The wool situation

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The wool situation
Uniform Title:
Wool situation (1937)
Physical Description:
64 no. : ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
United States -- Bureau of Agricultural Economics
Publisher:
Bureau of Agricultural Economics, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication:
Washington
Publication Date:
Frequency:
monthly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Wool industry -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial   ( sobekcm )
federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
WOOL-1 (Jan. 1937)-Wool-64 (Apr. 1942).
Numbering Peculiarities:
No. 1 called new series.
General Note:
Title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 02269655
ocm02269655
Classification:
lcc - HD9894 .Un33
System ID:
AA00011232:00033

Related Items

Preceded by:
World wool prospects
Succeeded by:
Livestock situation
Succeeded by:
Livestock and wool situation

Full Text
/ + % -95 s.


THE


SITUATION


BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

6 A



MILL CONSUMPTION OF APPAREL AND CARPET WOOL
(SCOURED BASIS ). UNITED STATES. 1935-41*
I WEE KL AVERAGE FOR EACH MONTH)


JULY JAN. UL JJUL A UL JAN JULY JAN JULY JANl
1936 1937 1938 1939 1940
DA T FRt M 6uA auEAIu :F THE CtLL L'


JAN JULY JAN
1935


PRIL 1941


JULY JAN.
1941


U S DEPARTMENT OFAGRICILTuRE


NE; 390%' BUREAU OF A.:RCIJLTiVUAL EClONOMICS


STIMULATED BY LARGE ORDERS FOR ARMY MATERIALS, DOMESTIC MILL CON-
SUMPTION OF APPAREL WOOL HAS INCREASED RAP ILY IN RECENT MONTHS. THE
RATE OF CONSUMPTION (SCOURED BASIS) IN FEBRUARY WAS THE HIGHEST IN 23
YEARS OF RECORD. UNFILLED ARMY ORDERS NOW HELD BY MILLS CALL FOR DE-
LIVERY OF LARGE QUANTITIES OF WOOL CLOTH IN THE NEXT 8 MONTHS. WITH
FURTHER INCREASES IN CONSUMER INCOMES AND RETAIL SALES ALSO IN PROS-
PECT, MILL CONSUMPTION IS EXPECTED TO CONTINUE AT A HIGH LESEL THROUGH
MOST OF 1941. CONSUMPTION OF APPAREL WOOL FOR THE YEAR IF EXPECTED TO
BE LARGER THAN IN ANY PREVIOUS YEAP.

MILL CONSUMPTION OF CARPET WOOL ALSO HAS INCREASED, BUT IT IS
BELOW THE RECORD CONSUMPTION IN THE EARLY MONTHS OF 1977.






U S DEPOSITORY


WooL-52


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WOOL-52


----------'~--- ---- 7 --- ---
THE WO L SI T UA'T I 0 N
---------------------------------

Summary

Mill consumption of apparel wool in the United States in 1941 is

expected to be considerably greater than in 1940 and larger than in any

previous year. Large orders for wool fabrics for Army use and the high

level of incomes of consumers are the important reasons for the large con-

sumption. The weekly rate of consumption of apparel wool, scoured basis,

in February was the highest in the 23 years of record.

The prospect of a record mill consumption will be a strong supporting

factor to domestic wool prices in the 1941 marketing season. Quotations on

new clip domestic wools for near-future delivery at Boston appeared to be

about equal to spot prices of old clip wools as the new season got under way

about April 1. Prices in mid-March in early shearing States were 5 to 7

cents a pound higher than a year earlier.

Imports of apparel wool for consumption totaled 106.5 million pounds

in the first 2 months of 1941 compared with 45.1 million pounds imported in

the same months last year. Imports in the early months of this year were

larger than at any time since 1921. The large imports were stimulated by

relatively small supplies of domestic wool, and the need for large quantities

of raw wool to complete Army orders.

