports
in the first 3 months of the year iwere wools grading finer than 56s. Im-
ports of carpet wool for consumption totaled 22 million pounds in March
and 18 million pounds in February. Imports of carpet wool in the first 3
months of this year totaled 60.3 million pounds compared with 54.5 million
pounds in the same months last year and a 5-year (1935-39) average for
those months of 34.5 million pounds.

Mill consumption at new high
in March

Mill consumption of apparel wool averaged 9,668,000 pounds a week,
scoured basis, in March compared with 9,058,000 pounds in February and
4,427,000 pounds in March 1940. The March rate of consumption was a new
high for the 23 years of record. lill consumption of apparel wool has


W/' Vool entered for immediate consumption plus wool withdrawn from bonded
warehouses on which duty has been paid.


- 6 -






UOOL-53


been at a record level since November. The weekly rate of consumption for
the first quarter of 1941 was 8,847,000 pounds, scoured basis. In the
entire year 1940 consumption averaged 5,962,000 pounds a week.

Consumption of apparel wool in the first quarter of 1941 was
eqr.ivil1int to 222.9 million pounds, greasy shorn and pulled. In the first
quarter of last year consumption on a grease basis totaled 130.9 million
Founds. Mill consumption reached a low point in April 1940 and then in-
crezsed rapidly under the stimulus of army orders for wool fabrics. About
123 million pounds of the wool consumed in the first quarter of 1941 were
dome-tic wool and 100 million pounds were foreign. In the entire year 1940
consunmction on a grease basis totaled 487 million pounds of domestic wool
and 154 million pounds of foreign wool.

Consumption of carpet wool increased in March. The March rate of
consumption was 50 percent larger than in March of last year. Consumption
of crp:t wool was relatively large in the first quarter of this year, but
it was blow the record consumption in the early months of 1937.

E'ivisiciL of Purchase to make early
ik :urincement of Army requirements

To help domestic wool growers to benefit more fully from Government
purchas~_s the Division of Purchase, Office of Production Management, has
outlin- d the following procedure relating to purchases of wool materials.

1. The Division of Purchase will survey needs of the armed services
and other Government organizations and will state publicly at an early
date the. total amount of wool that will be needed for the balance of the
y e .a r.

2. rTnd:rs for bids for cloth using that amount of wool will be
put out by mid-June or sooner so that mills can arrange for requirements
while wool is still in growers' possession.

.The Government will confer with representatives of domestic
wool growers and will agree with them on a method of determining a fair
price for domestic wool at the time that bids for ar;rm fabrics are being
placed. The Government will also discuss the differential between foreign
and dormn stic wool in an effort to determine a level which would mean a
f.ir aind reasonable price to the domestic grower.

Selling season about'over in South America;
um.s-ild stocks small

The .wool markets in South America were quiet generally in April
with t-he selling season finished on many wools. Demand was good and
pric,-s 'v,ere firm in Argentina on remaining supplies of good quality cross-
bred wDols. Unsold stocks of many classes were of poor quality not gen-
erally used by United States mills. Prices for second clip wools and
coacZs wools declined somewhat in the latter part of April because of
the decline in demand from United States carpet mills.


- 7 -





MAY 1941


Supplies of good quality fine uools in Uru6uay were disposed of
generally by the early part of April. StocKs remaining unsold consisted
largely of medium and coarse crossbred wools and miscellaneous wools.
Sales have been small in recent v.eeks.

South American exports, largest in recent vy.ars,
go principally to-The u ited Stat 7s

Exports from Argentina and Ur.iguay in the first 6 months (October-
March) of the current season were larger than in any recent year. Exports
from the two countries totaled 324 million pounds compared with 252 million
pounds in the same months last season and a 5-year average for those months
of 240 million pounds, About 85 percent of the shirnments from Argentina
and Uruguay from October through Y'arrch vwer to the United States. Japan
has been the second most important buyer in South Ai,!erican markets in the
current season, but the quantity purchased by Japan vas relatively small,
totaling only 26 million pounds or 8 porcant of the exports from Argentina
and Uruguay, Exports in the first 6 months of the season, by countries of
destination, are shown in tables 4 and 5.