In recent months the spread between prices of domestic and foreign

wool has been reduced. South American supplies of fine wools suitable for

United States purchase are clearing rapidly. With the new domestic clip

now becoming available, United States imports are likely to decline in the

late spring and summer.


-3 -









Exports of wool from Argentina and Uruguay in the first 5 months

(October-Februar:-) of the current export season totaled 272.7 million pounds

and were larger than those for the same months of any recent year. About

83 percent of the shipments from October through February were to the United

States. As a result of the large -xports, supplies of wool remaining in

Argentina and Uug-:3ay on March 1 were estimated to be 15 percent smaller

than a year earlier and about 14 percent smaller than the 195-39 March 1

average. The calculated stocks as of March 1 probably included a consider-

able quantity of wool already sold and awaiting shipment.

Supplies of wool in South Africa and Australia probably are relatively

large. But the growing shortage of shipping space and advancing freight

rates will tend to restrict exports from those countries.

-- April 10, 19hl

REVIEW OF RECENT DEVELOF:.IE;TS

Wool prices firm as new domestic
season opens at Boston

"oil prices at Boston were iuichion--d or slightly higher in March.
Sales were rather limited in volume, chiefly because of the small available
supplies of spot domestic wools. Some forward sales were reported on wools
to be delivered from the new clip. Quotations on new clir wools for near
future delivery m r '-r to be about at current old clip levels. Spot prices
at Boston at the close of the 194O selling season (about Aoril 1, 1ll1) were
equal to or only slightly below the high-st prices of the season, established
in October and l:ov~r.b.r. Prices of domestic wools at Boston have becn quitr
steady for the last 5 months. 3::cpt for some short periods of irregularity,
quotations have been largely -.n.chaiicd since the latter part of October.
Prices of representative ,raj.:-s of territory wool at Boston in MIarch wore 10
to 15 cents a pound, scoured basis, higher than in March 194 '.

Contracting of new clip wools in T..xs and the Western States con-
tinued in March at prices equivalent to about $1.00-$1.05 a round, scoured
basis, delivered Boston, for fine grades, according. to re-orts of the Agri-
cultural Marketing Service. Prices on such wools were firm or slightly
higher than in February. Early sales were much larger this year than last.
At the end of March, 3/8 and 1/4 blood bright Ohio fleece wools which will
be available within a few weeks sold at Boston fI.r future delivery at 43--
cents a p,;oun, grease basis, delivered to eastern markets. Similar wools
of the 1940 clip were offered a year ago at 35-37 cents a pound.


- 1


'1OOL-52






70OOL-52


-.5 -


The United. States average price of wool received by farmers was 33.4
cents a pound on March 15 compared with 32.1 cents on February 15 and 27.3
cents on March 1i, 1940.

Prices of foreign "ools at Boston
st reLng hen in '.arch'

Demand for fine grades of foreign apparel wools continued good at
Boston in Iarch. Prices were generally firm and in some cases.advanced
slightly during ch1 month. Although receipts of foreign wool have been
relatively lar.e iLn bhe last few months, the wool has moved rapidly into
consuming channel Medium grades of foreign wool also sold in fair volume
during MI.arch. S.l':s of Australian 64s combing wools at Boston were reported
the latter part cf "'arch at $1,00-$1.05 scoured basis, including duty, and
good tcpmakinrg i'4s, 70s, brought $1.02-$1.06. Fine South American wools were
quoted imotly at '.S cents to $1.03 a pound, scoured basis, compared with 95
cents to $1.'00 a pol'nd a month earlier, according to reports of the Agricul-
tural Mark:t int Ser--ice,

Trading in gre~ce wool futures
be~-.gn on IiL rch 17

Tra9 inF in grease wool futures began on the New York Exchange on
March 17. Trading in wool top futures has been in operation at the New
York Exchanze since IMay" 18, 1931. The new grease wool contract calls for
the deliver'- of thEi grease equivalent of 6,000 pounds of clean wool. The
staridari f.-.r d.-li-.'-ry is a 64s quality, graded wool, shorn from living
animals in the. Unit.-d States. But domestic or foreign shorn and pulled
o0ols of av'er'.c' 60.- or finer grade (United States standard) are tenderable
at rrorot.r diffcrmc...s. Foreign wools for delivery must be duty oaid. De-
livery of nool on exchange contracts is to be made. from licensed public
warehouses locatcd in-the Greater Boston area.

Trading iln t..j e May contract on the cp-eriinc: day (March 17) was at
96.4 cents with Oct:,ber futures at 94.1 cents a po-und, scoured basis. On
March -l the I.e:, contract traded at 96.0 cents and the October contract at
95.7 cents, sc.ourlTr basis. Contracts traded in the first 2 weeks of opera-
tion (to 1March -3) represented about 2.2 million pounds of clean wool,
according to ti-: F'- York Wool Top Exchange Service. The .grease wool spot
price on the I:.'. Y:.-t Exchange ranged from 95 to 98 cents, scoured basis,
on rcrorted E-ils ir. the 2 weeks ended March .31.

Imports incre-,sed further in February

Imports nf apparel wool for consumption / :totaled 54.7 million pounds
in February: r-cnro:.r.i with 51.8 million pounds in January and 20.8 million
pounds in Febou.tar,- 1940. The February imports were the largest for any month
since Atiril 121i. Of the 106.5 million -ounds imported in the first 2 months
of this' year, 76.4 million pounds were wools grading finer than 56S. Im-
lorts of carpr.t '.ool for consimrrtion totaled 18 million pounds in February,
20.4 million pounds in January, and 16.1 million pounds in February 1940.

/ Wool entered for immediate consumption plus wool withdrawn from bonded
warehouses on which duty has been paid.







VWCL-52 6 -.

Imoc rt bv c ,rjnt ric
in 1940

-cuth American countries provided a much larger percentage of United
States imports of apparel wool in 1940 than in imr-t recent ;'eirs. More than
half of the 1940 imports cvme from Argentina an.d uruguay. Import s from the
Union of South Africa also were much larger in 1i',' than in r any recent year.
Al hei.1.h considerable wool was ob '-ine- from Australia the quantity was small
in relation to total imports. In most recent years Australia had been the
principal source of fine wool imports for the U.nit-e states. The relatively
small imports from Australia, Nfe%. Zealand, and the United Kingd..m, reflect
the purchase and control by the British Government cf the entire wool production
of. those countries since the outbreak of the war. W'!ith the opening of the
1940-41 season the purchase was extended to cov-r Zc:uth African production.

Vool imports for consumption by principal countries of production,
United States, 1939 and liC'


1939
:Carpet : Anparel wool


Swocl Hrnt


production :including:
: camels':
______ hair
:1,000
: pounds

Argentina .........: 45,609
Uruguay ............: 598
Chile ..............: 0
Australia .........: 34
'I-u Zealand .......: 8,019
Union of South
Africa .........: 1,1 6
British India .....: -,236
United :in r.dom ....: 10,157
Ireland ...........: 2,513
Syria .............: 8,386
Iraq .............. 10,, .
France ............: 4,052
China .............: 2,663
' ,rt, .............: 4,168
Canada ............: 70
Oth-ir countries ...: 8,653
Total ..........: 1L4,A,87
Comnpii r. -r. t.n'iy i.'ii r.:,
December issues.


finer
than
40s 1/
1,000
pounds


13,932
634
0
257
5,640

0
552
1,475
177
167
0
290
156

135
129
23,582
" F Fire i P n


Finer
than
40s
1,000
pound-


8,07-
16,062
1,217
29,11
6,697

8,329
0
2,211
217


13
C)

2,015
6581
7,n611e
C-mane-c-


: 1940
: Carpet : Apparel wool
: ool : pilot :
including : finer : n
than
: c. am-ei : than :
S hair : l'Os 1/ : 4s
1,0' O 1 ,00 1,000
pcun Is pounds pounds