Stoeks below average on April 1

Stocks of wool remaining for export or carry-over in Argentina and
Uruguay on April 1 are estimated Pt 215 million pounds compared with 263
million pounds on April 1, 1940. The April 1 stks3 this year arm estimated
to be about 17 percent smaller than the 1935-39 April 1 average. The calou-
lated stocks on April 1 included a considerable quantity of wool already
sold but awaiting shipment.

Supplies and distribution of wool in Argentina and Uruguay to
April 1 of the export season, 1939-40

Item I rgentina : Uruguay
_____te1939-40 ,T-40-41 1/T 1939-40 :1940-41 1/
ill. lb, J.iil. l lb "Iil. 1 l. Mil. lb.

Stocks, Oct. 1 5................. 52.9 83.8 9.4 26.5
Production ......,............. 403.0 397.0 133.9 122.0
Total supply 1 455.9 480.8 143.3 3 .3.5
For domestic consumption 2/ ...st 66.1 66.1 6.6 ".7
SAvailable for export ..,....,.. 389.8 414.7 136.7 141.5
Exports, Oct.-Mar. 3/ ..........0 190,3 248.0 73.7 92.6
Stocks, Apr. I (cal ulated) .... -199.5 16.,7 63.0 48.9

Compiled from official sour es and reliable commercial sources.
P/ preliminary. 2/ Estimated domestic requirements fbr entire season.
/Export weight 7f scoured and skin wool converted to a grease basis for
Argentina, and Uruguay exports as reported.

OUTLOOK

BACKGROUND.- Millconsumption of apparel wool in the United
States increased'rapidly in the second half of 1940, reflecting


- 8 -







in part the manufacture'ofmaterials for large Army contracts.
Consumption in the final quarter of 1940 was larger than at
any time since 1918, and despite a relatively small consump-
tion in the early part of the year total consumption in 1940
was larger than in any recent year except 1935. Mill consump-
tion conti-nu6d at a'record level in the first" quarter of'1941.

4The increase .in mill consumption was accompanied in the
latter:part of 1940 :by an increase of 15 to :20: percent in do-.'
mestic wool prices at Boston. Prices received by farmers
increased steadily in the latter part 'of:.1940 and-as the new -
season got under way'in April 1941 farm prices 'for wool were "
higher than at any time .since 1929'. .

United States imports of apparel wool in 1940 were the
largest since 1923, and .imports increased further in the early
Months of 1941. :

Wool supplies

The carry-over of apparel wool in the United States on April 1, 1941,
including wool afloat to United States dealers and manufacturers, totaled
283 million pounds, grease basis. This was considerably larger than the
carry-over in most recent years but it was not large in relation to the
current rate of mill consumption. Domestic production of wool in 1941 prob-
ably will not be greatly different from the 1940 production and the carry-
over plus domestic production probably will total about 735 million pounds.
This is approximately a 10-months supply at the current rate of mill con-
sumption. Consumption on a grease basis in the first quarter of 1941
averaged 74 million pounds a-month.

Wool imports

Because of the relatively small supplies of domestic wool and the
need for large quantities of wool to complete Army orders, United States
wool imports have been large in recent months. Receipts of foreign apparel
wool at United States ports averaged about 60 million pounds a month in the
first quarter of 1941. This figure does not include British-owned Australian
wool sent to the United States for storage as an emergency reserve. Unsold
stocks of wool from the current clip in South America are now relatively
small. With the new domestic clip becoming available, supplies of domestic
wools will be fairly large in the next few months. Because of these factors
wool imports are likely to decline in the late spring and summer. However,
a considerable quantity of wool purchased by United States buyers in
Australia and South America was awaiting shipment on April 1 and such wool
will continue to arrive as shipping is obtained. On March 29 there were 85
million pounds of foreign apparel wool afloat to United States dealers and
manufacturers.

'iith a record mill consumption of wool in prospect in 1941 stocks of
wool in the United States will be greatly reduced by the end of the year.
Consequently imports are likely to be large in the fall and winter of 1941-42.
The uncertainty of shipping facilities will tend to promote early purchasing


i00L-53


- 9 -




MAY 1941 10 -

of wools in South American markets in the 1941-42 season which begins in
October and Iovember.