6r,413 20,540 65,473
216 1,215 43,144
0 3 6,396
114 39,358
872 548 3,974

1,105 42 31,233
0,2 130 0
7,27s 330 1,082
3,t00 520 534
5.,280 0 0
14,152' 25 0
178 16t 26
7,123 124 0
40 0
1 117 3,193
2C_0 70 6,736
134.291 23,834 199,149
of the United States,


till consumption at new hi-h
in .- bruairv

"ill c-'rn:Lrit ion of apparel wool averaged ',05.,C,000 pounds a week,
scoured basis, in F.-bru'-t'y, compared with 8,023,000 pounds in January and
5,326,000 pounds in February 1940. The rate of consumption in February


Country of


I


. w o .... t...







WCOOL-52


exceeded that of December (the previous high), by 6.5 percent to reach a new
hich fr'r the 23 years of record. Because of the smaller number of working
days in February, total consumption for the month was slightly smaller than
the December consumption. Mill consumption of apparel wool has been at a
record level since [;ovc-mb-r.

Corisinption of apparel wool in the first 2 months of 1941 was equivalent
to 1i.3 "iliiion pounds, greasy shorn and pulled. In the same months last
year, cnLsum.ption on a grease basis totaled 97.3 million pounds. About 86.5
million pcr.;nd. of the wool consumed in January and February 1941 were domestic
wool and 63.3 million pounds were foreign. In the entire year 1940, consump-
tion on a ~rease basis totaled 487 million pounds of domestic wool and 154
million pounds of foreign wool.

Cor-,Lnrition of carpet wool increased in February. The February rate
of consilTmpti-on was 24 percent higher than in February of last year and was the
highest for iny month since March 1937.

c-overnment a. -rds on wool goods

In M-irch and the early part of April the Army announced awards made
under the deficiency appropriation for wool cloth and equipment. The quanti-
ties ord-ired .-ere not fully equal to proposals on some items (see March 7Vc0ol
Situation f. r proposals). Major awards covered approximately 1,587,500
blankets, 3,'.'0,000 yards of melton overcoating, 9,640,000 yards of serge, and
o,830,C"X' yrds of shirting flannel as well as large quantities of wool gloves,
underv..=ar, an-i socks, and small quantities of miscellaneous cloths.

Elan'r:et awards call for the use of about 60 percent domestic wool and
40 percent foreign wool, awards for serge and shirting will contain about 45
percent domestic wool and 55 percent foreign wool, and overcoating material
will be mail chiefly from foreign wool. The orders will require about 40
million rrurnds of clean wool.

Soi.th A-rrerican wool sales decline
e' c nlv I.i."

>Sles :,f South American wool declined in March, partly because of the
decliiinr i~ur.lies of wool suited to United States demand. Prices continued
firm on most grades. Wool dealers reported in March that very little wool
frc.m Cr-ri:-r.tes and Entre Rios remained for disposal and that as much as 80
percent of th- November clip in the Province of Buenos Aires had been sold,
according to nformt ion received from Agricultural Attache Paul 0. Nyhus at
Buenos Air.:-. Second clip (March) wools from the Province of Buenos Aires are
now aiilbie. 'oc.l of this clip is reported to be somewhat inferior to that
of the previous season because of the large amounts of burry wools. As a
result of co-l weather, which is unfavorable for taking a second clip, the
clip will be somewhat smaller than had been expected.

HI rkeet supplies of fine wool in Montevideo were practically exhausted
b,- the end of March, according to cabled reports. Prices of fine and medium
wools have increased steadily during the current selling season in Uruguay.


- 7 -







'.TCOL-52


Unsold stocks in Montevideo at the ,:--innin., of A-ril consisted of medium and
coarse crossbred wools and miscellaneous wools. Substant.ial quantities of
wool were awaiting shipment to the United States at the b:i nnniin cf April.
It was r c. ntl;/ reported that shipping facilities had improved and unshipped
orders were exracted to be absorbed in April..

South Amrerican xyrerts continue lircr

--'~ ~ts from Ar-.-ntina and Uruguay in the first 5 months (October-
February) of the current season were larger than in any recent y:;ar. Exports
from the two countries totaled 272.7 million pounds compared with 197.1 million
pounds in tht same months last season and a 5-year average for those months of
190.9 million pounds. About 83 percent of the shipments from Arg. ntina and
Uruguay from October through February were to United States ports. In the
5 years, 1934-38, only about one-fifth of the shipments went to the United
States.. Japan has been the second most important buyer in South American
markets in the current season, t-k:i-g 24.3 million pounds or 9 percent of the
total exports. Small u-,-it cities have been shipped to Russia S :d Sweden and
to a few other neutral countries. Most of the European countries which pre-
viously purchased large quantities of South nAerican wools arc now cut off
from the market b: the British blockade. The United Kingdom, previously one
of the Frrinciril buyers of South American wools, has made only a fvew smn-
purchases in the current season. Wool requirements of the United Kingdom are
brinf filled largely with wools from British 7Zn.ire sources.

.Wcol s-p,.LI'-- below rue on :M-rch 1
in Argentina and UIT .ia:-r

Supplies of wool available for export or carry-over in Argentina and
Uruguay on March 1 r.ri- Ably totaled about 268 million pounds, compared with
316 million rcunds on March 1, 1940. The March 1 stocks this ye--r are esti-
mated to be about 14 Dp2rcent smaller than the 1935-39 I.-rh 1 iver -ge. Total
supplies available at the btsinn-i ; of the current season in Argentina and
Uruui'.- were considerably larger than in lost recent years. But exports to
March 1 were much larger than usual.

In view of shipping difficulties reDorted in the South AmnericLan wool
trade it is likely that calculated stocks on March 1 this year included a
relatively l 'rr clqanttity of wool al.-'idy sold but await.i.n- rhipme:nt.









Supplies and distribution of wool in Argentina and Uruguay to
IMarch 1 of the export season, 1939-41

: ArI. tina : Uruguay
_____ 1939-40 : lI C-4 11,,-: 1939-40 : 1940-41 1/
E: L. I, ;i z lb. Mil. lb. M bil. lb.

Stocks, Oct. 1. .....................: 52.9 83.8 9.4 26.5
Production ......................... 403.0 397.0 133.9 122.0
Total supply ..................... : 455,9 480.8 143.3 148.5
For domestic consumpti on 2/ .........: 66.1 66.1 6.6 7.0
Available for ::.port ................: 389.8 414.7 136.7 141.5
Exports, Oct.-Frb. 3/ ..............: 158.0 206.7 52.2 82.0
Stocks, Mar. 1 calculatede) .........: 231.8 208.0 84.5 59.5

Compiled I'r:m t:.'fciali Solrcl- s End reliable commercial sources.
1/ Preliminary. 2. Estimated di-metic requirements for entire season. 3/ Export
weight of sc.iure6 nrd skin iwool con-.erted to a grease basis for Argentina, and
Uruguay exports as reported.


Exports of ,,"ool from ,rge7ntlna end Uruguay in the first 5 months
(October-Februairy) jof the export season, 1934-40 l/

Period : Ar-Entin : Uruguay Two countries
beginning : li ted : United : : United T
Total Total Total
Oct. 1 :States 2/ : Tot States Total States
Iiil. lb. ii. l. b. .il. lb. Mi. lb. Mil. lb. Mil. lb.