Mill consumption

Army contracts now held by mills call for the delivery of large
quantities of wool fabrics to be completed by Novenber 30. It is also pos-
sible that additional Government orders will be placed under the 1941-42
appropriation which becomes available July 1. '7ith further increases in
consumer incomes in prospect in coming months, consumption of wool for
civilian uses may increase in 1941. In view of these factors it appears
likely that consumption of apparel wool will continue at a relatively high
level through 1941. And consumption for the year will exceed that of all
other years on record.

The prospect of a record mill consumption in 1941 will be a strong
supporting factor to domestic wool prices in the 1941 marketing season.




1OOL-5 3


- 11 -


Table i.- Stocks of wool held by dealers and manufacturers, and stocks on
farms and ranches in Western States, United States, 1935-41
Grease basis
: ...... --- -A pai Wol' .-- -C.---- : c arpet--
L"D:'i"estic :. Foreign : :n farms : wool
Date : : Iu-: : : Total : and all
: Dealers :facturers: On hand : Afloat :reported : ranches : foreign
1/ : : : 2/ 3/
:i,C'i. 1.,. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb..1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,00 lb.
1935


Yar. 30 4/: 17T,,.-7,
June 2c' : 1 .11
Sept.2E : 15.,945
Dec. 31 71
1936
Ear. 2: : 41,3,c
June 27 : 13C,3'5
Sept.26 : 12.,345
Dec. 31 : 7,55
1937
Mar. 27 : 35,873
June 26 : 121,'67
Sept.25 : 15-, CS
Dec. 31 : 134,623
1938
Mar. 26 : 117,226
June 25 : 16' ,043
Sept.24 : 181,8:47
Dec. 31 : 11i3,635
1939
Apr. 1 : 68,554
July 1 1:7,91
Sept.30 : 75,24
Dec. 31 : 4,131
1940
Mar. 50 : 4C., -2
June 29 : I-",73
Sept.28 : 9 ,11 -
Dec. 31 : 35,r'.5
1941
Mar. 29 6/: 2 ,1-51


S90,398
112,758
155,708
114,239

80,581
105,108
93,696
102,208

81,488
87,989
85,303
66,037

63,396
95,397
104,559
82,225

64,345
103,857
125,084.
81,491

58,017
99,363
108,031
86,991


5/ 28,105
22,899
27,156
43,433


67,088


52,448
35,912
36,537

77,585
63,024
49,721
37,568

33,510
32,069
32,306
31,365

39,764
38,575
36,637
51,749

68,618
47,165
44,311
71,795


1,265
3,145
40,783

18,804
4,407
2,069
1,259

2,640
1,213
2,445
8,178

8,276
5,425
7,896-
25,243-

6,656
5,111
20,141
67,779


289,390
319,475
344,809
234,533

189,505
295,146
261,598
246,881

212,750
287,387
276,178
239,487

216,772
297,722
521,157
238,403

180,939
255,767
244,862
202,534

173,683
262,942
263,59-3
261,620


41,907
43,004
51,795
4,500 51,772

350 55,049
49,060
47,462
1,800 53,959

330 53,923
51,172
59,846
31,600 63,471

22,500 49,640
43,927
37,969
13,340 43,137

6,290 48,527
46,860
53,705
14,384 53,942

10,786 66,971
63,789
53,624
1,463 57,302


61,927 109,887 85,314 283,289


69,926


Compiled from E.ure as oT'the Census, Quarterly Wool Stocks Reports. -These statis-
tics are believed to include over 95 percent of the total stocks held by, and
afloat to, all -d alers, manufacturers and topmakers in the United States.
I/ Includes toprna!:ers stocks.
2/ Estimated b thie Department of Agriculture. Estimates are of wool on farms
and ranches and in local country warehouses in 13 Western Sheep States, not in-
cluding any wool of t-:e next season's clip. No estimates available for dates
where no figures are shown.
3/ Includes carpet 1.'ool afloat to the United States.
4/ Grease basis fi..-ures for March 30, 1935 calculated from statistics of condi-
tion in which reported. Stocks figures were not reported on a grease basis by
the Bureau of the Census until June 1935.
5/ Wool afloat not separately reported until June 1936.
6/ Preliminary.
/ Negligible quantity.