1934 : ?.9 127.8 0.6 44.4 10.5 172.2
1935 29.9 135.7 16.6 65.2 46.5 200.9
1936 : 52.5 166.4 22.3 79.9 74.8 246.3
1937 : 3.3 77.1 0.3 32.4 3.6 109.5
1938 39.8 175.4 3.6 50.1 43.4 225.5
1939 : 4.4 144.9 22.2 52.2 106.6 197.1
1940 Z/ : 155.3 190.7 71.0 82.0 226.3 272.7

Compiled from cJommercial reports supplied by the Buenos Aires office of Foreign
Agricultural Relations.
1,/ Ueight of greasy, scoured, 9nd skin wool as reported.
2/ Includes small shipments to Canad'i in some years.
T/ Preliminary.

OUTLOOK

BACKGROUnID.- Iill consumption of apparel wool in the United
States increased rapidly in the second half of 1940, reflecting
in part the manufacture of materials for large Army contracts.
Consumption in the final quarter of 1940 was larger than at any
time since 1918, and despite a relatively small consumption in
the early part of the yeir total consumption in 1940 was larger
than in any recent ye-,r except 1935.


- 9 -


W00L-52






r0OOL-52


- 10 -


The increase in mill consumption vrws accompanied in the
latter part of 1940 by an increase of 15 to 20 percent in do-
mestic wool prices. At the end of 1940 prices at Boston were
slightly below the peak of 1C39, but with that exception higher
than at an-- time since 1937.

United States imports of apparel wool in 1940 vwere the
largest since 1923. But stocks in this country remained
smaller than the average of recent years.

fill conFurrtion in 1941 expected to set new high;
prices will be higher than in 1940

In March and the early part of April, Army contracts for wool cloth
were awarded which will require the use of about 40 million louinds of
scoured wool. These contracts will be completed during 1941, in addition
to previous orders which call for delivery of large quantities of wool cloth
before Au:ust 1. With further increases in consumer incomes in prospect
in the next few r months, consumption of wool for civilian uses is likely to
increase in 1941. iill sales of wool fabrics for civilian uses in 1940 were
about 10 percent smaller than in 1939 although incomes of consumers increased
in 1940. The decline in mill sales probably is reflected in reduced stocks
in consuming channels. It is also.possible that additional Government orders
will be placed under the 1941-42 appropriation which becomes available July 1.

In view of these factors it appears likely that consumption of apparel
wool will continue at a relatively high level until the latter part of 1941.
And consumption for the year ray exceed that of all other years on record.
Consumption in 1918, the first year for which data are available, totaled
371 million pounds, scoured basis, an evera~e of 7.1 million pounds a week.
In 1935 consumption totaled 319 million pounds, the second highest on record.
Consumption in the first 2 months of 1941 was at the rate of 8.5 million
pounds a week.

The prospect of a record mill consumption in 1941 will be a strong
supporting factor to domestic wool prices in the 1941 marketing season.
Farm prices for wool in early shearing States in mid-llerch were 5 to 7 cents
a pound higher than a year earlier and farmers probably will receive a
larger income from wool this year than last.

Carry-over of domestic wool small

Preliminary calculations indicate that the carry-over of domestic
wool into the 1941 season which began about April 1 was the smallest in
recent years. Because of the unusually large amount of wool imported in the
first quarter of 1941, stocks of fo-ei-n vrool in this country on April 1
probably were somewhat larger than v-as anticipated earlier in the season.
But the total carry-over was not large in relation to the current rate of
mill consumption. Data on stocks held by dealers and manufacturers on
April 1 and stocks of old clip wool in Western States will be released by
the Bureau of the Census about April 25.







WOOL-52


- 11 -


Supplies in foreign countries available
to United States

In the early months of the 1940-41 export season the spread between
prices of domestic and South American wools was relatively large, and large
quantities of wool were purchased in Argentina and Uruguay for export to the
United States. In recent months, however, the spread has been reduced.
Furthermore, South American supplies of good quality fine wools suitable for
United States purposes are reported to be clearing rapidly and it is likely
that sales for export to the United States will decline.

Supplies of fine wool in Australia and the Union of South Africa
probably are relatively large, although the allocation of 250 million pounds
from the 1940-41 clip in Australia, for storage in the United States, re-
moved a considerable quantity of wool from commercial channels. But the
entire production of the Union of South Africa and Australia is under control
of the British Government and is being sold at fixed prices by that Govern-
ment. In the past year the British T0ool Control has followed a policy of
maintaining a relatively high level of prices for wool released for export
to other countries. The growing scarcity of shipping space and the rapid
advance in freight rates will limit the availability of this wool to the
United States. A considerable quantity of Australian wool has already been
received in the United States for storage, in bond, as an emergency reserve.
withdrawal l of this wool will be possible only in case of deficiencies in the
supply of domestic wools or where normal imports.are interrupted.


Prices per pound, grease basis, of medium wools at Boston
and Montevideo, 1939-41

S1959-40 : 1940-41
Ilonth :Boston :Montevideo: : Boston :MIontevideo:
: 1/ : 2/ Spread : / : 2/ Spread
Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents Cents

Oct. 48.9 3/ --- 45.0 4/ 25.9 19.1
Nov. : 47.0 / --- 46.4 28.2 18.2
Dec. 46.0 2T.9 21.1 45.2 2.9.0 16.2
Jan. 44.6 25.3 19.3 44.8 29.9 14.9
Feb. 42.4 28.8 13.6 44.0 31.4 12.6
liar. 38.5 29.6 8.9

1/ .veraCe of domestic 3/8 and 1/4 blood combing bright fleece wools from
Agricultural Marketing Service.
2/ UruguayLan fine crossbreds, superior from Revista Semanal, Camara IMercantel
de Products del Pais. Prices converted from pesos at controlled rates of
exchange.
3/ Iot quoted.
4/ 2 weeks only.









- 12 -


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- 13 -


United States: i'ool imports, consumption, and machinery activity
selected periods 1939-41

S Year T 40 : 1941T
Item: 1939 : 1940 : J. :: Feb. Jn. : Feb.
: 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000


Inports for corsu:-ition, : pounds
actual eight 1: :
Aoparcl ................: 98,194
Finer thsn 4(s .........: 74,612
Not finer tfal- 4'e .....: 23,582
Carpet, ir luding
camels hair ...........: 144,875

L:ill coneisumition 2/,:
Grease basis 3/ -
Apparel ................: 630,150
Carpet ............ 148,513
Scoured basis -
Aggregate -
Apparel ..............: 293,083
Carpet ..............: 103,421
Weekly s-ersg, -
Apparel ...............: 5,636
Carpet ................: 1,989


pounds pounds


222,983
199,149
23,834


24,266
22,1,10
2,156


134,691 20,498



640,871 56,420
137,494 14,050


310,021
97,852

5,962
1,882


28,189
9,703

5,638
1,941


pounds pounds pounds-


-20,791
18,563
2,228

16,149


51,809
49,047
2,762


54,698
49,879
4,819


20,354 17,982


40-,915 79,755 70,037
12,308 15,720 15,429


21,302 40,115 36,230
8,658 10,965 10,712


5,326
2,165


8,023 9,05,8
S2,193 2,678


iachiner:y activity 2,/:
Hours operates )rr ra-
chine in place -
Worsted combs ........:
Worsted spindles .....:
Woolen spindl es ......
Woolen and worsted
looms -
Broad ..............:
Harrowa *. ............
Carpet and ruvg loor-s -:
Broad ................
liarr ov 0.............:


Weekly average in hours


51.8
39.6
39.8


40.7
13.2

37.4
22.7


55.1
37.8
43.1


52.8
34.5
41.3


38.8 43.4
13.5 13.6

37.8 -42.0
22.0 23.0


48.9
32.7
39.9


77.3
51.3
53.4


84.6
56.7
58.3


37.2 52.9 58.3
15.7 15.7 17.6


42.6
22.1


43.2 50.2
26.4 30.4


Import fii:.es from the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. Consumption
and rachin--i-y activity from the Bureau of the Census.

l/ Weight of raasy, scoured, and skin wool added together.
2/ Figures for Febr..'ary based on 4 weeks, January on 5 weeks. 1o adjustments
made for holid?.--s.
3/ Total oi sl orn a:d ;pulled wool. Pulled wool, grease basis, is in condi-
tion received frojn rulleries and is mostly washed.