MAT 1941 12 -

Table 2.- United States: Wool imports, consumption, and machinery activity
selected periods 1939-41


: Year : Jan.-EIr.
Item o- "' 4 : 194 : 141 :


: 1,0'00
Imports for consumption, pounds
actual weight I/:
Apparel ............... 98,194
Finer than 40s .........: 74,612
Not finer than t-C' .....: 23,582
Carpet, including
camels hair ...........: 144,875

Mill consumption 2/:
Grease basis 3/ -
Apparel ..............: 630,150
Carpet ...............: 148,513
Scoured basis -
Aggregate -
Apparel ...........: 293,083
Carpet .............: 103,421
Weekly average -
Apparel ..............: 5,636
Carpet ............: 1,989


pounds
pounds


222,983
199,149
23,834


1,0900 1,00
pounds pounds


65,790
59,682
6,108


134,691 54,525


640,871 130,913
137,494 36,781


310,021
97,852

5,962
1,882


67,200
25,701

5,169
1,977


156,564
145,7C 2
10,862


iar. : Feb. : Mar.


1,00CI
pourds

20,733
19, C09
1,724


: 1941
1,000
pounds

54,698
49,879
4,819


:1941
1, 000
pounds

50,057
46,776
3,281


60,266 17,878 17,982 21,950


222,947 33,578 70,037 73,155
47,00C3 10,423 15,429 15,854


115,017
32, 6t3

8,847
2,5314


17,709 36,230 3,672
7,340 10,712 11,006

4,427 ,058 9,668
1,835 2,678 2,752


Weekly average in hours


Machinery activity 2/:
Hours operated per ma-
chine in rlace -
Worsted combs ........:.
Worsted spin.dles .....:
Voolen spindles ......:
Woolen and worsted
looms -
Broad ...............
Narrow .............
Carpet and rug looms -:
Broad ...............
Narrow ..............:


51.8
39.6
39.8


40.7
13.2

37.4
22.7


55.1
37.8
43.1


47.2
31.1
37.9


38.8 36.3
13.5 13.6

37.8 41.7
22.0 22.1


82.4
54.7
56.7


33.5
25.1
31.5


84.6
56.7
58.3


86.6
56.9
59.1


56.4 26.5 58.3 58.8
17.1 11.5 17.6 18.5

48.1 4C..5 50.2 52.2
29.5 21.1 30.4 32.6


Import figures from the Bureau of Foreign and Diomestic Comi-erce. Consumption and
machinery activity fror the Bureau of the Census.

/ lWeiGht of greasy, scoured, and skin wool added together.
2/ Figures for February and 1March based on 4 weeks, January-Tiarch or 13 weeks. No
adjustments made for holidays.
3 Total of shorn and pulled wool. Pullbd wool, grease basis, is in condition
received from pulleries and is mostly washed.




OL-53 13 -

Table 3.- Prices of wool per pound in specified markets, and prices of textile
raw materials in the United States, selected periods, 1939-41


market and description


ited States:
Boston market-
Territory, scoured basis-:
64s, 70s, 80s (fine)
staple ... ............ :
56s (3/8 blood) combing :
46s (low 1/4 blood) ....:
Bright fleece, greasy-
64s, 70s, 80s (fine)
delaine ...............
56s (3/8 blood) combing
46s (low 1/4 blood) ....:
Foreign wool in bond at:
Boston 2/
Sydney scoured basis
64s, 70s, combing .....
Cape scoured basis
12 months, combing ....:
Montevideo grease basis:
Ierinos (60-64s) ......
Is (56s) ..............:
Prices received by farmers,:
grease basis,15th of month:

Textile fibers:
Wool, territory fine
staple 4/ ..............
Cotton, 15/16" liiddling 5/:
Silk, Japanese 6/ .......:
Rayon yarn, 150-denier 7/
Rayon staple fiber 8/
Viscose 1-1/2 denier .....:
Acetate 5 denier .........:


S Aver age High : 1940 :
: 1939 : 1940 :1939 1/: April : Feb.


Cents Cents
I


82.7
69.3
62.6


32.9
36.2
35.5



56.6

53.7

26.1
28.3


96.3
79.7
76.1


38.0
41.2
41.0


1941
['ar.