-_ A -


II 1I262 08861 5III 67II 8IIII
3 1262 08861 5678


OVU dJJ", ,..

Prices of wool por pound in snecified marTkts, and prices of textile
raw materials .n the Uni.ted States, selected periods, 195,-41 :

S-.. :Average :]iY'h :: i -1 41
Market and description 9 :L9ae : -I / .: I -- :J n.-:E 41. -- a
United States:39 C9 C.t 9 s e /ns Ce:ts Ccan. Cets Cents.
United States: : Consc Ce'ts Cents Cent s Cone Certs Cents


Boston market-
Territory, scoured Lasis-:
64s, 70s, 80s (fine)
staple ...o....... ....:
56s (3/8 blood) combing
4?s (low 1/4 blood) ....
Bright fleece, grras:,'-
64s, 70s, 80s (fine)
delaine ..............:
56s (3/8 blood) combing
46s (low 1/4 blood) ....:
Foreign wool in bcnd at:
Boston 2/
Sydney scoured basis
64s, 70c, cor'ing .....:
Cape scoured basis
12 months, combing ....
Montevideo grease basis:
Merinoz (60-64s) .....:
is (56s) ..............
Prices received b- farmers,:
grease basis,15th of month:

Textile fibers:
Wool, trrito-:r fine
ste.ple 4/ .............
Cotton, 15/16" Middling 5/:
Silk, Japanese 6/ .......
Rayon yarn, 150 de-ier 7/ :
Rayon staple fil.r 8/
Viscose 1-1/2 denier ,....:
Acetate 5 denier .........:


82.7
69.3
62.6


32.9
36.2
35.5



58.6

53.7

26.1
28,3


96.3
7-9. 7
7c.7
76.1


38.0
41.2
41.0


109 .5
4.1
67.5


43.0
43.C
49.0


9Z.6
77.0
7-.-
'iL,..)


108.1
86.5
79.5


43.3
44.8
43.9


107.5
C6,2
79,5


43.0
44.0
43.5


106.5
87-.1
79.5


43.0
44.0
43.5


67.9 79.2 73.5 73.3 74.0 74.0

!2.9 73.8 66., 70.5 72.5 72.5


31.2 36.5 31.5 34.7 37.4
32.4 5z.5 35.5 33.5 35.8


22.3 3/28.4


82.7
9.30
271,8
51,5

25I.0
46.0


96.3
10.17
278.1
53.0


1


39.4
36.7


293.7 27.3 31.3 32,1 33.4



09.5 3.6 108.1 107.5 108.5
12.'4 1 .6C 10.10 10.13 10.58


3C2.1
53.0C


2'15 .1
55.0


256.0
53.0


258.9
53.0


281.6
53.0 .


25.0 25.0 2'5.0 25.0 25.0 25.0
43.0 46.0 45.u 43.0 43.0 43.0


Compiled from. reports oif the Agriculturcl 'arl'eting Service except as otherwise
noted.
I Highest monthly average price.
Before payment of duty. Compiled from the Boston Commercial Bulletin.
SPreliminary.
SScoured basis, Boston market.
SAverage at 10 markets. Tewv series, 15/16" in place of 7/8" previously quoted.
SWhite, 13-15 denier, at New York, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
7 Domestic :arn, first equality, Bureau of Labor Statistics.
F .o.b, producing plants, Bureau of Labor Statistics.


nrlT -C3


1