Cents Cents Cents Cents


109.5
94.1
87.5


43.0
48.8
49.0


88.5
73.2
72.2


33.9
36.1
35.6


107.5
86.2
79.5


43.0
44.0
43.5


108.5
87.1
79.5


43.0
44.0
43.5


67.9 79.2 69.0 .74.0 74.0

62.9 73.8 62.2 72.5 72.5

31.2 36.5 31.5 37.4 39.4
32.4 38.5 53.0 35.8 36.7


22.3 3/28.4


82.7
9.30
271.8
51.5

25.0
46.0


96.3
10.17
278.1
53.0


28.7 26.1 32.1 33.4


109.5
10.84
392.1
53.0


88.5
10.62
268.1
r 50
LU .0


107.5
10.13
25e.9
35.0


108.5
10.58
281.6
53.0


25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0
43.0 46.0 43.0 43.0 43.0


Compiled from reports of the
noted.


Agricultural Liarketing Service


except as otherwise


Highest monthly average price.
Before payment of duty. Compiled from the Boston Commercial Bulletin.
Preliminary.
Scoured basis, Boston market.
Average at 10 markets. lew series, 15/16" in place of 7/8" previously quoted.
ijhite, 13-15 denier, at Iiew York, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Domestic yarn, first quality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
F.o.b. producing plants, Eureau.of Labor Statistics.


107.6
11.09
283.4
53.0

25.0
43.0


Apr.
Cents



107.6
89.4
79.5


42.8
44.8
43.5



74.0

72.5

41.0
37.4

34.7


_ _~ ^_L




L'IiVERSITy OF FLORIDA

III Ill IllIII III ll II IIlill
MAY 1941 14 3 126208861 5538

Table 4.- Argentina: V'ool exports by principal countries of
destination, specified periods, 1934-41

; Yer.r Feginning O -
Country of .: Oct. 1 :ct.-a*r.
destination : Average : : average :
: 1931-38 : 1939 : 1934-38 : 1939-40 : 1940-41
: 1,u0 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000 lb. 1,000.1b.


United ,States ..........*
Japan .......*.. .........
United Kingdom ........:
France ...............,:
Belgium ................ :*
Italy ...... .. ......
Germany ...............:
Netherlands ............
Sveden .............:
Finland ............ ...:
Russia .................:
Other countries ........:


53,450
7,037
85,025
48,367
20,458
18,962
48,940
2,150
1,250
408

18,578


Total ............. 304,655


136,914 31,696


15,066 4,904
26,277 48,853
34,088 26,467
11,091 1r,232
18,603 ,47B
-- 30,551
10,227 lOE-
8,201 604
P53 1 Rl

2C,?72 ,560
2[1,792 173,G17


Compiled from coomercial reports supplied by the ibueros Aires -offioe of Foreign
Agricultural relationss .

.Table 5.- Ur'guay:' Wool exports by principal countries of
destination, specified periods, 1934-41

Year begirn.ing :
Country of : Oct. 1 Oct.-Mar.
destination : Average : : Averare : .
: 1934-3? : 1939 : 1934-38 1939-40 : 1940-41
: 1,000 lb. 1,-C0 lb. 1,bnC lb. f1,000 lb. 1,oo0 b.


United States ....;....: 14,718 36,C:.r 10,131 24;187 ** 80,657
Japan ................: 7,890 5,531 5,950 3,990 5,458
United Kinrdom ,........: 20,489 1,423 13,090 380 ---
France 7................: 7,225 1,137 4,105 1,088
Belgium ................: 10,465 3,628 4,562 1,920
Italy .....,............: 13,484 13,341 7,279 8,295
Germany ............... 30,511 4,416 10,342 4,416 ---
Netherlands ............: 3,968 13,552 2,11r 11,268
Sweden .................: 2,178 15,841 1,238 11,187 4,835
Finland .....,...1..... : 1/ 149 94 1/ 142 45 363
Russia -....,........,.: --- --- --- --- 172
Other countries ........: 4,125 9,759 1,961 6,908 1,116
Total ............. 115,083 106,402 66,796 73,684 92,601

Compiled from oonmLrcial reports supplied by the Buenos Aires office of
Foreign Agricultural 1?lations.
/ 1938 only.


94 ,714
12,410
2,244
25,9.17
,5383
10,501

8,602
6,215
S93
- _
13,300
178,379


194,170
20,794
2,681
1.,188




3,457
571
5,981
2,E 19
231,761